Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby VinayG » 16 Nov 2011 03:01

sawant wrote:just wondering.. no stabilizing fins on the missile ? how does it correct its path then...


Like all ballistic missiles, example the old Polaris missiles and the current Trident missiles use internal gyros for stability in flight. so Agni dosent need any stabilizing fins on the missile

more detailed information about missiles

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/ ... 10_ch9.pdf

How Things Work: Ring Laser Gyros


http://www.airspacemag.com/flight-today ... c=y&page=1

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby Vipul » 16 Nov 2011 03:53

Indigenous technologies played a big role.

In the successful flight of Agni-IV on Tuesday, what stands out is the flawless performance of a range of new indigenous technologies developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), and according to technologists in the organisation, they represent a quantum jump in the nation's missile technology prowess.The triumph caps three successful flights of Shourya, Prithvi and Agni-II missiles conducted in September last week and has boosted the DRDO's confidence to go in for the Agni-V's maiden flight in a couple of months.

V.K. Saraswat, Scientific Adviser to the Defence Minister, said, “The technologies proven in this mission will give us the necessary confidence to go in for the Agni-V launch [with a range of 5,000 km] in a couple of months.” The DRDO did not use any satellite during Agni-IV's flight. Agni-IV, earlier named Agni-II Prime, flew more than 3,000 km on Tuesday from the Wheeler Island, off the Odisha coast.

The spectrum of new technologies incorporated in the Agni-IV mission included fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) or composite casing for the second stage, ring-laser gyros for inertial navigation system (RINS), micro-navigation system (MINGS) as redundancy to improve the vehicle's reliability, a powerful onboard computer system, a multi-channel communication system and advanced avionics. The FRP reduced the missile's weight, enabling it to carry more propellants and to have a better range than Agni-II's 2,000 km.

Dr. Saraswat praised Gundra Satheesh Reddy, Associate Director, Research Centre, Imarat (RCI), Hyderabad, and his team for developing the RINS, MINGS and onboard avionics, all of which made it “a fantastic flight.”

“Today, we have a missile which is lighter in weight, highly accelerating, manoeuvrable and unmatched. This missile incorporated the type of redundancies seen in manned missions, providing for robustness and reliability,” Dr. Saraswat said.

The other important technologies that contributed to the Agni-IV's success were better stage separation systems, efficient propulsion, high-energy solid propellants and powerful batteries.

Avinash Chander, Chief Controller (Missiles and Strategic Systems), DRDO, and V.G. Sekaran, Director, Advanced Systems Laboratory, Hyderabad, were sure that the new technologies contributed to the Agni-IV's triumph. The missile was road-mobile (it can be launched from a specially designed truck), “which is state-of-the-art for this class of missile,” they said.

The Agni-IV Project Director was Tessy Thomas.

Dr. Saraswat attacked the technology denial regimes that worked against the DRDO developing these technologies. He said, “All the technology denial regimes that worked against the development of these systems were combated by the DRDO by its developing new materials, composite casting for second stage, the RINS and high-speed processing system for the guidance. The terminal accuracy achieved shows the DRDO's strength in the development of long-range missiles. The mission demonstrates that the Indian missile technologists are in a position to handle technologically and managerially complex missions. India has come of age and developed world-class technologies. Technology-denial regimes cannot deter a motivated country like India to achieve self-reliance.”

Mr. Reddy said the indigenous RINS and MINGS, complementing each other in a redundant mode, were proven in this flight. “We used a powerful onboard computer system with distributed avionics structure and a multi-channel, highly reliable communication system, which controlled and guided the missile accurately to the target.”

Dr. Sekaran said the new navigation system was basically software-intensive with a lot of built-in logic and redundancy, which provided the missile's reliability. “These are state-of-the-art systems and some of these new technologies will go into India's new missile systems, including the making of Agni-V.”

Dr. Sekaran called Agni-IV “a good, user-friendly weapon for the Army.” For, it could be integrated quickly and transported on road. In Mr. Chander's assessment, the new technologies would lead to freedom of operation for the Army.

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby SaiK » 16 Nov 2011 04:46

vinay g, good points to sawant, but I think providing how the RLGs alone help in guiding the missile still leaves half answers. The thought he and others have is removing the fins, mean there should be equivalent thrust based/air foil(drag) based guidance. The RLGs is thought of helping those precision guidance mechanism.

So, the question would be in place of the fin, what does the "gyro's measurement inputs" feeds into a device that takes the corrective path change?

This layman's mind only understands that RLGs are precision measurement onlee.. somewhere there needs to be drag/thrust that needs to guide the missile to the target.

tia

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby svinayak » 16 Nov 2011 05:46

D Roy wrote:Chicom will probably back off now. whether 20 or 125, the kind of accuracy being talked about should deter those within range. But for full deterrence an IGNSS ( with G for global) is required. See what a GPS really does is to correct the accumulated errors of the INS and once you have global coverage this whole 1 MT versus phooljhari debate becomes meaningless.

How significant is the 1MT size.
Most of the target in PRC will be the underground tunnels and infrastructure. With high accuracy these can be disabled.

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby tsarkar » 16 Nov 2011 06:19

Neela wrote:does this mean that radars from Odisha coast can track a falling motor stage almost 2000+ km away?
Multiple sensors on missile transmit telemetry data that is processed, fused and displayed at ground.

The parabolic display is just an "all is well" type dashboard, the real use of the data is for the many scientists and engineers who use it to monitor the health and performance of the various subsystems and the integrated missile.

Decades back, in my BE final year project, my team had developed a system with multiple "high" temperature sensors, a radio transmitter to send the data back, receivers to receive the data and algorithms to process the data. We had component failures, but the overall integration was highly successful. We tested it by heating multiple metal plates with an acetylene blowtorch on the back of a truck driving on the highway close to college. This was way before mobile phones and even before Sam Pitroda made telephone booths common, so communications between “ground staff” & “field staff” was fun.

Students with robust knowledge of electronics and communications can actually do rocket science :-)

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby chaanakya » 16 Nov 2011 06:44

With China in mind, India tests new-generation Agni missile with high 'kill efficiency

NEW DELHI: India on Tuesday successfully tested a new-generation Agni missile with a strike range of 3,500 km and souped-up "kill efficiency", prompting excited defence scientists to proclaim it would add "fantastic deterrence" to the country's nuclear weapons programme.

The test of the "most advanced" surface-to-surface missile called Agni-IV also launched the countdown for India to test its most ambitious strategic missile Agni-V, which will have near ICBM (intercontinental ballistic missile) capabilities with an over 5,000-km range, in December-January.

"This test has paved the way for the success of Agni-V mission, which will be launched shortly," said DRDO's chief controller (missiles and strategic systems) Avinash Chander.

Incidentally, the project director for Agni-IV is none other than Tessy Thomas, the 48-year-old DRDO scientist who has made a mark for herself in the avowedly male bastion of strategic missiles, as reported by TOI earlier.
.....
......

Having inducted the Pakistan-specific Agni-I (700-km) and Agni-II (over 2,000-km) missiles, the armed forces are now in the process of operationalising the 3,500-km Agni-III after completion of its developmental and pre-induction trials last year.
....
....

The two-stage Agni-IV and three-stage Agni-V, in turn, are meant to add some much-needed credible deterrence muscle against China, which has a massive nuclear arsenal with missiles like the 11,200-km Dong Feng-31A capable of hitting any Indian city.
The canister-launch Agni-V, with its high road mobility and fast-reaction ability, in particular, is being talked about as a small but sharp riposte to China.

The Agni-IV represents a significant step towards this objective. Though it was tested for a 3,000-km range from a road-mobile launcher at Wheeler's Island off the Odisha coast at 9 am on Tuesday, it can easily go up to 3,500 km.

"The missile, with a payload reduced to 800 kg from 1,000 kg, followed its trajectory, attained a height of about 900 km and reached the pre-designated target in Bay of Bengal with very high level of accuracy after a 20-minute flight," said a DRDO scientist.

"Much lighter in weight than Agni-II and Agni-III, Agni-IV is an entirely new missile with two stages of solid propulsion and a payload with re-entry heat shield. All mission objectives were fully met. All systems functioned perfectly till the end encountering re-entry temperatures of over 3,000 degree Celsius," he added.

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby VinayG » 16 Nov 2011 07:32

Thank you SaiK sir some more points hope it will fill the gap

With the start of modern rocketry in the 20th century, new ways were sought to improve rocket stability and at the same time reduce overall rocket weight. The answer to this was the development of active controls. Active control systems included vanes, movable fins, canards, gimbaled nozzles, vernier rockets, fuel injection, and attitude-control rockets. Tilting fins and canards are quite similar to each other in appearance. The only real difference between them is their location on the rockets. Canards are mounted on the front end of the rocket while the tilting fins are at the rear. In flight, the fins and canards tilt like rudders to deflect the air flow and cause the rocket to change course. Motion sensors on the rocket detect unplanned directional changes, and corrections can be made by slight tilting of the fins and canards. The advantage of these two devices is size and weight. They are smaller and lighter and produce less drag than the large fins.

Other active control systems can eliminate fins and canards altogether. By tilting the angle at which the exhaust gas leaves the rocket engine, course changes can be made in flight. Several techniques can be used for changing exhaust direction.

Vanes are small finlike devices that are placed inside the exhaust of the rocket engine. Tilting the vanes deflects the exhaust, and by action-reaction the rocket responds by pointing the opposite way.

Another method for changing the exhaust direction is to gimbal the nozzle. A gimbaled nozzle is one that is able to sway while exhaust gases are passing through it. By tilting the engine nozzle in the proper direction, the rocket responds by changing course

Vernier rockets can also be used to change direction. These are small rockets mounted on the outside of the large engine. When needed they fire, producing the desired course change.

In space, only by spinning the rocket along the roll axis or by using active controls involving the engine exhaust can the rocket be stabilized or have its direction changed. Without air, fins and canards have nothing to work upon. (Science fiction movies showing rockets in space with wings and fins are long on fiction and short on science.) The most common kinds of active control used in space are attitude-control rockets. Small clusters of engines are mounted all around the vehicle. By firing the right combination of these small rockets, the vehicle can be turned in any direction. As soon as they are aimed properly, the main engines fire, sending the rocket off in the new direction.

MORE INFO


http://inventors.about.com/library/inve ... ontrol.htm
http://inventors.about.com/library/inve ... thrust.htm

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby VinayG » 16 Nov 2011 07:41

gimbaled nozzle eliminates the necessity of external fins and canards

Image

more info

http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/educat ... baled.html

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby SaiK » 16 Nov 2011 07:51

yes.. flex nozzle on the second stage. [it also has a slight bell shape]

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby ramana » 16 Nov 2011 08:25

SaiK, Even First stage thats what the excitement is all about.

I find the 20min very interesting.

Is that telemetry from flight data and tracking against simulated trajectory?

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby ramana » 16 Nov 2011 08:34


CJ, Atleast you should stop referrng to earlier failure. The reason this is AIV is its a totally new system than the AII. Look at all those systems you, yourself have written about. No system has a redundant INS to guide it.

What is the Digital Controller System? What is it for? Are they saying the AIV is all digital vehicle? That would be total first.
Yo should get to your sources and get the jump.

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby Kanson » 16 Nov 2011 08:45

Indigenous technologies played a big role.

The spectrum of new technologies incorporated in the Agni-IV mission included fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) or composite casing for the second stage, ring-laser gyros for inertial navigation system (RINS), micro-navigation system (MINGS) as redundancy to improve the vehicle's reliability, a powerful onboard computer system, a multi-channel communication system and advanced avionics. The FRP reduced the missile's weight, enabling it to carry more propellants and to have a better range than Agni-II's 2,000 km.
The reason, drdo wanted to test flight Agni-IIp/Agni-IV before Agni-V is due to this new composite casing.

Dr. Saraswat praised Gundra Satheesh Reddy, Associate Director, Research Centre, Imarat (RCI), Hyderabad, and his team for developing the RINS, MINGS and onboard avionics, all of which made it “a fantastic flight.”
From the link earlier provided,

RCI, Hyderabad
Shri G Satheesh Reddy, MS
(Electronics and Communication Engineering), has made outstanding contributions in design, development and productionisation of advanced navigation technologies for the medium- and long-range tactical missiles like Agni, Prithvi, BrahMos, ANSP, Astra, as well as for fighter aircraft and other strategic missions in India.

He has to his credit the distinction of developing and demonstrating the capability of an indigenous ring laser gyro-based INS+GPS system comparable with such systems developed by few selected countries in the world. He played a pivotal role in building India’s totally indigenous multi-satellite constellation receiver (GPS+GLONASS+GAGAN) for high-dynamic applications. He has also developed India’s first miniaturised, 500 fibre-optic gyro-based INS+GPS (FINGS) system. Currently, he is working on MEMS-based miniaturised INS+GPS+GLONASS+Magnetometer System (MINGS) and indigenous navigation systems for Indian naval ships and submarines.

Shri Reddy has been conferred with the DRDO’s Young Scientist Award, Scientist of the Year Award and many other DRDO national awards. He is the Fellow of Indian National academy of Engineering (FNAE); Institution of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineers (IETE); and Institution of Engineers (India). He is also the Vice President of Aeronautical Society of India, Hyderabad, and Sensors Research Society, India.


The DRDO did not use any satellite during Agni-IV's flight.
Point to note. No GPS/GLONASS aided/guided flight. DRDO already preparing for future ASAT war. Do I see people across the NE border wetting their pants!

“Today, we have a missile which is lighter in weight, highly accelerating, manoeuvrable and unmatched. This missile incorporated the type of redundancies seen in manned missions, providing for robustness and reliability,” Dr. Saraswat said.
That is seriously a very strong statement - as seen in manned missions.

The other important technologies that contributed to the Agni-IV's success were better stage separation systems, efficient propulsion, high-energy solid propellants and powerful batteries.
Last time, we heard such term, "efficient propulsion" was during Shourya test.

Dr. Sekaran said the new navigation system was basically software-intensive with a lot of built-in logic and redundancy, which provided the missile's reliability. “These are state-of-the-art systems and some of these new technologies will go into India's new missile systems, including the making of Agni-V.”


Dr. Sekaran called Agni-IV “a good, user-friendly weapon for the Army.” For, it could be integrated quickly and transported on road. In Mr. Chander's assessment, the new technologies would lead to freedom of operation for the Army.
Finally, some nice words for the Army/end-user.

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby sohamn » 16 Nov 2011 08:51

Lisa wrote:
sohamn wrote:May be they have patatented the usage in civilian roles, may be in the name of ISRO or something. No body cares about military patents, because technology is not divulged.


Secret patents can be filed in the UK, ie although filed information is not
public. HOTOL tech is an example.


Agreed but who cares about such patents. If pak develops a missile with same tech tomorrow can India protest? No, because paki's will not allow anybody to inspect their weapons to figure out if the technology has been replicated or not.
So even if some country allows secret patents, it is useless when it comes to military tech. Hence, I can conclude it is DDM bullsh**.

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby SaiK » 16 Nov 2011 08:52

It is extremely interesting... may be it is hidden for our lateral view, and the angle of flex exhaust just about skims the rim of the first stage.

btw, did they mix cl20?
Last edited by SaiK on 16 Nov 2011 08:58, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby sohamn » 16 Nov 2011 08:53

Now the next logical step is to make Agni IV canisterized. Especially since the fins are removed it will be a good candidate for canisterization.

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby ramana » 16 Nov 2011 08:56

If the missile did not use any sats, then how do we reconcile with MINGS? Or the G as not switched on?

And was it a all digital missile?

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby chackojoseph » 16 Nov 2011 09:00

ramana wrote:

CJ, Atleast you should stop referrng to earlier failure. The reason this is AIV is its a totally new system than the AII. Look at all those systems you, yourself have written about. No system has a redundant INS to guide it.

What is the Digital Controller System? What is it for? Are they saying the AIV is all digital vehicle? That would be total first.
Yo should get to your sources and get the jump.


Ramana and Srinivasan,

The background is necessary. I thought readers will appreciate what went wrong and what they fixed to get it right. I am not sure that information exists anywhere else (or not until this test). When the story developed, I managed to get information on floating basis and present it to the readers.

Yes, A IV and v will be digitally controlled. They will release the info sometime. ASL lab is something I don't want to report as it is not the correct time. Even DDo treats the lab as out of bounds (in fact every missile report is nowadays).

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby SaiK » 16 Nov 2011 09:05

May be they wanted to test out completely how the RLGs performed. We don't have any video of target destruction.

On they switched it off at some point on re-entry.

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby member_20296 » 16 Nov 2011 09:34

There is surely a demand of its canisterization, on this point lets hear from experts that what challenges canisterization brings. There must be a few things for integration like integration with the gas generators and testing on combined systems etc..

But for sure it looks as if not a big task.

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby ramana » 16 Nov 2011 09:52

CJ, Every report on AII+ or Prime makes the ref to earlier failed flight. So whats the new now?

No need for that ref as this is a new bird.

Only thing common is the metal first stage.

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby ramana » 16 Nov 2011 10:19

Wonder if MINGS is psy-ops for intended target! Also famous Chinese restaurant in Hyderabad.

I think its a tri-axis accelerometer and magnetometer(to sense Earth's magnetic field) package, with GPS/GLONASS augmentation if needed, which provides error correction to the RLG which is a strap on system. What the "didn't use sats for AIV test' means that it can give even more accuracy if needed.

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby ramana » 16 Nov 2011 10:32

krishnan wrote:http://tarmak007.blogspot.com/2010/12/breaking-on-tarmak007-india-gears-up-to.html



This is the older flight about a year ago. Why?

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby Pogula » 16 Nov 2011 10:37

An altitude of 880 Kms for a 3000 Km range? I can see a 5000 Km range by merely altering the launch. Chicom must be changing its diapers right now.

By the way, I worked with a 3-axis Inertial Measurement System (basically the usual acc+mag+opt package) paired with a differential GPS unit to increase the accuracy and frequency of flight control on a multi-rotor craft. It was a pain in our Musharraf to make it work (Which took us 16 months to achieve). I can only imagine the kind of innovation that went into making a military grade redundant system with an optical gyro thrown into the mix as if things were not already complicated enough. I truely stand in amazement at what our scientists do, for the peanuts our Government gives them in return! Also, not to forget all the crap we Arm-Chair Generals hurl at them at the drop of a hat :-?

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby krishnan » 16 Nov 2011 10:43

ramana wrote:
krishnan wrote:http://tarmak007.blogspot.com/2010/12/breaking-on-tarmak007-india-gears-up-to.html



This is the older flight about a year ago. Why?


Someone posted a picture of that trial as said it was from the latest trial

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby wig » 16 Nov 2011 10:46

interesting news on munitions=Green explosives’ on DRDO’s agenda

Explosives meant to kill and destroy but being designed to minimise damage to the environment without compromising upon their lethality sounds strange. Yet this is what the scientific community is now seriously contemplating.

Being referred to “green explosives”, these bombs, and also propellants for missiles and rockets, would be using ingredients that release lesser toxic elements than the emissions of chemical compositions being used at present.

The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) has also initiated work on developing eco-friendly explosives and propellants. “We are also looking to collaborate with some friendly countries in this arena,” a senior scientist who attended the High Energy Materials Conference and Exhibits at DRDO’s Terminal Ballistics Research Laboratory here said. “The United Kingdom, Ukraine, Germany and Russia are among the prospective partners,” he added.

According to defence scientists, the fallout of a chemical explosion does not merely end with the detonation, but the adverse effects of the chemicals continue to linger on in the environment for a long time. This not only affects the atmosphere, but also the ground soil and its organic and inorganic constituents, including agricultural-friendly organisms in the vicinity of the blast site. Similarly, rocket engines emit a huge amount of toxic gases and other elements during combustion and their flight through the atmosphere.

“Among the options we are exploring is to avoid the use of certain aluminum-based compounds in rocket propellants. Similarly lead compounds in explosives can be replaced,” Dr A. Shubhanand Rao, Chief Controller, DRDO said. “Also, we are studying methodologies to safely dispose-off such toxic materials, where their use if inevitable, through processes known as green-synthesis,” he added.

DRDO’s High Energy Materials Research Laboratory (HEMRL) is the nodal agency for research and development of explosive materials. It has recently developed CL-20, being claimed as the world’s most powerful convectional explosive. Dr Rao said CL-20 is about 30 per cent more powerful than the RDX. It is now being produced by a private firm, but is an expensive material costing over Rs 70,000 per kg.



http://www.tribuneindia.com/2011/20111116/nation.htm#16

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby vasu_ray » 16 Nov 2011 10:57

Congrats DRDO on the A2P launch!

Before launch they expressed 2 concerns,

a) the max. altitude it would reach

b) and then surviving re-entry

for (a), the thrust they could achieve with the FRP stage was a question,

and now that they succeeded, the follow on development would be all FRP missiles? also, now that they got titanium going, would they still prefer maraging steel?

b) did they beef up the heat shield after review of the first launch so much so the payload was reduced by 200kg? like they were giving the guidance system the necessary leeway to get the accuracy than skimping on the weight

if they plan to derive an anti-ship version, since ships aren't expected to be degaussed, in this context, how is a magnetometer related to a magnetic anomaly detector? just difference in sensitivity? can a seeker be built based on it?

recent news reports say that A-3 can be the ASAT weapon, since this A-4 surpassed it, would this feature a definitive ASAT variant?

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby nits » 16 Nov 2011 11:59

Q to gurus

Agni 4 has Mobile Launcher and can be travelled by Road; but due to its long length these Mobile Launchers will be very easy to spot from Satelite Images (though misslines will be covered and all); do we have any Transport planes which can carry such long missiles and transport them to there required destinations...

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby kmkraoind » 16 Nov 2011 12:27

Probably they will design canisters in the form of cargo containers. India is not sparsely populated as Russia, US and China (most of China and Tibet), so best way to hide is to camouflage as it civilian type cargo containers to hide it from preying eyes.

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby Pogula » 16 Nov 2011 12:38

3000 Kms in 20 minutes!
Can any of the well-informed BRFites throw some light on the average delivery time for major missile systems (like Minuteman) around the world?
I am talking in terms of Range Vs. Time

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby VinayG » 16 Nov 2011 13:26

Russia Missile launcher disguised as a container

Image
we can try something like this to hide our missiles

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby Kanson » 16 Nov 2011 16:05

Pogula wrote:3000 Kms in 20 minutes!
Can any of the well-informed BRFites throw some light on the average delivery time for major missile systems (like Minuteman) around the world?
I am talking in terms of Range Vs. Time

Bulava missile took some where around 30 minutes or more to cover a range of 8000+ km. It reached an apogee of around 1000 km. Compared to Agni-3 which took roughly 13 mins to cover its range.

At an apogee of ~900 km, to cover a range of just 3000 km range, it sends out a messg to all the intended audience who are listening. The messg is clear: Don't F***k with me.

Of course we are very peace loving country, anything we do is to promote peace with neighbours and have deep stake in the welfare of this continent(!). In the interest of all fellow human beings we encourage our neighbours to sue peace with us, after all we are a peaceful and peace loving country. Period.

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby Kanson » 16 Nov 2011 16:13

rajanb wrote:Which means and maybe my interpretation is wishful thinking that the AGNI II Prime, maybe the Agni II with this coating = AGNI IV. Thus increasing its range.
Sirji, in every way from rocket motor to heat shield, Agni II Prime is different from Agni II. Only common where the names Agni II. Agni II prime was later renamed to Agni IV. Coating is a different thing, which can be applied to any missile in the inventory as they please.

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby karan_mc » 16 Nov 2011 19:09

February trial for naval air defence missile

Nirbhay cruise missile test next year

India will test its indigenously developed Nirbhay subsonic cruise missile in early 2012, Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) chief V.K. Saraswat said Wednesday.


Lot of missile test a head , next three months Nirbhay , Barak-2 , Agni-V . and in 2012 Brahmos air launched , Astra to be air launched , exciting year a head for Missile technology for India

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby chackojoseph » 16 Nov 2011 19:14

^^^ Agni II Prime was conceived when Agni -3 was in works. So, they decided to work on a proven mijjle.

BTW, Looking forward Agni - V Prime :mrgreen:

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby SaiK » 16 Nov 2011 19:25

any chance of showing larger shroud for chippanda logic?

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby rajanb » 16 Nov 2011 19:26

Kanson wrote:
rajanb wrote:Which means and maybe my interpretation is wishful thinking that the AGNI II Prime, maybe the Agni II with this coating = AGNI IV. Thus increasing its range.
Sirji, in every way from rocket motor to heat shield, Agni II Prime is different from Agni II. Only common where the names Agni II. Agni II prime was later renamed to Agni IV. Coating is a different thing, which can be applied to any missile in the inventory as they please.


Thanks Kanson. The name, to me, implied an uprated version of the Agni II. The downside would be a massive change in product line? And no way a II could be uprated to a IV.

Nonetheless, its a chinese silk twister :D

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby Singha » 16 Nov 2011 19:38

I wonder if A3 is going to be a mass production missile or will cede ground to A5? things are moving fast, if a couple of A5 tests works well they might be tempted to induct the A5 over A3 as our standard heavy ICBM , while producing A2P as std IRBM

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby chetak » 16 Nov 2011 19:45

Singha wrote:I wonder if A3 is going to be a mass production missile or will cede ground to A5? things are moving fast, if a couple of A5 tests works well they might be tempted to induct the A5 over A3 as our standard heavy ICBM , while producing A2P as std IRBM


With MIRV technology already ably demonstrated by other departments, the A5 and successors should be very interesting.

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby Singha » 16 Nov 2011 19:49

main challenge now seems to be cansisterizing the whole inventory from A1 , A2P, A3, A5 and mounting any road mobile ones into high mobility MAZ/Tatra type vehicles and streamlining the rail mobile units.

good that vl-brahmos, shourya, prahaar and A5(per reports) are in cansisters from day1. A2P has no fins is now ready for container.

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Re: Indian Missiles and Munitions Discussion

Postby SaiK » 16 Nov 2011 20:08

We need only three categories - short range [1000 miles*], med - 3500 m, long > 3500 m.

*intentional conversion


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