Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

The Military Issues & History Forum is a venue to discuss issues relating to the military aspects of the Indian Armed Forces, whether the past, present or future. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
Kersi D
BRFite
Posts: 1388
Joined: 20 Sep 2000 11:31

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Kersi D » 15 Jun 2016 17:53

Yagnasri wrote:But paki Bunder is super powerful like superman, iron man, batman, and Jihadi man combined. What to do? :mrgreen:


MiG 21FL is good enough to bring it down !!!!!!!

srin
BRFite
Posts: 1566
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:13

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby srin » 16 Jun 2016 15:29

Vipul wrote:[url=http://www.defensenews.com/story/defense/international/asia-pacific/2016/06/14/india--italy-germany-weapons/85861394/India Explores Alternative to Italian Weaponry in Germany.[/url]


“In addition, India is also quietly exploring possibilities of building six nuclear submarines with German help at a cost of $10 billion. It is a strategic program and we cannot reveal details," the MoD source said. :?:


I wonder which specific nuclear sub construction expertise that Germany has that we want to use ...

Kersi D
BRFite
Posts: 1388
Joined: 20 Sep 2000 11:31

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Kersi D » 16 Jun 2016 15:47

srin wrote:“In addition, India is also quietly exploring possibilities of building six nuclear submarines with German help at a cost of $10 billion. It is a strategic program and we cannot reveal details," the MoD source said. :?:
[/quote]

I wonder which specific nuclear sub construction expertise that Germany has that we want to use ...[/quote]

Could be related to the non nuclear part of the sub e.g. pressure hull material and welding, diesel engines - MTU, electric motors PERMASYN motors. PEM fuel cells for back-up, sonars, torpedo launchers etc.

Everything non nuclear can be got from Germany, if thye give us the 1500 hp EURO diesel engine for Arjun !!!!!

member_29378
BRFite -Trainee
Posts: 10
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby member_29378 » 17 Jun 2016 08:22

http://www.janes.com/article/61483/indi ... it-systems

India's Ministry of Defence (MoD) is finalising price negotiations with Israel's Elbit Systems for 747 12.7 mm naval remote weapon stations (RWSs), worth an estimated INR19 billion (USD282 million), for the Indian Navy (IN) and Indian Coast Guard (ICG).

Industry sources said the MoD is expected to complete the RWS deal, which it quoted was "substantially lower" than that of British rival EMDigital.

The deal includes importing 136 RWSs with electro-optic modules off the shelf and the remaining 611 systems in kit form for assembly by the state-run Ordnance Factory Board (OFB) unit at Tiruchirappalli, southern India. Ammunition for the 12.7 mm RWSs would be manufactured at the OFB plant in Kolkata.

member_22539
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2022
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby member_22539 » 17 Jun 2016 11:56

Chinmay wrote:The deal includes importing 136 RWSs with electro-optic modules off the shelf


Is this by any chance the new local products?

member_29378
BRFite -Trainee
Posts: 10
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby member_29378 » 17 Jun 2016 13:38

Arun Menon wrote:
Chinmay wrote:The deal includes importing 136 RWSs with electro-optic modules off the shelf


Is this by any chance the new local products?


Unlikely. The article mentions kit assembly so everything will be made in Israel.

abhik
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2213
Joined: 02 Feb 2009 17:42

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby abhik » 17 Jun 2016 17:31

Why weren't these RWSs not procured using Make-1/2 (or whatever it called) ?

Singha
BRF Oldie
Posts: 63136
Joined: 13 Aug 2004 19:42
Location: the grasshopper lies heavy

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Singha » 17 Jun 2016 18:35

747 RWS is a massive number for the IN+CG? how many do they want to mount per ship....hopefully not like a 60 gun man-o-war?

member_23370
BRFite
Posts: 1104
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby member_23370 » 17 Jun 2016 23:39

I hope these are also for the CG interceptors like
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABG_fast_ ... ptor_craft and
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%26T-cla ... ptor_craft

Never liked the idea of a soldier standing out firing a machine gun.

abhik
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2213
Joined: 02 Feb 2009 17:42

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby abhik » 18 Jun 2016 11:50

^^^
Those RWS don't come cheap, about 2.5 Crores/unit. Comes to about 10-15% of the fast interceptor craft quoted above.

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9998
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby arun » 19 Jun 2016 09:56

X Posted from the "Indian Coastguard Discussion" thread.

Aryaman , the 18th in the series of 20 Fast Patrol Vessel of the Aadesh Class under construction for the Indian Coast Guard by Cochin Shipyard delivered:

CSL delivers vessel before schedule

BharadwajV
BRFite
Posts: 116
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby BharadwajV » 20 Jun 2016 15:25

100% FDI in Defence-The Hindu
The Union government on Monday radically liberalised the FDI regime by permitting 100 per cent foreign direct investment under government approval route for almost every sector, including defence.


We need more jobs and I think this is a very positive step towards achieving that.

brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 6631
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby brar_w » 20 Jun 2016 19:10

Boeing, Tata invest in joint production facility - Jane's Defence Weekly

India's Tata Advanced Systems Limited (TASL) and Boeing started the construction of a new aerospace production facility in Hyderabad on 18 June that will be the base for a new joint venture (JV) between the two companies.

In a statement the companies said the production plant, which is expected to be operational by 2017, will manufacture Boeing AH-64 Apache helicopter fuselages and other aerostructures. The facility is expected to eventually be the sole producer of AH-64 fuselages globally and will also pursue opportunities to provide systems integration and other aerospace services.

David Koopersmith, Boeing's vice president of Vertical Lift and board member of the new JV, Tata Boeing Aerospace Limited, said, "We will be making significant investments to ensure the success of this joint venture as we bring value to our customers globally and compete for additional manufacturing work in the global market."

The JV represents Boeing's first defence sector foreign direct investment (FDI) activity in India. The value of investment in the JV has not been disclosed but, in line with Indian FDI rules, Boeing is likely to hold a 49% share in the new company, with Tata owning the controlling stake. The JV expands aerospace industrial collaboration between Boeing and TASL and the wider Tata group. The US corporation is working with TASL on the production in Indiaof aerostructures for Boeing's CH-47 Chinook heavy-lift helicopter and AH-6i light armed helicopter. Boeing has also contracted Tata Advanced Materials Limited to produce components and fittings for India's P-8I maritime patrol aircraft, and TAL Manufacturing Solutions to manufacture composite structures for Boeing 787-9 airliners as well as ground support equipment for India's C-17 Globemaster III strategic airlifter.

For TASL the JV with Boeing builds on its position as one of India's most prominent private-sector aerospace and defence firms. In the past few years TASL has established investment JVs with US companies Lockheed Martin and Sikorsky to produce Lockheed Martin C-130 Hercules empennage and centre wing-box structures, and cabins for the Sikorsky S-92 medium-lift helicopters. It has also formed manufacturing partnerships with companies including Airbus, Finmeccanica, RUAG Aviation, Pilatus, Cobham, and RUAG.


sudhan
BRFite
Posts: 803
Joined: 01 Jul 2009 17:53
Location: Timbuktoo..

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby sudhan » 20 Jun 2016 19:25

BharadwajV wrote:100% FDI in Defence-The Hindu


URL Needs fixing

ramana
Forum Moderator
Posts: 50409
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby ramana » 21 Jun 2016 01:52

So where does IA get the ammo for the Under Barrel Grenade Launchers?
I checked OFB site and didn't find any ammo being made while the UBGLs are made by OFB.

Kakkaji
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3145
Joined: 23 Oct 2002 11:31

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Kakkaji » 21 Jun 2016 05:03

'Modern' bait for FDI in defence

New Delhi, June 20: The "modern" is not the "state of the art" in the Modi government's new policy on easing foreign direct investment in defence announced today.

New Delhi has dispensed with the caveat, laid down in the UPA II regime, that the government will approve a 100 per cent FDI project in defence only if it brings in state-of-the-art technology or for other reasons that must be recorded.

"Foreign investment beyond 49 per cent has now been permitted through government approval route, in cases resulting in access to modern technology in the country or for other reasons to be recorded. The condition of access to 'state-of-art' technology in the country has been done away with," a statement from the Prime Minister's Office (PMO) announcing the reforms said.

In November last year, the government had raised the ceiling for FDI for automatic approval in defence to 49 per cent. Earlier, in 2013, the UPA II government had said that it could consider 100 FDI in defence on a case-to-case basis if a proposal would bring in cutting-edge technology.

But in the three years since successive governments have eased FDI in the defence sector, inflows have been poor. In February this year, defence minister Manohar Parrikar told Parliament that between August 2014 and February 2016, the total amount of FDI in the defence sector was Rs 1.12 crore.

But today's policy announcement could potentially end the monopoly of the government sector in the small arms sector - for weapons capable of firing ammunition that is less than 12mm calibre, such as pistols and rifles.

Currently, these are made by the Ordnance Factory Board, particularly its factories in Ichapore and Cossipore near Calcutta.

The PMO statement said that FDI limit for the defence sector would also be applicable to manufacturing of small arms and ammunitions covered under the Arms Act 1959.

Consultancy firm KPMG believes that easing of norms for FDI in defence will result in larger inflows if the government speeds up military contracts.

"This decision will now bring in real investments provided the defence ministry also speeds up the procurement process and issues big-ticket orders. We may see its positive impact over the next 6-12 months," said KPMG's head of aerospace and defence, Amber Dubey.

Vipul
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3728
Joined: 15 Jan 2005 03:30

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Vipul » 23 Jun 2016 03:23

Rs 1 lakh crore defence purchases on Manohar Parrikar’s mind.

In a marathon meeting on new acquisitions, defence minister Manohar Parrikar is set to discuss projects worth over Rs 1 lakh crore, including critical purchases like armed unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), an advanced air defence system, carbines for the Army and a range of vessels for the Navy.

A meeting of the high-powered Defence Acquisition Council (DAC) is scheduled for Saturday after a gap of several weeks and sources have told ET that the fate of several projects that have been in the works for years will be discussed. The forces are keen to move ahead on these acquisitions, several of which have not moved for over a year due to differences within the ministry.

High on the agenda is a proposal to acquire a new fleet of armed drone for the Indian Air Force, which will expand its options for punitive cross-border action in response to terror. While a $-400 million proposal for acquiring armed Heron TP drones from Israel was given a quiet goahead last year, the deal is yet to be inked.

India may now also have the option to purchase US-made Predator armed drones after its recent entry into the Missile Technology Control Regime. Another major Air Force acquisition plan to be discussed is the $6.1-billion purchase of S 400 air defence system from Russia that is seen as a game-changer for the region. The S 400, which is also being procured by China, has a range of over 300 km and an ability to even target aircraft flying deep in enemy territory.

The Air Force is also expected to push for its plans to acquire the Indo-Israeli long-range surface-to-air missile. A long-pending proposal to equip two Boeing 777 VVIP aircraft that are being transferred from Air India with missile avoidance systems is also to be discussed. On the Army front, some clarity is expected on the $700-million plan to purchase M777 ultra-light howitzers under a foreign military sales deal with the us.

The plan to purchase 145 howitzers from the BAE Systems has hardly moved forward since January this year. Another Army plan that has been in the works since 2010 to replace its long - retired short-range carbines is also to be discussed. The Army wants to import 44,600 carbines and only one of the three competitors — Israeli IWI — has qualified after field trials.

A decision could also be taken on the long-running 'short-range surface-to-air missile' project of the Army to purchase an agile missile shield for forward moving forces. While the Israeli Spyder system has qualified, the decision has to be taken on whether to continue with the acquisition or replace it with the indigenous Aakash missile system.

A range of Navy vessels that have to be bought are also to be discussed as the validity of their necessity is expiring shortly. Among these are six new-generation missile vessels expected to cost over Rs13,000 crore and a new range of fleet support vessels that could cost as much as Rs10,000 crore.

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9998
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby arun » 25 Jun 2016 19:27

X Posted from the “Indian Naval News & Discussion - 22 April 2015” thread.

A 6 week old press release which I have not found here on BRF so here goes ……………

P-17A frigates will be equipped with MAN 12V28/33D STC engines. MAN announces that orders for 14 engines (2 per ship) have been received. :

MAN Engines for Indian Navy Stealth Frigates : MAN Diesel & Turbo receives order for 14 engines for Indian Navy

Shanu
BRFite
Posts: 201
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Shanu » 25 Jun 2016 20:24

Marathon defence acquisition meeting comes up with some interesting results. 145 Ultra-light howitzers ordered, 18 Dhanush order to set up production and 6 missile boats tender to go out. No info on Predators though.

Defence ministry approves new howitzers, missile boats and other projects

Defence Ministry today approved the much delayed purchase of 145 Ultra Light Howitzers, worth about Rs 5,000 crore, from the US and also the bulk production of 18 Dhanush artillery guns, the first acquisition of such weapon systems by the Army in three decades since the Bofors scandal.

While 25 guns will come to India in a fly away condition, the rest will be assembled at the proposed Assembly Integration and Test facility for the weapon system in India in partnership with Mahindra.

The DAC also noted the "satisfactory progress" in manufacture of indigenous Dhanush guns, also known as Desi Bofors.

"While three guns would be delivered for user exploitation by June 30, three more will be handed over by September end. DAC also cleared bulk production of 18 guns to enable better exploitation and setting up of indigenous production," the officer said.

The gun, a towed howitzer with a strike range of 38-km, has been developed by Ordnance Factory Board (OFB), Kolkata, after going through the design and voluminous documents running into more than 12,000 pages which were delivered to India under the first phase of Transfer of Technology as part of the Bofors gun deal in late 80s.

Costing about Rs 14 crore a piece, Dhanush is comparable to most current generation weapons systems which are in use by different countries. Along with electronic gun-laying and sighting systems and other features, the indigenous gun has an enhanced 11-km range as against the gun range of 27-km of the imported Bofors.

Another key project that got an Acceptance of Necessity (AON), which will now allow the Navy to issue tenders, was the proposal to build six next generation missile vessels under 'Buy Indian' category for Rs 13,600 crore.

Meanwhile, the DAC also reviewed the ongoing procurement case of SRSAM and Very Short Range Air Defence (VSHORAD) System. "It was decided to keep on the ongoing acquisition process going in a multi-vendor situation", the officer said.

The DAC, which considered Armoured Fighter Vehicle Protection and Counter Measure System for T90 tanks, directed this to be taken up as indigenous project to strengthen future capability.

The Council also approved a Rs 386-crore project for modernisation and augmentation of facilities at naval dockyard and naval ship repair yards.

Acquisition of five diving support craft for Rs 150 crore was also approved.

The DAC also approved buying of indigenously made simulators for Jaguar aircraft for Rs 500 crore and setting up of an electronic warfare range for Rs 1,300 crore through indigenous capability.


Edited later - typo corrected.
Last edited by Shanu on 25 Jun 2016 20:44, edited 2 times in total.

Shanu
BRFite
Posts: 201
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Shanu » 25 Jun 2016 20:41

Don't know, why this anaemic order for Dhanush. Looks like MP has still not managed to subdue the 'unobtanium expectations' from Indian products and is managing to push through only small piecemeal orders. Lets hope that the next order is truly of 'bulk production' nature.

The 5 diving support crafts are for MARCOS, I presume. Do you guys have info on who will build them. Is it selected yet? By any chance, is it a Make in India project?

Gyan
BRFite
Posts: 1183
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Gyan » 25 Jun 2016 23:27

I am impressed with the massive order of 18 Dhanush howitzers for Rs. 250 crore while only minimal orders of Rs. 10,000 crore are given for imported K9 and M777.

Vivek K
BRFite
Posts: 1877
Joined: 15 Mar 2002 12:31

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Vivek K » 26 Jun 2016 00:27

Unfortunate. IA is trying to kill domestic sourcing by an infinite testing of locally produced systems and minimal testing of foreign weapons. Seems that the Raj mentality is alive and kicking.

Cybaru
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2197
Joined: 12 Jun 2000 11:31
Contact:

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Cybaru » 26 Jun 2016 02:10

Defence Ministry today approved the much delayed purchase of 145 Ultra Light Howitzers, worth about Rs 5,000 crore, from the US and also the bulk production of 18 Dhanush artillery guns, the first acquisition of such weapon systems by the Army in three decades since the Bofors scandal.


18 is bulk??? :((

Kakkaji
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3145
Joined: 23 Oct 2002 11:31

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Kakkaji » 26 Jun 2016 06:01

I think the "bulk production" order of 18 relates to the size of a producion batch on the assembly line.

The 6 units of Dhanush produced or in production so far have been custom-made in batch sizes of 1, 2, or 3 units at a time. Now what the MoD seems to have done is cleared the OFB to set up a production line that can simultaneously manufacture/ assemble 18 units.

It is like the LCA where, after the TDs and PVs, the first production order was for 8 LSPs. We know now that the HAL assembly line for the LCA currently is set up to assemble 8 at a time on the shop floor.

With this logic, I expect the future production orders for the Dhanus to be in multiples of 18.

JMT

Gyan
BRFite
Posts: 1183
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Gyan » 26 Jun 2016 10:58

Actually this massive order of 18 howitzers will allow us to rapidly develop vendors for sub components and invest in R&D for deeper indigenisation. I do hope UN does not sanction India for theatening the world by huge Howitzer deployment. I fully expect China to accept Indian suzerainty in Tibet after deplyment of 18 Howitzers.

Aditya G
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3342
Joined: 19 Feb 2002 12:31
Contact:

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Aditya G » 26 Jun 2016 13:42

Shanu wrote:...
The 5 diving support crafts are for MARCOS, I presume. Do you guys have info on who will build them. Is it selected yet? By any chance, is it a Make in India project?


Diving support vessels are typically not meant for special ops. Indian Navy has a diving cadre and there are many tasks which require divers, and hence diving support ships. This includes emergency rescue from submarines via diving bells.

Indian ship yards regularly make such ships.

arun
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9998
Joined: 28 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby arun » 26 Jun 2016 15:27

X Posted from the “India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II” thread.

arun wrote:
krishna_krishna wrote:Mean-e-while, India as a special partner bill rejected by Senate :

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 759681.cms


The US seems to have backed out of its commitment really rapidly. Posters here on BRF will recollect that the “Official” India-US Joint Declaration of June 7, 2016 stated that “the United States hereby recognizes India as a Major Defense Partner.” (See Here).

Our Prime Minister Narendra Modi will do well to be a great deal more circumspect in dealing with the US given the past history of their unfriendly acts and not get carried away with flattery.


I smell the spiel of a snake oil salesman.

In a legalistic rule bound society like the US “language you would not find in any arms transfer legislation or any of our existing policies” means only one thing, it means nothing, zero, nada, zilch especially when the necessary legislative underpinning for the term “'Major Defence Partner” was summarily turned down by the US legislature:

India to get access to almost 99% of US defence technologies: US official

Aditya_V
BRF Oldie
Posts: 9784
Joined: 05 Apr 2006 16:25

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Aditya_V » 27 Jun 2016 11:11

There used to be an MTCR thread before, now unable to locate it. Now it seems we are a member.

India formally joins elite missile club Missile Technology Control Regime

MTCR membership will now enable India to buy high-end missile technology and also enhance its joint ventures with Russia.


Does this mean that Brahmos will lose 290Km cap and like the UK which imported Polaris Missiles, the 300KM- 500KG limit on UAV's and Missiles to be imported by INdiia no longer applies?

Austin
BRF Oldie
Posts: 21918
Joined: 23 Jul 2000 11:31

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Austin » 27 Jun 2016 11:59

Why did we joined MTCR when all these while we refused to join the treaty saying it was discriminatory ?

AbhiJ
BRFite
Posts: 494
Joined: 29 Sep 2010 17:33
Contact:

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby AbhiJ » 27 Jun 2016 18:05

I really don't know where to put this stuff but surprising to know that Defence Ministry like all other Ministries works on single entry system of book keeping.

The ICAI said it will soon approach Union defence minister Manohar Parikkar to urge him to introduce double entry accounts system in the defence ministry.


The government departments are still using single entry accounts system. One can't check the balancesheet or where the money is being spent in single entry account system. :roll:


Link

tsarkar
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2506
Joined: 08 May 2006 13:44
Location: mumbai

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby tsarkar » 27 Jun 2016 22:53

Singha wrote:747 RWS is a massive number for the IN+CG? how many do they want to mount per ship....hopefully not like a 60 gun man-o-war?


Many. Check the 12.7 mm gun mount on top the helicopter hanger adjacent to the satellite antenna dome on INS Sahyadri here. You can spot another 12.7 mm gun mount on the other side.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ULG_Ne5VuWA/U ... 430970.jpg
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0eJxDc0Ouy8/U ... 431063.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/vIaPS9V.jpg

Large ships carry many 12.7 mm guns to protect them from close range swarming boat + men assault.

However, in choppy seas, manually handling the HMGs is tricky, hence RWS.

The guns will be OFB Prahari, that is the same HMG as our T-72/T-90s.

This is most likely the system in consideration http://www.defenseworld.net/uploads//ne ... 140122.jpg

Zynda
BRFite
Posts: 1468
Joined: 07 Jan 2006 00:37
Location: J4

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Zynda » 28 Jun 2016 20:46

X-posting

Air India retains rights to fly VVIPs

Air India retains rights to fly VVIPs

Gautam Datt | Posted by Parthshri Arora
New Delhi, June 25, 2016 | UPDATED 10:29 IST

Air India will continue to fly Prime Minister Narendra Modi instead of the Indian Air Force (IAF) as the two brand new Boeing 777s being procured for VVIP flying will remain with the national carrier.

The Prime Minister at present flies in Air India's Boeing 747s on his long haul intercontinental journeys. But under a new plan, the jumbo jets are being replaced by two Boeing 777s.

STATE-OF-THE-ART FACILITIES

The new aircraft, fitted with self-protection suites and state-of-the-art features, will fill the security gap that existed in current Air India One which is a regular aircraft pulled out from the fleet for the Prime Minister or the President's journeys.

It was earlier decided that the new Boeing 777-300s, to be tailor-made for VVIP flying, would be operated by the Indian Air Force (IAF) instead of Air India just like "Air Force One" carrying the US President.

IAF TO MANAGE SECURITY

Under the new plan, the new aircraft will remain with Air India but the IAF personnel will only manage the self-protection suite accompanying the aircraft.

The Defence Acquisition Council (DAC), which is meeting on Saturday, will also discuss this new arrangement. The proposal is one of many items on the agenda of DAC.

The new aircraft will be made by Boeing as per India's requirements of completely securing the VVIP from hostile missiles or any other threat posed in the operating environment.

The IAF has a communication squadron that flies the VVIP.

The squadron at present has three Boeing Business Jets (BBJs) purchased around 10 years ago. The BBJs - equipped with self protection suites -- are used for short haul flights because of the range limitations offered by the narrow body aircraft Boeing 737.

The squadron also has five Embraer 135 Legacy executive jets that are mostly used by senior cabinet ministers handling key defence, home and external affairs portfolios and the service chiefs.

TIME FOR NEW BOEING 777s

Officials said even the new jets being procured for VVIP flying can be utilised in the Air India fleet. The national carrier already flies Boeing 777s.

While deciding on the new aircraft, the Boeing 777 was seen as a logical choice as jumbo jets are going out of production and it would be difficult to maintain these machines in the long run.

The officials said that Boeing 777 is a well established platform and Air India has maintenance lines and expertise to handle the aircraft. It is the aircraft that will remain in service for long. The replacement of US Air Force One, however, will be newer version of Boeing 747.

wig
BRFite
Posts: 1535
Joined: 09 Feb 2009 16:58

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby wig » 22 Aug 2016 09:35

http://www.tribuneindia.com/news/commen ... 83419.html

Is it the Bofors syndrome-Defence modernisation, indigenisation face indifferent future
AS part of the last Cabinet reshuffle, the erstwhile minister of state for defence was shifted to another ministry. At the time, media reports had suggested that the reason was his involvement in a major row during a meeting of the Defence Acquisition Council (DAC), chaired by the Raksha Mantri. He had reportedly blamed members of the Army and the defence acquisition wing for an unfair carbine selection leading to a single vendor, which was an Israeli company, and battled for the inclusion of a second vendor, even suggesting a CBI probe into the matter.
A recent report now mentions that this company is so frustrated with the delay in decision-making in the Ministry of Defence (MoD) that it is rethinking its investments in India. If, as reported, 70 per cent of the FDI in defence in the last two years has come from this company’s joint venture alone, it makes for very poor copy for the ‘Make in India’ campaign.
In financial terms this procurement proposal must be modest. That even this has resulted in a piquant situation points to a deeper malaise afflicting defence procurement, due to which defence modernisation and indigenisation continue to face an indifferent future.
The traditional tug-of-war in the endless file driven decision-making process has normally been between the user service and the civilian bureaucracy with the Minister normally being the proverbial rubber stamp. Indeed, one grouse that services often have is of Ministers letting the bureaucracy have complete sway, even as procurement proposals linger for years, if not decades, whilst operational capabilities wither.
While this episode does raise the interesting question of whether a change is creeping in where the smug bureaucratic order is being challenged within the South Block, one thing is certain; the Army’s wait for the carbine is destined to get longer, no matter what the cost in human life. They must continue to do with ‘what they have’, the pregnant expression used by the then Army Chief when the nation was faced with the prospect of wider conflict during the Kargil episode. Clearly, the one disposable commodity in our completely broken down defence procurement and modernisation process, is life of those in uniform, for whom there appears little parliamentary, ministerial or bureaucratic empathy.
If this sounds harsh, one needs to look back at the IAF’s requirement for an advanced jet trainer whose need was first spelt out in 1982. The first aircraft arrived after 25 years while its non-availability continued to take a heavy toll in terms of training-related accidents. Bharat Rakshak website data indicates 543 IAF aircraft losses during this 25-year period, of which a significant number were fighter aircraft and most attritions were indirectly attributable to this wilful procrastination.
The chequered history of defence procurements dates back to 1948 and the Jeep scandal, but it was the Bofors scandal in 1987 and the ensuing political controversy that resulted in procrastination becoming the process mantra. The services termed this the Bofors Syndrome, a mindset where few in the decision-making chain would venture to take decisions on merit for fear of falling prey to shenanigans of others in the complex procurement system.
This syndrome’s unique feature is that it works smoothly where government-to-government contracts are concerned, but goes into deep freeze when faced with an open tender purchase. This would explain the dichotomy of over $10 billion defence purchases from the US and much more from erstwhile USSR and Russia, but decades of procrastination for the MMRCA or the howitzer, or now even carbines!
There is an added fallout. Massive investments have been made in defence PSUs and ordnance factories, yet India is among the world’s leading importers of arms! One effort to address this imbalance was a proposal to select and co-opt some private enterprises and designate them as Raksha Utpadan Ratnas. The proposal remains stillborn precisely because the decision-making eco-system avoids the prospect of choosing amongst private parties.
As part of the post-Kargil review, the DAC was set up to expedite the procurement process. In 2002, the syndrome-afflicted ecosystem invented a new tool called the Defence Procurement Procedure (DPP). Over the years, so much anticipation and hype accompanies each DPP revision that every new edition appears to be an end in itself rather than a means to an end.
DPP 2016 was the ninth such version and the first under the NDA government committed to the ‘Make in India’ mission. There was an air of optimistic anticipation, especially with regard to private sector involvement, more so as a committee had proposed a ‘strategic partner’ model, wherein selected Indian private enterprises would exclusively make designated military platforms. Not surprisingly, the proposal is proving to be contentious and the subject of study by successive committees. But the crucial chapter on strategic partners was missing from DPP 2016, to be issued later. Clearly, the Bofors Syndrome is at play again.
The underlying spirit of successive DPPs no longer appears to be for delivering and sustaining effective and affordable war-fighting capabilities to the users within a specified time frame. Instead, arriving at a perfect and foolproof system on paper takes precedence over achieving the outcome.
Defence acquisition is a mission for committed professionals and not administrative generalists and uniformed specialists working on rotating assignments, burdened with other chores and pressures. Elsewhere, it is considered a full time profession where people train, specialise and work full time. The US even has a Defence Acquisition University committed to creating acquisition professionals.
If the outgoing MoS’s outburst and ministerial over-reach results in a grudging acceptance that we need to rethink our defence acquisition system and processes, with accountability of outcomes suitably factored, he may have provided yeoman service to the armed forces. If on the other hand, we continue to treat defence acquisition as a routine administrative chore, our Commanders will continue to face future threats with ‘what they have’. The nation should be prepared to bear the consequences

Kakkaji
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3145
Joined: 23 Oct 2002 11:31

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Kakkaji » 11 Sep 2016 09:24

Japan may cut price to ink aircraft deal with India

NEW DELHI: Japan is negotiating the sale of Shinmaywa US-2 search and rescue aircraft with India not for any economic gain but because it considers India a friendly country, Tokyo has said amid reports that the deal for 12 amphibious aircraft had collapsed over pricing and technology transfer issues.

Top Japanese defence ministry sources told TOI in an exclusive interaction that they would look at reducing the price for the $ 1.6 billion aircraft deal ?as much as possible, in a fresh attempt to revive the negotiations.

The agreement, if it happens, will have a huge symbolic significance as a message to China about deepening defence and security cooperation between India and Japan, both victims of Chinese territorial aggression.

"Our position is that if this agreement happens, it will have a very favourable impact on our relations with India,'' said a Japanese defence ministry official.

Kakkaji
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3145
Joined: 23 Oct 2002 11:31

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Kakkaji » 11 Sep 2016 09:47

India not likely to come to resolution in production of F16 fighter jets

India is not likely to come to a resolution in ‘transfer of technology’ in production of F16 and other fighter jets “for at least a year and a half”, a top Pentagon official has said.

“Obviously technology transfer is something that India is really really hoping for — looking for so how much we’re able to work through — will probably be a key determinant,” US Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James told reporters on Friday.

“Then a key determinant in what India ultimately ends up doing will relate to the make in India part, how many jobs, what sorts of technologies might transfer,” James said.

James, who recently returned from India said, India is thinking about manufacturing not just F-16s and F-18s.

“They’re also considering the Grippons and a variety of other aircraft.

The US Air Force Secretary said, in India she discussed with Indian officials its modernisation programs, their desired modernisation program as well as their strong interest in co-production and co-development technology transfer.

“Some of this would occur under the defence technology and trade initiative. That, of course, would be viewed as complementary, to Prime Minister (Narendra) Modi’s make in India campaign, so they are interested in growing jobs in India,” she said.

“I did have the opportunity to talk about both the F-16 and the F-18 proposals which came direct from industry, they are not US government proposals, they are not FMS (Foreign Military Sales),” she said.

Manish_Sharma
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3870
Joined: 07 Sep 2009 16:17

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Manish_Sharma » 12 Sep 2016 10:44

Usually whole of our system is shown to be under amrikan thumb completely. While this same system took 23 years to purchase airforce trainer Hawk aircraft, the decisions to buy C-17, C-130, WL Radars & P-8Is have been lightening fast.

Prem
BRF Oldie
Posts: 20875
Joined: 01 Jul 1999 11:31
Location: Weighing and Waiting 8T Yconomy

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Prem » 16 Sep 2016 01:02

Russia displays special features of IL-112 to India
http://in.rbth.com/economics/cooperatio ... dia_629463

Dmitry Rogozin, Russia’s Deputy Prime Minister introduced the technological features of the Il-112 aircraft to Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, he said, while he visited the Voronezh Aircraft Building Enterprise VASO."This plane is of interest for some of our foreign partners. I myself handed the prospect for specifications on the airframe to Prime Minister of India, Modi," Rogozin said.He stated that the aircraft can be made to suit both military and civilian specifications.Additionally, the Il-112 will have unique capabilities, including being able to land on the ground and on unequipped airfields, and being able to raise bulky loads.Rogozin said the terrain in India is mountainous and the country needs to support the military forces."They have showed a preliminary interest in that," said Rogoz

Bheeshma
BRFite
Posts: 592
Joined: 15 Aug 2016 22:01

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Bheeshma » 16 Sep 2016 01:18

Hasn't CASA 295 deal been announced? What role does Il-112 have? Lets talk about MTA first.

Indranil
Forum Moderator
Posts: 6876
Joined: 02 Apr 2010 01:21

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Indranil » 16 Sep 2016 01:43

IL-112 makes no sense now that 295 has been selected. India should say, I need to design and build turboprop passenger regional airliner back home. Sit down with TASL/HAL and if you can come with a good airliner based on the IL-112, let's talk. Otherwise, let us talk to Antonov.

MTA is gone. Forget it.

Prem
BRF Oldie
Posts: 20875
Joined: 01 Jul 1999 11:31
Location: Weighing and Waiting 8T Yconomy

Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Prem » 16 Sep 2016 10:31

http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-bu ... -big-17717
The U.S. Army Is Firing 100 Mile Range, 5,000 Mile Per Hour 'Big' Guns
( Will need few hundreds of these at Attari to greet our neighbor)

n Army Howitzer is now firing a 5,000-miles per hour, high-tech, electromagnetic Hyper Velocity Projectile, initially developed as a Navy weapon, an effort to fast-track increasing lethal and effective weapons to warzones and key strategic locations, Pentagon officials said.[ /b]Overall, the Pentagon is accelerating developmental testing of its high-tech, long-range Electro-Magnetic Rail Gun by expanding the platforms from which it might fire and potentially postponing an upcoming at-sea demonstration of the weapon, Pentagon and Navy officials told Scout Warrior. While initially conceived of and developed for the Navy's emerging Rail Gun Weapon, the Pentagon and Army are now firing the Hyper Velocity Projectile from an Army Howitzer in order to potential harness near-term weapons ability, increase the scope, lethality and range ability to accelerate combat deployment of the lethal, high-speed round.[b]Firing from an Army Howitzer, the rail gun hypervelocity projectile can fire a 5,000-mile and hour projectile at enemy targets to include buildings, force concentrations, weapons systems, drones, aircraft,vehicle bunkers and even incoming enemy missiles and artillery rounds. "We can defend against an incoming salvo with a bullet. That is very much a focus getting ready for the future," Dr. William Roper, Director of the Pentagon's once-secret Strategic Capabilities Office, told Scout Warrior among a small group of reporters. Roper further explained that firing the HVP out of a 155m Howitzer brings certain advantages, because the weapon's muzzle breach at the end of its cannon is able to catch some of the round's propellant - making the firing safer for Soldiers. "Its design traits were all based with dealing with extreme electromagnetic fields - that projectile could be fired out of an existing weapon system. Its whole role is to just keep the hot gas and propellant from rushing past. You dont want it eroded by the hot material," Roper explained. On the ocean, a HPV be fired against a floating target, in an effort to test the rail gun’s ability to destroy targets that are beyond-the-horizon much faster than existing long-range weapons, Navy officials said.The rail gun uses an electromagnetic current to fire a kinetic energy warhead up to 100 miles at speeds greater than 5,000 miles an hour, a speed at least three times as fast as existing weapons.The weapon’s range, which can fire guided, high-speed projectiles more than 100 miles, makes it suitable for cruise missile defense, ballistic missile defense and various kinds of surface warfare applications.
The railgun uses electrical energy to create a magnetic field and propel a kinetic energy projectile at Mach 7.5 toward a wide range of targets, such as enemy vehicles, or cruise and ballistic missiles.The weapon works when electrical power charges up a pulse-forming network. That pulse-forming network is made up of capacitors able to release very large amounts of energy in a very short period of time. The weapon releases a current on the order of 3 to 5 million amps --- that’s 1,200 volts released in a ten millisecond timeframe, experts have said. That is enough to accelerate a mass of approximately 45 pounds from zero to five thousand miles per hour in one one-hundredth of a second, Navy officials added at a briefing last Spring. Due to its ability to reach speeds of up to 5,600 miles per hour, the hypervelocity projectile is engineered as a kinetic energy warhead, meaning no explosives are necessary. The hyper velocity projectile can travel at speeds up to 2,000 meters per second, a speed which is about three times that of most existing weapons. The rate of fire is 10-rounds per minute, developers explained at last years' briefing.Due to its ability to reach speeds of up to 5,600 miles per hour, the hypervelocity projectile is engineered as a kinetic energy warhead, meaning no explosives are necessary. The hyper velocity projectile can travel at speeds up to 2,000 meters per second, a speed which is about three times that of most existing weapons. The rate of fire is 10-rounds per minute, developers explained at last years' briefing.A kinetic energy hypervelocity warhead also lowers the cost and the logistics burden of the weapon, they explained.Although it has the ability to intercept cruise missiles, the hypervelocity projectile can be stored in large numbers on ships. Unlike other larger missile systems designed for similar missions, the hypervelocity projectile costs only $25,000 per round. The railgun can draw its power from an onboard electrical system or large battery, Navy officials said. The system consists of five parts, including a launcher, energy storage system, a pulse-forming network, hypervelocity projectile and gun mount., the Navy is evaluating whether to mount its new Electromagnetic Rail Gun weapon from the high-tech DDG 1000 destroyer by the mid-2020s, service officials said.The DDG 1000’s Integrated Power System provides a large amount of on board electricity sufficient to accommodate the weapon, Navy developers have explained.The first of three planned DDG 1000 destroyers was christened in April of


Return to “Military Issues & History Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 28 guests