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Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Neshant » 18 Jan 2017 09:10

Perhaps parts of it can be disassembled and it can be carried in pieces.

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby negi » 18 Jan 2017 09:16

Many have claimed of superior performance on paper remember the MRCA trails ? Iirc except the EF and Rafale all others failed the tests in Leh.

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby rohitvats » 18 Jan 2017 10:05

It is not only about carrying the guns to a certain altitude but also being able to move the gun across sectors.

For example, the guns can easily reach eastern Ladakh by road. But what if you need to move a battery from location X to location Y? This problem becomes still more acute in eastern sector. Eastern sector has various valleys running in north-south direction in parallel with ridges separating them. And our road transport is like a Japanese fan - roads emanate from a focal point in plains of Assam and radiate outwards to reach these valleys. But there is no lateral connectivity.

What might be a few 10s of Km in lateral distance will turn out to be 100s of km because you have to travel downwards to Assam plains and then again go upward.

This is where the ability to lift guns between lateral sectors is most important. It is not only about taking a gun from plains to a place at altitude X.

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby rkhanna » 18 Jan 2017 11:39

After the Gun you also have to move enough Ammo to make the deployment worthwhile. How Many Trips/Helos will it take to make 1 Gun deploy able?

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby abhishek_sharma » 18 Jan 2017 18:27

Image

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Lalmohan » 18 Jan 2017 20:22

rkhanna wrote:After the Gun you also have to move enough Ammo to make the deployment worthwhile. How Many Trips/Helos will it take to make 1 Gun deploy able?


question to any gunners - what is the spares/lubes requirement when actively deployed? Assume that these complex beasts need a fair amount of maintenance also? How many hours before they have to go into some sort of maintenance mode?

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby manjgu » 18 Jan 2017 21:06

i think gun positions are pre determined, surveyed etc..and ammo stocked in proximity..

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Rakesh » 18 Jan 2017 22:05

A lightweight bullet proof jacket developed by BARC which incorporates carbon nano-tube technology has been tested for the Indian Army
https://twitter.com/IndianDefenceRA/sta ... 6180916224

After Waiting For Decades, Army Jawans To Finally Get Their First Modern Helmet
http://www.ndtv.com/india-news/exclusive-indian-army-jawans-to-finally-get-a-modern-helmet-1649923

After Waiting For Decades, Army Jawans To Finally Get Their First Modern Helmet
http://www.defencenews.in/article.aspx?id=249954

MKU to supply 1. 58 lac advanced helmet for Indian Army
https://twitter.com/IndianDefenceRA/status/821711627179425792

The corporation that is making the helmets...the website below does not work all the time, but when it does, enjoy :)
http://www.mku.com/en/

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Rakesh » 18 Jan 2017 22:12

Cold Start
https://majorgauravarya.wordpress.com/2016/09/11/cold-start/

Mjölnir, the legendary hammer of Norse legend had the power to level mountains. But the person wielding it had to be worthy. That was the only condition. Cold Start is fearsome in its potential for sudden destruction, but our policymakers must be absolutely certain, beyond a shadow of doubt, what they wish from this divine hammer. As the legendary inscription on Mjölnir declares, “Whosoever holds this hammer, if he be worthy, shall possess the power of Thor”.

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Nick_S » 19 Jan 2017 02:02

Indian Army Surgical Strikes Operational Demonstration | Army Day 2017

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTo1EDxEVsI


ATAGS at 3 min.

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Indranil » 19 Jan 2017 02:11

Not ATAGs, but Bofors.

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Nick_S » 19 Jan 2017 02:47

Ooops, ty. I guess I am keen to see ATAGS everywhere... hehe.

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Rakesh » 19 Jan 2017 02:51

:D that makes two of us Nick!

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Indranil » 19 Jan 2017 03:39

Hakeem,

1. External carriage is not limited to payloads alone.
2. CH-47F retains the same engine and transmission as the 47D.So although, there is an increase in the ease and flexibility of cargo handling, there is next to no increase in capacity.. With 22 % more power, you can probably add a 1000 more feet. Infact, 47F-blk2 which is supposed to come post 2020, is likely to be cleared for carriage of M777 to 6,000 feet. That aircraft will be lighter than the current 47F, have blades which generate significantly higher lift and 20% more engine power. So, you can put two and two together.
3. If I go by Ch-47D's hover chart, at 75F (10C lower), you can increase the ceiling by at most 1000 feet.

Image

With only 22 helicopters, and all the restrictions of range and time at those altitudes, it will be probably be faster to employ FATs to tow them throughout the day. It is a hare vs. tortoise race.

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby shiv » 19 Jan 2017 07:48

Indranil wrote:2. CH-47F retains the same engine and transmission as the 47D.So although, there is an increase in the ease and flexibility of cargo handling, there is next to no increase in capacity.. With 22 % more power, you can probably add a 1000 more feet. Infact, 47F-blk2 which is supposed to come post 2020, is likely to be cleared for carriage of M777 to 6,000 feet. That aircraft will be lighter than the current 47F, have blades which generate significantly higher lift and 20% more engine power. So, you can put two and two together.
3. If I go by Ch-47D's hover chart, at 75F (10C lower), you can increase the ceiling by at most 1000 feet.


The link below shows daytime and nighttime temps at Leh through the year
https://www.worldweatheronline.com/leh- ... ir/in.aspx

It appears that early morning temperatures are likely to be less than 10 deg C at Leh at any time of year.

Edited later:

I used the arrows on the graph to create one for 10 deg C at 12000 feet and 38000 lbs. Seems to show it doable at 70% dual engine power
Image

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby tsarkar » 19 Jan 2017 11:09

Indranil wrote:I have read this a million times and even heard Parrikar say it that the Chinook can carry the M777 underslung.


Presently Bofors 155 mm and M-46 130 mm are deployed at Siachen having been flown in Mi-17 and Cheetah in parts and re-assembled on site. They've broken up numerous Pakistani attacks. Ammunition too is flown in & stocked.

Obviously M777 cant be flown everywhere but when disassembled will require far lesser number of sorties than required by Bofors/M-46

Nick_S wrote:Ooops, ty. I guess I am keen to see ATAGS everywhere... hehe.
Rakesh wrote::D that makes two of us Nick!

The Bofors FH-77 design influence is visible on all three - Dhanush, Bharat Forge & Tata models. Since OFB has been manufacturing sub assemblies since 90's and the Swedes doing more ToT than anyone else ever did, it was easier to re-use & improve the sub-assemblies whose technology was available.

Visually I find muzzle brake & recoil shock absorbers common to all three and Bofors.

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Indranil » 19 Jan 2017 14:08

I have no problem in agreeing that the M777 is easier to carry in parts by man, mule or helis. But I don't agree that M777s can be carried from hill to hill by virtue of the Chinooks.

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Singha » 19 Jan 2017 14:39

moving the gun itself is 10% of the problem.

every location its taken to, including supposedly unmotorable firebases perched on some eagles crag - Quilla-E-Baaz - where will the charges and shells come from ? the need might be 100s of shells every day even for a small trooplet of 6 guns and associated WLR and weather radar. each 155mm shell is around 50kg + weight of consumable charge. 500 shells is 25+ tons ... quite a lot at 15,000 feet type altitude to move by air.

there is no alternative to roads and bunkers of pre-cached ammo all over the place.

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby tsarkar » 19 Jan 2017 15:39

Indranil wrote:I have no problem in agreeing that the M777 is easier to carry in parts by man, mule or helis. But I don't agree that M777s can be carried from hill to hill by virtue of the Chinooks.

You're right, not every hill to hill. But to hills where Mi-17 can't lift. And more often than the maintenance intensive Mi-26.

USP for Chinook is better availability than Mi-26.

M777 carriage will be less than 1% of sorties flown over their lifetime.

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby deejay » 19 Jan 2017 19:02

tsarkar wrote:
Indranil wrote:I have no problem in agreeing that the M777 is easier to carry in parts by man, mule or helis. But I don't agree that M777s can be carried from hill to hill by virtue of the Chinooks.

You're right, not every hill to hill. But to hills where Mi-17 can't lift. And more often than the maintenance intensive Mi-26.

USP for Chinook is better availability than Mi-26.

M777 carriage will be less than 1% of sorties flown over their lifetime.


Chinook's are being bought to fulfill the need for "heavy lift" helicopters for which we currently use Mi 26. Mi 26 are excellent in operations but are difficult to maintain. The experience with Mi 26 over the years "encouraged" search for alternatives. Chinook was the only alternative available.

That Chinook maybe able to carry M777s is an additional advantage and not the primary reason for either the gun or the helicopter.

The discussion on whether this is a good decision or bad is a different matter. For the record IA has managed to operate, equip, move and maintain guns in the remotest positions even when air support through helicopters did not come through for instance due sustained bad weather.

Hence, IMO and humbly at that, Chinooks may aid on some occasions movement of M777 but not necessarily always. Light weight guns will be useful in all formats of gun transportation.

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Rakesh » 19 Jan 2017 22:14


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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Rakesh » 19 Jan 2017 22:17

First large order for ballistic helmets for army jawans provides hope to industry
http://ajaishukla.blogspot.ca/2017/01/first-large-order-for-ballistic-helmets.html

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Rakesh » 19 Jan 2017 22:30


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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Rakesh » 19 Jan 2017 22:32


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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Rakesh » 19 Jan 2017 22:36


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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Rakesh » 19 Jan 2017 22:41

Making it Palatable – Managing Food Supply in the Armed Forces
http://www.indiandefencereview.com/making-it-palatable-managing-food-supply-in-the-armed-forces/

By Amit Cowshish - a former Financial Advisor (Acquisition), Ministry of Defence and presently a Distinguished Fellow with the Indian Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses.


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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Rakesh » 19 Jan 2017 22:45

'Indian Peace Keeping Force officers motivated, professional'
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/56670386.cms

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Rakesh » 19 Jan 2017 23:37


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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Rakesh » 19 Jan 2017 23:41

The constable’s lament
http://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/columns/bsf-tej-bahadur-yadav-army-video-29th-battalion-4477547/

By Abhinav Kumar - The writer, an IPS officer, is presently working with the BSF. Views are personal.

Outrage and disquiet following the video about food served to BSF jawans is understandable. But hype and hysteria cannot help resolve the issues it has flagged.

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby ramana » 20 Jan 2017 03:09

Akshay Kappor, Can we have a few posts describing the field rations that the IA serves up?
Thanks in advance.

ramana

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby ramana » 20 Jan 2017 03:14

Answering my own question. From Lt. Gen Syed Ata Hasnain

https://swarajyamag.com/defence/inside- ... he-soldier

The trigger for this anecdotal piece is the Border Security Force (BSF) constable’s video on poor quality of food and the article by Lt Col Noel Ellis’ titled ‘Dal Tadka Maar Ke’. I am a hardcore Awadhi aficionado with a penchant for multi cuisines. However, my family has one grouse against me; over time spent in the Indian Army my culinary tastes have become more and more desi. I blame the sub-units of my battalion, most of which I commanded as a junior officer. It is the taste of my troops (all Garhwalis) and the limited resources available in field kitchens, which developed my taste buds. The reader will get an idea of the passion of my choice when he learns that I gladly avoided food of the Officers’ Mess and sneaked into langars to simply devour that dal-sabzi-raita-kachri-rice-roti fare. I ate rice and dal with my hands, just like the men and slurped the last bit from the plate by drinking it up.

During operations in Sri Lanka, I enjoyed discussing with the men what we should eat when we were self-contained for 72 hours. The Meals Ready to Eat prepared by the Defence Research and Development Organisation is good once in a while for a change, but mostly flavours that the troops like the most. My men loved to have yellow rice, watery curd carried in rum bottles and a combination of condiments ground together to powder; it was called Garhwali namak. Shakkarparas and namakparas are the most popular survival rations. Consumed with hot tea in the jungle or on a long range patrol in high altitude, they are simply marvellous, and when under preparation in the company cook house, it is always good to visit because you get them piping hot.

As a company commander, I made sure that our Junior Commissioned Officer in charge of administration ordered all the right condiments, and the management of variety in food was done by add-ons such as pickle, raita, papad and chutneys. In Kashmir, chutneys were prepared from the fallen and damaged apples, which are much cheaper. Some of the saved sugar from the cook house was used to prepare these. The government gives an allowance in cash to the unit to procure pickle, papad and copra for troops; it is called PPC. This money can be put to great use to put some zing into the food of jawans. We saved some money by making our own pickles and chutneys instead of purchasing them and using the saved money to buy extra vegetables, so that the boys had two veggies for each meal; call it illegal or whatever you wish to.

When fresh rations do not fetch up many a time due to unforeseen circumstances such as the agitation on the streets of Kashmir or due to roadblocks, there are two options – first, go for local purchase if there is availability or resort to reserves of tinned variety. You get potato, tinda, turnip, peas or carrots, which can be mixed with hard varieties such as onions and fresh potatoes. Good old egg powder is always a suitable option for making a tasty bhujiya. There is enough atta around to make a superb halwa for dessert, which anyway is a must on Sunday at the mandir, masjid, gurudwara ‘parade’; yes everything in the Army is a parade including prostrating before God.

In most field areas, food is collected in groups by jawans in the most oddly shaped containers including ghee tins. It is taken to the section bunkers, where it is given an extra treatment based on individual taste. Ghee from home in the case of Jat troops, extra tadka in the case of all troops, rotis are made karari and the vegetable may have some add-ons, if a leave party jawan has brought some radish or carrots from a local Gujjar village en route to the post.

The biggest consumers of food are the civil porters, who trudge up and down from 4,000 feet to 13,000 feet every day carrying 20 kg of supplies on their backs. This can either be a jerrican of kerosene oil or a pack full of dry ration or tinned stuff. All this is a part of the summer effort to stock the posts because once the snow starts falling, no one can move and no supplies can reach. The tired local porter is not authorised any food, but can you ever expect the ever-kind Indian Army to be eating while the porters sit and watch? Hot delicious food is served to them when they reach the posts and if their local ponies are accompanying them, they too would at least be given water, if not some food. There is enough to go around and keep everyone happy. What is needed is ‘spirit’, not the alcoholic variety, but the human one – espirite de corps.

When good men relate to each other and there is a man above who welds them together, the spirit of camaraderie produces a different taste in everything, let alone the food which is consumed together. I just cannot understand how the BSF jawan could not get the food he wanted; either he was a true bad hat, a trouble creator or there is a larger issue which prevented all I have written from permeating the culture of the sub-unit he belonged to.

Some of my cherished moments concerning any type of food is, first, the prasad at our company mandirs in Sri Lanka during Operation Pawan. Good enough to die for; it was served almost exactly as served in so many good gurudwaras, in fistfuls when troops returned from operations. The halwa party stood at the entrance gate and also did a head count of those entering, just in case a hungry Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam militant did not get tempted to join the party. Another fantastic experience was that of climbing Kala Pahar in Uri sector. We placed a 180-kg steel flag atop the Kala Pahar 13 years ago; the flag displays the dagger of the Dagger Division in all its glory. The effort made with 15 Grenadiers leading and providing the logistics, led to my consuming 18 pooris for lunch along with aloo tamatar. I have never enjoyed a meal more than that in all my life. It was one of those moments when the hunger in the mind doesn’t get satiated but the stomach cannot take any more. The 7 Dogra’s breakfast at the Kaman Aman Setu in Uri was just amazing. The lingering taste of 3 Madras South Indian breakfast at Bandipore in 2011 continues to the day. That reminds me of 4 Madras, the Wallajah Light Infantry; I was to visit them at Velu in South Kashmir and the route was stricken with improvised explosive devices. I agreed to go there even in a Mine Protected Vehicle because I did not wish to miss their famed vadas and dosas.

As a senior officer, I would look down upon units, which tried to get fruits and special stuff from far away, but always complimented a unit, which could produce things out of what was available. Invariably these turned out to be delectable. This piece won’t be complete without a mention of Tibetan troops, who are the most natural cooks you can ever find. Every soldier is a cook and if you happen to be invited to a Tibetan unit for a lunch, half the unit turns up to do the cooking. The number of dishes is usually not less than 20. I was blessed to have three Maratha units in my division at one time. Once they came to know about my fascination for Maharashtrian dal, amras and poori followed by srikhand, I was the happiest guy around.

How can one forget the Gorkhas of all varieties? The best of their food for me was sel roti, the jalebi-shaped deep fried rice dough and a radish-based vegetable. Let me be honest; I once gave preference for a Gorkha flagstaff house guard because I was tempted by the idea of having sel roti once a week.

My own Garhwali bhullas whose fare has been mentioned in snippets throughout this piece make the famous highlander dish kachmoli, half-cooked mutton with a tadka of mustard oil and green chilies, consumed with rum by the side. A common snack at all Garhwali barakhanas is butuwa, the deep fried cut pieces of goat intestine with coagulated blood. It takes an acquired taste to enjoy all this.

The veterans and even the serving officers of the Army are going berserk recalling the variety and high-quality of their culinary experience with troops’ food. Almost each one of them bemoans the food of the Officers’ Mess; very soon one should have a few officers posting videos on social media to the Supreme Commander. But honestly, as someone who has been with mess food for 63 years, I think Officers’ Mess food has improved by miles. Everything depends on the interest one takes. On leave, I would learn an odd western dish from my wife or mother and then try it out in Punjab’s field kitchens during the deployment of the Army there in 1990-91. The keema samosas, dim sums, mutton chops and salads of some good cavalry messes can be amazing.

So, why not an Indian Army Master Chef competition? Any takers for this in the different formations? At least it will get the minds off from this unnecessary negativity. The BSF can try its own too.

Have a great Army Day and may the men and their officers flourish wherever they are.




Can some one post from Noel Ellis blog Dal Tadka Maare Ke!

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby deejay » 20 Jan 2017 07:48



Very encouraging to see Armed Forces, Para Military engage research institutes directly for solving our problems. It is fast becoming a culture. Definitely, the current Raksha Mantri has played a vital part in this direction and if this becomes institutionalized, it will be a great legacy.

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Aarvee » 20 Jan 2017 08:01

http://noelellisblog.com/daal-tadka-maar-ke/

DAAL TADKA MAAR KE
BY NOEL ELLIS ON 12TH JANUARY 2017 IN ARMED FORCES, ARMY LIFE, BSF, INDIA


I was born in B Company, 5 Platoon on commissioning into my battalion. We were in Jaisalmer of all the God forsaken places where a goods train of water used to come from Jodhpur many-many moons back or else one had to do dry cleaning. Anyways, by the time Bhindi used to reach us, it would be bhindi dry, Palak used to become palak fry, cucumbers were already crushed to a salad, lauki used to be lauki juice, dal used to be all stones, and any curry made used to be full of the golden sands of Jaisalmer. The day the train used to get late the whole supply chain used to go for a six. Luckily they found the mystical river called Saraswati, which had its underground connection till Sangam at Allahabad flowing deep below Sanu about 20 kms from Jaisalmer that we started getting the purest form of drinking water. Well, all this I am telling you to make you understand that times were harsh, communications were bad, train services were few, bus services were negligible, roads and rail tracks were invariably covered with sand, thus commuting was a big issue. Hence getting any sort of supply, dry or fresh was dependent on the “Majboori Express” the only train running between Jaisalmer and Jodhpur. Let me narrate a few stories of those times and then we shall talk about the video gone viral about the BSF jawan. By the way there used to be just one battalion of BSF stationed there in 1985.

My CO was very particular about the food, we the Second Lieutenants’ were the official tasters for the langar. Invariably one was the duty officer, or was detailed to check guards for a snafu done. May be sometimes when one forgot that the tooth pick stand of white metal in the mess which looked like a wild boar ridden with bullets was presented by Col Thorat or Thimmaya, I still can’t remember, though our senior subalterns tried their best by giving us additional guard checks. We used to love checking khana, as the officers mess khana was made by a Cook “Nair”, and it was more inclined towards the Gods own country taste. I preferred the desi langar khana, and mostly it used to be Dal Soup. A glass filled with dal, and about an inch of tadka with caramelised onions floating on them. It used to smell marvellous and used to be tasty like hell. My fauji friends will be able to relate to it I am sure. For a youngster like me, food of any kind and at any time was most welcome. This much was sure, we all took great interest in everything our men needed and food was always one of the highest priorities as far as welfare was concerned.

There was this old Punjab Regiment sardar chap called Parsan Singh, a Naik at that time and a driver by trade. His personal stove, a pure brass piece, was always impeccably clean and glittered like gold. I one day asked him why does he keep a stove in the first place and then the way he used to rub and shine it with sand, it would become invisible in a few months time. This man was a “pahalwan” basically, and his diet was way beyond your and my imagination. He used to make a special tadka, that too in pure desi ghee from his pind on this stove over and above the tadka which the langar used to put in the dal. Well, his barrack was next to the langar and we always found time to socialise with him while his stove was brewing this tadka. With a jerky Ram Ram he used to offer a little bit out of his degchi of dal. Let me assure you folks, I haven’t had anything like that ever in my life. The dal used to taste like manna. His mukki mar ke payaz along with it used to be ultimate.

This man had another issue and that was drinking tea. Mind you, you may be on a recce in a One tonne, three ton or a BMP, the moment the vehicle stopped anywhere in the wilderness, out used to pop a hand from behind the drivers cabin, in that typical kaanch ka glass and he used to say in chaste punjabi, “Saab Ghutk Cha pee lo” (Sir kindly have a sip of tea). The terrain did not matter, the bumps were passé, the jolts didn’t bother his concentration, Parsan, his stove in a bucket, and holding on to a degchi with soottar (cotton waste), the pot was kept on the boil, and saab always got the hottest of tea in the coldest of winter. Parsan Singh I can never forget you.

I also had one deputation with the PINJAs (means brother in Tibetan). One day while on a long range patrol of about 21 days, I was fed up of eating that damn tinned tuna for breakfast lunch and dinner. One fine day, as it had snowed heavily the previous night our departure got delayed. I entered the langar arctic tent and there I found something cooking. I told them why don’t you give this stuff to me to eat? They said Indian Army walas don’t eat this. I said I can eat anything which moves but not tuna. They reluctantly offered me that concoction. It was the tastiest Khichri I had ever eaten, made of Sattu, bichoo-booti and yak meat. This was at a pass called Ya Ye La, 15000 feet above sea level, about 45 kms ahead of Chushul towards Chumatang. Friends it was the most delicious, freshest, tastiest, appetising, yummy, lip smacking meal I have ever had in my life. From that day onwards I too became a pure pinja as I ate yak like them.

Well let me tell you about another deputation of mine where as a company commander I was authorised a cook. We had been pushed out from down town Srinagar into the anti infiltration role, and I was close to a lake called Ganga bal. Well, my troops were Nagas, Gorkhas, Assamies basically the hilly tribes. I being a pure Non vegetarian had a ball with them. On returning from a ROP, we used to get pigeons, all courtesy their catapults. Well, if luck favoured us while going through a village, one odd hen or a rooster was bound to be eliminated if not a militant. The best part was when these bakkarwals and gujjars came up. The leopards and tigers used to injure their animals. They had no choice but to abandon the lame animals. Invariably they used to hand them over to us, and I and my company used to have liver fry quite often. Moment there used to be a commotion in the gujjar camp, my cook used to be the first person to start sharpening his knives. I told him one day, it is a militant attack, he said no worries sir, we shall bar-be-que him too. Hari Prasad god bless you, you made the best of khana for me, even my wife will certify that.

Let me narrate you another anecdote. I was sitting outside my log hut, basically a cattle shed and watching a “barasingha” and its little one crossing the river. I was basking and causally asked hari do we have bread? He said yes, so I said make bread pakoras for me. Abhi lo he said, and within minutes I had a hot cuppa tea and a few bread pakoras for breakfast. The taste seemed odd but I hadn’t tasted bread in ages so enjoyed it and went off on my routine. By the evening it was hell for me. My combat pants were going up and down like the breach block on rapid fire. My loose motions had reached that proportion. I was in pain; the nursing assistant gave me all sorts of medicines. Next morning it was time for the drip to be put. I asked hari was the bread old, to which he meekly replied nahi sir, it came when we were moving to this post. I asked how long back we established this post, and the typical gorkha answer “hujoor ek mahino ko lagi”. I said bloody hell, and told him to show the bread to me. Friends it was green with fungus, but it was officer’s rations and how could he discard them. Sincerity, thy name was Hari. Well, I became Ok moment I smelt liver being fried in the langar.

Well, I rather not comment on the BSF video. Yes, there is something definitely amiss there. Is it the morale? Is it the man management? Is it the welfare? I leave it to them to answer, but I can assure you, we never went hungry, even when we had to live off the land. God bless our Army, they take good care of the men. Will BSF start introspecting and learning from this very important issue raised by this havildar? I wonder!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Sanju
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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Sanju » 20 Jan 2017 19:25

Just as an fyi...when the Good Colonel in his blog above referred to the below:
I was born in B Company, 5 Platoon on commissioning into my battalion. We were in Jaisalmer of all the God forsaken places where a goods train of water used to come from Jodhpur many-many moons back or else one had to do dry cleaning.


He was referring to cleaning oneself after the job...I am not sure about the quality of the TP much less about its availability in 1985, but in the 1960's as per my late Father, river stones did the job. Talk about getting stoned! :rotfl: :rotfl:

There is a story there with a brave heart getting a VC.

shiv
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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby shiv » 20 Jan 2017 20:36

Sanju wrote:He was referring to cleaning oneself after the job...I am not sure about the quality of the TP much less about its availability in 1985, .

Toilet paper was only available in fancy stores in 1985. Even disposable diapers were not available - well some were and they were of very poor quality. In the 1960s? Fuggedaboutit

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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Rakesh » 21 Jan 2017 00:30


Rakesh
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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby Rakesh » 21 Jan 2017 00:31

Indian Army to revise Cold Start to give Pakistan the jitters
http://www.india.com/news/india/indian-army-to-revise-cold-start-to-give-pakistan-the-jitters-1771188/
According to senior serving and retired Army officers, the armoured, mechanized infantry and artillery arms have been trained for rapid mobility across the border.


Cold Start: India to Deploy Massive Tank Army Along Border With Pakistan
http://thediplomat.com/2017/01/india-to-deploy-massive-tank-army-along-border-with-pakistan/
The Indian Army plans to deploy almost 500 main battle tanks along the India-Pakistan border.

AdityaM
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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby AdityaM » 21 Jan 2017 19:09

Court-martialled army officer reinstated after 26 years, def min fined Rs 5 cr

The officer’s ordeal began when he recovered 147 gold biscuits weighing around 27.5kg during a search operation in Srinagar on April 11, 1990.

In his petition, Chauhan pointed out that the gold biscuits were recovered from a house in the presence of other soldiers and were handed over to the then Colonel KRS Pawar and then Lt General Zaki Mohammad Ahmad.

The gold biscuits were allegedly ‘embezzled’ by the senior army officers.

During the trial, the tribunal observed that Chauhan’s senior officers implicated him in false cases to ensure that the recovery of gold could be concealed from the government.


Military justice took 26 years!

kit
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Re: Indian Army News & Discussions - 11 June 2014

Postby kit » 21 Jan 2017 20:10

As the IA moves towards SDR s the future might well be Cognitive radio

http://mil-embedded.com/articles/evolving-technology-sdr-cognitive-radio/


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