Indian Coast Guard: News & Discussion

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Leo.Davidson
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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby Leo.Davidson » 21 Jul 2014 04:25

chackojoseph wrote:International Maritime Organistaion commends Indian Coast Guard officer For bravery

Image

A subordinate officer of the Indian coast guard, Uttam Adhikari Mahavir Singh has been commended by the International Maritime Organistaion for display of exceptional bravery at sea while assisting in the fire fighting operations onboard merchant vessel MOL Comfort, thus avoiding a pollution incident.


Couldn't Mr. Uttam Adhikari Mahavir Singh SHAVE before taking this photograph.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby deWalker » 21 Jul 2014 07:43

Leo.Davidson wrote:
chackojoseph wrote:International Maritime Organistaion commends Indian Coast Guard officer For bravery

Image

A subordinate officer of the Indian coast guard, Uttam Adhikari Mahavir Singh has been commended by the International Maritime Organistaion for display of exceptional bravery at sea while assisting in the fire fighting operations onboard merchant vessel MOL Comfort, thus avoiding a pollution incident.


Couldn't Mr. Uttam Adhikari Mahavir Singh SHAVE before taking this photograph.


Navy officers, especially on long duty on board, get dispensation to grow beards. Many Indian admirals sport beards, and your opinion on what looks good might be different than their own, or their commanding officers'. See for example DK Joshi's official pic here. This gentleman is a hero, doesn't need to pretty up for us.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devendra_Kumar_Joshi

D/

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby Leo.Davidson » 21 Jul 2014 22:31

That's not a beard, it's a stubble. Look it up.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby deejay » 22 Jul 2014 09:46

Leo.Davidson wrote:
chackojoseph wrote:International Maritime Organistaion commends Indian Coast Guard officer For bravery

Image

A subordinate officer of the Indian coast guard, Uttam Adhikari Mahavir Singh has been commended by the International Maritime Organistaion for display of exceptional bravery at sea while assisting in the fire fighting operations onboard merchant vessel MOL Comfort, thus avoiding a pollution incident.


Couldn't Mr. Uttam Adhikari Mahavir Singh SHAVE before taking this photograph.


Leo.Davidson wrote:That's not a beard, it's a stubble. Look it up.


Couldn't you do some research on Naval, Coast Guard and / or maritime traditions before posting? Shri Leo.Davidson, please check what you write down, Uttam Adhikari Mahavir Singh has spent a long time in Service and does not need your inputs about 'Turn Out'.

The person in question was recognized for bravery and you would do well to at least mention that instead of a misplaced, ill informed and low down comment.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby Vipul » 07 Aug 2014 04:46

Cochin Shipyard Ltd Launches its Tenth Fast Patrol Vessel.

The Cochin Shipyard Ltd (CSL)launched the tenth of the 20 Fast Patrol Vessels (FPV) being built for the Indian Coast Guard. Ranjana Singh, wife of R K Singh, integrated financial adviser to the Director General of Indian Coast Guard, launched the vessel at a ceremony that was conducted at the Cochin Shipyard on Tuesday.

Cochin Shipyard director (operations) Captain R S Sundar, Coast Guard DIG T P Sadanandan, CSL finance director D Paul Ranjan, technical director Sunny Thomas and other senior officials of CSL and Indian Coast Guard were present on the occasion.

On the occasion, R K Singh laid the Keel of BY-511, the eleventh FPV. CSL has so far delivered seven vessels of the 20-vessel series and the eight vessel is getting ready for sea trials.

The seventh vessel ICGS AMAL was handed over to the Indian Coast Guard on July 18.

In 2013-14, CSL delivered five fast patrol vessels to the Indian Coast Guard and two high end Platform Supply Vessels to Norwegian owners.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby Sachin » 07 Aug 2014 10:05

Leo.Davidson wrote:A subordinate officer of the Indian coast guard, Uttam Adhikari Mahavir Singh

Uttam Adhikari seems to be rank and from the insignia it looks like that of a Chief Petty Officer of the Navy. Any idea on the Hindi ranks in Coast Guard?

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby krishnan » 07 Aug 2014 13:14

Sachin wrote:
Leo.Davidson wrote:A subordinate officer of the Indian coast guard, Uttam Adhikari Mahavir Singh

Uttam Adhikari seems to be rank and from the insignia it looks like that of a Chief Petty Officer of the Navy. Any idea on the Hindi ranks in Coast Guard?


http://joinindiancoastguard.gov.in/sailorentry.html

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby krishnan » 07 Aug 2014 13:19

BTW never knewn they are insurance cover


=> Entitled rations, medical cover for self and family including dependent parents.

=> Government accommodation for self & family on nominal licence fee.
=> 45 days Earned leave and 08 days Casual leave every year with Leave Travel Concession (LTC) for self, family and dependent parents as per Govt. rules.
=> Life cover of Rs. 50 lakhs at a premium of Rs. 5,000/- per month as (Officers) and for EPs Rs. 25 lakhs at a premium of Rs. 2,500/- per month Group insurance.
=> Contributory Pension Scheme and Gratuity on retirement.
=> Canteen and various loan facilities.
=> MCO rail reservation facility as Defence Demand Quota (DDQ).
=> 50% concession in air ticket booking.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby Sachin » 10 Aug 2014 12:39

The premium per month (which I assume gets deducted from their salaries) seems to be way too high!! A Navik (Sailor) joins at a pay scale of 5200 to 20,200. It would be some time later that he can easily keep aside Rs.2500 insurance premium on a monthly basis. Note that their pensions are also "Contributory" (not the statutory pensions which other forces have).

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby chackojoseph » 02 Sep 2014 17:46


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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby member_28714 » 02 Sep 2014 17:53

Sachin wrote:The premium per month (which I assume gets deducted from their salaries) seems to be way too high!! A Navik (Sailor) joins at a pay scale of 5200 to 20,200. It would be some time later that he can easily keep aside Rs.2500 insurance premium on a monthly basis. Note that their pensions are also "Contributory" (not the statutory pensions which other forces have).



Sir, Insurance cover premium is paid outside of regular wages. It is a perk and a necessary one considering the risk to life for being out at sea.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby arun » 11 Oct 2014 17:07

Coastguard commissions 11th Griffon 8000TD(M) Hovercraft, H-197:

11th Hovercraft for Coast Guard inducted into service

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby bharats » 28 Oct 2014 19:59

Coast guard ship Amartya to further bolster security off Karnataka's coast
By Jaideep Shenoy
Link: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 879329.cms

MANGALORE: Indian Coast Guard's mandate to protect Karnataka's 320-km long coast from a 26/11-type seaborne incursion received a shot in the arm with arrival of inshore patrol vessel Amartya at New Mangalore Port on Sunday. This 50-metre long vessel that displaces 297 tonnes and can achieve maximum speed of 35-knots will be vital to Coast Guard's endeavour to protect 16 vital installations along the coast including Kaiga nuclear power plant.

Eighth in the series of 20 inshore patrol vessels indigenously built by Cochin Shipyard Ltd, Kochi, the ship has an endurance of 1,500 nautical miles at an economical speed of 13 knots. The arrival of Amartya, soon to be christened ICGS Amartya after its formal commissioning at Goa on November 5 will help security forces including Coast Guard avert threat to vital installations, DIG Rajmani Sharma, commander, Coast Guard Karnataka said.

Stating that the vital installations have been identified as per a threat perception assessment carried out by intelligence community, Sharma said there is a need to protect them. "Indian Coast Guard has the characteristic that is military in nature and achievement of this force that is 30,000 strong has given Coast Guards operational in 41 countries in the world a boost ever since Indian Coast Guard apprehended MV Alondra Rainbow in 1999," he said. The Japanese Maritime Safety Agency now rechristened Japan Coast Guard, and Pakistani Maritime Safety Agency and various other such forces have started to take on a role similar to Indian Coast Guard, he said. The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea also provides Coast Guards additional territory to operate beyond their territorial waters and country exclusive economic zone and Indian Coast Guard is game for it, he said.

P C Parida, chairman, New Mangalore Port Trust, who welcomed Amartya, commanded by Commandant P K Jaiswal assured Coast Guard all help from the port. "Security of the nation must get top priority and it is imperative for the Port and the Coast Guard to work together," he said, while requesting Coast Guard authorities to complement the port's security along its Northern breakwaters post sunset. The port has a manned watch tower there.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby Vipul » 10 Nov 2014 23:17

Air Cushion Vehicles to be commissioned on November 10.

Two new Air Cushion Vehicles (ACVs) acquired by the coast guard, H-196 and H-198, would be commissioned by Karnataka Governor Vajubhai Rudabhai Vala at the Coast Guard complex at Panambur near here on November 10.

The ACVs would complement the existing four inshore patrol vessels with the Coast Guard, Deputy Inspector General of Indian Coast Guard and Karnataka commander Rajamani Sharma said.

The 21-metre-long ACV with 31 tons displacement could achieve a maximum speed of 45 knots, he said. It was capable of undertaking multifarious tasks such as surveillance, interdiction, search and rescue and rendering assistance to small boats and crafts.

The craft could move on land and sea. It operates by skimming over the surface of the water using a cushion of air created by two propellers fitted on top of the craft.

It was fully armed with heavy machine guns and latest state-of-the-art communication and navigation equipment, including radar and worldwide satellite communication, he said in a release here.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby saip » 11 Nov 2014 00:18

arun wrote:Coastguard commissions 11th Griffon 8000TD(M) Hovercraft, H-197:

11th Hovercraft for Coast Guard inducted into service


The 200-metre hovercraft displaces 30 tonnes and can hit a maximum speed of 45 knots.


More like 20 meters.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby arshyam » 09 Jan 2015 02:20

Cross post from the Porbander boat interception thread:

Saurav Jha's take on CSN improvements of late. As usual, lots of info, posting some snippets:

Terror boat incident brings India's post-Mumbai Coastal Security Network into focus

The feasibility study led by the ICG came up with a plan to implement CSN in two phases. Under Phase-I of the network, static sensors would be put up at 46 different locations along the Indian coast, with 36 on the mainland, 6 in the Lakshadweep & Minicoy Islands and 4 in the Andaman & Nicobar Islands. Phase-I, which is now complete, has been tailored to provide surveillance around areas of high sensitivity and traffic density along India's coast line. Near gap free real­time surveillance covering up to 25 nautical miles from the Indian coastline would however be achieved only with Phase-II, when 38 additional remote radar sites would be established as part of the CSN and these would be further complemented by some 8 mobile surveillance units.

As such, the project involves the setting up of frequency diversity radar, electro-optical sensors including CCD day cameras, low light television (LLTV) and thermal imagers, VHF sets and meteorological equipment on lighthouses and masts erected on DGLL land at up to 84 locations under both phases. The data generated by various static sensors would flow over a robust hierarchical network architecture, connecting ICG District Headquarters and Regional Headquarters to Coast Guard Headquarters in New Delhi.


Now despite CSN plugging into NAIS and various VTMS sites at ports along the Indian coastline there is concern that it would be able to identify only boats above a certain size. After all more than 2,00,000 small fishing boats operate from our coasts and several of these do not carry any kind of transponder whatsoever that would have otherwise plugged them in with the NAIS, CSN or VTMS. Indeed, it was just such a boat (typically less than 20-25 metres in length) that was used in the suspected terror attempt off the coast of Porbandar. The Mumbai 2008 attackers too came in such a boat.

So even if detected, final identification of friend from foe becomes a major issue for coastal security agencies when tracking very small vessels devoid of transformers. This is one of the reasons why the ICGS Rajratan was sent to physically tag the suspected Pakistani terror boat and investigate it.

It seems that at the moment the ICG and DGLL are also testing at least three different technologies for tagging and monitoring these kinds of small fishing boats. One of the technologies being trialled could involve the widespread use of radio frequency identification devices.


These vessels therefore represent a very complex asymmetric challenge for the defenders. They are made using easily available materials in workshops often in remote and forested locations. Yet they increase the costs of defending disproportionately. It is perhaps time that all concerned stakeholders start brainstorming on ways to defeat such threats before they manifest themselves. Besides refashioning deployment procedures perhaps using new modelling methods, attention will have to be given to garnering enough intelligence about networks that might be involved in the construction of such vessels, in order to neutralize the supply chain and expertise as it were.


Indeed regardless of the technology augmentation that the ICG's CSN represents, at the end of the day, given the sheer numbers of vessels that need to be tracked and the length of our coastline the role of intelligence cannot be highlighted enough. An extension of this would suggest that cultivating fishermen via outreach programs and making them an integral part of the CSN is imperative as is the need for multiple agencies to bury petty differences and share information in an actionable manner. Ultimately the real 'soft upgrades' in the security domain lie in getting the social network right as it were. The foiled terror boat attack shows that things may indeed be moving in the right direction for India on this front.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby ramana » 09 Jan 2015 06:34

How about requiring all boats to carry transponders to broadcast their position to some central location?

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby chackojoseph » 09 Jan 2015 06:58

ramanna,

These things do not actually get implemented as fishermen / small boat owners cannot afford or maintain them. The corruption. As an example, Maharashtra requires id card to be issued if some wants to join a boat. Now, the verification takes weeks and months. So, if they are paid Rs 500, the verification comes in few hours.

Coast Guard boats does not has bio metric readers onboard.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby SaiK » 09 Jan 2015 07:12

an IFF like system can be done via GPS. all these boat operator should do is buy a cheapest gps device, register it with CG/IN or other services. Tracking for free! even the huts carry a cell phone now-a-dins. i'd be darned if they don't

ramanna->raja ramanna? :)

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby shaun » 09 Jan 2015 08:30

^^^^ if the same IFF is plugged off from an Indian ships and plugged into baki ship , the scenario will be horrible. Educating the fishermens will increase the humanit and sweeping the coastal line the "hard way" can only bring credible deterrence. no easy plug in !!

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby shyams » 09 Jan 2015 09:38

chackojoseph wrote:ramanna,

So, if they are paid Rs 500, the verification comes in few hours.



I hope they are not just giving the "verification certificate" without any basic checks, even after taking Rs. 500.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby chackojoseph » 09 Jan 2015 10:41

shyams wrote:I hope they are not just giving the "verification certificate" without any basic checks, even after taking Rs. 500.


Well, it cannot be conclusively said. I remember the fisher folks telling me that there is a shortage of manpower. When boats are ready to leave and to get additional manpower, the Rs 500 routine happens. There is a possibility of non verified getting a certificate or the card.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby Sachin » 09 Jan 2015 16:43

chackojoseph wrote:These things do not actually get implemented as fishermen / small boat owners cannot afford or maintain them.

The fishermen are also some times acting too smart. The government (I don't know if it was the Central Govt. or the State Govt. in Kerala) had given money to all fishing boats to fix Marine VHF sets. This was done to help them get alerted in case the weather changes etc. These fellows cracked the "software" based lock of the sets, and made it operate on frequencies not allocated for Marine use (156Mhz). In many places they blatantly misused Police and Amateur Radio frequencies. So any new equipment given to these chaps also have to be tamper proof and "mis use" proof.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby Vipul » 14 Jan 2015 05:46

Boost for Coast Guard, Parrikar set to commission four ships on Monday.

With just over a fortnight following the interception of the suspect pakistani fishing boat, the Indian Coast Guard (ICG) is all set to augment its muscle-power with the planned induction of four ships in one single commissioning ceremony to be held in Goa's Mormugao Port Trust on Monday, a rarity of sorts. The Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar will be commissioning them all on Monday afternoon. It will be his first commissioning of a Coast Guard vessel.

Among the ships to be commissioned are two Fast Patrol Vessels (FPVs) and two Interceptor Boats (IB), both smaller swifter assets meant to ensure a quick response to developments taking place at sea. Both will sport indigenous design and development.

The larger of the lot are Indian Coast Guard Ship (ICGS) Amogh and Ameya, both FPVs built by the Kerala-based Cochin Shipyard Limited (CSL). While the former will be deployed at Paradip in Odisha, the latter will see Tamil Nadu's Karaikal as its home port. In addition are two IBs C-413 and C-414, both built by Larsen & Toubro in Surat of which the former will be based in Gujarat's Okha and the latter at Mandapam.

Said a senior Coast Guard officer, "We are seeing a spurt in these smaller vessels coming up for commissioning and thus it makes sense to club them all instead of piecemeal ceremonies which end up costing a lot and entail a lot of VIP committments." Speaking about the vessels, he said, "They are our workhorses at sea. Larger ships may give us more endurance but they lack speed and flexibility which comes from these vessels. As such assets like FPVs can be deployed in a long haul operation, whereas IBs are best suited for close coast patrolling and medium range operations."

Close to 70 ships of different sizes and aircraft (including helicopters and fixed wing) are in the offing for the ICG and are at varied stages of completion.

FPVs

Displacement: 290 tons

Maximum Speed: 33 nautical miles per hour

Crew: Five Officers and 35 personnel

IBs

Displacement: 106 tons

Maximum Speed: 45 nautical miles per hour

Crew: One officer and 11 personnel

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby shaun » 14 Jan 2015 12:13

ICGS Abheek of the same FPV class above and L&T IB below
Image
Image

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby chaanakya » 14 Jan 2015 14:01

ramana wrote:How about requiring all boats to carry transponders to broadcast their position to some central location?


This is 2010 report from toilet.
the Centre's failure to identify suitable transponders for fitment onboard fishing vessels less than 20 metres in length. The transponder first identified had to be abandoned after it turned out that most of these small vessels did not have power supply. So, trial for a modified transponder was underway until a few weeks ago, according to sources in the security establishment. Coast Guard is tasked to identify the transponder.


In various reviews it was pointed out that boats less than 20 mts (15Mt was the limit for fixing transpoders) did not have power supply. Fishermen were reluctant to put any such devices and fearful of tracking. Esp. TN where they are used to crossing IMBL and get into trouble occasionally with SL Navy. Smaller vessels did not require these transponders and they are in larger numbers In absence of independent and temper-proof source of power to transponder meant it could be cut off .

Most of the radar chains on the coast have been operationalised excepting a few.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby Sachin » 16 Jan 2015 09:34

chaanakya wrote: Esp. TN where they are used to crossing IMBL and get into trouble occasionally with SL Navy. Smaller vessels did not require these transponders and they are in larger numbers

Last week there was a minor incident at Thiruvananthapuram coast in Kerala. I don't know if the national media high lighted it very much. The Coast Guard vessel on patrol had spotted a fishing vessel moving suspiciously. So she followed the fishing vessel who suddenly started increasing the speed. Coast Guard vessel put on their siren, made announcement, and even fired a few warning shots. The fishing trawler tried to become a Kejriwal (Bhagoda), and finally Coast Guard ship fired a few rounds.

This fishing trawler was from Tamil Nadu and going to a Port in Kerala. The helmsman had no required licenses/documents and the trawler too seems to be not having all ID papers in place. The licensed Sraank (Helmsman??) had got down at a port - Muttom in TN itself.

These incidents just prove that the fishermen are acting too smart and dodging the law and order machinery given a chance. And when SL Navy etc. gives them back in good measure they start whining and expects GoI to bat on their behalf.
Coast Guard firing along Kerala coast: Intelligence agencies to probe incident

Fisherfolk protest against Coast Guard firing

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby Aditya G » 16 Jan 2015 20:15

^ A typical case we see in India is of small town folk breaking traffic rules in bigger cities and getting surprised at being challanged. Due to implementation of Coastal Security scheme, there is more policing of the sea now ... and fisherfolk need to adjust and accept it. Scope for "chalta hai" has reduced.

Moreover, everyone needs to be cognizant of the new normal viz security threat perception in the security forces. For example, maneuvering close to bigger merchant vessels was routine earlier, but now you may get shot (as it happened in Italian Marines case).

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby chaanakya » 16 Jan 2015 21:12

Yea I read that story and thought of posting it. The reason CG got suspicious of the Boat was presence of a student who looked differently attired than a fisherman going on fishing trip. It transpired that when Saarang got off the boat that student was taken on board as he was known to him. In firing that student was also injured in the leg and taken to hospital and later questioned. All harmless stuff and he got lesson of his life. Could easily have been terror boat. The incident shows that CG is authorised to fire even when not fired upon.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby fanne » 16 Jan 2015 21:23

Why is this not a big incident by DDM? Could it be that this was a genuine non terrorist boat? Is it fair to say in the future if the DDMs say that it is not terrorist than it is and vice verse?

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby K Mehta » 19 Jan 2015 21:13

A good article on rediff
Trust the captain on the spot
Sometimes security at sea will require action to be taken on mere suspicion alone

The recent episode in which a supposedly Pakistani boat destroyed itself at sea, apparently by setting itself on fire, has aroused a great deal of comment in the media. There have been some positive words for the Coast Guard which responded to the developing situation, such as it was, but also doubts about what had actually transpired.

Some suggestions have been made that the boat may have been involved in smuggling and not in possible acts of terrorism as seen in Mumbai in November 2008.

Initially, it was alleged that only the CG and not the Indian Navy, the apex authority for responding to and coordinating responses to developing threats at sea, was informed by the National Technical Research Organisation of the 'intelligence' it had through interception of some satellite phone talk; later, the Navy clarified that it had also received inputs from that agency. Other intelligence agencies denied receipt of any information.

In short, instead of the clear, confident and precise picture that should have been on display, we have a quite hazy and disjointed account in which the bona fides of the incident themselves have been questioned. This is disappointing and some clarity is needed regarding the manner in which potentially hostile inimical scenarios may develop at sea and the responses that these must merit.

In 1995, a good five years after the Indian Peace Keeping Force had withdrawn from Sri Lanka, a vague input was received at the Eastern Naval Command Headquarters in Visakhapatnam that a vessel suspected of carrying some arms and important leaders of the Tamil Tigers had sailed from Singapore, apparently bound for the east coast of Sri Lanka.

Indian naval ships and aircraft were immediately dispatched to investigate this ship, which was intercepted about 500 miles eastwards of our coast, and in international waters which enjoin right of innocent passage. Voice communications with the ship were not sufficiently convincing either about its cargo or destination, and it was ordered to accompany the naval ship to Madras, now Chennai, for further scrutiny; in effect, it was 'informally arrested'.

Shortly before reaching port, the suspected ship scuttled itself -- i.e., sank. Nineteen persons were rescued from the water but found among those dead was the body of one of the highest ranking leaders of the LTTE, Kittu, second in hierarchy only to Prabhakaran. Clearly, the vessel was heading for the LTTE strongholds in eastern Sri Lanka.

Even though India was not targeted, the purport was criminal. The persons on board were taken to Visakhapatnam, where they were charged suitably and, after a short trial, acquitted by the trial judge, who made scathing remarks on the Navy's illegality in apprehending a ship on the high seas in contravention of international law. Such things can happen only in this country. On appeal, the highest court, mercifully, reversed the ruling and expunged these remarks.

Again, in 1997, reports of arms movement to the LTTE in a vessel, this time sailing from Chittagong, came in. Once again, the ENC sent out a ship and located it in the middle of the Bay of Bengal. The vessel altered course rapidly, seemingly trying to ram the naval warship. A shot was fired to signal our readiness to use force.

But having burnt its fingers once, the Navy decided not to bring the vessel to an Indian port but to escort it towards Sri Lankan territorial waters where it was duly handed over to the that country's naval forces and with expected results -- the suspected vessel was immediately destroyed. Lessons learnt in the earlier episode helped avoid further strictures and uncalled-for deprecatory remarks. This ship also was in international waters when apprehended and India, though not targeted, discharged its lawful responsibilities.

More such incidents, albeit minor, have taken place. In more recent times a Japanese merchant vessel hijacked by Indonesian pirates in that country's waters was being taken to the Gulf when, based on information received, it was intercepted by in the middle of the Arabian Sea by ships of the Coast Guard assisted by those of the Navy and brought to Mumbai.

The captain and crew were tried and released but given our laid-back judicial process had, thankfully, already spent five years in prison before that happened.

In all cases, the suspected vessels were apprehended well beyond our jurisdiction, based on assessment by the captains of our ships that the intent was criminal. There is no illegality in this action whatsoever. Judgment as to whether a vessel is on innocent passage or not cannot be made by people sitting in well-furnished offices ashore or in conference rooms.

They have to be made by the man at the scene of action where weather conditions are often poor and communications only intermittent. This responsibility and authority of the person on the spot has been acknowledged and respected since man first went to sea and there is no reason why it must not apply today.

This brings us back to this recent incident.

First, full marks are due to the Coast Guard for taking a rather insipid NTRO report at face value and sending an aircraft nearly 350 kilometers away to look for a tiny craft. Second, hats must be doffed to the pilots of the small Dorniers who flew for long periods at an altitude of no more than 1,500 feet and were able to spot the speck in the ocean that the small boat was, and thereafter to track it continuously, no easy task as those knowledgeable about these things can appreciate. Third, kudos must go to the captain of the Coast Guard vessel which, after a journey of several hours, found and stayed with the suspicious craft.

All of these are operational actions and without doubt they were performed very satisfactorily. When hundreds of small craft are operating in close proximity as they do in fish-rich areas, it is easy for smugglers and potential terrorists to slip in as, indeed, they did for the Mumbai attack when the criminals appropriated one of our fishing trawlers and after killing all but one crew, forced the master to take them to their chosen point of disembarkation before killing him.

Some years earlier, in 1993, similar boats masquerading as fishermen had landed tons of explosives on the Ratnagiri coast, which were then transported by road and used for multiple explosions in Mumbai. To locate such nefarious activity in good time and then to neutralise it through preventive or responsive action is easier said than done.

Once an input is received, the agencies concerned must act upon it and, should investigation not merit further action, just forget it as part of a day's work. But if there is even the slightest room for doubt, proactive action is essential.

We cannot wait for more than 250 people to be killed in Mumbai before deciding that an act of terrorism has taken place. To stop the miscreants before they can do damage, assertive measures are needed. In this case, it did not matter if the boat was to be used for an act of terrorism or for smuggling or for anything else.

There was enough cause for suspicion. The worst possible scenario had to be catered for and actions taken to prevent it and, quite correctly, this was done. Security at sea in the existing environment is serious business and suspicion will often be good enough for firm action. Ill-informed rhetoric will not help; we must learn to walk the talk.

ramana
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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby ramana » 20 Jan 2015 02:14

Every Fishing vessel in India's EEZ to be tracked:Parrikar

Looks like what I suggested in the closed thread...

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby Thakur_B » 21 Jan 2015 07:30

ramana wrote:Every Fishing vessel in India's EEZ to be tracked:Parrikar

Looks like what I suggested in the closed thread...


It has been a long term plan since the Mumbai attacks. Costal radar battery was phase 1.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby Aditya G » 22 Jan 2015 23:41

K Mehta wrote:...In 1995, a good five years after the Indian Peace Keeping Force had withdrawn from Sri Lanka, a vague input was received at the Eastern Naval Command Headquarters in Visakhapatnam that a vessel suspected of carrying some arms and important leaders of the Tamil Tigers had sailed from Singapore, apparently bound for the east coast of Sri Lanka.

Indian naval ships and aircraft were immediately dispatched to investigate this ship, which was intercepted about 500 miles eastwards of our coast, and in international waters which enjoin right of innocent passage. Voice communications with the ship were not sufficiently convincing either about its cargo or destination, and it was ordered to accompany the naval ship to Madras, now Chennai, for further scrutiny; in effect, it was 'informally arrested'.

Shortly before reaching port, the suspected ship scuttled itself -- i.e., sank. Nineteen persons were rescued from the water but found among those dead was the body of one of the highest ranking leaders of the LTTE, Kittu, second in hierarchy only to Prabhakaran. Clearly, the vessel was heading for the LTTE strongholds in eastern Sri Lanka....


This happened in 1993 and not 1995. MV Ahat was the ship.

Again, in 1997, reports of arms movement to the LTTE in a vessel, this time sailing from Chittagong, came in. Once again, the ENC sent out a ship and located it in the middle of the Bay of Bengal. The vessel altered course rapidly, seemingly trying to ram the naval warship. A shot was fired to signal our readiness to use force.

But having burnt its fingers once, the Navy decided not to bring the vessel to an Indian port but to escort it towards Sri Lankan territorial waters where it was duly handed over to the that country's naval forces and with expected results -- the suspected vessel was immediately destroyed. Lessons learnt in the earlier episode helped avoid further strictures and uncalled-for deprecatory remarks. This ship also was in international waters when apprehended and India, though not targeted, discharged its lawful responsibilities......


This needs to be confirmed. In November 1997, MV Fratzescom was destroyed by SLN off Mullaithivu.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby Kashi » 18 Feb 2015 07:50

So the coastguard DIG is claiming that it was CG that blew up the terror boat and not the terror boat crew themselves.

Not that it makes any difference, but expect the likes of Swami et al to go on a trolling spree.

Why make such disclosures now?

Prem Kumar
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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby Prem Kumar » 18 Feb 2015 09:25

The CG DIG had denied making those statements. This is a hit job by Indian Express. Please see below the official denial by the DIG

I am sure the mofos at Indian Express either broke a law here or can be sued by the Coast Guard!

https://twitter.com/GappistanRadio/status/567906798423838720

Pratyush
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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby Pratyush » 18 Feb 2015 10:27

This would not be the first time the Indian Express has reported a fabricated news.

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby Singha » 18 Feb 2015 10:56

they alleged the army coup in VKS tenure. the same set of miscreants probably.

uddu
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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby uddu » 18 Feb 2015 13:52

:lol: Our media is full of morons
Question to media is...Let's assume that if the order is to blow of the boat..then tumko kujli kyon hota hai?

Are you Pakistani terrorists?

Why are you showing sympathy for Pakistani terrorists who killed people in the most brutal Mumbai terror attacks?
You people wish the terror attacks succeeds so that you can show it on TV? Let many Indiaans get killed?
If the answer is no..then why you bother whether the boat blowns up or get blasted away by Coast guard.

As per BR slogan " A good terrorist is a dead terrorist"

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Re: Indian Coast Guard Discussion

Postby uddu » 18 Feb 2015 13:58


This is one of the comment below the video.
We need more such officers who have the capacity to do that and blow those trying to disturb our peace from other side.We should respect such person.One Ajmal Khan have enjoyed a lot at taxpayers money but we need no more 

This is how normal Indians see it. Only the Media morons are the ones who act more Backpaki than Backpakis themselves.


And indeed if the boat is blown up by ICG..then thumbs up to them..cheers...where is the whistling symbol?


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