International Aerospace Discussion

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Austin
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Austin » 15 Jun 2012 22:04

B-2 is a strategic bomber so i dont expect B-2 volume will be similar in size/volume but the concept for bomber cockpit like Side seating arrangement and it certainly has the most spacious cockpit in flanker series.

Interesting , so the B-2 cockpit uses Blue-Green ( Teel ) colour in the background of the instrument famously found on Russian military and civil aircraft ?

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby ArmenT » 17 Jun 2012 11:09

Both cockpits look a bit cramped, especially the B-2 which doesn't seem to have any space between the seat and the various controls on the side. Which is funny, because I read in various places that both aircraft have toilet facilities + a small galley in the back to prepare hot meals. I wonder how the pilots leave their seats then? Is the B-2 cockpit photo that of a simulator?

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Singha » 17 Jun 2012 16:02

I think the seats slide back. same scene in most commercial a/c as well.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Kartik » 20 Jun 2012 22:11

Updates on the Gripen E/F by Bill Sweetman.

link to article

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby AdityaM » 22 Jun 2012 02:52

Special Ops Commander Sacked After Tiltrotor Crash

An early version of the V-22, which takes off and lands like a helicopter but cruises like an airplane, crashed four times during testing between 1991 and 2000, killing 30 people. Since entering frontline service in 2009, three of the Air Force’s roughly 20 V-22s have been destroyed or badly damaged in accidents, at the cost of four lives. Likewise, in the last 10 years the Marines’ fleet of some 200 Ospreys has suffered around a dozen major accidents resulting in several destroyed aircraft and no fewer than three deaths.
The Marines, who tout the Osprey as their “safest tactical rotorcraft,” have used semantic games and fudged statistics to obscure the V-22′s true safety record.


from internal link:
It’s an aircraft with a reputation for falling from the sky. But on at least one occasion, the U.S. military’s controversial V-22 Osprey tiltrotor — a hybrid transport that takes off like a helicopter and cruises like an airplane, thanks to its rotating engine nacelles — did just the opposite. It flew upward, out of control of its pilots.

Yet the Marines and the Naval Safety Center ultimately decided that the Osprey’s dangerous joyride didn’t count as a serious flying accident, known in Pentagon parlance as a “Class A flight mishap.” The reason, said Capt. Brian Block, a Marine spokesman: The aircraft wasn’t supposed to take off just then; therefore, it’s not a flight problem. :mrgreen: If a V-22 suffers damage while preparing to launch or after landing, or if the crew does not explicitly command the aircraft to take off but it does anyways, then the accident doesn’t count as a flight accident. :lol:


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Austin » 26 Jun 2012 22:07

MBDA completes Meteor test campaign, launches production

MBDA is satisfied with the results of its recently-completed live firing campaign with the Meteor beyond visual-range air-to-air missile (BVRAAM), and will deliver its first production rounds before year-end, says Andy Bradford, the company's chief engineer and head of the project.

Three electronic protection measures firings conducted at the Aberporth test range off the west Wales coast earlier this year from Panavia Tornado F2 trials aircraft resulted in direct hits on Selex Galileo Mirach target drones, Bradford says, despite their use of jamming equipment and chaff.

In all, 21 Meteor missiles fitted with telemetry equipment were fired during a development and test campaign conducted for lead customer the UK and its partner nations France, Germany, Italy, Spain and Sweden.

"The firing campaign has given us very good results, and good performance," Bradford said at MBDA's Stevenage site in Hertfordshire on 26 June. "Meteor does what it is meant to do."

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Austin » 27 Jun 2012 16:11

A good over view on Yak-130 project

Yak-130: New Russia’s Most Successful Aircraft

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Victor » 28 Jun 2012 09:50

These photos give us one indication of how Embraer succeeded in carving out a dominant niche for itself in the global feeder airliner business.
Image
On the left is the Embraer-FMA Vector developed in partnership with Argentina which flew in 1990. It bears an uncanny resemblance to our NAL Saras which flew in 2004. When this design proved too expensive in relation to the market for it, Embraer built on the expertise gained and modified the design with jets instead of turboprops, giving birth to the the ERJ135 on the right. This was followed up with a stretch version, the ERJ145. Both were successful and we ended up ordering the former for transport and the latter for AEW/AWACS roles.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Austin » 28 Jun 2012 14:38


Kartik
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Kartik » 30 Jun 2012 00:04

Very nicely written article on the Yak-130 by Peter Collins, who has test flown other airplanes as well for Flight Global.

Yak-130 Flight Test- FlightGlobal exclusive

Image
Last edited by Kartik on 30 Jun 2012 00:06, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Kartik » 30 Jun 2012 00:05

Russian Aerospace- Russian Helicopters article on FlightGlobal

FlightGlobal Russian Helicopters article

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Austin » 04 Jul 2012 23:55


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby negi » 05 Jul 2012 00:58

That writeup on YAK-130 is excellent. Thanks for posting Kartik.

Following caught my eye

In both modes, the Yak-130 features anti-spin protection. We climbed rapidly to 10,000m and with all FBW limiters off, I entered into a two-turn spin to the left from a level entry. The spin mode was very stable in both the pitch and yaw axis and had a moderately low yaw rate. Recovery was instantaneous when I centralised the rudder and pushed the stick forward to around neutral. Pulling out with 4g, I levelled at 6,000m. This was the first time I had ever spun a FBW jet and it felt like a very impressive capability.


So that clearly shows that an unstable design with FBW controls can be put into spin and recovered manually.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Austin » 05 Jul 2012 10:11

Perhaps with Yak-130 you could do that which is a trainer aircraft and you need to teach young pilots the joy of putting in spin for other FBW combat fighter aircraft it may not allow you to put FBW limiters off.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby PratikDas » 06 Jul 2012 01:33

Also, is switching off FBW limiters the same as switching off FBW? I think not. I think by switching the limiters off the pilot is allowed to push the aircraft into a region of the flight envelope undefined in the FBW control laws, in which case he's on his own. However, the moment the pilot brings the aircraft back into the defined region of the flight envelope, the FBW should take over for what the author describes as an "instantaneous" recovery.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Austin » 07 Jul 2012 11:54

I think going beyond limiters set by FBW may not be as risky as it sounds , most likely the test pilots would have tried most of beyond FBW limit manouvering/AOA etc its more of mental block for pilots , where they would know they are not within the comfort of software FBW and needs to be more alert when they switch off delimiters but it would allow them to explore beyond the set limits and make them better pilots.

After all in good old days before FBW pilots used to still fly without the comfort of having a safe limiter.


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Aditya_V » 07 Jul 2012 14:49

Is it April fools day. Russians as aggressors would fit the bill.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Surya » 07 Jul 2012 18:51

teach young pilots the joy of putting in spin



Joy!!!

If the vomit incidents are any indication -- its no joy :)

just something that has to be mastered along with your fear

more so if you have a nasty instructor

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Singha » 07 Jul 2012 19:46

they should bring atleast a couple stripped down built for the race SU35BM and see what it can do against the aggressor F16s...

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby shiv » 08 Jul 2012 07:07

negi wrote:That writeup on YAK-130 is excellent. Thanks for posting Kartik.

Following caught my eye

In both modes, the Yak-130 features anti-spin protection. We climbed rapidly to 10,000m and with all FBW limiters off, I entered into a two-turn spin to the left from a level entry. The spin mode was very stable in both the pitch and yaw axis and had a moderately low yaw rate. Recovery was instantaneous when I centralised the rudder and pushed the stick forward to around neutral. Pulling out with 4g, I levelled at 6,000m. This was the first time I had ever spun a FBW jet and it felt like a very impressive capability.


So that clearly shows that an unstable design with FBW controls can be put into spin and recovered manually.


Negi does it say anywhere in the article that the Yak 130 has an unstable design? Stable aircraft (such as airliners and trainers) can have FBW. In the case of trainers the FBW is useful both to prevent the trainee pilot from exceeding limits as well as to use software based changes in aircraft handling behaviour to mimic other aircraft.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby SaiK » 08 Jul 2012 09:33


Going by the lower end of the MKI spectrum, anything that bit tiny positive score for the Russians mean MKI is sitting way high, and if we had not given out on many of the agreed protocols on our earlier visit.

popcorn, peanuts and beer time ahead!

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Singha » 08 Jul 2012 16:00

old video of U2 landing demos on carriers
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L8HMPMYL ... re=related

this was perhaps tried as a means of emergency recovery

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Austin » 08 Jul 2012 16:54

Quite good for this huge wing span bird to land on carriers ,I read landing U-2 was always a risky affair and needed great skills landing on carriers would have been far more riskier.

I always thought we should have gone for M-55 in 90 , could have flown high above and deep inside Pakistani Air Space and mapped out the entire area and military target and there was nothing then and now that could have reached the M-55 , it avoids the risk of sonic boom that Mig-25 always gave in when it flew over Islamabad.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Singha » 08 Jul 2012 19:46

the U2 had inline wheels nose and back , with two outrigger wheels near midwing which were jettisoned after takeoff to save weight as it started its long slow climb to 70,000ft.
on landing it landed using the inline wheels only and as the speed slowed I think the long wings would droop and gently scrape the runway before the a/c came to a halt.

must be a true dog to try landing during high wind conditions....

---
Instead of the typical tricycle landing gear, the U-2 uses a bicycle configuration with a forward set of main wheels located just behind the cockpit, and a rear set of main wheels located behind the engine. The rear wheels are coupled to the rudder to provide steering during taxiing. To maintain balance while taxiing, two auxiliary wheels, called "pogos" are added for takeoff. These fit into sockets underneath each wing at about mid-span, and fall off during takeoff. To protect the wings during landing, each wingtip has a titanium skid. After the U-2 comes to a halt, the ground crew re-installs the pogos one wing at a time, then the aircraft taxis to parking

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Singha » 08 Jul 2012 19:53

m55 good on paper but in public domain never had a recon role in host country(USSR collapse). not sure if Rus operates any .
it would be a dog to maintain esp if it has a unique engine...aviadigital PS30v12

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Kartik » 08 Jul 2012 21:21

Singha wrote:the U2 had inline wheels nose and back , with two outrigger wheels near midwing which were jettisoned after takeoff to save weight as it started its long slow climb to 70,000ft.
on landing it landed using the inline wheels only and as the speed slowed I think the long wings would droop and gently scrape the runway before the a/c came to a halt.

must be a true dog to try landing during high wind conditions....

---
Instead of the typical tricycle landing gear, the U-2 uses a bicycle configuration with a forward set of main wheels located just behind the cockpit, and a rear set of main wheels located behind the engine. The rear wheels are coupled to the rudder to provide steering during taxiing. To maintain balance while taxiing, two auxiliary wheels, called "pogos" are added for takeoff. These fit into sockets underneath each wing at about mid-span, and fall off during takeoff. To protect the wings during landing, each wingtip has a titanium skid. After the U-2 comes to a halt, the ground crew re-installs the pogos one wing at a time, then the aircraft taxis to parking


I heard on radio, where a U2 pilot described how difficult it is to land the U2; mostly because the frontal view is restricted and the U2 is designed to want to fly, with long wings that generate a lot of lift. The U2 would just not want to land and at least a couple of bounces were common for each landing. A chase car driver would need to keep giving instructions to the pilot to aid him in landing it.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Austin » 08 Jul 2012 22:15

IN FOCUS: German Eurofighters impress during Red Flag debut


Grune says that the Raptor's advantage lies in its stealth and ability to dominate air-to-air fights from beyond visual range. That is not disputed by USAF sources.

"Its unique capabilities are overwhelming from our first impressions in terms of modern air combat," Pfeiffer says. "But once you get to the merge, which is only a very small spectrum of air combat, in that area the Typhoon doesn't have to fear the F-22 in all aspects."

The Typhoons were stripped of their external fuel tanks and slicked off as much as possible before the encounter with the Raptors, says Grune, who adds that in that configuration, the Typhoon is an "animal".

Pfeiffer notes that the Eurofighter has better acceleration and can out-climb the F-22. ­Additionally, he says that the Raptor sinks when it is using its thrust vectoring capabilities, although one USAF source says he is skeptical of the German claims.

Overall, Grune says the two aircraft are closely matched in the visual range arena, but Pfeiffer says the Typhoon is the superior ­dogfighter.


While Grune does not directly say that the Eurofighters emerged as the overall victors, he strongly implies it.

"I put out some whiskey. If they come back with some good performances, and if you know what the goal is from a BFM setup, and you achieve that, then I will pay you whiskey," he says. "And I paid quite a lot of whiskey."

That account, however, is strongly disputed by USAF sources flying the F-22. "It sounds as though we have very different recollections as to the outcomes of the BFM engagements that were fought," one Raptor pilot says.

USAF sources say that the Typhoon has good energy and a pretty good first turn, but that they were able to outmanoeuvre the Germans due to the Raptor's thrust vectoring. Additionally, the Typhoon was not able to match the high angle of attack capability of the F-22. "We ended up with numerous gunshots," another USAF pilot says.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Singha » 08 Jul 2012 22:34

while these two bull-headed knights duel in the hallway on a matter of honor on who is best with the saber, the crafty cat rafale will sneak in, set fire to the arsenal, loot the royal treasury and kiss and elope with the kings wife.... :mrgreen:

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby adityadange » 09 Jul 2012 10:26

Anatomy of a goof-up: How an Indian Army chopper landed in Pakistan

dont know if this is the right thread to post this. The headline itself is pathetic. Why should one think skardu is in pakistan? all J&K is indian and pakistan has invaded it. They should at least mention Anatomy of a goof-up: How an Indian Army chopper landed in POK.
i could not see the video due to firewall settings though.


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Prem » 10 Jul 2012 01:11

http://news.yahoo.com/sikorsky-eyes-for ... nance.html
Sikorsky eyes foreign deals to offset U.S. drop
.....FARNBOROUGH, England (Reuters) - Sikorsky Aircraft, the helicopter maker owned by United Technologies Corp , on Sunday said it has a large backlog of international orders and sees good opportunities for growth in countries like Brazil, India, Turkey, China and Mexico."We're going to be fairly flat for the next couple of years and then it will start to pick up again as some of the international military market starts to kick in for us," he told Reuters in an interview on the eve of the Farnborough Airshow.Sikorsky was on track to finalize an eighth multi-year procurement contract to deliver different models of its popular Black Hawk helicopter to the U.S. Army, Navy and Air Force -- an important deal that should help facilitate several additional foreign sales, Maurer said.He said the company had several large orders in hand from Australia, Taiwan and Saudi Arabia, among others, but those deliveries were not slated to begin until 2014.Maurer said the parent company, which is selling several other units, remained committed to Sikorsky, despite the anticipated slowdown in U.S. defense spending, and there were no current plans to sell the helicopter maker.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Austin » 10 Jul 2012 23:18

This one is going to be one great BVR missile , read it in full

There’s No Escaping MBDA’s Meteor Missile

Operational analysis conducted by the company suggests that a fighter firing the Meteor is six to eight times more likely to survive an air-to-air engagement against a representative threat than one equipped with a currently available medium-range AAM.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Austin » 11 Jul 2012 10:29

Fully Operational Yak-130 Makes International Debut At Farnborough Show

Read the whole article its informative but some synopsis


Highly Agile

Although subsonic (Mach 0.93), the Yak-130 is highly agile (with an angle of attack up to 35 degrees) and maneuverable (up to +8g). It can climb to 30,000 feet in three minutes.

A high power-to-weight ratio (0.7) and advanced aerodynamic configuration with moderately swept wings smoothly blended into large fuselage root extensions allow the Yak-130 to have more than a 200-fps climb rate at 15,000 feet. This enables its use as interceptor armed with Vympel R-73E infrared air-to-air missiles, for which the pilots can designate targets using helmet-mounted sights.



Ground-attack Variant

Now Yakovlev is also working on a dedicated ground-attack variant of the Yak-130. It will differ from the baseline combat trainer in having a larger nose housing a multifunctional radar, an armor-protected pilot cockpit for one crew member instead of two and higher-power engines each developing 6,173 pounds of thrust compared to 5,511 pounds for the current production Ivchenko-Progress AI222-25.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby Austin » 13 Jul 2012 11:59

New Ka-62 has all touch screen cockpit , even the traditional overhead knobs and switches has been replaced by touch screen...interesting concept

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e4pRiESrPgo

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby srai » 13 Jul 2012 23:55

http://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/ ... rough-show

^^^

For those constantly griping about the delays in the LCA program, Yak-130 attained its FOC only last year. This means it took almost 25 years (late 1980s till 2011) to complete R&D.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby member_22539 » 14 Jul 2012 07:24

^^This is blasphemous, how dare you compare the white man to the brown man! When white man takes 25 years, it is to improve and perfect the design to the best possible extent, but when the brown man does it, it is because he is incompetent. See the difference?

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby member_23626 » 14 Jul 2012 07:25

Arun Menon wrote:^^This is blasphemous, how dare you compare the white man to the brown man! When white man takes 25 years, it is to improve and perfect the design to the best possible extent, but when the brown man does it, it is because he is incompetent. See the difference?

+ 10000 :rotfl:

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby SaiK » 14 Jul 2012 07:33

MWTW (more whiter than whites) of DDM actually are the 99% of blasphemous people on the planet.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion

Postby NRao » 17 Jul 2012 21:56

Aviastar Sends First Il-76MD-90A Plane for Tests

ULYANOVSK. July 5 (RIA Novosti)

Russia's Aviastar aircraft plant has completed the first flying prototype of the Ilyushin Il-76MD-90A transport aircraft and sent it off for test-flights, the plant's general director, Sergei Dementyev, said on Thursday.

The plant has built two of the modernized aircraft, he said.

"The first one can only partly be called a plane - it is a testbed we sent to TsAGI (the central aerodynamics institute) in Moscow last year. Today, we completed the second. In addition we have also started building three production-standard aircraft. Assembly of the first of these three production planes will start in August," he said.

The factory plans to build 16 of the aircraft per year by 2016, for which the plant will take on an additional 5,000 staff he said.

The Russian Defense Ministry has a stated requirement in its rearmament plan for 90 of the modernized transport aircraft, he said, but no company contract has yet been signed. Aviastar foresees a total production run of around 190 aircraft, with likely civilian customers including Russian cargo airlines Volga-Dnepr and Polet, as well as possible exports to China, India and Israel.

The new aircraft is fitted with the PS-90A turbofan in place of the older D-30 engine, increasing the aircraft's speed, range, and cargo capacity, which is up from 52 to 60 tons. The modernized Il-76MD090A, also known as the Il-476, also has new cockpit avionics allowing a smaller flight crew.

"It's a completely new plane," said Chief Designer Sergei Urasov, "which completely differs from its predecessor in terms of systems."

The Soviet Union produced hundreds of early model Il-76s at its Tashkent factory in Uzbekistan in the 1970s and 1980s. The Il-76 is capable of landing on rough strips and carrying large cargos, and remains popular with outsize cargo airlines and many air forces across the world.


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