Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

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VinodTK
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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby VinodTK » 26 Nov 2015 15:28

India, US make progress on jet engine, aircraft career co-op
WASHINGTON: Ahead of defence minister Manohar Parrikar's maiden US visit next month, the two countries have made progress on their ambitious collaboration in the fields of jet engine and aircraft career technology, according to a Pentagon official.

The terms of reference for Jet Engine Technology Joint Working Group has been finalised and is likely to be signed next month, while the second meeting of the Joint Working Group on Aircraft Carrier Technology Cooperation (JWGACTC) has been slated for next February, a senior US defence department official told PTI.

During the 4th meeting of the India-US Defense Technology and Trade Initiative (DTTI) Group held at the Pentagon on November 17, officials of the two countries discussed the way ahead for the Jet Engine Technology Joint Working, which included exchanging strategies for government and industry cooperation.

Co-chaired by Frank Kendall, Undersecretary of Defence for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics, and by A K Gupta, Indian Secretary (Defence Production), the meeting reviewed progress on the six DTTI Pathfinder efforts announced in January by Prime Minister Narendra Modi and President Barack Obama.

These includes next Generation Cheel Mini Unmanned Aerial Vehicle; Roll-on/Roll-off Kits for C-130s; Mobile Electric Hybrid Power Sources (MEHPS), Next Generation Protective Ensemble (NGPE), Aircraft Carrier Technology Working Group and Jet Engine Technology Cooperation.

"(The meeting) presented new ideas for collaboration and promised to provide further details on each project proposal, as well as to assess their counterpart's suggestions for possible future joint projects," the official said.

During the meeting, Indian and US officials committed to executing the project plans for the two government-to- government pathfinder projects -- MEHPS and the NGPE.

They also agreed to expeditiously work to resolve remaining issues and complete the Engineer and Scientist Exchange Program (ESEP) Memorandum of Agreement so that the exchange of scientists can begin as soon as possible.

The Indian delegation also visited the Patuxent River Naval Station, Maryland and US Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Virginia where they toured facilities associated with the Jet Engine and Aircraft Carrier Pathfinder initiatives and received a briefing and demonstration from the Project Manager for MEHPS, respectively, the official said.

Expressing satisfaction with DTTI progress to date, India and US defence officials committed to continue to exchange ideas in the search for additional projects for possible co-development and co-production that meet the spirit of DTTI.

Kendall is now likely to visit India in February 2016 for the 5th DTTI Group meeting.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Will » 26 Nov 2015 16:46

If anyone thinks that the US is going to give India any core technologies with regards to jet engines they are living in dream land. This is just a ploy to derail Indian research and to suck us in and make us dependent on them for the engine for the AMCA. Better to go with the Europeans for the Jet engine for the AMCA. One will get more from them.
Last edited by Will on 26 Nov 2015 20:13, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby JTull » 26 Nov 2015 17:30

Why not get engine tech from Russia? The new Chinese 24 Su-35 deal for $2B is rumoured to also include the engine tech.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby srai » 26 Nov 2015 18:11

^^^

You mean the "reverse engineer" ToT ;)

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby JTull » 26 Nov 2015 18:17

srai wrote:^^^

You mean the "reverse engineer" ToT ;)


Personally, I think this deal is a cover to get advanced engine tech which is holding back all 5th Gen aircraft China is building.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Paul » 26 Nov 2015 22:13

The India and Japan will finalize the joint production agreement amphibious seaplane Shin Maywa US 2 during the upcoming visit of Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to India. This will be the first contract in the defense sector signed between the two countries.

The US 2, which is a search and rescue apparatus may also be employed as a surveillance and intelligence gathering device, will be produced in India. The amphibious seaplane will not only be confined to an Indian use, as it will be also offered for export.

The two countries are likely to expand their agreement to develop and produce other military systems.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Vipul » 28 Nov 2015 20:13

Apache, Chinook, Rafale deals got stuck due to UPA: Parrikar.


“In Apache and Chinook things were going in circle and circle and we had to break the mould. We had to break the mould in Rafale deal also. No decision would have come. One decision is already there, the second decision is very close. To initiate a process afresh is much easier than rectify the massive manipulations, mistakes and total chaos of the earlier regime. Correcting the flaws of earlier regime is taking time,” Parrikar said here today.


PHD Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PHDCCI), Parrikar said the revised Defence Procurement Procedure (DPP) 2015 is going to be a dynamic document with half-yearly revisions.

“I know the DPP 2015 has got delayed. It is now getting final touch-ups. This is a not a static document. Within six months of the issuance of document, we can improve up on it. It will be a dynamic document,” he said.


Parrikar added the new DPP will also focus on making the country’s small and medium enterprises (SMEs) financially viable in the defence sector. He said the SMEs can deliver more because the sector has more flexibility. The SMEs will be able to get easier access to finance and can draw advance against bank guarantees.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Singha » 28 Nov 2015 20:31

exactly. the J35 and J20 are stuck on older engine tech. the reverse engineer TOT will permit them some version of the AL41 engine and get them started using Rus current state of art suitably toned down a little...which will nicely fund the Rus 5th gen engine.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Prem » 17 Dec 2015 03:35

Experts worry that India is creating new fuel for an arsenal of H-bombs


Challakere, India —.Only after construction on the site began that year did it finally become clear that two secretive agencies were behind a project that experts say will be the subcontinent’s largest military-run complex of nuclear centrifuges, atomic research laboratories and weapons and aircraft testing facilities. Among the project's aims: to expand the government’s nuclear research, to produce fuel for India’s nuclear reactors, and to help power the country’s fleet of new submarines, one of which underwent sea trials in 2014.But another, more controversial ambition, according to retired Indian government officials and independent experts in London and Washington, is to give India an extra stockpile of enriched uranium fuel that could — if India so decides — be used in new hydrogen bombs (also known as thermonuclear weapons), substantially increasing the explosive force of those in its existing nuclear arsenal.Such a move would be regarded uneasily by India’s close neighbors, China and Pakistan, which experts say might respond by ratcheting up their own nuclear firepower. Pakistan in particular considers itself a fierce military rival, having been entangled in four major conflicts with India, as well as frequent border skirmishing.New Delhi has never published a detailed account of its nuclear arsenal, which it first developed in 1974. Until now, there has been little public notice, outside India, about the construction at Challakere and its strategic implications. The government has said little about it, and made no public promises about how the highly enriched uranium to be produced there will be used. As a military facility, it is not open to international inspection.

But a lengthy investigation by the Center for Public Integrity, including interviews with local residents, senior and retired Indian scientists and military officers connected to the nuclear program, and foreign experts and intelligence analysts, has pierced some of the secrecy surrounding the new facility, parts of which are set to open next year. It makes clear that it will give India a nuclear capability – the ability to make many large-yield nuclear arms – that most experts say it presently lacks.
China successfully tested a thermonuclear weapon — involving a two-stage explosion, typically producing a much larger force and far greater destruction than single-stage atomic bombs — as long ago as 1967, while India’s scientists claimed to have detonated a thermonuclear weapon in 1998. But test site preparations director K. Santhanam said in 2009 it had “fizzled,” rendering the number and type of such weapons in India’s arsenal uncertain to outsiders.
Finding authoritative information about the scope and objectives of these two massive construction projects is not easy. “Even for us, details of the Indian program are always sketchy, and hard facts thin on the ground,” a circumstance that leaves room for misunderstanding, a senior Obama administration official said in Washington.But Gary Samore, who served from 2009 to 2013 as the White House coordinator for arms control and weapons of mass destruction, said "I believe that India intends to build thermonuclear weapons as part of its strategic deterrent against China." Samore said it is unclear when India will realize this goal of a larger and more powerful arsenal, but “they will.”A former senior British official who worked on nuclear issues likewise said intelligence analysts on both sides of the Atlantic are “increasingly concerned” about India’s pursuit of thermonuclear weapons and “actively monitoring” both sites. U.S. officials in Washington said they shared this assessment. “Mysore is being constantly monitored, and we are constantly monitoring progress in Challakere,” a former White House official said.However, Western knowledge about India’s weapons are stored, transported and protected, and how the radiological and fissile material that fuels them is guarded and warehoused — the chain of custody — remains rudimentary.“Many other countries, including China, have worked with us to understand the ratings system and better their positions,” but India did not, the analyst said.
Spokesmen for the two organizations involved in the Challakere construction, the Defense Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), and the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), which has played a leading role in nuclear weapons design, declined comment about the government’s ambitions for the new park.Like the villagers nearby, key members of the Indian Parliament say they know little about the project. One veteran lawmaker, who has twice been a cabinet minister, said his colleagues are rarely briefed about nuclear weapons-related issues. “Frankly, we in Parliament discover little,” he said, “and what we do find out is normally from Western newspapers.” In an interview with Indian reporters in 2003, Jayanthi Natarajan, a former minister for environment and forests and past member of a parliamentary committee on defense and atomic energy matters, said that she and other members of Parliament had “tried time and again to raise [nuclear-related] issues … and have achieved precious little.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby John » 17 Dec 2015 04:55

Singha wrote:exactly. the J35 and J20 are stuck on older engine tech. the reverse engineer TOT will permit them some version of the AL41 engine and get them started using Rus current state of art suitably toned down a little...which will nicely fund the Rus 5th gen engine.


I hope you are not seriously believing that Chinese are miraculous reverse engineer Russian tech because they are good at it. As per leaks a lot of tech was given over to China in deals that under the table and have greatly enriched many Russian oligarchs including putin. While Sukhoi publicly critize China for reverse engineering in reality they are participating in it.

The amount of money Chinese have funneled to Russia and CIS far exceeds our arm sales by multiple factors, how less do you think Russians have been able to keep pace with west in spite of miniscule domestic budget (actual budget is smaller than reported).

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Singha » 17 Dec 2015 07:11

^^ I totally agree and I have on numerous occasions here said that this so called cloning is a sham for public display of displeasure by russia while taking money under table for TOT , professional help to better chinese designs and in some cases licensed manufacture of sub components. why else would stuff like the J-11 fielding all sorts of russi parts including the engine(!) be even possible. its just a more deeply sinicized flanker with more local manufacture of parts.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby srai » 17 Dec 2015 12:27

^^^

They also took in many former Soviet Union scientists and engineers when they were at their most desperate of times. Along with that they seem to be heavy into industrial espionage, emulating best practices of the West and pouring in funds (many more times than India) into the rapid growth of its MIC. The fruits of all of that are bearing now.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby pkudva » 17 Dec 2015 13:07

The Tech Absorption by China will also reflect when China starts getting the Delivaries of Su-35.

Though Russia has maintained a stance that since China Reverse Engineers its tech, no sensitive technology shall be sold but for Economic Purposes & maintaining a united front against U.S they do indulge in sensitive defence deals which may directly or indirectly have an impact on India.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby vishal » 18 Dec 2015 11:06

India Is Building a Top-Secret Nuclear City to Produce Thermonuclear Weapons

Excerpt: Only after construction on the site began that year did it finally become clear to the tribesmen and others that two secretive agencies were behind a project that experts say will be the subcontinent’s largest military-run complex of nuclear centrifuges, atomic-research laboratories, and weapons- and aircraft-testing facilities when it’s completed, probably sometime in 2017. Among the project’s aims: to expand the government’s nuclear research, to produce fuel for India’s nuclear reactors, and to help power the country’s fleet of new submarines.

But another, more controversial ambition, according to retired Indian government officials and independent experts in London and Washington, is to give India an extra stockpile of enriched uranium fuel that could be used in new hydrogen bombs, also known as thermonuclear weapons, substantially increasing the explosive force of those in its existing nuclear arsenal.
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The government has said little about it and made no public promises about how the highly enriched uranium to be produced there will be used. As a military facility, it is not open to international inspection.
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“I believe that India intends to build thermonuclear weapons as part of its strategic deterrent against China,” said Samore. It is unclear, he continued, when India will realize this goal of a larger and more powerful arsenal, but “they will.”
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Nonetheless, Environment Support Group lawyers acting for the villagers living close to Challakere eventually forced some important disclosures.
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The sensitivity of the Challakere project became clearer after the Environment Support Group legal team filed a lawsuit in 2012 at the High Court of Karnataka, demanding a complete accounting of pastureland being seized by the authorities — only to learn from the state land registry that local authorities had granted the Indian army 10,000 acres too, as the future home for a brigade of 2,500 soldiers. The State Reserve Police, an armed force, would receive 350 acres, and 500 acres more had been set aside for a commando training center. The nuclear city would, in short, be ringed by a security perimeter of thousands of military and paramilitary guards.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Kakkaji » 19 Dec 2015 09:26

Narendra Modi to ink $1-billion Russia chopper deal

The inter-government deal for procurement of 40 locally-assembled flyaway and 160 locally-manufactured Kamov Ka-226T helicopters also has scope for the the possibility of exports. Earlier in May, the Defence Acquisition Council approved the Ka-226T on a non-tender basis to meet the Reconnaissance and Surveillance Helicopter requirement of the Indian armed forces.

An agreement between Reliance Helicopters, Russian Helicopters and RosoboronExport, the official agency for defence exports of the Russian defence ministry, is already in place.

Reliance Helicopters will be the lead integrator for a licensed production arrangement with transfer of technology from Russia for the Ka-226T. A value addition of 30% will be provided for the first 40 helicopters for which an assembly plant will be set up, and 50% for the co-produced helicopters for which Reliance and its partners will set up a facility for component manufacturing and assembly of parts to include avionics, gearboxes, transmission and engine rotor blades.

Reliance Defence has taken possession last month of 86 acres to set up its assembly and components manufacturing facility at the Multi-modal International Cargo Hub at Nagpur Airport in Maharashtra. Reliance expects the first phase of its new facility to be ready by early 2017. It is located next to the recently-inaugurated Boeing-Air India MRO facility. Reliance is creating a 375-acre aerospace park at Nagpur Airport that will facilitate indigenous manufacturing of aerospace components by tier 1 and 2 companies under the government’s ‘Make in India’ programme.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Kakkaji » 26 Dec 2015 06:12

Paging Karan M and other Gurus: What do you think?

Defence ministry to change offsets policy; proposals worth $16 billion underway

Sources have told ET that the defence ministry has firmed up its futuristic offset policy to promote 'Make in India', technology transfer and skill development - the key focus areas of the government.

In the past, foreign companies winning major Indian military contracts were mandated to spend at least 30 per cent of the contract value. This would give the foreign players flexibility to choose any area to invest in, leaving little control on the kind of technology or capability transfer . With the new rules, set to be part of the Defence Procurement Policy 2016, the defence ministry and the armed forces buying the equipment will specify what they want as offsets for a particular deal. Three options will be available for the government under the new policy.

One would be a directed offsets plan in which the foreign vendor will be mandated to spend its 30 per cent investment share in a particular Make in India plan - to set up a defined manufacturing facility in India, be it a aircraft production line or a ballistic testing facility.

The second option would be transfer of technology - with a committee of the armed forces and defence ministry deciding what technology is needed. In this case, DRDO would be the custodian of the technology but the production agency - the private sector will be preferred - would be fully involved from the beginning.

The third option is for skill development - creation of R&D facilities, innovation centers, training institutions and labs - to raise a new generation of skilled workers for the defence and aerospace sector.

The stress on skill development makes perfect sense. Better skills would boost innovation and give rise to a spirit of enterprise. In tandem, we need a better institutional setup for tech revamp in the defence sector and beyond. We need close interaction between DRDO, industry and academe, and not just for technology and skill absorption.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby NRao » 26 Dec 2015 06:20

Water always finds its own level and players will work their way around any new requirements.

I just do not see a way around India investing in her own future. The main thrust has to come from there and not depend on *any* other source to provide this. Some help, gap fillers, etc is OK. One to expect, another to make it happen.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Indranil » 26 Dec 2015 22:51

Seems like NCAD is being born again (as a HAL project), and hopefully as a turboprop.

HAL to seek foreign partners for small passenger plane
State-owned aircraft maker Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL) will float a tender by March inviting global aircraft makers to partner it in the design and development of a 50-70 seat passenger plane to serve small cities across India.

HAL board had approved the decision to invite international bids to co-develop the aircraft, a person familiar with the development said. The project is estimated to cost Rs 7,000 crore for three prototypes and certification.

“There will be a requirement for 200 such aircraft in India in the next five years, T Suvarna Raju, chairman and managing director of HAL, had told reporters earlier.

The National Aerospace Laboratories (NAL) and HAL had jointly planned to set up a special purpose vehicle for a regional transport aircraft RTA-70 but this was later scrapped because of funding issues.

NAL had in 2007 settled on a design and selected a turboprop engine from Pratt & Whitney for the plane that did not take off from the drawing board. G Madhavan Nair, former chairman of the Indian Space Research Organisation, had headed a committee to identify local partners for the project. India has built trainers, planes and helicopters for the military, but its commercial aircraft programme is yet to find its feet.

Hansa, a two-seat passenger plane, has been a commercial flop, while Saras, a 14-seat passenger plane that was grounded after a crash killed three people on a test flight, were designed and built by NAl. In 2000, HAL had planned a joint venture with Franco-Italian aircraft maker ATR, now owned by Airbus, to make small planes in India but later aborted it.

HAL is expanding its footprint beyond making doors for Airbus passenger planes. “If a regional transport aircraft were to be economical, we may co-develop a futuristic engine, which is a green engine,” Suvarna Raju said.

HAL will also double the production of the home-grown light combat aircraft Tejas to 16 a year in anticipation of the 108-plane order for the Mk1 make. The expansion will cost the company Rs 2,100 crore, half of which will be borne by HAL and a quarter each by the navy and air force.

“The biggest weakness of the aerospace industry in India is the dependency on foreign engines. In the next 25 years, I see India having its indigenous aircraft with indigenous engines,” Suvarna Raju said.

HAL has sanctioned Rs 458 crore for the development of a turbofan engine that ran its first test on December 14. The design and development programme for an engine for small helicopters is also on.


Very similar report.
Global partners to design HAL commercial aircraft

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Zynda » 26 Dec 2015 23:19

indranilroy wrote:Seems like NCAD is being born again (as a HAL project), and hopefully as a turboprop.


The only good thing which happened with NCAD was ability for non-CSIR/DRDO/HAL experienced folks to be part of an indigenous development efforts albeit the employment terms were on contractual basis. I don't know if HAL is gonna go in that direction. Lets hope for the best.

It will be interesting to see which of the global partners will respond. One player which readily comes to my mind is Bombardier...they are in solely need of cash and have pretty good experience with platforms of this range.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Indranil » 27 Dec 2015 00:16

I am hopeful with Modi Sarkar.

NCAD had all the makings. It was headed by an empowered committee directly reporting to the PM. But, UPA-sarkars legendary could never take things forward. There were some dilly-dallying by NCAD team two. I don't understand why they want to build a Turbofan first!!!

Anyways, if HAL can be Embraer, and Modi sarkar be the nationist govt. like Brazil's in the 70s-80s, we can develop a good turbo-prop.

1. Bombardier is real option. SAAB is an option.
2. Another thing that I have often wondered is whether can HAL, Tata and Airbus can come together to come up with the civilian version of the C-295s. It is a win-win for all. Airbus always wanted it. Airbus can go into this with much lower risk (if Indian govt. pledges support). It can be the design consultant in design and certification. Tata gets to be Tier-1 supplier for major aerostructures. HAL gets to be lead designer and integrator. They could even rope in Indonesians for their experience with the N-250 series or just buy the design if IPTN is ready to sell them. Just build on that design and refine the same. The problem with all this is whether Airbus wants to build competition for the ATRs. But the same is true about Bombardier vis-a-vis their existing lines.
3. And then of course, if HAL is interested to build the MTA with the Illyushins, they can also consider the IL-112 variants.
4. Antonov is always is always knowing on the doors with the An-140s. I remember them approaching the Tata's for production in India.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Gyan » 27 Dec 2015 18:31

I think we must differentiate amoung four different programs which are often confused-mixed together. Though which program me, if any, will be sanctioned is a issue.

20 ton MTOW turboprop military aircraft like C-295/C-27 which would normally have loading ramp and rough field capability.

60-80 ton MTOW military aircraft like MRTA and C-130

50-70 seater ie 20 ton turboprop civilian aircraft which was referred as RTA earlier.

80-110 seater ie 50-60 ton MTOW turbofan civilian aircraft which was again referred to, as NCA earlier

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Indranil » 28 Dec 2015 06:26

I don't think that anybody is confused about that. But you see a civilian turboprop and a 20T turboprop for civilian use will have the same wing set up. So you can use the same aerostructures like wings, wing boxes, empennage, landing gear.

Some of the military transport planes are fatter to allow for wider cargo. This increases drag and is therefore not good for a civilian plane which is designed for maximum efficiency. Thankfully, the C295 is not fat. Its fuselage is shaped like a pear which maximizes floor area. Incidentally this also good for passenger plane. So, presumable, one can reuse the majority of the fuselage as well. They will have to remove with the rear ramp and extend the floor to accommodate more rows of seating.

Try to imagine what would be the differentiating factor for yet another regional turboprop?
1. Extremely low ingress and egress points, ideal for remote airports and airports in under developed countries
2. With the 295W, we have a rugged, yet efficient base.
3. It will be time-tested. A major selling point, unlike an ab-initio effort by India
4. Low development cost through reuse of major structures
5. Even if we can manage 50-odd orders, we will have the economies of scale and QC of a line which will be manufacturing at least 250-odd planes.


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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Austin » 29 Dec 2015 11:20

International figures say India no longer biggest arms importer; India’s own figures say still Number One

The authoritative Congressional Research Service (CRS), which provides data and analysis to the US Congress, finds that India no longer features in the world’s three biggest arms importers.

A new CRS report, according to The New York Times, finds that of the world’s total arms trade of $71.8 billion in 2014, the three biggest importers were South Korea ($7.8 billion in contracts signed), Iraq ($7.3 billion) and Brazil with $6.5 billion.

In March, the equally authoritative Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) had declared, in its annual weapons trade report for 2014, that Saudi Arabia had surpassed India as the world’s biggest arms importer. According to that report, Saudi Arabia imported $6.46 billion worth of arms, compared to India’s $5.57 billion.

This is not the only divergence in public figures relating to defence procurement, particularly that of India.

On December 8, the defence ministry told parliament that India had bought Rs 24,992 crore ($3.78 billion) worth of foreign weaponry in 2014-15. Ten days later, the same defence ministry told the same parliament that India had spent Rs 29,222 crore ($4.42 billion) on foreign arms in that same period.

There are several reasons for such divergent figures in tracking the weapons trade. First, some institutions track the signature of defence contracts in a particular year. On the other hand, others track the actual delivery of defence systems during that year.

For example, India signed a $2.1 billion contract with Boeing for eight P8-I multi-mission maritime aircraft in 2009-10. Agencies tracking arms contracts would have put that entire amount in India’s arms trade ledger for that year. Others, who track delivery, would spread the $2.1 billion across the six years till 2015, when the last P8-I was delivered.

There is also a reason for divergence in the defence ministry’s own figures. The figure placed before parliament on December 8 represents actual orders placed on foreign vendors during the year, and assumes orders placed on Indian vendors to be 100 per cent indigenous. The higher figure placed before parliament on December 18 tracks foreign components in “Indian” weapon systems, treating them as imports.

For example, the warship INS Kochi was built by Mazagon Dock Ltd, Mumbai (MDL) and is, technically, an indigenous system. But it contains numerous foreign systems, such as the Israeli MF-STAR radar. According to the Defence Procurement Procedure of 2013 (DPP-2013), the cost of foreign systems, sub-systems and components in “indigenous” platforms are treated as imports, along with the freight, insurance, service costs, license fees, royalties and duties relating to their import.

Calculating according to DPP-2013, the “indigenous content in defence procurements for the year 2014-15 is approximately 40 per cent”, the defence ministry informed parliament on December 18. Based on the total procurement outgo of Rs 78,754 crore ($11.9 billion) for 2014-15, an imported component of 60 per cent adds up to Rs 47,252 crore ($7.14 billion).

That outgo is only from the capital budget. In addition, a significant portion of imported spares and components comes from the revenue budget, which, after deducting salaries, amounts to Rs 46,905 for the three services. Conservatively assuming a foreign outgo of 20 per cent from that component of the revenue budget, another Rs 9,381 crore ($1.4 billion) is added to India’s defence imports.

India’s total defence imports, arrived at by adding Rs 47,252 crore ($ 7.14 billion) of imports from the capital account to Rs 9,381 crore ($1.4 billion) of imports from the revenue account, amounts to $8.54 billion for 2014-15.


This means going by either CRS’s calculations, or those of SIPRI, India remains for now the world’s biggest arms importer.

On the export side, the CRS report notes that America is handily the world’s biggest arms exporter. From $26.7 billion in 2013, the sale of US arms rose in 2014 by almost $10 billion (35 per cent) to $36.3 billion, more than half of the global $71.8 billion arms export market.

Russia is a distant second, logging $10.2 billion in arms sales in 2014. Sweden is in third position ($5.5 billion); France is fourth ($4.4 billion) and China is fifth ($2.2 billion).

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Gyan » 29 Dec 2015 20:43

Estimating 15% as minimum standard rate of bribes would mean that around Rs. 10,000 crore per annum Is generated as moolah from imports. No wonder MoD, DPSUs, OFB are never in hurry for import replacement or developing indigenous products or placing orders for arms already developed.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby arshyam » 04 Jan 2016 19:44

x-post from the Rafale thread.
So it's finally over:

India Confirms Order for IAF's Rafale Deal With France - New Indian Express

The Indian Air Force's quest for a Medium Multi Role Combat Aircraft (MMRCA) is finally over with the Indian government confirming the order for 36 Rafale jets with the French government.

According to sources, documents for the government-to-government deal were delivered by New Delhi to Paris on New Year's eve, and the agreement is on the same lines as that for the Mirage 2000 aircraft signed in the early 1980s. IAF will buy all the Rafale aircraft from Dassault, the French aircraft builder and integrator, in a flyaway condition.

As the deal is between governments, the French authorities will ensure that Dassault complies with the terms of reference as it has successfully done in the case of Mirage 2000 -- about 60 of which were delivered beginning 1985. The basic agreement was for 49 and 10 more were acquired later.

Significantly, this is the second deal for IAF - and Indian Army - within one week, the other being for Russian Kamov-31 helicopters signed on Christmas Eve with the Russian Government in Moscow during Prime Minister Narendra Modi's visit there. That deal involves substantial manufacture of these machines in India as the number is large -- more than 200.

It may be noted that originally IAF was to acquire 126 aircraft after the Rafale was selected in the MMRCA competition some time back, 18 in flyaway condition and 108 as progressively assembled and made in India by HAL under part Transfer of Technology (ToT). Private industry was to be involved, but HAL's share was negotiated as more than 70 percent.

There were a lot of hiccups, over costs of the aircraft -- over $100 million-plus per aircraft -- and offsets from the Indian side and responsibility over the quality of production in India from the French side. Finally, keeping in mind IAF's urgent requirements, the prime minister intervened to order 36 aircraft, or two squadrons, in a direct government-to-government deal during his visit to Paris in April.

This time, the deal involved no production in India but there were still some hiccups over the 50 percent stipulated offsets although aircraft costs would by and large have been the same as for the French Air Force (Armée de l'Air). Offset obligations would always be additional.

Modi, intervening again, spoke directly with French President Francois Hollande on telephone in early September, and expressed difficulty in concluding the deal without the offsets. Hollande graciously agreed, and IAF approved the deal in mid-December. The Ministry of Defence (MoD) delivered a copy of the Inter-Government Agreement in this regard through the established diplomatic channels just as the New Year was set to begin.

Under the deal, Dassault and its main partners -- engine-maker Safran and electronic systems-maker Thales -- will share some technology with DRDO (Defence Research and Development Organisation) and maybe some private sector companies and HAL under the offsets clause. Details are not known but as the aircraft have to be flown and maintained in India for at least three-to-four decades, a lot of information and technology upgrades will be needed to keep them operational.

The twin-engine Rafale combat jet is designed from the beginning as a multi-role fighter for air-to-air and air-to-ground attacks, is nuclear- capable and, thanks to its onboard Electronic Warfare (EW) systems, can also perform reconnaissance and radar jamming roles.

The deal involves delivery of aircraft to begin within three years of signing the agreement -- 2018-end in this case -- but French industry sources told this writer some time back in Paris that Dassault had started planning for the Indian order from mid-2015 itself, and "maybe the deliveries could be faster, if required".

Last year had been lucky for Dassault as the Rafale has also been selected by Egypt and Qatar, while the UAE is considering it seriously.

There are suddenly too many orders, and the only way to meet them is to divert the French Air Force requirements for the next few years. That is being done.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Prem » 06 Jan 2016 07:23

The Int'l Spectator
‏@intlspectator
BREAKING: South Korean officials believe it is 'very likely' that North Korea has conducted nuclear test

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby wig » 11 Jan 2016 09:05

http://www.tribuneindia.com/news/nation ... 82090.html
Defence council set to list purchase rules
Almost 20 months into its tenure, the Narendra Modi-led National Democratic Alliance government is set to change the all-important defence procurement procedure (DPP), the policy document for defence equipment purchases, local production and imports.
The amendments to the DPP-2013 are on the agenda of the Defence Acquisition Council (DAC) slated to meet in New Delhi on January 12, sources told The Tribune. Headed by Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar, the DAC is the apex decision making body on defence matters and its decision will need ratification from the Cabinet Committee on Security. The new DPP is likely to incorporate most recommendations made by the Dhirendra Singh-headed panel of experts, which gave its report in July. It will lay down benchmarks for selection of private strategic partners from among Indian or foreign firms.
The strategic partners are mandated to undertake design and development projects under the “Make in India” procedure. These firms will tie up with Indian private or public sector companies for making top-of-the-line military equipment.
The new procedure will address policy issues to attract investment, build local confidence and allow indigenous manufacturing. The DPP is likely to disallow any bans against equipment for misdeeds of company employees; will seek to appoint an ombudsman to remove subjectivity in deals and have a panel of experts on cost negotiations to prevent delays.
The DPP may set in clause to have the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) to do pre-audit of deals rather than raise objections later.
It will increase the level of indigenisation and the method of calculating the local content in each defence equipment and lay down the indigenous threshold for categories “buy Indian” and “buy & make Indian” at 40 per cent and 60 per cent, respectively.
A lower local content threshold could be considered by the DAC, based on technology and its availability. Globally, India is the largest buyer of weapons and military equipment, accounting for 15 per cent of all such international imports, said a report by Sweden-based think-tank Stockholm International Peace Research Institute in March. The DPP will also address the issue of banning firms. The misdeeds of an entity or its employees may not have any bearing on the equipment or system. This will ensure that the supply of equipment is not blocked in case a bribery charge emerges.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Kakkaji » 13 Jan 2016 00:49

Lot of details, hence posting in full:

New Defence Procurement Policy promises to make defense market more lucrative

The Defence Acquisition Council (DAC) on Monday cleared new clauses to the proposed Defence Procurement Policy (DPP). The most important takeaway is the increase in the offset baseline from Rs 300 crore to Rs 2,000 crore. However, even beyond that, the policy promises to make the defense market more lucrative for Indian industry.

Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar stressed that the new policy will ensure the modernisation of defence forces remains unaffected — least due to procedural intricacies. “Every word (of the DPP) had become a gate” to stall projects during the previous government, he alleged.

The new DPP has stressed reducing delays in procurements by eliminating repetitive procedures. It has also introduced certain clauses which allow procurements in case of single vendor situations with “proper justifications”. Interestingly, the government is also “ready” to pay up to 10 per cent extra for those products which are better than others. This will ensure that the armed forces — the end users– will benefit.

The DPP will also have a new category of Indigenously Designed Developed and Manufactured (IDMM) as the most preferred category for procurements. The three sub procedures under the “Make” category aim to boost domestic private and small scale industry.

Decisions on strategic partnerships, blacklisting and middlemen are still awaited though.

While the changes proposed will be implemented only after about two months, the practicalities/shortcomings of the new DPP will be visible only once it is implemented and contracts are executed under these guidelines. Industry, which was eagerly awaiting the new guidelines is so far welcoming of the changes. “The new category of Buy Indigenously Designed, Developed and Manufactured Equipment is ingenious. This changes everything. The impact will be far-reaching and will have cascading effect. This will change India from being a destination for low-cost manufacturing, to being a starting place for cutting-edge innovation; from being a consumer of out-dated equipment to being a producer of trail-blazing technology; from being the world’s largest importer to being a leader in export of defence equipment,” said Ashok Atluri, Managing Director, Zen Technologies.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Prem » 14 Jan 2016 07:32

http://www.tribuneindia.com/news/commen ... 82818.html
Strategic setback. It’s Israel, China buy-buy
(Lifafa warning / Cry Of Chandigarh lobby)

AFTER Russia breached the exclusivity in its military association with India, Israel may be the next in line despite Prime Minister Narendra Modi's unprecedented contacts for an Indian Prime Minister with the Jewish state. Modi had become the first Indian Prime Minister to hold a meeting under arclights with his Israeli counterpart Benjamin Netanyahu in New York besides holding an extended conversation with President Reuven Rivlin at Singapore strongman Lee Kuan Yew's funeral. To the accompaniment of a crescendo of approvals from the right corner of the Indian strategic community, Modi let it be known that he will become the first Indian Prime Minister to visit Jerusalem. The tour was going to be packaged with balancing-out stopovers in a couple of Muslim-majority countries.It may not longer be a mystery why neither External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj nor Modi could persuade themselves to visit Tel Aviv the whole of last year despite making an announcement to that effect (Ms. Swaraj will now visit Tel Aviv from January 17). Instead the Government opted to send President Pranab Mukherjee to the three destinations, including Israel. The reason lies in Israel's inability to resist Chinese overtures for its military equipment. Even as the right-wing corner of the Indian strategic community was hailing the upswing in ties with Tel Aviv and diplomats of both countries were burning the wires to prepare for the Modi visit, China was indulging in some quiet bargaining with Israeli defence manufacturers. As in the past, once military equipment is sold to China, it is a matter of time before Pakistan lays its hands on it. The recent inauguration of a top Israeli defence company's factory in China has negated some 15 years of spirited Indian diplomacy to thwart the two from defence cooperation that enters the realm of joint research and development. With active US help, the Atal Bihari Vajpayee Government had accomplished something very rare in the annals of international military trade. Israel was forced to return Chinese advance payment for high-end aircraft-mounted radars that spot planes in a 400-km radius, thus providing considerable advance warning for the air defence systems to get ready for action. Without resorting to this Government's penchant for high-end optics, the Vajpayee Government followed by the Manmohan Singh regime then quietly shaped a unique India-Israel-Russia partnership to get this technology for its armed forces.
For the record, Israel Aeropsace Industries (IAI) claims its upcoming factory in China will cater to the civilian sector. The ambitious Chinese plans to double the number of its civilian fleet and add about 60 airports within the next two decades may underscore the assertion. It is true that China-Israel military relationship is of older vintage than India's defence ties with Tel Aviv. . Israel is also said to be China's second biggest foreign supplier of military equipment. This statistic conceals Israel's huge gap with Russia, China's biggest supplier of equipment. It also does not tell the story of Israel developing military equipment for India not obtainable elsewhere in the world such as Barak ship-busting missiles, advanced men and equipment-detection radars and lethal aircraft-fired missiles.
he Chinese breakthrough in poaching companies exclusively equipping the Indian armed forces is the secondT strategic set back in the defence sphere during this Government's tenure. Russia had caused a flutter in the Indian strategic community when six months into the Modi Government, its Defence Minister went to Islamabad and met Pakistan's leadership. TAs a follow up of the first contract for four Mi-35s, Russia has promised to supply Pakistan with at least 20 more pieces. These have the potential to even out the overhead advantage enjoyed by Indian tank formations in the event of a thrust into Pakistan.Apart from India, Russia had so far supplied these helicopters to Brazil, Venezuela and Azerbaijan. None of them is likely to turn over the technology to Pakistan till the present Government's inordinate proximity to the US led Russia to redraw its strategic game plan for military cooperation in South Asia. :-?
Now Israel seems unable to resist Chinese overtures for its military technology. Apart from Modi's top-level meetings, India abstained from a recent UN vote on the Israel's strong arm tactics in Gaza, the first time ever. The first visit by an Israeli Defence Minister to India also took place under his watch. Modi also did the unprecedented for an Indian Prime Minister to keep Israel happy. He got himself photographed while standing next to the booth of an Israeli company at the Indian defence expo last year. His spin managers billed it was a public display of Israel and India's strategic relationship. That solid and quiet diplomacy and agile political footwork is no match for ploys such as these has become painfully apparent after the same company, IAI, now breaks bread with the Chinese. China in the past could not persuade four visiting Israeli Presidents and three Prime Ministers to go the whole hog in defence equipment transfers. Modi's simplistic approach to international relations may have unravelled India's previous efforts to prevent exactly that.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Singha » 14 Jan 2016 07:40

ultimately all are after money.

the only long term solution is domestic production of everything vital and high end. there is no way to "placate" everyone at all times without a dollar printing machine which only gotus has.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Paul » 14 Jan 2016 08:37

Amen....

Israel stopped selling its wares like the Phalcon to China under US pressure, India did not have anything to do with that. They have been providing arms to Pakistan discreetly as well. They sold the Radar and blueprint for the Lavi to China which has morphed into the J-10. So the pipeline was flourishing long before we came into the picture. Question is, if Israel is reviving the arms sales process, is it happening with US blessings.

The USSR sold Mi-4 helos and 130 mm guns to Pakistan as early as 1969...Hope Philip read this

India has done well to move away from Russia over the years and also keep good relations with the Arab world. However it is time Modi reached out to Oman and other wellswishers of India in ME. Sisi came to India recently...we should reciprocate the gesture.
Last edited by Paul on 14 Jan 2016 08:42, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Paul » 14 Jan 2016 08:40

I also notice that Indian RWs on SM go overboard in hailing ties with Israel....they need to come down to Earth and understand the hard realities of life.

There is no reason for us to go pick a fight with Shias when our rivals in the subcontinent are the Sunni school of thought.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Prem » 14 Jan 2016 09:51

Paul wrote:Amen....
India has done well to move away from Russia over the years and also keep good relations with the Arab world. However it is time Modi reached out to Oman and other wellswishers of India in ME. Sisi came to India recently...we should reciprocate the gesture.


Seems both Vietnam and India are moving away from buying Russian arms . China is one time buyer, adept in the art of RE multiplier. There is no other major customer left for Russia to sell beside these two.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby uddu » 14 Jan 2016 10:23

We must be providing an alternative to Vietnam in terms of arms supply. Let's not push Vietnam into the hands of western nations. I think even Russians will be comfortable with Vietnam purchasing Indian weapons.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby sum » 14 Jan 2016 10:32

China in the past could not persuade four visiting Israeli Presidents and three Prime Ministers to go the whole hog in defence equipment transfers. Modi's simplistic approach to international relations may have unravelled India's previous efforts to prevent exactly that.

Riiight.

1 year of a particular Indian govt caused Israel to suddenly turn to China and become best buddies. Wonder what passes of as strategic analysis in this country!

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby kit » 14 Jan 2016 10:41

More than India the US should be concerned at an extensive engagement by Israel in China ..

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Austin » 14 Jan 2016 10:53

Looks like BiBi is giving Obama some strong pain there :lol:

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby chetak » 14 Jan 2016 11:03

sum wrote:
China in the past could not persuade four visiting Israeli Presidents and three Prime Ministers to go the whole hog in defence equipment transfers. Modi's simplistic approach to international relations may have unravelled India's previous efforts to prevent exactly that.

Riiight.

1 year of a particular Indian govt caused Israel to suddenly turn to China and become best buddies. Wonder what passes of as strategic analysis in this country!


they have been at it for a long long time now. they have no scruples or conscience as far as business is concerned and that is how it should be.

There are no free lunches, especially not israeli ones.

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Re: Military Acquisitions, Partnerships & Developments

Postby Kakkaji » 18 Jan 2016 04:42

India and France to focus on Rafale deal, more defence projects in pipeline during François Hollande’s visit

NEW DELHI: While much attention has been on the mega Rafale fighter aircraft contract, India and France are likely to focus on several defence projects during French President Francois Hollande's visit for the Republic Day celebrations, including the possibility of extending the Scorpene submarine line with additional orders.

"We may look at an addition of two more submarines, but with an enhanced capability of staying underwater for longer. This would also help retain the skilled manpower that MDL has raised over the years by working on the Scorpene submarines," a senior Navy officer told ET.


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