Transport Aircraft for IAF

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby Singha » 02 Aug 2013 19:21

16 C17 would be too less for India, considering the huge gap to the next rung which is the C130

we need imho
- 10 super heavies (Ruslan2)
- 25 heavies (C17) - 3 sqdns
- 75 medium C130J
- 100-120 smalls AN32 sized

would impart the much needed balance and rightsizing of missions.

we need airlift bigtime to make up for lack of road infra in mountains, permit better resupply payloads and support the formation of 2 airmobile brigades one for Ladakh-TSP and one for Sikkim-AP. each alone with their complement of artillery, light vehicles, C4I kit and helicopters would cost not less than $1 billion to formate.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby NRao » 02 Aug 2013 19:57

pragnya,

Thanks. I was aware of that "8 more". However, the point I was trying to make was to tie the potential of an Indian buy with the news from Boeing. So, 6 + 8 = 14, which is more than the 12 the news items leads us to believe. And IF Aus/SA/Singapore really want some, the numbers are further diluted.

But, I would like the 14. Fine with me. Although I would like more C-130 regulars. Say around 50 of them (instead of the "8 more" C-17s) (and add more P-8Is).

Singha,

16 C-17s is about 25 IL-476s, the number the Russians had initially identified as a requirement for the IAF. This was way back and the numbers could be out dated by now.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby Surya » 02 Aug 2013 20:03

sigh

landed at MSP airport
the two wings of ANG here and there are right now almost 20 C 130s parked :((

envy Khan

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby Philip » 02 Aug 2013 20:40

Given the expanding Indian role in the IOR and ASEAN region alone,not to mention the Indo-China region,with our expanding defence ties with Vietnam,our requirement for heavweights would need to be at least 24.14/16 C-17s plus the dozen or so upgraded Il-76s should suffice until about 2025,when the IL-76s will be due for retirement.At that time,should they need to be replaced,IL-476s in production will be available, but the Boeing C-17 line would've been closed down.So if we want a large fleet of C-17s for the future,then the time to order the lot is now.Boeing say that the production line can be extended by another year.The big Q being how much moolah can be earmarked for the heavy transports when there are other "mouths to feed" in the IAF's own stable.There is a demand for more C-130s and smaller transports too.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby putnanja » 02 Aug 2013 20:49

NRao wrote:But, I would like the 14. Fine with me. Although I would like more C-130 regulars. Say around 50 of them (instead of the "8 more" C-17s) (and add more P-8Is).


Yup, advocating the same for some time. WE need 50 more plain vanilla cargo C-130s, not the special ops version.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby Victor » 02 Aug 2013 21:14

Tata should be allowed to set up a C-130 assembly plant. It could become the Asian service center. Of course this would throw the fear of God into HAL so it probably won't happen, country be damned.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby pragnya » 02 Aug 2013 22:42

Singha wrote:16 C17 would be too less for India, considering the huge gap to the next rung which is the C130

we need imho
- 10 super heavies (Ruslan2)
- 25 heavies (C17) - 3 sqdns
- 75 medium C130J
- 100-120 smalls AN32 sized

would impart the much needed balance and rightsizing of missions.

we need airlift bigtime to make up for lack of road infra in mountains, permit better resupply payloads and support the formation of 2 airmobile brigades one for Ladakh-TSP and one for Sikkim-AP. each alone with their complement of artillery, light vehicles, C4I kit and helicopters would cost not less than $1 billion to formate.


while Ruslans might be a 'iffy' at present, rest of your wishlist is probably on the dot.

24 C-17s is a real possibility not just going by the report but taking into consideration the IL 76 spares/maintainence issues as per IAF.

75 - medium, would be a mix of MTA (45 for IAF) and C-130J. expect more orders for C-130J after the present deliveries.

AN 32s already number that much which are being upgraded for a 15 year lifetime extension. so they are going to be around for a while. possibly supplemented by more MTA and AVRO replacements later...

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby NRao » 08 Aug 2013 02:07

Dec, 2012 :: More aircraft, copters for IAF

“Six C-130J Hercules transport aircraft, designed to carry out special operations during combat, have already been inducted, and a contract for six more will be inked soon. Also, ten C-17 aircraft from the U.S. are expected to arrive in India and will become part of the IAF in June 2013. Such strategic airlift capabilities will be multiplied manifold. Ten more C-17 aircraft will join the IAF as part of phase II,” the Air Chief Marshal said.


That should take the total to 20 C17s.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby JTull » 08 Aug 2013 16:47

jai wrote:
Victor wrote:Tender for IAF planes hits air pocket


I am not surprised- I remember reading the rfp doc published and wondering why is the rip asking for a 800 km cruise speed - from the competing aircraft- clearly only one could - and that's not a hardcore lifter but a civilian conversion, most of the rest were turbo props. Does anyone else notice this or am I wrong - this was a while back so I could be.


Doesn't make sense. I thought EADS was okay with domestic the production as it could lead to larger orders.
http://www.indiastrategic.in/topstories2029_Airbus_Military_improved_C295W_India.htm

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby JTull » 08 Aug 2013 16:55

NRao wrote:Dec, 2012 :: More aircraft, copters for IAF

“Six C-130J Hercules transport aircraft, designed to carry out special operations during combat, have already been inducted, and a contract for six more will be inked soon. Also, ten C-17 aircraft from the U.S. are expected to arrive in India and will become part of the IAF in June 2013. Such strategic airlift capabilities will be multiplied manifold. Ten more C-17 aircraft will join the IAF as part of phase II,” the Air Chief Marshal said.


That should take the total to 20 C17s.


The IAF was also looking at replacing IL-76 in the next 10 or 15 years with upgraded versions of AN-32s and C-17s.


This seems to imply that orders beyond 20 are likely. So far they could just be topping up for current strategic airlift needs and IL-76 replacement would require further orders.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby Hiten » 18 Aug 2013 17:53

is the HAL going to propose an upgrade program for the Avro

Better engines, advanced auto-pilot systems, among others, being looked into, for this 50s aircraft. What, then, happens to the program to replace it?

The Hindustan Aeronautics Limited [HAL] recently issued a 'Request For Information' [RFI] for a proposal to replace the Gas Turbine-powered turbo-prop engines of the Indian Air Force's [IAF] Hawker Siddeley's Avro HS 748 medium-lift transport aircraft. It seeks to replace the currently used British Rolls-Royce Dart 533-2 & 536-2T engines, which HAL license-built, with a modern solution that churns out more power, demonstrates better fuel efficiency1, and also weighs less & has dimensions no bigger than the ones presently used. To get an idea of how old the engines & the aircraft it powers are, the engine has already found its way into HAL's Heritage Museum, its manufacturer in India, even as it powers this IAF aircraft, as of today.

Any change of Engine would also likely require change to systems connected to it, like the Gear Box transferring power to the aircraft's auxiliary systems, like Cabin Supercharger, Tachometer, Generator etc, possibly requiring their replacement too. HAL, over the past one year, has been issuing similar notification soliciting 'Expression of Interest' for other sub-systems for incorporating into this aircraft, like improved Autopilot system & Weather Radar, fitting it with Multi-Function Display [MFD] & Flight Data Recorder [FDR], that would, no doubt, lessen its obsolescence.

HAL states that 59 flight-worthy HS-748 airframes in the country, have notched relatively fewer flying hours of around 350 hours/annum & have, thus, substantial residual life of around 80,000 hours to warrant such an upgrade. The HAL website informs of already having carried out a limited upgrade of its Navigation & Communication systems. However, given the nature of systems, like its engine & radar, that is sought to be replaced this time, one could infer that this possible life-extension move aims to prolong its use much beyond 2020, when it was expected to cease service with the IAF. 59, actually 56, is also the number that is sought to be replaced. So essentially, HAL is asserting that entire fleet of these IAF aircrafts have sufficient life left in them, so as to preclude any replacement plans. This being the case, it raises an interesting question. One has been reading reports suggesting a move to replace these aircrafts, designed in the 1950s, with a contemporary solution. In fact, as being bandied, it would have been a showcase project, of sorts, wholly undertaken by the country's private sector, with no involvement of the state-owned monopoly, the HAL, in the production process. However, given the stifling nature of current policies governing domestic Defence production, & the military's habit of placing orders in a piecemeal manner, that wouldn't afford first-time manufacturers the benefit of economies of scale, this move to let India Inc. handle the project hasn't been met with the kind of enthusiasm GoI had hoped for. No reports in the MSM to suggest any forward movement on this front.

This HAL-issued notification also leads one to ask if the IAF is already on board this proposal, or whether HAL hopes to sell this idea to its captive customer, once it itself is suitably confident of its viability. If one were a betting person, one would bet money on the fact that it is the latter. For one, there are no reports presently in the MSM that indicate any intent to go the upgrade route. With the Govt already having decided to let the private sector handle the Avro-replacement project, HAL would essentially be bereft of any share in this pie, if the proposal does see fructification. Thus, it would make great sense for it to extract maximum possible mileage from this aircraft, which it license produced, by prolonging its use with the IAF, possibly even scuttling the original one. Not factoring in maintainability of a vintage system, the economic cost of this upgrade is likely to be much lower than building a new airframe from the ground up. Given the recent depreciation of the Indian Rupee. that continues, any proposal that promises to lessen the burden on the state exchequer is likely to get a sympathetic hearing too. Going in HAL's favour is also the, aforementioned, near non-response from India Inc.. Any such HAL intentions is presently at a preliminary stage, as it has only just issued a RFI.

One of the requirement that stands out is the need for one of the engines to operate in "Hotel Mode" - keeping one of the engines running when the bird is on the ground, but preventing propeller movement, for powering the HS 748's electrical systems, even when not flying. This function is normally performed by an Auxiliary Power Unit [APU]. The HS748 is believed to be fitted with a British Rover Company-built small Gas Turbine engine for this purpose. Use of the aircraft's main engine in 'Hotel Mode' precludes the use of an APU, leading to weight savings. However, its use in this manner poses some significant drawbacks. Most obvious one among them being the differential wearing of the engines, the one used for this purpose would fail faster. Besides this, it also poses certain operational hazards. Considering that the propeller is prevented from rotating using a braking arrangement, failure of the brake would lead to a catastrophic situation if there are human presence in the vicinity at that moment. It would, therefore, require adoption of Standard Operating Procedures [SOP] that address this hazard. It is thus a trade-off between a less hazardous work environment or weight saving, something HAL would surely have given sufficient thought to prior to stipulating such requirement.

Coming back to the issue at hand, that of upgrading this aircraft, it surely is an interesting proposition, though one can't say one agrees with the proposal, in the limited amount of time one has thought about it. Ensuring continued reliability & maintainability of an aircraft is an equally capital intensive proposition, whose value piles up through the passage of time. This is especially true for a legacy platform such as the Avro HS-748. Present financial conditions permitting, It would be much more prudent & cost-effective, in the long run, to operate a modern aircraft, instead of flogging an old horse, however well-rested it is claimed to be. As rightly envisaged by the Government, this Avro replacement program is an ideal springboard for adding capacity & building capability in the private sector, boosting indigenous production, spurring healthy competition, breaking the shackles of monopoly of state-owned DPSU, all leading to a satisfied & confident customer - the Indian Armed Force. The Government would be well-advised in expending its political capital in ensuring that the original programme gets off the metaphorical ground & all HS-748 aircrafts are honourably retired, before they begin acquiring notorious reputations.

Footnotes:

1= Specific Fuel Consumption less than or equal to 0.5 lbs/hr/SHP


http://www.aame.in/2013/08/hal-proposin ... -avro.html

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby NRao » 18 Aug 2013 18:24

The Hindustan Aeronautics Limited [HAL] recently issued a 'Request For Information' [RFI] for a proposal to replace the Gas Turbine-powered turbo-prop engines of the Indian Air Force's [IAF] Hawker Siddeley's Avro HS 748 medium-lift transport aircraft. It seeks to replace the currently used British Rolls-Royce Dart 533-2 & 536-2T engines, which HAL license-built, with a modern solution that churns out more power, demonstrates better fuel efficiency1, and also weighs less & has dimensions no bigger than the ones presently used. To get an idea of how old the engines & the aircraft it powers are, the engine has already found its way into HAL's Heritage Museum, its manufacturer in India, even as it powers this IAF aircraft, as of today.

Any change of Engine would also likely require change to systems connected to it, like the Gear Box transferring power to the aircraft's auxiliary systems, like Cabin Supercharger, Tachometer, Generator etc, possibly requiring their replacement too. HAL, over the past one year, has been issuing similar notification soliciting 'Expression of Interest' for other sub-systems for incorporating into this aircraft, like improved Autopilot system & Weather Radar, fitting it with Multi-Function Display [MFD] & Flight Data Recorder [FDR], that would, no doubt, lessen its obsolescence.


Add the air frame and we should have a totally new aircraft?

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby pragnya » 18 Aug 2013 19:34

Since none in the private sector has come forward to work on the replacement, what are the options for IAF and GOI apart from wholesale replacement or upgrade!!

if what HAL says (lot of life left in the airframes) is true it does make sense to upgrade them 'provided' cost/time/benefit analysis is made which leads to the question whether HAL can do it single handedly considering there would be airframe modifications to accomadate the engine change. IMO, it would be prudent to involve OEM. HAL should do complete overhaul, refit of the a/c with the OEM.

how come no one in the private sector is interested?? :roll:

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby Singha » 18 Aug 2013 19:41

it looks certain now we will become the 2nd largest operator of the C17.
RAF with 8 and UAE with 6 are next.
USAF has 220 :eek:

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby abhik » 18 Aug 2013 21:18

Why is there is need to replace/upgrade the Avro at all? What unique role does it fulfil that can't be done by the combination of the Do 228(with a max payload 2+ tonne), the An-32( 5+ tonne) and the MTA (~20 tonnes)?

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby Kakarat » 20 Aug 2013 16:29

New Record: IAF Puts Super Herc Down On Earth's Loftiest Airfield - Livefist

Image

IAF Statement: In a significant capability demonstration move by the IAF, a C 130J-30 Super Hercules aircraft landed at Daulat Beg Oldie (DBO), the highest airstrip in the world at 0654 hrs today. The Commanding Officer Group Captain Tejbir Singh and the crew of the "Veiled Vipers" along with senior officer of Air Headquarters touched down on the DBO airstrip located at 16614 feet (5065 meters) in the Aksai Chin area after taking off from their home base at Hindon.

...

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby manjgu » 20 Aug 2013 17:27

and this is being touted as a big challenge to the chinese..and the good Air Marshal is saying why should we fear the chinese, as DBO is our territory !!! i his saying this reveals his fear IMHO...

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby rajanb » 20 Aug 2013 18:39

^^^ Awesome news.

Now the Chinese know we can throw more at them. Way to go IAF.

Where and what fear Manjgu?

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby manjgu » 20 Aug 2013 19:06

rajanb... i mean even without the good Air Marshal saying that we dont fear the chinese.. the chinese will know what we can throw at them. His words to me show hint of fear. he culd have kept quiet instead of the words he choose to say. Do the chinese say the same thing , when they land a a/c on their airstrip??

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby Indrajit » 20 Aug 2013 19:09

Watching the visuals of Super Herc landing at DBO,just awesome sight! 8) Kudos to Wing Co Tejbir Singh and his crew.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby Victor » 20 Aug 2013 19:22

manjgu wrote:and this is being touted as a big challenge to the chinese..and the good Air Marshal is saying why should we fear the chinese, as DBO is our territory !!! i his saying this reveals his fear IMHO...

Where do you see this in the linked article? I didn't see any talk, just another quiet IAF world record, this time with the C-130. C-17 is next, with 3 x the load inshallah.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby NRao » 20 Aug 2013 20:00


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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby manjgu » 20 Aug 2013 20:21

victor.. he said it in a short clip on NDTV or was it TIMES NOW.. i heard it. its not in the article. its almost like Indian saying Kashmir is a inseperable part of india. I never heard china say Tiber is a inseperable part of China ! anyway..this was only a little quibble.. i wish we as a country are more correct with what we say.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby Victor » 20 Aug 2013 20:41

manjgu, don't pay attention to what is said or not said. Only the actions are relevant. Chinese are famous for having far more than their share of official gasbags.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby MN Kumar » 20 Aug 2013 20:52

Looking at the DBO pic. Any reason we didnt build a concrete runway?

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby Singha » 20 Aug 2013 20:56

all the concrete mix will need to be airlifted as there aint no motorable roads to DBO iirc.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby NRao » 20 Aug 2013 20:57

MN Kumar wrote:Looking at the DBO pic. Any reason we didnt build a concrete runway?


They are ALGs. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daulat_Beg_Oldi

Wiki is already updated with this landing's info.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby rajanb » 20 Aug 2013 21:27

manjgu wrote:rajanb... i mean even without the good Air Marshal saying that we dont fear the chinese.. the chinese will know what we can throw at them. His words to me show hint of fear. he culd have kept quiet instead of the words he choose to say. Do the chinese say the same thing , when they land a a/c on their airstrip??


Thanks for explaining.

Having been closely associated with the IAF, though not in it.

This is their style. Telling the adversary that you have a lot to sh!t for. Different uniform than the Indian Army or Navy, who are more subtle in their approach. But we have to remember one thing. Every time a fighter jock is in his outdated A/C, he is playing odds. Sad but true.

The reason I am for the LCA, is because of its relaxed stability. Translates to safety for the pilot as many who have flown it, and swear by. And as an engineer, I understand. The same applies for the C transport series which we have. But this will never stop the IAF from innovating. And taking risks. It is one thing to be daring in flying A/C which are past their prime. Another to be innovative and shock the enemy. Like flying over lawhore in a Foxbat and breaking the sound barrier. "I am here you Pukis. Touch me if you can!"

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby gnair » 20 Aug 2013 22:26

The Hindustan Aeronautics Limited [HAL] recently issued a 'Request For Information' [RFI] for a proposal to replace the Gas Turbine-powered turbo-prop engines of the Indian Air Force's [IAF] Hawker Siddeley's Avro HS 748 medium-lift transport aircraft. It seeks to replace the currently used British Rolls-Royce Dart 533-2 & 536-2T engines, which HAL license-built, with a modern solution that churns out more power, demonstrates better fuel efficiency1, and also weighs less & has dimensions no bigger than the ones presently used.

The PW-120 series engines would be a good option. Wonder why nobody is yet to respond to the HAL proposal. HS-748's are still widely used in different parts of the world with tier 3 freighter operators. IAF-HS-748's seem to have a good 10-15 years of operating life in it. They are pretty tough built airframes, with minimal maintenance per flt. hour. RollsRoyce Darts have seen better times but are still reliable enough. The penetrating sound of those engines are another matter! It should cost approx. $3.5-4 million per unit, to refurbish this. About $2.8 for the engines and the balance for avionics,radios and structural work with (local labor) [/b][/b]http://www.pwc.ca/en/engines/pw120[/b]

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby pragnya » 31 Aug 2013 21:02

Boeing Delivers Indian Air Force's 3rd C-17 Globemaster III

LONG BEACH, Calif., Aug. 22, 2013 – The third Boeing [NYSE: BA] C-17 Globemaster III airlifter for the Indian Air Force (IAF) departed for India Aug. 20 from the company’s Long Beach facility.

It joins the first and second India C-17 airlifters, which arrived in June and July, respectively. Boeing is on track to deliver two more C-17s to the IAF this year and five in 2014.

In operation since 1991, the C-17 is a large, versatile military transport aircraft able to carry heavy, oversize loads long distances and land on rough and unprepared surfaces. It has been used in humanitarian and military missions around the world and recently surpassed 2.6 million flight hours.

Boeing has delivered 256 C-17s, including 222 to the U.S. Air Force and a total of 34 to Australia, Canada, India, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom and the 12-member Strategic Airlift Capability initiative of NATO and Partnership for Peace nations.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby Gurneesh » 31 Aug 2013 21:48

gnair wrote:The PW-120 series engines would be a good option. Wonder why nobody is yet to respond to the HAL proposal. HS-748's are still widely used in different parts of the world with tier 3 freighter operators. IAF-HS-748's seem to have a good 10-15 years of operating life in it. They are pretty tough built airframes, with minimal maintenance per flt. hour. RollsRoyce Darts have seen better times but are still reliable enough. The penetrating sound of those engines are another matter! It should cost approx. $3.5-4 million per unit, to refurbish this. About $2.8 for the engines and the balance for avionics,radios and structural work with (local labor) [/b][/b]http://www.pwc.ca/en/engines/pw120[/b]


I think upgradation of the Avro fleet is a perfect starting project for the Indian private industry. Refurbishing the airframe, getting new cockpit/avionics, and installing new engines will give the private industry enough experience to take up aviation projects of higher complexity. Also, setting up a facility for overhaul should cost less than the facility required to make a new line of planes.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby NRao » 02 Sep 2013 00:29

Sept 2, 2013 :: Indian Air Force to induct its biggest transport aircraft on Monday

Bolstering the Indian Air Force's capability to swiftly transport combat troops and equipment such as tanks to the front, Defence Minister A K Antony will on Monday formally induct its biggest 70-tonne C-17 heavy-lift transport aircraft into service at the Hindon Air Base near Delhi.

Mr Antony will formally induct the aircraft procured from the US under a deal expected to be over Rs. 20,000 crore into the newly-formed 81 'Skylord' Squadron in Delhi, IAF officials said.

The American C-17, with a capability to carry around 80 tonnes of load and around 150 fully geared troops, will replace the Russian Il-76 as the biggest aircraft in the IAF inventory till now.



The Il-76 had the capability to carry loads of up to around 40 tonnes.

The IAF has placed orders with the US for ten such aircraft under the deal signed in 2011 and three of them have already been delivered.

The US Air Force will complete the delivery of all the 10 aircraft by the end of next year.

The aircraft is expected to enhance the operational potential of the IAF with its payload carriage and performance capability and would augment the strategic reach during disaster relief or any similar missions.

After the completion of the 10 aircraft, the IAF may also exercise the option of procuring six more planes for its fleet.

In recent times, the IAF has shifted its dependence from the Russian-origin aircraft towards the American ones with the induction of the C-17 and the C-130J Super Hercules transport
aircraft.

The IAF operates six C-130Js and has plans of procuring six more for operations on small and unpaved runways alongside routine transport missions.

The IAF also has the Russian Antonov-32 in its inventory.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby NRao » 03 Sep 2013 20:26

C-17 Globemaster III: IAF's biggest transport aircraft

Can be refueled midair

3 Sep, 2013

The pellets for the C-17 and the Lockheed Martin C-130J Super Hercules which IAF has already acquired are common and can be moved from one aircraft to another with ease.

Also, although the C-17 is a long-range aircraft, it can be refueled midair.


Nice feature.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby Surya » 03 Sep 2013 21:36

pellets or pallets ??

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby Kartik » 04 Sep 2013 11:39

pallets

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby Singha » 04 Sep 2013 12:12

can the AN124 land and takeoff in the same kind of places a IL76 can?
we really need some 15 of these bad boys to make a dent on the problem, whatever be the problem

gnair
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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby gnair » 04 Sep 2013 18:50

Singha wrote:can the AN124 land and takeoff in the same kind of places a IL76 can?
we really need some 15 of these bad boys to make a dent on the problem, whatever be the problem

Theoritically AN124's should be able to operate on the same runway length and weight density on where IL76's operate out of. But the question is, will it be able to operate on MTOW (max take off wt) for it to be an economical operation.
I've seen some AN124 manifests and they almost always seem to be carrying oil field equipment that cannot be further dismantled. The best bet for AN-124's for the IAF is to use a couple of them on long term wet lease for the Border Roads Org.to carry construction equipment to the best logical point or perhaps even ISRO to transfer their rocket stages, from Thumba, BLR or else where to SHAR. The main disadvantage of this jet is, because it's so maintenance heavy, 'QTA's (quick turn around ops) are certainly going to be a challenge in military conditions.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby NRao » 04 Sep 2013 19:36

They used one of them to transport the train compartment/bogie from Germany to Mumbai (for the Mumbai subway?) (youtube has an hour long story - big, bigger. biggest is what it is called IIRC).

But I do not think they are used too much - anywhere - for military purposes. The US could perhaps use them - they seem to have a dire need for something like that (but they have the 747-800F to compete). No other nation really has such a NEED.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby Vipul » 10 Sep 2013 08:03

Globemasters deployed for overseas missions.

The 'SkyLords' have already begun to spread their wings. India has quietly started deploying its latest aircraft, the gigantic C-17 Globemaster-III, on "special overseas airlift missions" in tune with its geostrategic objectives.

Defence ministry sources on Monday said while one C-17 made a trip to energy-rich Tajikistan in August, another is slated to fly all the way to Rwanda later this month. "The Tajik flight carried special equipment, including instrument landing aids. The one to Rwanda will carry heavy equipment to support our troops deployed in the UN stabilization mission in war-ravaged Congo," said a source.

This comes even as the C-17s are being flown to places like Port Blair, Leh and Thoise within the country on different missions. Impressed with the "sheer ruggedness" of the four-engine C-17s, dubbed "game-changers" by Air Chief Marshal N A K Browne, IAF has finalised plans to acquire six more Globemasters in the 13th Plan (2017-2022) period.

Three of the first 10 C-17 aircraft ordered for $4.1 billion from the US were "formally" inducted into the 81 Squadron, nicknamed the 'SkyLords', at the Hindon airbase last week. While another two will touch down by November, the other five will come by end-2014. Designed to swiftly airlift a 70-tonne cargo across 4,200 km, the C-17s can even land at makeshift airstrips in forward areas.

The overseas missions are being seen as "crucial" to Indian interests abroad. India has forged a "deep strategic partnership" with Tajikistan, which shares its borders with Afghanistan, China, Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan. In March-April, India had also used its C-130J 'Super Hercules' aircraft to airlift a military hospital with doctors, paramedics and equipment to Tajikistan.

Moreover, the Indian military presence at the Ayni airbase, around 15 km from Dushanbe, helps New Delhi keep some tabs on its strategic interests in Central Asia as well as terrorism-infested Af-Pak region.

The C-17 flight to Rwanda, in turn, will be "critical" in supporting the 4,000 Indian troops deployed in Congo. "The C-17s have tremendously boosted India's capabilities for strategic operations overseas. It would have required three to four trips by our older IL-76 aircraft to carry the heavy load to Rwanda, which is the gateway to Congo. The C-17 will do in a single non-stop flight," said the source.

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Re: Transport Aircraft for IAF

Postby member_20453 » 10 Sep 2013 13:49

Sweet, 6 more, I think perhaps another 16 on top of the 16 would be a good number in total. Time to order another 30+ C-130Js as well.


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