Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Victor » 14 Nov 2014 06:30

Vishnu wrote:I had the entire Mangalyaan team in our studios for a very special programme last night at 9 pm ...

Enjoy ....


http://www.ndtv.com/video/player/ndtv-s ... ion/344672

Excellent program which has given us some new info for the 1st time afaik:

* Mangalyaan is healthy and will last not for 6 months but for years (confirming what I had speculated right after Mars orbit was achieved :) ). Very little fuel is needed to remain in orbit by correcting orbit drift via thrusters and the on-board electricity generation is enough for internal systems and instruments, including data transmission and orientation of antenna via reaction wheels. The extra fuel (40kg instead of 20kg) offers the possibility of doing other stuff not originally planned.

* Mangalyaan is the only spacecraft on an equatorial orbit of Mars as opposed to polar orbit, thus offering a unique look at mars.

* Initial indications point to some gas signatures, specially during Siding Spring fly-by, although the data is still being studied.

* Even weather in South Pacific was considered for launch window in order for our ships to monitor the jettisoning of stages and injection into space.

* Trans Mars Injection date (Nov 30-Dec 1) was crucial as gravitational influences of all planets over the journey of 680 million km, 300 days in advance, was calculated in order to enter a window of 500 km, +/- 50 km, to enter Mars orbit.

* Golf analogy is teeing off from Bangalore and achieving a hole-in-one on a Los Angeles green.
Last edited by Victor on 14 Nov 2014 07:09, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Singha » 14 Nov 2014 07:09

Vishnu wrote:I had the entire Mangalyaan team in our studios for a very special programme last night at 9 pm ...

Enjoy ....


http://www.ndtv.com/video/player/ndtv-s ... ion/344672


I have written a criticism of the isro reply to one question in the international space thread.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SaiK » 14 Nov 2014 08:27

by default all our space missions including regular earth bound satellite launches must contain communication data routers/relays installed. the maven is doing this. such a capability can take us into much more into future deep space missions.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby JE Menon » 14 Nov 2014 17:15

What is amazing to me about all these pictures of the comet, as well as Mars, is not how different they seem in comparison to earth, but how similar. Damn, these could be pretty much any rugged desert environment on earth!

Damn sure it is only a matter of time (and not much of it) before traces of life are discovered outside earth.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Yayavar » 15 Nov 2014 00:33

especially as water seems to be quite pervasive - found on moon, on asteroids, mars and of course on comets.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SaiK » 15 Nov 2014 06:45

If the chemical analysis should not differ any between that water found on Earth to water say now being analyzed by philae! Voila! comets were actually the ones delivered water to Earth.

May be giant frozen comets/moons crashed into Earth some billions of years back.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_28652 » 15 Nov 2014 07:02

SaiK wrote:If the chemical analysis should not differ any between that water found on Earth to water say now being analyzed by philae! Voila! comets were actually the ones delivered water to Earth.

May be giant frozen comets/moons crashed into Earth some billions of years back.


There is a theory called panspermia by Chandra Wickramsingh and Fred hoyle. Very fascinating. They have been speculating for long that many of these interstellar clouds exhibit spectral lines very close to live molecules and such like.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby RonyKJ » 15 Nov 2014 17:43

Recently the red rain in Kerala has attrated a lot of attention and research and Wickramsingha was there to look
at studies conducted by a local researcher.

Btw, does water have to be delivered by another body? Couldn't it form by itself on a plnaet given the existence
of its constituent elements?

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SaiK » 16 Nov 2014 02:28

have anyone found how much energy is required to create water from h and o?

that will give a lot of pointers to the actual source of water. also note, if it has to be formed in Earth, a consistent state of that energy state might not lead to form water as it might split back to h and o due to heat. it has to be a much cooled down earth (after its formation), then the event happened like a big bang process, or series of such big bangs.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Lalmohan » 16 Nov 2014 03:51

if a comet delivered water to earth, did it land gently and offload an iceberg or million to fill up the oceans...
finding it hard to believe this scenario

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_22733 » 16 Nov 2014 04:11

Read up on "heavy bombardment period in planetary evolution". The early solar system would have billions of comets racing towards a newly born sun. Most of them are filled with primordial materials belonging to stars that went nova long back.

Water is a common material in the pre-solar material mix. Understanding the true composition of the pre-solar material mix is the reason why studying a comet is extremely important, since the oort cloud objects and comets are completely "pristine" and have not been influenced by the sun for long periods of time.

Anyway, the theory is that during the "late heavy bombardment period" massive commets the huge size (10s - 100s of kilometers) that carried mostly water either landed on earth or skimmed the earth like rocks skimming the pond leaving behind watervapor.

One single comet may seem small. But think of millions of comets per year over a period of a few hundred million years. Can easily fill up a few oceans.
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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Lalmohan » 16 Nov 2014 04:13

the impact of the comet on the planet would have released energy sufficient to not only create water vapour but possibly to disassociate the molecules back to its elements?

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_22733 » 16 Nov 2014 04:20

Yes, but when they cool down they re-associate themselves.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Lalmohan » 16 Nov 2014 04:22

and the planet hasn't been bent out of shape, orbit, orientation, atmosphere, etc., by the time all this H2O has re-associated, instead of forming other H or O based molecules

has anyone worked out how many comets would have to have hit us to deliver the amount of water we have?

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_22733 » 16 Nov 2014 04:27

I believe they have. Infact there is a group in one of the oxbridges or harvard/mit (dont recall) that have large scale simulations of planetary evolution and they came to a conclusion that you will almost always find a water rich planet in the Goldilocks zone of a sun-like star.

This is the reason why many people (including myself) believe that our Galaxy (and universe) is teeming with life. Just a matter of time before we come across something.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Lalmohan » 16 Nov 2014 04:29

am happy to believe that we are not alone - in fact on my home planet we find earthlings quite amusing
don't believe that life has to be water based
still struggling with the concept of comet borne water delivery

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_22733 » 16 Nov 2014 04:32

You are not alone (in finding it hard to believe the comet theory). Here is a page from NASA on the yes-to-cometary-water side:

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/sc ... st18may_1/

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Lalmohan » 16 Nov 2014 04:39

thanks for sharing, interesting - but still highly speculative

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_22733 » 16 Nov 2014 04:47

Yes, there is no definitive proof yet. Unlike you I am a believer :mrgreen: Inshallah the proof will be found soon.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Lalmohan » 16 Nov 2014 04:49

till then, live long and prosper

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_28652 » 16 Nov 2014 06:23

I am a believer too. Look at Titan Ganyemede. Simulations have shown even complex molecules will survive the impact on land. The inner core apparently remains cool . I will have to look up the references.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Jayram » 19 Nov 2014 22:29

Image

I grew from this small town in Northern Karnataka and this is the a welcome side effect of MOM. Long may it continue!

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Jayram » 19 Nov 2014 22:48

Image

I grew from this small town in Northern Karnataka and this is the a welcome side effect of MOM. Long may it continue!

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SSSalvi » 20 Nov 2014 04:12

Reg : MOM imaging Slding Spring

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-la ... -mars.html

I'm not exactly sure what, if anything, to take away from these photos. They are not of very high quality, but part of the problem seems to be a severe amount of JPEG compression applied to them before posting -- I assume the original data look somewhat better. The original image (posted on Twitter November 12) included caption information describing the top center image as showing a comet jet, but I'm quite dubious of that interpretation -- it looks like stray light to me, an imaging artifact. I post them here mostly in order to complete the set of Mars mission observations of comet Siding Spring! I look forward to future science meetings where scientists will present and discuss all the Mars spacecraft work on the comet.


Image

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SBajwa » 22 Nov 2014 00:04

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2014/201411 ... ews.htm#11

India's Mangalyaan among best inventions of 2014

NEW YORK: Mangalyaan has been named among the best inventions of 2014 by Time magazine which described it as a technological feat that will allow India to flex its "interplanetary muscles."

"Nobody gets Mars right on the first try. The US didn't, Russia didn't, the Europeans didn't. But on September 24, India did. That's when the Mangalyaan ...went into orbit around the Red Planet, a technological feat no other Asian nation has yet achieved," Time said about Mangalyaan, calling it "The Supersmart Spacecraft."

Mangalyaan is among the 25 'Best Inventions of 2014' listed by Time magazine that are "making the world better, smarter and—in some cases—a little more fun."

Developed by the Indian Space Research Organisation, the Mars spacecraft cost India just USD 74 million, less than the budget for the multi-Acacdemy Award winning science fiction thriller film Gravity. Time said at that price, the Mangalyaan is equipped with just five onboard instruments that allow it to do simple tasks like measure Martian methane and surface composition.

"More important, however, it allows India to flex its interplanetary muscles, which portends great things for the country's space programme and for science in general," Time said.

The list also includes inventions by two Indians for developing an exercise space for prisoners in solitary confinement and a tablet toy for kids.

Nalini Nadkarni, forest ecologist and college professor helped develop the 'Blue Room' with Snake River Correctional Institution in Oregon for inmates in solitary confinement, who for 23 hours a day see nothing but a tiny, white-walled cell, an experience some research suggests heightens mental illness and makes prisoners prone to suicide attempts and violence.

Last year, officials began letting some of them spend their free hour in a first-of-its-kind Blue Room, an exercise space where a projector plays video of open deserts, streaming waterfalls and other outdoor scenes. Nadkarni says the imagery is designed to calm prisoners, "much in the way we walk through a park" to relax.

Former Google engineer Pramod Sharma developed 'Osmo', a tablet toy that gets physical. Sharma got the inspiration when he saw his daughter playing with the iPad, but did not want her to be glued to the tablet all day long.

The toy, which debuted in October, has helped Osmo raise USD 14.5 million in capital and is now being sold in the Apple Store.

The other inventions are a reactor developed by aerospace company Lockheed Martin that could realize nuclear fusion, Apple's smart watch that besides telling time, can send messages, give directions, track fitness and make wireless payments and Microsoft's Surface Pro 3, a "hybrid" that bundles laptop into a 12-inch tablet and can run desktop apps. -PTI

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby srin » 22 Nov 2014 00:09

Technically, it is a 2013 invention, but heck, it is good free publicity.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby arun » 22 Nov 2014 10:05

SBajwa wrote:http://www.tribuneindia.com/2014/20141121/latest-news.htm#11

India's Mangalyaan among best inventions of 2014 ............{Snipped}...........


ISRO’s Mangalyaan Mars Orbiter is the second one on TIME Magazines 25 Best Inventions of 2014 and appears after the “Hendo Hoverboard”:

The Supersmart Spacecraft
Mangalyaan

Developed by the Indian Space Research Organization

Nobody gets Mars right on the first try. The U.S. didn’t, Russia didn’t, the Europeans didn’t. But on Sept. 24, India did. That’s when the Mangalyaan (Mars craft in Hindi) went into orbit around the Red Planet, a technological feat no other Asian nation has yet achieved. Building the craft cost India just $74 million, less than the budget for the film Gravity. At that price, the Mangalyaan is equipped with just five onboard instruments that allow it to do simple tasks like measure Martian methane and surface composition. More important, however, it allows India to flex its interplanetary muscles, which portends great things for the country’s space program—and for science in general.

The 25 Best Inventions of 2014

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby Anant » 08 Dec 2014 08:47

Any more data from this mission? Nothing on facebook, twitter, official website. Maven's data also seems spotty by NASA but MOM seems stone cold silent.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_28108 » 08 Dec 2014 19:43

Nothing seems to ber released once the launch team handed it over to the science team

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SaiK » 08 Dec 2014 19:51

I am sorry, neither NASA (to some extent okay) nor ISRO has satisfying images.. but Eus have done much better on their philea/rosetta and it is sumptuous for the eyes.


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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_28108 » 14 Dec 2014 18:13

Small snippet of information

"Study is under progress on the construction of a third launch pad. We have to take into consideration the kind of launch vehicles - GSLV-Mark III - and other future rockets to be developed while building the third launch pad," Radhakrishnan said.

He added that the health of the Mars Orbiter - launched last year - is good.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... IIndiaNews

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SBajwa » 07 Jan 2015 02:19

any updates on this?

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_28108 » 07 Jan 2015 07:17

Dat collection is going on.They are waiting for the 15 day "Eclipse" when they will lose contact with it and want to study if they can reestablish communication after the batteries have run out and are recharged.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_28820 » 12 Jan 2015 09:28

TLS Team Confirmed the existence of Methane in Mars Atmosphere.

More on Emily's blog

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2014/12301420-curiosity-results-from-agu.html

Want to know what ISRO has in its store from MOM's Methane Sensor

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SSSalvi » 12 Jan 2015 20:44

prasannasimha wrote:Dat collection is going on.They are waiting for the 15 day "Eclipse" when they will lose contact with it and want to study if they can reestablish communication after the batteries have run out and are recharged.


They can draw some results by using the existing data ( and acquiring some new data before solar noise blackout and solar eclipse of satellite ) .

You do not have to wait for only the new data after the eclipse ( if available ..if batteries wrk ... )

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SaiK » 12 Jan 2015 21:42

I think for future deep space mission, we should surge ahead with miniaturized nuke power as NASA does

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby member_28108 » 12 Jan 2015 23:12

SSSalvi wrote:
prasannasimha wrote:Dat collection is going on.They are waiting for the 15 day "Eclipse" when they will lose contact with it and want to study if they can reestablish communication after the batteries have run out and are recharged.


They can draw some results by using the existing data ( and acquiring some new data before solar noise blackout and solar eclipse of satellite ) .

You do not have to wait for only the new data after the eclipse ( if available ..if batteries wrk ... )



I don't think that they have stopped working till the eclipse occurs- what was said is that this will be a next "waypoint" or "hurdle" for the orbiter .
I presume the data they are analyzing will probably be submitted to a peer reviewed journal and be released to the public only after acceptance from a journal. I don't know in physical sciences but in medicine we have often an embargo not to communicate till publication date when we submit articles to reputed journals.

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby SaiK » 04 Mar 2015 08:46

hello mom! are you ok?

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Re: Mangalyaan : ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission

Postby adityadange » 04 Mar 2015 12:41

^^ isro has released a pic of mars taken from methane sensor. its on their fb page.


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