Disruptive Technologies List

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Disruptive Technologies List

Postby kit » 12 Dec 2012 13:00

Drastic innovations in technology that has the potential to completely transform and replace existing technology leading to unprecedented changes in existing scenarios.

1) Quantum stealth .. 6th gen stealth / optical camouflage
(http://www.hyperstealth.com/Quantum-Stealth/index.html)

2) Air breathing Rocket engines ..
(Reaction Engine's SABRE rocket engine ..
http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... es-379772/)

Please add to list. Hope moderators approve of a new thread for this list.

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Re: Disruptive technologies List

Postby member_20292 » 12 Dec 2012 13:25

Good thread.

Software. More so than hardware!

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Re: Disruptive technologies List

Postby Shrinivasan » 12 Dec 2012 22:58

Rail guns would be my addition to this list. also would be re-usable rockets.

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Re: Disruptive technologies List

Postby kit » 13 Dec 2012 17:09

Ok., i think its better to put a link for the latest updates

3) Rail gun programs : General Atomics Blitzer
http://www.ga.com/railgun-programs
www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWZPp3aEjuM

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Re: Disruptive technologies List

Postby Shrinivasan » 14 Dec 2012 06:43

Thanks Kit, you may also want to add a link to AVATAR too.

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Re: Disruptive technologies List

Postby kit » 16 Feb 2013 15:46

STSS-D satellites, SM-3 missile join for intercept

STSS-D, an experimental space layer of MDA's overall ballistic missile defence system, is a grouping of two satellites that employ sensors capable of detecting visible and infrared light.

http://www.raytheon.com/capabilities/products/stss/

http://www.janes.com/products/janes/def ... el=defence


Detect missile launches and track targets from boost phase into midcourse
Acquire and track short range air-launched targets
Track multiple targets simultaneously
Communicate with missile defense command and control systems
Provide “launch on remote” cueing information to U.S. Navy ship defenses before the ship itself acquired the target

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Re: Disruptive technologies List

Postby shiv » 17 Feb 2013 14:10

3-D printing

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Re: Disruptive technologies List

Postby Guddu » 17 Feb 2013 19:05

http://hbr.org/2013/03/3-d-printing-will-change-the-world/ar/1


3-D Printing Will Change the World
by Richard A. D'Aveni

To anyone who hasn’t seen it demonstrated, 3-D printing sounds futuristic—like the meals that materialized in the Jetsons’ oven at the touch of a keypad. But the technology is quite straightforward: It is a small evolutionary step from spraying toner on paper to putting down layers of something more substantial (such as plastic resin) until the layers add up to an object. And yet, by enabling a machine to produce objects of any shape, on the spot and as needed, 3-D printing really is ushering in a new era.

As applications of the technology expand and prices drop, the first big implication is that more goods will be manufactured at or close to their point of purchase or consumption. This might even mean household-level production of some things. (You’ll pay for raw materials and the IP—the software files for any designs you can’t find free on the web.) Short of that, many goods that have relied on the scale efficiencies of large, centralized plants will be produced locally. Even if the per-unit production cost is higher, it will be more than offset by the elimination of shipping and of buffer inventories. Whereas cars today are made by just a few hundred factories around the world, they might one day be made in every metropolitan area. Parts could be made at dealerships and repair shops, and assembly plants could eliminate the need for supply chain management by making components as needed.

Another implication is that goods will be infinitely more customized, because altering them won’t require retooling, only tweaking the instructions in the software. Creativity in meeting individuals’ needs will come to the fore, just as quality control did in the age of rolling out sameness.

These first-order implications will cause businesses all along the supply, manufacturing, and retailing chains to rethink their strategies and operations. And a second-order implication will have even greater impact. As 3-D printing takes hold, the factors that have made China the workshop of the world will lose much of their force.

China has grabbed outsourced-manufacturing contracts from every mature economy by pushing the mass-manufacturing model to its limit. It not only aggregates enough demand to create unprecedented efficiencies of scale but also minimizes a key cost: labor. Chinese government interventions have been pro-producer at every turn, favoring the growth of the country’s manufacturers over the purchasing power and living standards of its consumers.

Under a model of widely distributed, highly flexible, small-scale manufacturing, these daunting advantages become liabilities. No workforce can be paid little enough to make up for the cost of shipping across oceans. And few managers raised in a pro-producer climate have the consumer instincts to compete on customization.

It seems that the United States and other Western countries, almost in spite of themselves, will pull off the old judo technique of exploiting a competitor’s lack of balance and making its own massive weight instrumental in its fall.

China won’t be a loser in the new era; like every nation, it will have a domestic market to serve on a local basis, and its domestic market is huge. And not all products lend themselves to 3-D printing. But China will have to give up on being the mass-manufacturing powerhouse of the world. The strategy that has given it such political heft won’t serve it in the future.

The great transfer of wealth and jobs to the East over the past two decades may have seemed a decisive tipping point. But this new technology will change again how the world leans.

1
Richard A. D’Aveni is the Bakala Professor of Strategy at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business and the author of Strategic Capitalism (McGraw-Hill, 2012).

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Re: Disruptive technologies List

Postby Manish_P » 06 Jan 2019 10:45

Not really sure if it is correct to call this tech as disruptive.. or it is really an evolutionary step (a leap rather)

This Is What Color Night Vision Looks Like And It Stands to be a game changer

There is absolutely no debate that increasingly compact night vision optics and cameras have fundamentally changed the nature of warfare, as well as law enforcement and a host of other activities. But as revolutionary as these systems have been, they have historically been limited to producing monochrome imagery that can make it difficult to determine many important details at even modest ranges. In recent years, however, there have been significant developments in technology that makes it possible to see in the dark and in full color, making it easier to quickly identify items of interest and drastically increasing a user's overall situational awareness.


Las Vegas-headquartered SPI Corporation’s X27 Osprey full motion video camera is a great example of how far the technology has come, providing impressive color imagery in very low-light-level conditions. It’s hard to believe that the videos below were shot at midnight in their respective locations.




Image

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Re: Disruptive technologies List

Postby Austin » 06 Jan 2019 11:39

Indeed coloured night vision is impression , how long till we get coloured thermal sights

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Re: Disruptive technologies List

Postby JayS » 06 Jan 2019 12:22

Here is a demo video by SPI showing comparison with other low light techs. EMCCD come close but too noisy. They may be able to reduce noise in future perhaps. Thermal imaging has the clarity but its monochromatic. This latest tech betters all these as of today. But of coarse its marketing video.

https://youtu.be/c_0s06ORTkY

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Re: Disruptive technologies List

Postby kit » 06 Jan 2019 14:59


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Re: Disruptive technologies List

Postby souravB » 06 Jan 2019 18:42

JayS sir, I have seen some sensors that work by removing the IR filter and flooding the scene with an IR illuminator.
The basic working principle remains same i.e. cram as much big pixels as possible without affecting the resolution.
This works much better outside where there is some illuminating source like sky or stars. For pitch black dark indoor conditions, an IR light is required.

Austin wrote:Indeed coloured night vision is impression , how long till we get coloured thermal sights

Austin sir, an IR camera works by detecting the EM wave in IR spectrum. The wavelengths are different from which helps us to determine colors.

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Re: Disruptive Technologies List

Postby Ravi Karumanchiri » 07 Jan 2019 21:34








^^^^^^^
As I understand it, "Spintronics" are a bridging technology to practical quantum devices. Most press attention has been on "quantum computing" but the application of the technology is explained in overly superficial terms, so much so that most people don't see the advance beyond a vague notion of what it will mean in terms of "just another, faster computer". The truth is: This technology will seem magical when it's fully-cooked. That's probably the best word to describe it. (Quantum modems that are not only unhackable, but which also transmit information instantaneously, by means of quantum entanglement -- an instrumentality that is not limited by range.)

For the here and now: Such devices will run on software that is "fuzzy", not built on ones and zeros, but on numbers with umpteen decimal places; with instantaneous access to libraries of unlimited size. Read/write access would have zero latency.

I was reading about a fabulous experiment that produced a fascinating result: They super-cooled and high-pressure compressed a small quantity of helium gas. When they later warmed and expanded the gas, they carefully divided that amount of gas into two equal measures, kept them in special containers, and then removed one from that lab, to another lab, a great distance away. Then, they hit one cloud of helium gas with a simple electron beam -- and observed a corresponding disturbance in the twin cloud of helium, i.e. information transmission. Time stamps show zero time-pass between transmission and reception.

Using an electron beam to change the spin of helium atoms, or perhaps another more practical or advantageous gas, ideally nitrogen (most abundant, normally inert, not too small to store easily); we could, 1) compute, 2) transmit, 3) receive, AND REPEAT at extremely high speeds, with much less energy use all around; and zero need for exotic materials or rare earths. With this tech: Smartphones would port directly to "the hive" or whatever it'll be called. Any attempt to intercept the message, would disrupt the transmission, and not go unnoticed.

Essentially, a portable, handheld device would have "Super T1" access to unlimited computing power and total information access. Business travel would completely die, as you could "attend" a meeting virtually. People you'd work with daily, would only be visible to you if you are wearing your "work googles" (which would show a virtual workplace). You'd "work" physically in the real world, by deftly operating a robot at a great distance -- probably connected to a "manipulator" you could wear on your dominant hand. Robots and other equipment will increasingly be designed by AI systems, and produced in automated factories. Zero latency and high fidelity VR, AR and XR (virtual, augmented and extended realities) means distance is no barrier to high-touch endeavour.

Medical robots will begin doing house calls, but they'll wear the face of the doctor operating them.

If you're not thinking "hard core" scifi or downright magical, you're not even seeing as far as the horizon.

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Re: Disruptive Technologies List

Postby Ravi Karumanchiri » 08 Jan 2019 01:00

Scientists discover how to harness the power of quantum spookiness by entangling clouds of atoms
April 26, 2018 2.13pm EDT

<snip>

While entanglement may sound wacky, experiments have been able to show that it exists for many years now. It also has the potential to be exceptionally useful – particles linked in this way can be used to transfer a particle’s quantum state, such as spin, from one location to another immediately (teleportation). They can also help store a huge amount of information in a given volume (super-dense coding).

Along with this storage capacity, entanglement can also help link and combine the computing power of systems in different parts of the globe. It is easy to see how that makes it a crucial aspect of quantum computation. Another promising avenue is truly secure communications. That’s because any attempt to interfere with systems involving entangled particles immediately disrupts the entanglement, making it obvious that a message has been tampered with.

It is also possible to use entangled photons to enhance the resolution of imaging techniques. Researchers at the University of Waterloo are currently hoping to develop a quantum radar that may be capable of detecting stealth aircraft.

<snip>


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Quantum mechanics: entanglements in ultracold atomic clouds
June 27, 2018, Heidelberg University


In their experiment, the researchers used a cloud of approximately 11,000 rubidium atoms, which they cooled to extremely low temperatures. Using laser light, they kept the atoms suspended in a vacuum chamber, which allowed them to exclude any disturbing effects, such as collisions with air molecules. Because quantum effects are detectable only at very low temperatures, working with ultracold atoms is required. Like when measuring position and speed, these extreme conditions allow the internal state of the particles, often called spin, to be measured as well. "By measuring the spin in one half of the cloud, we were able to predict the spin in the other more accurately than the local uncertainty principle would allow," explains Philipp Kunkel.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-06-quantum-m ... c.html#jCp


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Quantum scientists demonstrate world-first 3-D atomic-scale quantum chip architecture
January 7, 2019, University of New South Wales

The group is the first to demonstrate the feasibility of an architecture that uses atomic-scale qubits aligned to control lines—which are essentially very narrow wires—inside a 3-D design.

What's more, the team was able to align the different layers in their 3-D device with nanometer precision—and showed they could read out qubit states single shot, i.e. within one single measurement, with very high fidelity.

"This 3-D device architecture is a significant advancement for atomic qubits in silicon," says Professor Simmons. "To be able to constantly correct for errors in quantum calculations—an important milestone in our field—you have to be able to control many qubits in parallel.

"The only way to do this is to use a 3-D architecture, so in 2015 we developed and patented a vertical crisscross architecture. However, there were still a series of challenges related to the fabrication of this multi-layered device. With this result we have now shown that engineering our approach in 3-D is possible in the way we envisioned it a few years ago."


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2019-01-quantum-s ... e.html#jCp


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What can all this disrupt? Plenty. But probably the first applications will be military. So given this application arena; what are we talking about? Missiles with seekers that are "bussed" directly to a network with zero latency. No real need for "on board computing", since entanglement is instantaneous and not reliant on things such as "line of sight" or "satellite signal relay". Nothing to jam, as this datalink has no transmitter/receiver involved. Quantum entanglement is the information transfer instrumentality, not RF of any wavelength.

Command guidance without line of sight or satellite or aircraft control/relay.

Truly dark comms with submerged subs.

Eventually, the tech will be in our pockets, or built into our contact lenses, etc.

And if the people of today were to suddenly find the technology of 20 years from now: They'd cut it open to see how it works, and they'd see a device they can hardly comprehend doing anything practical at all. Tomorrow's tech will look deceptively simple, but it will have great powers.

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Re: Disruptive technologies List

Postby Ravi Karumanchiri » 08 Jan 2019 01:18

shiv wrote:3-D printing

^^^^^^^^^^^
We call it 'Additive Manufacturing". According to ASTM there are currently 7 or so 'AM' technologies in use commercially; but everyone knows there are many more in labs, soon to be seen on the trade show floors.

This is definitely a very "disruptive advance" for industry and so also the military. Parts and systems are being designed and brought to the test bed at remarkably fast and ever-speedier intervals; which is definitely driving the learning curve upward.

AM is of great interest to me, and is already a "hot" area. I've heard it said that it used to be that parts and things generally, were designed for form, for aesthetics. Then, with greater insight into how things are better when they are made of lighter weight parts (thinner walled, less material usage, lighter means quicker and more efficient too, so also cheaper, etc.), the design ethos moved 'from form to function'.

Now with the design software systems in-use today, which are optimized for AM (or what you call "3D printing"), the software is suggesting designs, because the forces are the starting point of the design process (not how it will fit together with some other, preconceived part or system). As a result, the design ethos has moved on again, 'from function to forces', which produces "organic-looking designs" that mimic the living systems we see in nature.

I have seen a number of AM projects that are basically 'parts consolidations'; where an assembly that used to be made of several parts, some of which are prone to failure, the failure mode data is incorporated into the design, because the software demands it. The resulting design is not only 'lightweighted' (in that materials are used only in sufficient quantities to bear the loads/forces it'll be subjected to), but those several parts are now one piece. This simplifies inventories and entire supply lines.

Now consider, if something breaks on your oil rig or your battle ship, and you need a part to fix it: How many of which parts will you need to bring with you, to avoid 'sending ashore' for it? What if you had to 'go to port' to get that part, how long would that take?

A big part of the potential of AM is how it can shorten supply lines and lead times. Nowadays, the oil rigs and the battleships are all out there, with AM machines on board, to produce parts in situ, that are not in the inventory of replacement parts carried on-hand.





Last edited by Ravi Karumanchiri on 08 Jan 2019 01:41, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Disruptive Technologies List

Postby Ravi Karumanchiri » 08 Jan 2019 01:33

^^^^^^^^^
Even bigger advances are just coming withing grasp, when we combine a number of these disruptive technologies to create absolutely novel products.

Precision robotics and additive manufacturing are speeding-up the adoption of new materials; most promisingly, 'Ceramic Matrix Composites' which will give us parts with sapphire-like surface hardness and smoothness (wear resistance, temperature stability), but which will be minutely entangled with 'fuzzy fibers', probably of carbon-carbon. Altogether, there'd be nothing we couldn't build with this material, including 'hot parts' of engines that can run hotter than any metal, but at less than 70% the weight.

Depending on the dynamic loads of the parts under full power, the maximal forces are computed, and this informs precisely where the AM "3D printer" lays-down special materials along special axes, for precise requirements.

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Re: Disruptive Technologies List

Postby Ravi Karumanchiri » 09 Jan 2019 21:04

The US and China are in a quantum arms race that will transform warfare
Radar that can spot stealth aircraft and other quantum innovations could give their militaries a strategic edge.

by Martin Giles January 3, 2019


<snip>

Stealth spotter

How quickly quantum advances will influence military power will depend on the work of researchers like Jonathan Baugh. A professor at the University of Waterloo in Canada, Baugh is working on a device that’s part of a bigger project to develop quantum radar. Its intended users: stations in the Arctic run by the North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD, a joint US-Canadian organization.

Baugh’s machine generates pairs of photons that are “entangled”—a phenomenon that means the particles of light share a single quantum state. A change in one photon immediately influences the state of the other, even if they are separated by vast distances.

Quantum radar operates by taking one photon from every pair generated and firing it out in a microwave beam. The other photon from each pair is held back inside the radar system.

Only a few of the photons sent out will be reflected back if they hit a stealth aircraft. A conventional radar wouldn’t be able to distinguish these returning photons from the mass of other incoming ones created by natural phenomena—or by radar-jamming devices. But a quantum radar can check for evidence that incoming photons are entangled with the ones held back. Any that are must have originated at the radar station. This enables it to detect even the faintest of return signals in a mass of background noise.

<snip>

One of those technologies is likely to be quantum communication networks. Chinese researchers have already built a satellite that can send quantum-encrypted messages between distant locations, as well as a terrestrial network that stretches between Beijing and Shanghai. Both projects were developed by scientific researchers, but the know-how and infrastructure could easily be adapted for military use.

<snip>

Quantum compass

Researchers are also exploring using quantum approaches to deliver more accurate and foolproof navigation tools to the military. US aircraft and naval vessels already rely on precise atomic clocks to help keep track of where they are. But they also count on signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS), a network of satellites orbiting Earth. This poses a risk because an enemy could falsify, or “spoof,” GPS signals—or jam them altogether.

Lockheed Martin thinks American sailors could use a quantum compass based on microscopic synthetic diamonds with atomic flaws known as nitrogen-vacancy centers, or NV centers. These quantum defects in the diamond lattice can be harnessed to form an extremely accurate magnetometer. Shining a laser on diamonds with NV centers makes them emit light at an intensity that varies according to the surrounding magnetic field.

<snip>

Ned Allen, Lockheed’s chief scientist, says the magnetometer is great at detecting magnetic anomalies..... <snip>

As well as being used for navigation, magnetometers can also detect and track the movement of large metallic objects, like submarines, by fluctuations they cause in local magnetic fields. Because they are very sensitive, the magnetometers are easily disrupted by background noise, so for now they are used for detection only at very short distances. But last year, the Chinese Academy of Sciences let slip that some Chinese researchers had found a way to compensate for this using quantum technology. That might mean the devices could be used in the future to spot submarines at much longer ranges.

<snip>

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Re: Disruptive Technologies List

Postby Ravi Karumanchiri » 09 Jan 2019 23:59





^^^^^^^^^^^^
Any further development track for Kaveri engines is a dead-end, unless it leverages AM and CMCs.

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Re: Disruptive Technologies List

Postby Ravi Karumanchiri » 10 Jan 2019 00:53

The Markforged Metal Printers are unique in their approach. A part design is first enlarged by about 20%, and the part is printed using a variety of metal powders which are coated with polymers. The oversized part is then printed very quickly, and processed to remove the plastic, and finally run-through a sintering oven, to cook-off the remaining plastic. All that remains is the metal powders, which fuse together to form the part. They have achieved material density over 99.6% (with that 0.4% consisting of diffuse voids, which granted, do weaken the part somewhat -- but the part is still adequately strong).







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