Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_23658 » 25 Sep 2014 19:42

saip wrote:Ah, shoot. MOM forgot her glasses!

haha funny. but i think the blurry parts in the first pic at the bottom half are the shadows, while the second pic is showing the atmospheric envelope arround the planet, hence looks double.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Neela » 25 Sep 2014 19:43

Amol.D wrote:2nd photos up
cheecky comments :), loving the sense of humour

ISRO's Mars Orbiter @MarsOrbiter · 37m
A shot of Martian atmosphere. I'm getting better at it. No pressure

Image


Help me. Where is the martian atmosphere? I feel like an idiot now.
All I see is blurry edges. :(

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SSSalvi » 25 Sep 2014 19:48

^^^

If you are not joking .. yes the rim is the atmosphere

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Neela » 25 Sep 2014 19:50

SSSalvi wrote:^^^

If you are not joking .. yes the rim is the atmosphere


Not joking . Not even by martian atmosphere amounts.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby saip » 25 Sep 2014 19:50

Relax guys. I was just kidding. If you recall when US launched the Hubble space telescope some years ago the images were blurry and the problem was traced to a calibrating instrument which itself was off. And so they had to fix it with 'glasses' to correct the blur.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_22733 » 25 Sep 2014 19:53

http://blogs.wsj.com/indiarealtime/2014 ... r-mankind/

House Slave claims massas 'dad' is bigger than India's dad. Derrick Bell's rule#4 hard at work.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby shiv » 25 Sep 2014 19:54

A bit of rotation, cropping and enhancement later - I can see a river at bottom right
Image

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SSSalvi » 25 Sep 2014 19:59

sudhan wrote:I see no discussion about the imminent arrival of comet Siding Spring and its potential impact on MOM... Any nuggets on this?


Scan back a few pages .. given geometry of SS , Mars and MOM

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Amber G. » 25 Sep 2014 20:08

SSSalvi wrote:
sudhan wrote:I see no discussion about the imminent arrival of comet Siding Spring and its potential impact on MOM... Any nuggets on this?


Scan back a few pages .. given geometry of SS , Mars and MOM


Yes, it is well worth scanning .. (scan for posts by SSSalvi).

Brf has talked about this (a few times )

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby svinayak » 25 Sep 2014 20:52

A Chronology of Mars Exploration
No name (retroactively named Marsnik 1)(Mars 1960A) - 480 kg - USSR Mars Probe - (October 10, 1960)
Failed to reach Earth orbit.
No name (retroactively named Marsnik 2)(Mars 1960B) - 480 kg - USSR Mars Probe - (October 14, 1960)
Failed to reach Earth orbit.
Sputnik 22 (Mars 1962A) - USSR Mars Flyby - 900 kg - (October 24, 1962)
Spacecraft failed to leave Earth orbit after the final rocketstage exploded.
Mars 1 - USSR Mars Flyby - 893 kg - (November 1, 1962)
Communications failed en route.
Sputnik 24 (Mars 1962B) - USSR Mars lander - mass unknown (November 4, 1962)
Failed to leave Earth orbit.
Mariner 3 - USA Mars Flyby - 260 kg - (November 5, 1964)
Mars flyby attempt. Solar panels did not open, preventing flyby. Mariner 3 is now in a solar orbit.
Mariner 4 - USA Mars Flyby - 260 kg - (November 28, 1964- December 20, 1967)
Mariner 4 arrived at Mars on July 14, 1965 and passed within 6,118 miles of the planet's surface after an eight month journey. This mission provided the first close-up images of the red planet. It returned 22 close-up photos showing a cratered surface. The thin atmosphere was confirmed to be composed of carbon dioxide in the range of 5-10 mbar. A small intrinsic magnetic field was detected. Mariner 4 is now in a solar orbit.
Zond 2 - USSR Mars Flyby - 996 kg - (November 30, 1964)
Contact was lost en route.
Mariner 6 - USA Mars Flyby - 412 kg - (February 24, 1969)
Mariner 6 arrived at Mars on February 24, 1969, and passed within 3,437 kilometers of the planet's equatorial region. Mariner 6 and 7 took measurements of the surface and atmospheric temperature, surface molecular composition, and pressure of the atmosphere. In addition, over 200 pictures were taken. Mariner 6 is now in a solar orbit.
Mariner 7 - USA Mars Flyby - 412 kg - (March 27, 1969)
Mariner 7 arrived at Mars on August 5, 1969, and passed within 3,551 kilometers of the planet's south pole region. Mariner 6 and 7 took measurements of the surface and atmospheric temperature, surface molecular composition, and pressure of the atmosphere. In addition, over 200 pictures were taken. Mariner 7 is now in a solar orbit.
Mars 1969A USSR
Launch Failure
Mars 1969B USSR
Launch Failure
Mariner 8 - USA Mars Flyby - 997.9 kg - (May 8, 1971)
Failed to reach Earth orbit.
Kosmos 419 - USSR Mars Probe - 4,549 kg - (May 10, 1971)
Failed to leave Earth orbit.
Mars 2 - USSR Mars Orbiter/Soft Lander - 4,650 kg - (May 19, 1971)
The Mars 2 lander was released from the orbiter on November 27, 1971. It crashed-landed because its braking rockets failed- no data was returned and the first human artifact was created on Mars. The orbiter returned data until 1972.
Mars 3 - USSR Mars Orbiter/Soft Lander - 4,643 kg - (May 28, 1971)
Mars 3 arrived at Mars on December 2, 1971. The lander was released and became the first successful landing on Mars. It failed after relaying 20 seconds of video data to the orbiter. The Mars 3 orbiter returned data until August, 1972. It made measurements of surface temperature and atmospheric composition.
Mariner 9 - USA Mars Orbiter - 974 kg - (May 30, 1971 -1972)
Mariner 9 arrived at Mars on November 3, 1971 and was placed into orbit on November 24. This was the first US spacecraft to enter an orbit around a planet other than Earth. At the time of its arrival a huge dust storm was in progress on the planet. Many of the scientific experiments were delayed until the storm had subsided. The first hi-resolution images of the moons Phobos and Deimos were taken. River and channel like features were discovered. Mariner 9 is still in Martian orbit.
Mars 4 - USSR Mars Orbiter - 4,650 kg - (July 21, 1973)
Mars 4 arrived at Mars on February, 1974, but failed to go into orbit due to a malfunction of its breaking engine. It flew past the planet within 2,200 kilometers of the surface. It returned some images and data.
Mars 5 - USSR Mars Orbiter - 4,650 kg - (July 25, 1973)
Mars 5 entered into orbit around Mars on February 12, 1974. It acquired imaging data for the Mars 6 and 7 missions.
Mars 6 - USSR Mars Orbiter/Soft Lander - 4,650 kg - (August 5, 1973)
On March 12, 1974, Mars 6 entered into orbit and launched its lander. The lander returned atmospheric descent data, but failed on its way down.
Mars 7 - USSR Mars Orbiter/Soft Lander - 4,650 kg - (August 9, 1973)
On March 6, 1974, Mars 7 failed to go into orbit about Mars and the lander missed the planet. Carrier and lander are now in a solar orbit.
Viking 1 - USA Mars Orbiter/Lander - 3,527 kg including fuel - (August 20, 1975 - August 7, 1980)
Viking 2 - USA Mars Orbiter/Lander - 3,527 kg including fuel - (September 9, 1975 - July 25, 1978)
Viking 1 and 2 spacecraft included orbiters (designed after the Mariner 8 and 9 orbiters) and landers. The orbiter weighed 883 kg and the lander 572 kg. Viking 1 was launched from the Kennedy Space Center, on August 20, 1975, the trip to Mars and went into orbit about the planet on June 19, 1976. The lander touched down on July 20, 1976 on the western slopes of Chryse Planitia (Golden Plains). Viking 2 was launched for Mars on November 9, 1975, and landed on September 3, 1976. Both landers had experiments to search for Martian micro-organisms. The results of these experiments are still being debated. The landers provided detailed color panoramic views of the Martian terrain. They also monitored the Martian weather. The orbiters mapped the planet's surface, acquiring over 52,000 images. The Viking project's primary mission ended on November 15, 1976, eleven days before Mars' superior conjunction (its passage behind the Sun), although the Viking spacecraft continued to operate for six years after first reaching Mars. The Viking 1 orbiter was deactivated on August 7, 1980, when it ran out of altitude-control propellant. Viking 1 lander was accidentally shut down on November 13, 1982, and communication was never regained. Its last transmission reached Earth on November 11, 1982. Controllers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory tried unsuccessfully for another six and one ­half months to regain contact with the lander, but finally closed down the overall mission on 21 May 1983.
Phobos 1 - USSR Mars Orbiter/Lander - 5,000 kg - (July 7, 1988)
Phobos 1 was sent to investigate the Martian moon Phobos. It was lost en route to Mars through a command error on September 2, 1988.
Phobos 2 - USSR Phobos Flyby/Lander - 5,000 kg - (July 12, 1988)
Phobos 2 arrived at Mars and was inserted into orbit on January 30, 1989. The orbiter moved within 800 kilometers of Phobos and then failed. The lander never made it to Phobos.
Mars Observer - USA Mars Orbiter - 2,573 kg - (September 25, 1992)
Communication was lost with Mars Observer on August 21, 1993, just before it was to be inserted into orbit.
Mars Global Surveyor - USA Mars Orbiter - 1,062.1 kg - (November 7, 1996)
Initiated due to the loss of the Mars Observer spacecraft, the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission launched on November 7, 1996. MGS has been in a Martian orbit, successfully mapping the surface since March 1998.
Mars 96 - Russia Orbiter & Lander - 6,200 kg - (November 16, 1996)
Mars '96 consisted of an orbiter, two landers, and two soil penetrators that were to reach the planet in September 1997. The rocket carrying Mars 96 lifted off successfully, but as it entered orbit the rocket's fourth stage ignited prematurely and sent the probe into a wild tumble. It crashed into the ocean somewhere between the Chilean coast and Easter Island. The spacecraft sank, carrying with it 270 grams of plutonium-238.
Mars Pathfinder - USA Lander & Surface Rover - 870 kg - (December 1996)
The Mars Pathfinder delivered a stationary lander and a surface rover to the Red Planet on July 4, 1997. The six-wheel rover, named Sojourner, explored the area near the lander. The mission's primary objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost landings on the Martian surface. This was the second mission in NASA's low-cost Discovery series. After great scientific success and public interest, the mission formally ended on November 4, 1997, when NASA ended daily communications with the Pathfinder lander and Sojourner rover.
Nozomi - Japan Mars Orbiter - 536 kg - (July 3, 1998) (Planet B)
Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) launched this probe on July 4, 1998 to study the Martian environment. This would have been the first Japanese spacecraft to reach another planet. The probe was due to arrive at Mars in December of 2003. After revising the flight plan due to earlier problems with the probe, the mission was abandoned on December 9, 2003 when ISAS was unable to communicate with the probe in order to prepare it for orbital insertion.
Mars Climate Orbiter - USA Orbiter - 629 kg - (December 11, 1998) (Mars Surveyor '98 Orbiter)
This orbiter was the companion spacecraft to the Mars Surveyor '98 Lander, but the mission failed. Click here to read the Mars Climate Orbiter Mishap Investigation Board's report.
Mars Polar Lander - USA Lander - 583 kg - (January 3, 1999) (Mars Surveyor '98 Lander)
The Polar Lander was scheduled to land on Mars on December 3, 1999. Mounted on the cruise stage of the Mars Polar Lander were two Deep Space 2 impact probes, named Amundsen and Scott. The probes had a mass of 3.572 kg each. The cruise stage was to separate from the Mars Polar Lander, and subsequently the two probes were to detach from the cruise stage. The two probes planned to impact the surface 15 to 20 seconds before the Mars Polar Lander was to touch down. Ground crews were unable to contact the spacecraft, and the two probes. NASA concluded that spurious signals during the lander leg deployment caused the spacecraft to think it had landed, resulting in premature shutdown of the spacecraft's engines and destruction of the lander on impact.
2001 Mars Odyssey - USA Mars Orbiter and Lander/Rover - 376.3 kg - (April 7, 2001) (Mars Surveyor 2001 Orbiter)
This Mars orbiter reached the planet on October 24, 2001 and served as a communications relay for future Mars missions. In 2010 Odyssey broke the record for longest-serving spacecraft at the Red Planet. It will support the 2012 landing of the Mars Science Laboratory and surface operations of that mission.
Mars Express - European Space Agency Mars Orbiter and Lander - 666 kg - (June 2, 2003)
The Mars Express Orbiter and the Beagle 2 lander were launched together on June 2, 2003. The Beagle 2 was released from the Mars Express Orbiter on December 19, 2003. The Mars Express arrived successfully on December 25, 2003. The Beagle 2 was also scheduled to land on December 25, 2003; however, ground controllers have been unable to communicate with the probe.
Spirit (MER-A) - USA Mars Rover - 185 kg - (June 10, 2003)
As part of the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Mission, "Spirit", also known as MER-A, was launched on June 10, 2003 and successfully arrived on Mars on January 3, 2004. The last communication with Spirit occurred on March 22, 2010. JPL ended attempts to re-establish contact on May 25, 2011. The rover likely lost power due to excessively cold internal temperatures.
Opportunity (MER-B) - USA Mars Rover - 185 kg - (July 7, 2003)
"Opportunity", also known as MER-B, was launched on July 7, 2003 and successfully arrived on Mars on January 24, 2004.
Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter - 1,031 kg - (August 12, 2005)
The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) was launched on August 12, 2005 for a seven month voyage to Mars. MRO reached Mars in March 10, 2006 and began its scientific mission in November 2006.
Phoenix Mars Lander - 350 kg - (August 4, 2007)
The Phoenix Mars Lander was launched on August 4, 2007 and landed on Mars on May 25, 2008. It is the first in NASA's Scout Program. Phoenix was designed to study the history of water and habitability potential in the Martian arctic's ice-rich soil. The solar-powered lander completed its three-month mission and kept working until sunlight waned two months later. The mission was officially ended in May 2010.
Phobos-Grunt - 730 kg/Yinghuo-1 - 115 kg - (November 8, 2011)
The Phobos-Grunt spacecraft was meant to land on the Martian moon Phobos. The Russian spacecraft did not properly leave Earth's orbit to set out on its trajectory toward Mars. Yinghuo-1 was a planned Chinese Mars orbital probe launched along with Phobos-Grunt. Both craft were destroyed on re-entry from Earth orbit in January 2012.
Mars Science Laboratory - 750 kg - (November 26, 2011)
The Mars Science Laboratory was launched on November 26, 2011. With its rover named Curiosity, NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission is designed to assess whether Mars ever had an environment able to support small life forms called microbes. In other words, its mission is to determine the planet's "habitability." Curiosity landed successfully in Gale Crater at 1:31 am EDT on August 6, 2012.
Mars Orbiter Mission (Mangalyaan) - 15 kg - (November 5, 2013)
The Indian Mars Orbiter Mission was launched on November 5, 2013, from the Satish Dhawan Space Center. Insertion into orbit around Mars is planned for late September 2014.
MAVEN (Launch Window Nov 18-Dec 7, 2013)
MAVEN (Mars Atmospheric and Volatile EvolutioN) is the second mission selected for NASA's Mars Scout program. MAVEN will obtain critical measurements of the Martian atmosphere to help understand dramatic climate change on the red planet over its history.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SagarAg » 25 Sep 2014 20:55

The first pics are lovely 8)
Can @MarsOrbiter MOM color camera take pics in this resolution?
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _MC-13.jpg

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_28108 » 25 Sep 2014 21:00

SagarAg wrote:The first pics are lovely 8)
Can @MarsOrbiter MOM color camera take pics in this resolution?
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _MC-13.jpg

That is achieved by collating images/

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Ranjani Brow » 25 Sep 2014 21:00

Image

Martian atmosphere as seen from an altitude of 8449 km. Image taken using Mars Color Camera on-board ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby abhijitm » 25 Sep 2014 21:01

Raja Bose wrote:
sooraj wrote:India reaches the Red Planet! So why is Britain giving £1BILLION in aid to a nation that can afford a mission to Mars?
:((

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2767471/India-triumphs-maiden-Mars-mission.html


Somebody even claimed Mangalyaan was funded with Br1sh1t tax dollars. :rotfl:

They are right. Millions of poor indians don't need mobile. They need toilets. So to set an example vodafone should bow out of indian market and give up earnings of billions of $.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SagarAg » 25 Sep 2014 21:15

hecky wrote:Martian atmosphere as seen from an altitude of 8449 km. Image taken using Mars Color Camera on-board ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Mind = Blown. Shivers of pride down the whole body :D

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SSSalvi » 25 Sep 2014 21:22

Mars' atmosphere extends to 11 kms ( compared to 7 kms of Earth ) .. so one can't expect a thicker 'rim' around it.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_22733 » 25 Sep 2014 21:24

You mean earth = 70km

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Raja Bose » 25 Sep 2014 21:27

svinayak wrote:http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-29357472
Image


"The women were leading the applause when the good news arrived. They were celebrating more than men. Who said men are from Mars and women are from Venus?" says senior science journalist Pallava Bagla, who was present in the control room.

The picture - which brightened up my manic morning writing up the Mars mission story - went viral and became the event's image of the day.

People in their thousands tweeted that they loved it. One said "when was the last time you saw women scientists celebrate a space mission?"; another that the women showed "we don't need to wear labcoats". Others said the scientists in saris had "redefined mission control" and called them "true role models".

The chatter even veered into the contentious Indian debate about tradition and modernity.

Look at our rocket scientists, said one tweet, when women working in call centres think that wearing jeans "makes them modern and scientific". Somebody wondered why "no matter how much women succeed/achieve, the focus ultimately is on what they are wearing?" That, another respondent tweeted, is "because we have newspapers telling us that smart career women don't wear saris only western business suits!".

Although we do not know for sure whether all the women in this picture are engineers or scientists, they all probably work with India's space agency. Some 20% of Isro's 14,246 employees are women and their numbers are growing.

Nandini Harinath, 44, a physicist and a mother of two, was the deputy operations director of the Mars mission - in other words, she was the person "operating" the spacecraft between Earth and Mars. "It's easier to bring up children than to control the Mars orbiter," she told the NDTV news channel. Minal Sampath and her team built three instruments for the spacecraft and she wants to become "the first woman director of a space centre".


Can someone create a Tumblr page or FB post titled: " The moms behind MOM"? :)

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby svinayak » 25 Sep 2014 21:30


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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_22733 » 25 Sep 2014 21:32

^^^ what is that about? Can we have something more than just a link pls :)

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Amber G. » 25 Sep 2014 22:29

Now that all the orbital data is available... MOM is near farthest point moving with about .22 Km/sec..
(Other orbit is of MAVEN ..
Image

At this point... Some data (
Relative to Sun
MOM is at 212.664.784 Km and Maven is 212,739,073 Km
Velocity (km/s): 25.95 (MOM) 26.14 (Maven)

Relative to Earth :

Distance MOM: 225,369,223 (Km) MAven: 225,439,508 Km
Velocity (km/s): 32.90 (MOM) 32.90 (MAVEN)

Relative to Mars

Distance (km): 79,763 Km (MOM) 47,696 KM (Maven)
Velocity (km/s): 0.22 (MOM) 0.36 (Maven)

(If all of the calculations are correct... Siding Spring comet is still millions of Km away)

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SSSalvi » 25 Sep 2014 23:41

Few observations ( snoop operations ) about 1st pic of Mars by MOM. Based on orbit analysis.

1. If the height is 7300 kms then it has been obtained just after the MOI.
2. With that background , the time of snap is about 4 GMT on 24th Sep. ( 930 IST )
3. The craft was exactly over the area where the blue line ends in the pic below and the image has to be of area in the vicinity.

Image

Now some Mars geeks can tell us the geography of this location.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby V_Raman » 26 Sep 2014 00:06

Raja Bose wrote:Can someone create a Tumblr page or FB post titled: " The moms behind MOM"? :)


Done on my timeline!

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby CRamS » 26 Sep 2014 00:10

Guys, have the Indian drain inspectors: Adhothi, PMisra, Manu Jospeh et. all been activated yet to put out their theories on Hindu fascist India celebrating Mangalyaan alongside the usual poverty and the like, or how Mangayaan is actually because of western technology etc?

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Vayutuvan » 26 Sep 2014 00:19

What has gotten into Nightwatch now a days? Lifafa from Chinese/Pakistani lobbies? or just plain jealousy of Beltway banidts?

NightWatch - For the night of 24 September 2014 wrote:
India: India's unmanned Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) spacecraft entered Mars orbit on Wednesday, 24 September 2014, the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) reported. The MOM orbiter, also known as Mangalyaan or "Mars craft" in Hindi, is the first spacecraft sent by an Asian nation to Mars.

"History has been created today. We have dared to reach out into the unknown and have achieved the near-impossible," Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi said, during a visit to ISRO's mission command center in Bangalore.

Indian news services said that one of the most celebrated achievements of the MOM mission has been its very low cost. Inserting the Mangalyaan spacecraft in orbit around Mars cost just $74 million. That compares to the US NASA's MAVEN mars mission which cost $671 million.

Mangalyaan, launched Nov. 5, 2013 from the Satish Dhawan Space Center in Sriharikota, Andhra Pradesh, traveled 414 million miles to Mars before performing its successful orbital insertion maneuvers at around 10.30 p.m. Eastern on Tuesday, 23 September 2014, according to ISRO. The spacecraft carries five science instruments for studying the surface of Mars and detecting methane in its atmosphere. The probe is expected to function for about six months before running out of fuel and crashing into Mars, the Indian space agency said. (they havn't got the memo that the craft can go on for much longer)

India is the fourth country to launch a spacecraft to Mars successfully. The others are the US, Russia and the European Space Agency (obviously not a country). In this achievement, India has bragging rights over China, until the Chinese launch their own Mars space mission. (trying to make Chinese jealous of Indian achievement where as Chinese already congratulated.What is it to these guys whether India or China has the bragging rights and until whatever time? Indian scientists have been very cautious and transparent)

Comment: The Indians have boasted (what? when? They told as it is - it does cost less than making the movie Gravity) about the cut-rate costs of their space adventures. Some of those derive from the southern launch orientation of Sri Harikota. The Indian payload also is lighter and much less capable than the NASA Mars missions. Still, India is a developing country whose leaders appreciate the benefits of an active space program in their strategic environment. (tsk tsk tsk India and its scientists don't need patronizingly grudging respect - thanks but no thanks)

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SagarAg » 26 Sep 2014 00:27

prasannasimha wrote:
SagarAg wrote:The first pics are lovely 8)
Can @MarsOrbiter MOM color camera take pics in this resolution?
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _MC-13.jpg

That is achieved by collating images/

Thanks prasannasimha ji. So an image like this can be created by collating the images taken by @MarsOrbiter MOM :?:

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby sudhan » 26 Sep 2014 01:19

News from Germany :)

Image

Translation: "The impossible made possible"

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby rgosain » 26 Sep 2014 01:57

I am writing this from Cambridge UK, where I happen to be attending a conference on computational drug discovery, and the MOM mission has created a very positive attitude from the scientific and engineering community here, in stark contrast to the media and political commentators who are blinded by the false notion that this mission was funded by UK aid. In contrast, a few of the space scientists have expressed concern, that the constant harping and criticism of India by the UK media, have locked a lot of UK payloads out of ISRO launchers, whilst a host of German, Swiss and other European payloads are given free rides into orbit and beyond. The fear is that as India's space application industry expands, the UK could be at a disadvantage.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SagarAg » 26 Sep 2014 02:07

rgosain wrote:I am writing this from Cambridge UK, where I happen to be attending a conference on computational drug discovery, and the MOM mission has created a very positive attitude from the scientific and engineering community here, in stark contrast to the media and political commentators who are blinded by the false notion that this mission was funded by UK aid. In contrast, a few of the space scientists have expressed concern, that the constant harping and criticism of India by the UK media, have locked a lot of UK payloads out of ISRO launchers, whilst a host of German, Swiss and other European payloads are given free rides into orbit and beyond. The fear is that as India's space application industry expands, the UK could be at a disadvantage.


Said no news article, op-eds, news discussions ever. Be it Indian or international media.

Thank you rgosain saar for sharing this :)

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_23370 » 26 Sep 2014 02:17

UK can always count on ESA or SUAR-CO whenever they launch a slv :rotfl:

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Ardeshir » 26 Sep 2014 02:27

Just imagine, if this happened in September 2013 instead of 2014, we could have witnessed the birth of Rajiv Gandhi Lal Grah.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Amber G. » 26 Sep 2014 02:46

SSSalvi wrote:Few observations ( snoop operations ) about 1st pic of Mars by MOM. Based on orbit analysis.

1. If the height is 7300 kms then it has been obtained just after the MOI.
2. With that background , the time of snap is about 4 GMT on 24th Sep. ( 930 IST )
3. The craft was exactly over the area where the blue line ends in the pic below and the image has to be of area in the vicinity.

Image

Now some Mars geeks can tell us the geography of this location.


Here is Detail map of the area around (8° 24′ N and 69° 30′ E) - (google maps also can help)
Image

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SaiK » 26 Sep 2014 03:32

svinayak wrote:http://bcove.me/4cp3x2fl
would this be the same reason for the difference between crams ji and
?
see also: RBullah's note.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SaiK » 26 Sep 2014 03:35

SagarAg&prasannasimha wrote:
SagarAg wrote:The first pics are lovely 8)
Can @MarsOrbiter MOM color camera take pics in this resolution?
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _MC-13.jpg /quote]That is achieved by collating images/
Thanks prasannasimha ji. So an image like this can be created by collating the images taken by @MarsOrbiter MOM :?:
don't forget plain photography qualities - focus, lighting, exposure etc.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SaiK » 26 Sep 2014 03:42

matrimc, don't forget the pisskology dhoti shibber of low cost missions.. this itself will make competitors go crazy! even if they end up doing it, they definitely can't do it for the cost we have done it. that is the gripe and jealousy factor. it is a direct challenge to brand game factor, being cool on the billion d-allah club. from snake charming to bicycle launch to reaching mars on fasting and poverty stricken living conditions. ouch! how can you guys do this? it is unfair~to those who are in the other kinds of have-nots.

next move: UNSC considers sanctions on India for letting its people being poor, and going to mars.
Last edited by SaiK on 26 Sep 2014 03:47, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Ardeshir » 26 Sep 2014 03:47

Already mucho takleef in their Musharrafs with respect to the low cost factor - that our mission objectives are less, that our equipment is inferior etc. :rotfl:

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SaiK » 26 Sep 2014 03:49

when musharrafs blow up, it has no face to tell if it was hit by a million d-allah mijle or thousand rupiya microcontroller based sivakasi mijle.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_22733 » 26 Sep 2014 03:50

Yep, Big time "inverse" napoleon complex onleee. My ding-dong bigger than yo ding-dong :)

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SaiK » 26 Sep 2014 03:56

actually, my yellow eleven pings are better than your black skinned tea bags.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Rony » 26 Sep 2014 04:10

why are "beautiful" people dumb ? Kareena's dumb reply on Mangalyaan

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srStQAp7mfg


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