International Military Discussion

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Singha » 09 Dec 2009 21:07

well this new drone hardly looks any different from the half dozen other UAV/UCAV progs in the USN/USAF we know of in the X-series.

it looks stealthy so perhaps targeted at Iran spying, but might also help in Pak whose PA/PAF radars can see normal predators coming and warn the meerkats to scurry deep inside their burrows.

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Craig Alpert » 10 Dec 2009 00:28

Singha wrote:well this new drone hardly looks any different from the half dozen other UAV/UCAV progs in the USN/USAF we know of in the X-series.

it looks stealthy so perhaps targeted at Iran spying, but might also help in Pak whose PA/PAF radars can see normal predators coming and warn the meerkats to scurry deep inside their burrows.

Paji, the big picture here is trying to avoid radars.. Iranians have a good radar coverage with their S-300 batteries. If Sentinel is able to penerate through them, think about the possibilites of it penatrating through countries like China, north Korea, heck even India perhaps..Who knows may be this is just a stepping stone for it to be formally inducted based on the experiences gained over operating in hot, hazy and cooler enviornments?? I guess time will tell..BUT definately a good project for other countries (inlcuding Bharat) to get started on perhaps...

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Craig Alpert » 10 Dec 2009 20:32

New Russian missile BULAVA fails testing again
Images of the white light that appeared in the sky above the Norwegian city of Tromso prompted explanations ranging from a meteor, northern lights, a failed missile or even a UFO.

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The Bulava missile saga

Postby Austin » 11 Dec 2009 10:26

The Bulava missile saga

MOSCOW. (RIA Novosti military commentator Ilya Kramnik) - The December 9, 2009 test of the RSM-56 Bulava (SS-NX-30) submarine-launched ballistic missile has failed, said the Russian Defense Ministry. There have been 12 other test flights since December 2003.

Without going into technical details, which must be clarified by experts, we must now assess the entire project's status and the implications of the latest abortive test on the future development of Russia's strategic nuclear forces.

The decision to develop the Bulava missile was adopted in 1998 when Moscow's Institute of Thermal Technology was directed to develop an advanced missile system for the Russian navy.

Institute management claimed that it could promptly develop a new ballistic missile based on the Topol M (SS-27 Sickle B) intercontinental ballistic missile, for the Russian navy. This concept was expected to simplify the deployment of the naval component of Russia's strategic nuclear forces and to require less maintenance costs.

Although it is hard to say who initiated such drastic changes, the press claims that Yury Solomonov, director of the Institute of Thermal Technology, Major-General Vladimir Dvorkin, director of the Defense Ministry's Fourth Central Research Institute, Navy Commander Fleet Admiral Vladimir Kuroyedov, the then Defense Minister Marshal Igor Sergeyev, Economics Minister Yakov Urinson and Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin, are responsible for this.

It was decided to deploy the new Bulava missiles aboard the Project 955 Borei class and Project 955A Borei-A class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines.

The first submarine of the class, the Yury Dolgoruky, is currently undergoing sea trials. Another two submarines are under construction, and the keel of the fourth Borei class submarine is to be laid before New Year's Eve.

Initial tests of the new missile and its first images revealed that the Bulava will have little in common with the Topol-M. The Bulava was completely different in terms of its appearance, dimensions and warhead lay-out. Nevertheless, the plan had gone too far to back out.

Eleven full-fledged flight tests were conducted between September 27, 2005 and December 9, 2009. Only three launches, specifically the first, second and eighth, were deemed fully successful. Two other launches were rated partially successful.

Facilitating due control over missile component production and ready-made missile assembly, rather than project funding, is the main problem. Moreover, the companies involved require skilled, well-paid workers. However, wage raises alone cannot boost missile quality.

More expensive missiles would be manufactured, unless other measures are implemented.

Some experts think it would be appropriate to upgrade the Bulava missile and to hold a tender for another missile system, due to be installed aboard Project 955 submarines. In their opinion, the program should involve several leading design bureaus, and the most promising project should be implemented.

This would make it possible to develop another missile system for replacing the Bulava if its reliability is not improved.

Russia's president, who oversees the state of the Armed Forces as Commander-in-Chief, would be expected to personally monitor the program because this will ensure due supervision.

The project managers involved should be held personally liable in case of failure because material incentives are ineffective and because resignations no longer scare anyone.

Nuclear-tipped missiles largely facilitate national defense capability. Since the end of World War II and the break-up of the Soviet Union, too many high-ranking officials and production workers have become accustomed to the fact that resignations are the ultimate punishment for incompetence and mismanagement.

Obviously, this concept must be changed with regard to logistics support of the strategic nuclear forces, to say the least, because the price of possible mistakes is becoming too high.

The opinions expressed in this article are the author's and do not necessarily represent those of RIA Novosti.

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Russia's Strategic Missile Forces

Postby Austin » 11 Dec 2009 10:26


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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby amol.p » 12 Dec 2009 10:25

Maiden flight of Airbus A400M military transport plane


http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/Mai ... 327904.cms

The link has 10 pics of same.

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Austin » 12 Dec 2009 20:02


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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby sumshyam » 13 Dec 2009 14:25

Boeing eyeing?over 30 pc share in Indian defence market

"Looking at the growing Indian defence market, Boeing currently sees a 10-year business potential of USD 31 billion for our company, which includes potential sales of fighter aircraft, maritime patrol aircraft, helicopters and strategic lift aircraft," Boeing Integrated Defense System India head Vivek Lall told PTI here.

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Khalsa » 14 Dec 2009 05:13

Moscow about to buy the French Mistral-class assault warship - capable of transporting and deploying up to 16 helicopters, 13 battle tanks and 450 troops - costing between $600m (£368m) and $750m.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/8408445.stm

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Dmurphy » 14 Dec 2009 09:13

amol.p wrote:Maiden flight of Airbus A400M military transport plane


http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/Mai ... 327904.cms

The link has 10 pics of same.

How does the A400 match up to the MRTA? God forbid, but if something goes wrong with MRTA, we can have an advanced fall back option in A400.

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby NRao » 14 Dec 2009 10:05

http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2009\12\14\story_14-12-2009_pg7_11

Pakistan to get 3 more AWACS in 2010: Jatoi

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby NRao » 15 Dec 2009 09:52


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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby andy B » 15 Dec 2009 11:40

Dmurphy wrote:
amol.p wrote:Maiden flight of Airbus A400M military transport plane


http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/Mai ... 327904.cms

The link has 10 pics of same.

How does the A400 match up to the MRTA? God forbid, but if something goes wrong with MRTA, we can have an advanced fall back option in A400.


IIRC the A400 sits above the Herk but below the Globemaster...the MTA replacing the Sutlej will be below the A400 given the dimesnions I think....The A400 is sort of semi strategic....

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Malayappan » 15 Dec 2009 12:10

Found an interesting piece on Blackwater and other security contractor arrangements..
Blackwater and Security Contracting: The Economics of War Tim Hsia, NYT, Dec 14 2009

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Gerard » 16 Dec 2009 16:54


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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Craig Alpert » 16 Dec 2009 19:00

Image
Iran tests long-range missile, raises ire of West
Iran Reportedly Test-Fires Its Most Advanced Missile
Given its high speed, it is impossible to destroy the missile with anti-missile systems because of its radar-evading ability.Wednesday's test was for the latest version of Iran's most advanced missile, the Sajjil-2, with a range of about 1,200 miles. That range places Israel, Iran's sworn enemy, well within reach, as well as U.S. bases in the Gulf region and parts of southeastern Europe.
:?: Since 1992, Iran has produced its own tanks, armored personnel carriers, missiles and a fighter plane. The actual capabilities of the weapons, including the accuracy and range of the country's homemade missiles, are difficult to ascertain given the secrecy of the Iranian military. :?:

talk about Idigenious development...

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Dmurphy » 17 Dec 2009 09:13

Ahem!

China to train Nepalese Army and pledges Rs 220 million in military assistance
In a move that may raise concerns, according to DD India, China on Wednesday said it will train the Nepalese Army and pledged Rs 220 million as military assistance for procuring "non lethal" hardware and logistics.

The pledge was made during a meeting between a Chinese military delegation led by Maj Gen Jia Jialing and Defence Minister Vidya Bhandari.

The money will be utilised to supply the "non-lethal" military hardware including logistics and training to the Nepal Army, according to Adviser to Defence Minister Subhash Devkota.

According to Defence Ministry sources China will supply 20 million Yuan worth of "non-lethal" military hardware to strengthen the Nepal Army. The remaining 800,000 Yuan will be utilised for imparting training and holding interaction between the two armies in the Nepal-China border area.

:-?


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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Philip » 18 Dec 2009 19:05

NoKo alleged theft through hacking of the US-SoKo battleplan ,wheree the US will pour in 700,000 troops!

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/de ... ea-hackers

North Korean hackers may have stolen US war plans

outline South Korea and Washington's strategy in event of war on the peninsula

Justin McCurry
guardian.co.uk, Friday 18 December 2009 12.41 GMT

South Korean tanks taking part in a military exercise near the demilitarised zone in 2000 to prepare for a possible North Korean attack. Photograph: Ahn Young-joon/AP

South Korea's military is investigating a cyber attack in which North Korean hackers may have stolen secret defence plans outlining Seoul and Washington's strategy in the event of war on the Korean peninsula.

The highly sensitive information, codenamed Oplan 5027, may have found its way into hostile hands last month after a South Korean officer used an unsecured USB memory stick to download it.

It reportedly contained a summary of military operations involving South Korean and US troops should North Korea conduct a pre-emptive strike or attempt to invade.

According to the Chosun Ilbo, a South Korean newspaper, the document outlines troop deployments, a list of North Korean targets, amphibious landing scenarios and how to establish a post-war occupation.

The Yonhap news agency said the plan allowed for the deployment of 700,000 US troops in the event of a full-scale war.

Embarrassed officials in Seoul attempted to play down its importance. The document was not a full text of the plans, said the defence ministry spokesman Won Tae-jae, adding that the 11-page file was intended simply to brief military officials and did not contain sensitive information.

The investigation has yet to establish how the hackers were able to get in or whether they were acting with North Korean support. One theory is that they used an internet protocol address registered in China, a preferred route for North Koreans attempting to hack into files on foreign networks.

The US has 28,500 troops based in South Korea. David Oten, a spokesman for the US military in Seoul, said: "As a matter of policy we do not comment on operational planning or intelligence matters, nor would we confirm details pertaining to any security investigation."

The mishap occurred in one of the world's most militarily sensitive regions. Tensions between the two Koreas have grown this year amid Pyongyang's refusal to abandon its nuclear weapons programme. Although the three-year Korean war ended in 1953 the countries have never signed a peace treaty and are divided by one of the world's most heavily fortified borders.

Faced with the military might of the world's only superpower, North Korea appears to believe it can at least gain an advantage in cyberspace. It is thought to have been responsible for high-profile cyber attacks in July that caused web outages at the White House and its South Korean equivalent, the Blue House. Reports in South Korea said investigators had traced the Chinese IP address used in those attacks to North Korea's post and telecommunications ministry.

The communist state is believed to operate an internet warfare unit, staffed by between 500 and 1,000 people, that attempts to hack into US and South Korean military networks in search of classified information or to throw government institutions into chaos.

The revelation that such sensitive information may have fallen into North Korean hands has provoked outrage in sections of the South Korean media. In a stinging editorial, the Chosun Ilbo noted that tens of thousands of heavily armed South Korean and US troops were involved in a tense standoff along the two Korea's land and maritime borders.

"If North Korean hackers can infiltrate the south's cyber borders at will, then all of those troops and weapons protecting the country along the border are useless," it said.

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Craig Alpert » 19 Dec 2009 05:20

http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/ima ... ept_lg.jpg
More Powerful Strykers to Address Afghanistan Mobility Problems
One complaint heard about the 8×8 wheeled Stryker armored vehicles in Afghanistan was that they had difficulties with the rough, mountainous off-road terrain. The Canadian forces in particular found that their Strykers’ mobility limitations created unacceptable difficulties.

In particular, the upgraded Stryker base vehicle will have:
* 450-horsepower diesel engine;
* suspension system and driveline to carry a 60,000-lb payload;
* larger tires;
* new braking system; and
* digital architecture that connects the C4ISR system to situational awareness tools.

In an Oct 6/09 briefing [pdf], the PEO GCS identified a number of technology improvements that the Army is seeking in the Stryker modernization program:
* Improved lower hull survivability;
* 60,000-lb semi-active suspension;
* Increased electrical power generation;
* Gun shot detector;
* Data/video network link;
* 425-horsepower engine;
* Improved embedded training system;
* Larger cooling module for air conditioning;
* Lithium batteries;
* Improved remote weapons station
* Tire fire suppression system;
* Larger tires with axle spacing change; and
* 360-degree situational awareness system.


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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Aditya G » 19 Dec 2009 14:14

Some interesting pictures ...

Sled test of the BLU-122/B:

http://www.ausairpower.net/BLU-122-Sled-Test-1S.jpg

Reinforced Concrete penetration by GBU-39/B SDB:

http://www.ausairpower.net/GBU-39-SDB-9.jpg

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby VijayKumarSinha » 19 Dec 2009 17:32

Vietnam Buys Russian Kilo Class Subs, SU-30 Fighters, Nuke Plant

In April 2009, reports surfaced that Vietnam had agreed in principle to a deal with Russia for 6 of its diesel-electric Kilo/ Project 636 Class fast attack submarines.


China’s 2009 display of naval might certainly marks an increased shift toward “forward defense” farther from its borders, a policy that must eventually include China’s trade lifeline to Vietnam’s south, through the Straits of Malacca.


Wouldn't it be fun building a naval base in south vietnam?

Ownership of the Spratly Islands remains very much in dispute, and Vietnam and China share a centuries-long history of mutual distrust and occupation. Recent punctuations of that animosity include the 1979 3rd Indochina War; this was followed by a significant skirmish in 1981, and a naval skirmish over the Spratly Islands in 1988. Today, Vietnamese protests over a Chinese bauxite mine in Vietnam, and media disobedience over the Spratly Islands issue, serve as a reminder that the 1989 treaty has not changed the relationship’s underlying fundamentals.


China itself has adopted a strategy of building up a submarine force to counter a superior surface opponent (the US Navy). It is entirely logical for Vietnam to adopt a similar approach vis-a-vis China, especially given that China’s lifeline of raw materials and exported goods leading from and to Africa, the Middle East, Europe, and parts of Asia passes right by Vietnam’s doorstep.


Looks like Vietnam and China are still not the best of pals. Are we pushing for closer military ties with Vietnam? Would you like some Brahmos missiles, Vietnam? How about a security cooperation with us? Wanna join us in our submarine and ship production programs?


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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Vipul » 23 Dec 2009 21:21

Myanmar opts for Russian MiG-29s over Chinese fighters news.

Russian media has revealed that the military junta in Myanmar may have signed a $570 million contract with Russian arms export monopoly Rosoboronexport for the delivery of MiG-29 fighters for the Myanmar Air Force.

Business daily Vedomosti quoted sources at Rosoboronexport as saying the Russian bid for the supply of MiG-29 (NATO: Fulcrum-D) fighter jets was preferred over China's offer to supply its latest J-10 and FC-1 fighters. Apparently these combat jets were offered by Beijing at "quite favourable terms." :mrgreen: (Heh Heh only the Pakis take junk from their Tallel then mountains friends)

Myanmar had earlier bought 12 MiG-29 fighters in 2001, but for Russia this contract is the largest since a failed attempt in 2007 to supply Algeria with 34 MiG-29 fighters.

Myanmar had taken Chinese military aircraft worth some $2 billion in the 1990s, the paper said. These were a mix of Chengdu F-7, Shenyang J-6 and Nanchang Q-5 fighters.

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby NRao » 26 Dec 2009 22:45


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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby srai » 27 Dec 2009 07:17



Revealed: British soldiers return to wearing the Tommy helmet as Army unveils new equipment for infantrymen
Image

He's deadlier, lighter, more streamlined and better protected - and he's wearing the latest stylish four-colour camouflage pattern with matching two-tone Union Jack insignia and coral sunglasses.

...

Out goes the familiar and distinctive 'pudding bowl' shaped helmet worn by Britain's soldiers for 20 years, and in comes a new shape more akin to today's U.S. Army helmet, or the Second World War German design - offering improved neck movement and more space to fit a rifle sight to the eye.

The new colour scheme has nothing to do with fashion and everything to do with new high-tech fabric dyes which maintain camouflage properties when viewed through infra-red night sights, and combine traditional desert colours with pale green shades - suited to the semi-desert environments where many of today's battles are fought.

...

The Treasury has spent £1billion a year on the 'Urgent Operational Requirement' programme - rushing new kit into service in Iraq and Afghanistan when existing equipment proves to be dangerously inadequate - delivering a range of new armoured vehicles, weapons and clothing.

...

The new infantryman's kit is known as project PECOC - Personal Equipment Common Operating Clothing - and is in the final stages of assessment before being issued to troops deploying on combat operations.

Designers are struggling to save weight across the board, because of recent feedback from commanders in Afghanistan warning that today's infanteer is being expected to carry too much weight, often approaching 150lb of weaponry, armour, ammunition, food and a host of gadgets - 'like going to work carrying your wife on your back' as one soldier described it.

In soaring summer temperatures of 50 degrees centigrade, foot patrols are having to be equipped with more quad bikes and trailers to take some of the burden, and to help evacuate wounded troops.

Major Richard Coomber of the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, requirements manager for the PECOC programme, said: 'We have scoured the world for the best materials.

There is no magic secret to saving weight. We have to get the integration of all the different items right, starting with body armour plates which are thinner but tougher, and better designed to fit with webbing, packs, and weapons.

'We spent a lot of time talking to troops who are using the existing equipment on operations.

'The result is a system designed to fit together, and to be as flexible as possible, so the soldier can adapt it to the job he's doing.'

The new clothing features removable padding inserts at the knees and elbows, and new 'coral-coloured' ballistic eye protectors, which give better colour perception than existing sunglasses.

The distinctive black-and-green Union Flag insignia offers better camouflage in daylight, but is also clearly identifiable through night-vision goggles, helping troops recognise each other during night battles.

Weaponry is constantly being upgraded, and the SA-80A2 assault rifle - which appears finally to have shaken off its unreliable reputation - is now fitted with an underslung grenade launcher and improved sights.

At a facility to show off the new kit on Salisbury Plain today Major General Bill Moore, Director General Logistic Support and Equipment for Land Forces, told the Mail that speed was the key to the Urgent Operational Requirement system.

He said: 'In peacetime you can afford to spend five or ten years getting the reliability of your new tank just right, but in wartime we take a bit more risk with getting new equipment into service fast.

'I think the next big thing for us is reducing weight for infantrymen, to make them more agile.

'If we can make electrical batteries smaller and lighter, we will make progress.

'We want to give the guys more options as to how much heavy protection they wear, depending on the threat and the task.'

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Craig Alpert » 29 Dec 2009 20:00

Underwear Bomb Revealed as Terror Suspect Warns More Attacks Coming
Image
The bomb, seen for the first time, is reported to have contained a six-inch pack of highly-explosive powder called PETN, which weighed about 80 grams (less than 3 ounces) and was sewn into the briefs.
According to ABC News, a government test with 50 grams of PETN blew a hole in the side of an airliner — the same amount carried by so-called shoe bomber Richard Reid over Christmas in 2001.

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Craig Alpert » 29 Dec 2009 22:24

Russia must develop weapons to pierce US missile shields: Putin
MOSCOW: Russia will have to develop new offensive weapon systems capable of piercing American missile shields in order to maintain balance with the US and prevent it from feeling it "can do anything" it wants, Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said on Tuesday.
"To maintain the power balance while not developing AMD (anti-missile defence), like the US, we'll have to develop offensive arms," Putin told reporters in Vladivostok in the country's Far East Pacific Coast, where he is on a working visit.

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Vinito » 30 Dec 2009 00:48

Craig Alpert wrote:Russia must develop weapons to pierce US missile shields: Putin
MOSCOW: Russia will have to develop new offensive weapon systems capable of piercing American missile shields in order to maintain balance with the US and prevent it from feeling it "can do anything" it wants, Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said on Tuesday.
"To maintain the power balance while not developing AMD (anti-missile defence), like the US, we'll have to develop offensive arms," Putin told reporters in Vladivostok in the country's Far East Pacific Coast, where he is on a working visit.


With the START treaty coming to an end and with the Russians concerned over the ever increasing presence of NATO everywhere on its turf its no surprise that there will be an acceleration in the development and number of new Russian weapon technologies to counter the threat from the west. Here's my thought on what they might do to build up some muscle ;-)

Offensive developments -
Acceleration of the SSN-NX-28 Bulava missile development programme
Increase in the number of Topol-M missiles and also more MIRV warheads given that the limit of warheads on each missile no longer applies
Acceleration of the SSBN programme
More Tu-160 bombers and possible upgrades to the existing inventory?
Replacing the Su-24 with the formidable Su-34 on a 1:1 basis

Defensive developments -
S-400 batteries to increase
Upgrade of Mig-29 force to SMT+ level
More Su-35's and 30's
Acceleration of SSN program

The main question being "will the Russians be able to afford this"?

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby amol.p » 30 Dec 2009 10:47

Lockheed to sell 24 F-16 fighter jets to Egypt

US aerospace giant Lockheed Martin is to sell 24 F-16 jet fighters to Egypt in a 3.2 billion dollar deal, a company spokesman said on Tuesday.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/new ... 393814.cms

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Austin » 30 Dec 2009 14:58

R-36M2 Voyevoda ICBM was developed in the 1970s and put into service in 1988. At present, about 70 R-36M2 missiles are in service with the Strategic Missile Forces

http://en.rian.ru/images/15740/41/157404187.jpg

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Vinito » 30 Dec 2009 22:08

Austin wrote:R-36M2 Voyevoda ICBM was developed in the 1970s and put into service in 1988. At present, about 70 R-36M2 missiles are in service with the Strategic Missile Forces

http://en.rian.ru/images/15740/41/157404187.jpg


Now this is the pinnacle of the Russian ICBM fleet. I always wondered why the Russians had the need to be scared of anyone when they had this behemoth in their arsenal. The silo based platform may have been one reason for them to decomission most of them and move to a more mobile friendly ICBM e.g. Topol M

This was the only reason that gave NATO nightmares whenever they thought of a all out nuclear war with te USSR. This massive ICBM has been tested with a 25 MT single warhead (although removed after START) and later on modified to carry 10 * 1 MT thermonuclear warheads.

12000 KM with a CEP of 120 m was definitely enough to give any nation hostile to the USSR the jitters when they had this colossus pointed towards them. A true ICBM in every sense.


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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby VijayKumarSinha » 31 Dec 2009 18:29

4 Canadian soldier's and 1 Canadian journalist killed in a roadside bomb near Kandahar city:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/nat ... le1415241/

From the look of comments on G&M website it seems that most of the posters are opposed to Canadian role in Afghanistan.
But, my experience has been its mostly the Panda, Paki, Middle-east types that troll the comments section and post comments opposed to the war. In my view the Canadian opinion on their presence in Afghanistan is split down the middle. Canada has had 3 elections since 2004 all resulting in minority governments (and we thought we were bad). 2010 is considered an election year, again and their presence in Afghanistan would be a major election topic.

Villagers interviewed by The Globe, however, said the Taliban had been gaining strength in recent months, posting “night letters” – written warnings and edicts – on homes and mosques in the area.


The kind of 'night letters' that Kashmiri's received in the 90's asking them to flee their homes or be killed shortly.

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Aditya G » 01 Jan 2010 23:55

Last edited by Gerard on 04 Jan 2010 05:40, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: please indicate what this file's topic is

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Gerard » 04 Jan 2010 05:39

The Rise and Demise of the “Three Block War”
The “Three Block War” concept was briefly used as a military metaphor by the US Marine Corps leadership at the end of the 20th Century. It was resurrected by the Canadian Forces (CF) in 2004-2005 and touted as the new model for Canadian field operations. The core idea is that military forces conduct humanitarian, peacekeeping/stabilization, and combat operations simultaneously on three separate city blocks, or more widely. How did Canada arrive at this concept, and what has been the Canadian experience with its application? Why do some military officers consider it a vision for the future, while others consider it tragically flawed?

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby pgbhat » 04 Jan 2010 09:52

^
Isn't this what unkil is doing in A'stan. :-? Gen. Petraeus calls it "Full Spectrum" operations.

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby narayana » 04 Jan 2010 16:49

F-16 vs C130

Funny but interesting Stuff

A C-130 was lumbering along when a cocky F-16 flashed by.The jet jockey decided to show off.

The fighter jock told the C-130 pilot, 'watch this!' and promptly went into a barrel roll followed by a steep climb. He then finished with a sonic boom as he broke the sound barrier. The F-16 pilot asked the C-130 pilot what he thought of that?

The C-130 pilot said, 'That was impressive, but watch this!' The C-130 droned along for about 5 minutes and then the C-130 pilot came back on and said: 'What did you think of that?' Puzzled, the F-16 pilot asked, 'What the heck did you do?' The C-130 pilot chuckled. 'I stood up, stretched my legs, walked to the back, went to the bathroom, then got a cup of coffee and a cinnamon bun.'

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby vishal » 05 Jan 2010 08:45

10 Sci-Fi weapons that actually exist

Extract: The XM-25 grenade launcher is equipped with a laser rangefinder and on-board computer. It packs a magazine of four 25mm projectiles, and programs them to detonate as they pass by their targets. That feature will allow soldiers to strike enemies who are taking cover. By 2012, the Army hopes to arm every infantry squad and Special Forces unit with at least one of the big guns.

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Re: International Military Discussion

Postby Craig Alpert » 06 Jan 2010 05:25

Egypt Looking for more AGM-114K Hellfire II Missiles
Image
Dec 18/09: The US Defense Security Cooperation Agency formally announces [PDF] Egypt’s request to buy another 450 AGM-114K3A Hellfire II missiles, plus spare and repair parts, test and tool sets, personnel training and equipment, publications, and U.S. Government and contractor support. Egypt already has AGM-114K missiles in its inventory, to equip its AH-64D Apache attack helicopters. As such, implementation of this proposed sale will not require the assignment of any additional U.S. Government or contractor representatives to Egypt. The prime contractor is HELLFIRE Ltd., LLC, and the estimated cost is $51 million.
.....
While this request in likely to be uncontroversial, Egypt’s simultaneous request for Harpoon Block II anti-ship and land-attack missiles has created far more concern in Israel.


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