India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

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Karan M
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 18 Apr 2016 22:49

deejay wrote:
Karan M wrote:Indigenous Commanders Sight for Arjun Mk2. Replaces the Elbit COAPS used for initial trials. As predicted the DRDO stabilized sight development has worked. :D

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-LJi-fFgihys/ ... BSight.jpg


Karan, I think even Tonbo makes similar products. Is this some earlier DRDO initiative or was Tonbo alternative not considered / overlooked for this?


This is the DRDO sight from which (IMHO) this one was derived.

Ranjani Brow wrote:Breakthrough in indigenous E/O sensor tech

A heartening new indigenous development could take care of India's over-dependence on foreign suppliers for critical electro-optical sensors for surface payloads. The DRDO's Instruments Research and Development Establishment (IRDE) in Dehradun has developed a Stabilised Electro Optical Sight (SEOS) with two-axis stabilisation and an integrated automatic video tracker facility. The indigenous SEOS has three electro-optical sensors, 3rd generation 3-5 µm (640 x 512 FPA) thermal imager (TI) with optical zoom, colour day TV with optical zoom camera and eye-safe laser range finder (ELRF). The day TV camera and TI sport a narrow field of view (NFOV) of 0.8° x 0.6° and wide field of view (WFOV) of 5° x 4° with additional 2 X electronic zoom in TI. These sensors provide a recognition range of 7 km for a NATO type of target. ELRF provides range of the target from 200 m to 9995 m with an accuracy of ± 5 m. According to DRDO, "The modular approach of this sight results into a quick customisation for different applications namely fire control solution for armoured fighting vehicles, surveillance from high speed boats and low altitude aerostat, and tracking system for a QR-SAM." The DRDO will be looking to integrate the new sight onto a slew of upcoming products.


SEOS has three electro-optical sensors:

1. Thermal imager (TI) -
    3rd generation 3-5 µm (640 x 512 FPA)
    Narrow field of view (NFOV) - 0.8° x 0.6°
    Wide field of view (WFOV) - 5° x 4°
    2 X electronic zoom
    7 km for a NATO type of target

2. Colour day TV camera -
    Narrow field of view (NFOV) - 0.8° x 0.6°
    Wide field of view (WFOV) - 5° x 4°
    7 km for a NATO type of target

3. Eye-Safe laser range finder (ELRF)
    Range of the target - 200 m to 9995 m (± 5 m)

-----------------------------------------------------------------

Image

This is the picture given in the article. Isn't this the improved/modified (by IRDE) COAPS from Elbit Systems for Arjun Mk II manufactured by an Indian firm VEM Technologies ?


In short, the IRDE worked with Elbit to create a fully stabilized sighting system for armoured vehicles (which basically means that all gunners sights on our tanks can ALSO be locally made!).

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby srai » 19 Apr 2016 02:15

Gyan,

What's with your obsession with criticizing HAL (or something else) on almost every post? Do you have some personal vendetta against them in particular? We all criticize from time to time but yours is approaching the unhealthy. Why not post some positive things (not related to HAL) more often :wink:

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby rkhanna » 19 Apr 2016 14:29

For what its worth ...

Two Engineers from TN Claimed to have created a Combat Suit with Radar and some sort of EMP Weapon

News Article
http://www.newindianexpress.com/education/edex/Iron-Man-Suits-for-the-Army/2016/04/18/article3380533.ece

Their Paper
http://ijirset.com/upload/2016/ncfcsps/36_2_new.pdf

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby srin » 19 Apr 2016 15:26

^^ No batteries ? Power consumption would be huge ...

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 19 Apr 2016 16:29


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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jayasimha » 19 Apr 2016 21:04

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp ... 491241.ece

Image

Defence preparedness: the way forward

“Are things moving in [the] MoD [Ministry of Defence]?” is the question on everyone’s lips in defence seminars these days. It’s time for a reality check after the recently concluded DefExpo (which was the ninth in the series of biennial land, naval and internal homeland security systems exhibitions), and the newly released Defence Procurement Procedure (DPP) 2016.

It all boils down to the “environment” created by the government with three clear signals from the Union Defence Minister, Manohar Parrikar. First, the government can claim credit for demonstrating intent to energise the procurement process by accepting many of the suggestions of the Dhirendra Singh Committee set up to make recommendations to revamp the DPP. The introduction of a new category of Buy Indian (or IDDM, Indigenous Design Development and Manufacture), the graded acceptance of better quality through the introduction of an “enhanced” performance parameter clause, and the sudden energisation of private players in defence manufacturing are some cause for cheer.

Second, many of the rules that hitherto put the private industry at a disadvantage vis-à-vis the Defence Public Sector Undertakings (DPSU) have been modified or removed. Thus, “nomination” of a DPSU for absorbing transfer of technology has been done away with and the tax exemptions withdrawn, which effectively makes pricing more competitive.

Boosting MSMEs

Third and most important, there is visible incentivisation of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSME) in many spheres. Their energetic response to the government’s initiatives is seen in their setting up of a Defence Innovators and Industry Association to “interact with Government decision-makers to ensure a policy that encourages design and development of defence equipment with IP [Intellectual Property] ownership in Indian companies”. This bodes well for the future since MSMEs, which are the Tier-II and -III suppliers, are the crucibles of innovation and the true determinants of indigenisation.

So far so good. But there is still a huge amount of work left. Acceptance of some of the far-reaching recommendations of the Dhirendra Singh Committee, even at the expense of expending political capital, is the need of the hour. There are four key requirements. Foremost is the creation of a Procurement Executive (PE) outside the government. The thought that the PE should be autonomous is a radical suggestion, but desperate times call for desperate measures. To quote the committee, “Steps should be initiated without further ado to set up a specialised structure outside the formal structure of the Ministry of Defence.”

Second, the acceptance of selecting strategic partners in six key sectors (aircraft, ship building, et al. ) is good but would require diligent implementation. Opposition to this has already begun, but the laissez-faire approach of “anyone can make a complex item, so keep an open competition” has to be turned round through transparent, affirmative selection of private players who have the capability and capacity to deliver. Decades of pumping in billions in the research and development (R&D) budget of the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) has resulted in very little, and meandering in future through open competitions in these vital sectors would lead to the same results.

Third, the empowering of the private sector by letting them lead in large ‘Make in India’ projects, with support from the DRDO, is unique as is the suggestion to give weightage to quality by following the L1T1 concept (selecting better technology, not necessarily at the lowest price) in the techno-commercial bid evaluation; both will incentivise them no end and result in true R&D generation. The challenge lies in its implementation in letter and in spirit.

Last, all good intentions will come undone if acquisition manpower remains untrained. The process has been ad hoc at best. Despite noble intentions, the tough world of defence procurements has seen us being bested in terms of selection of equipment, the contracting procedure, acceptance and the follow through in-service. All foreign manufacturers have dedicated professional procurement teams with decades of experience. Unfortunately, two years of this government have elapsed with absolutely no movement in this area.

Must be ‘election-proof’

With the new DPP in place, one hopes that it empowers the procurement process to become election-proof — national security cannot be held hostage to ineffective functioning of personnel who constitute the MoD and the political system. The DPP should commit to action the people tasked with procuring capability for the war fighter so that the momentum of defence procurements cannot be derailed. The state of preparedness of the defence forces has to be an activity in continuum, with or without bipartisan support.

So, is there light at the end of the tunnel? Well, DefExpo this year did attract more participating countries — 46 from 30 in 2014 — but the proof of the pudding lies in Indian private enterprise now driving linkages with foreign manufacturers for technology and business. There has been a surge in the number of defence licences being issued by the MoD, and it is heartening to see majors like the Tatas, Reliance, L&T, Mahindras, and so on set up shop in varied defence manufacturing areas. Despite speed bumps like the delayed Rafale Fighter deal, the Avro aircraft replacement and mid-air refueller aircraft contracts, sentiment is positive. Procurement for defence can be as cruel as it gets, as there is no place for sentiment, just the brute successes in R&D and finished products. The energies generated following DefExpo and the new DPP-2016, if converted to actual, professional R&D, would be true indicators of the government being on the right track in enabling defence indigenisation and regaining its strategic autonomy.

Manmohan Bahadur, Air Vice-Marshal (retired), is a Distinguished Fellow at the Centre

for Air Power Studies, New Delhi. The views expressed are personal.


The incentivisation of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises bodes well for the future since they are the crucibles of innovation

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby SaiK » 20 Apr 2016 19:17

^^

Must be ‘election-proof’

With the new DPP in place, one hopes that it empowers the procurement process to become election-proof — national security cannot be held hostage to ineffective functioning of personnel who constitute the MoD and the political system. The DPP should commit to action the people tasked with procuring capability for the war fighter so that the momentum of defence procurements cannot be derailed. The state of preparedness of the defence forces has to be an activity in continuum, with or without bipartisan support.


well, national security cannot be held hostage to ineffective strategic and logistics proposals from the forces as well. we have seen in the past how ordained they were to firang purchase subduing and killing many home grown projects. thank goodness, we have a new MoD. these subliminal acceptance of such article will make us all dull boys.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Gyan » 20 Apr 2016 22:44

srai wrote:Gyan,

What's with your obsession with criticizing HAL (or something else) on almost every post? Do you have some personal vendetta against them in particular? We all criticize from time to time but yours is approaching the unhealthy. Why not post some positive things (not related to HAL) more often :wink:


I am anti-imports. I have posted lot of positive posts about Akash Missile which is a very successful indigenous product but may be superseded by another import ie Barak-8

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 20 Apr 2016 22:54

TLDR summary. No tangible units apart from Pipapav. Lots of JVs. Are depending on orders to come so they can do it. Have signed up ex-services folks to make things easier with target customers.

How Reliance Group Chairman Anil Ambani is readying his companies to target big-ticket defence projects

Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/art ... aign=cppst

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jayasimha » 20 Apr 2016 23:16

Akshay Kapoor wrote:Come on Karan, you also know that not all DRDO labs and PSUs have delivered consistently..



Gyan wrote:I have personally talked to small arms designers in DRDO at a Def Expo eons back. They told that they were specifically barred from 2000 to 2006 from developing a follow on to INSAS. Only later they were permitted to proceed ahead and they developed MCIWS.


That is because, when we dont get it from abroad ( like A1/2/3/4/5 ) A burner is put under their seat to deliver.
Where there is option to import speed breakers are automatically put. In fact the development is such that it is used as a bargaining chip and demonstrated in def-expo. with a message " hey,, look what we can develop,, u supply ( with kick back ) or we will do ourselves. For me Def-"expo"is no better than sangeet natak academy show of IFFI film festival rather than truly DEFENCE EXPORT..

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jayasimha » 20 Apr 2016 23:31

Prem Kumar wrote:To sudeepj's point. Though I hear your viewpoint, I want to make a point about the difference in attitude between DRDO & IA:

Component manufacture can be an initial baby-step but the final goal should be towards system design. Especially for a country with India's size, clout & ambitions. The Naval Design bureau is a great example of (1).

Its a shame that the DRDO is demonstrating a world-class, complete system design, but the IA is button-holing them into a component-manufacturer role. No engineer worth his salt will accept this sort of disgrace. The good ones will either leave or just pass time, being demoralized.



Absolutely true.. development of components was not DRDOs job it was Semiconductor Complex India limited job. Now it is with DoS they must be doing/ supplying.

Let me quote ( from my friend) an incident which happened in ITI Ltd. They developed a system and senior staff from Air force came to see it. He asked them to open which they obliged. The comment was " hey you have used all RCA components and how do u say it is indigenous" with in 3 working days Pirangi maal was ordered.

Recently there was a tug of war that was going that AIR force personal was not allowed to head a DPSU.


But but but Infact ITI limited was once headed by a CMD who was Retd. Wing commander I think. What happened ?? it (was) sunk...

Around or During the same period Capt. Prabala From Navy was CMD of Bharat Electronics. He turned every corner of the organisation and now it is a true jewel in the Indian DPSU and Industry...

Believe me One point of time ITI and BEL was neck to neck in competencies / infra / market situation / etc. etc..

All this shows it is the intention of the Owner ( in this case Goi) that manifest in to boom or gloom..

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jayasimha » 21 Apr 2016 00:06

http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwgeeks/a ... -20160420#

We have the Power Chip anaerobic (non-air) fuel cell, most recently accepted by the Defense Research and Development Organization (DRDO) of the Government of India.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Bhaskar_T » 21 Apr 2016 10:06

ISRO's New Light-As-Air Gel Can Keep Indian Soldiers Warm In Siachen Snow - Scientist say it is a high guarded technology, I wonder if DRDO computer systems cannot be breached by Chinese hackers!!


http://www.ndtv.com/india-news/isros-ne ... ow-1397777

Scientists at the Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram, India's premier rocket lab recently manufactured the world's lightest material called silica aerogel or 'blue air.'

This material, scientists say, has excellent thermal resistance and if used as a filler in soldiers' uniforms it can possibly help save many lives at the Siachen glacier.

The material has uses both in space and on Earth.

So light weight that it can be delicately placed on a flower head, ISRO has made the world's lightest known material, sometimes also called 'frozen smoke.' Scientists hope it can be used to insulate rocket engines.

Dr K Sivan, Director, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre told NDTV, "It is the world's lightest synthetic material made by man. It is a highly guarded technology. We have indigenously made it in India. It is used for insulating the rocket's surface."

But, the uses extended beyond rocket insulations. "It has applications for thermal jacket, foot insoles, as well as for window glazing. It is extremely useful for people working in very cold environments, in a very strategic way," Dr Sivan added.

Turned into fabric, this aerogel could have possibly saved Lance Naik Hanamanthappa Koppad and his fellow soldiers' lives when they were buried under an ice wall at the Siachen Glacier in February.

Frozen smoke can be used to make light weight clothing, if painted on windows it can keep buildings cool or warm. The matrix of aerogel is made up of 99 per cent air. The material is likely to be used on India's moon rover in Chandryaan-2 mission.

The material is still very fragile and brittle and scientists at the space centre are still finding ways to make it tough and resilient. Silica Aerogel is the lightest synthetic material ever made by man.


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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Gyan » 21 Apr 2016 16:06

Funds for setting up production line were allocated in 2001. It is patently false argument that one has to wait for exact configuration to be frozen before even building the hangers. All the hangers and most of the production line equipment is generic and can adjust to minor expected changes in configuration. HAL did not even complete the buildings in which production lines would be set up. HAL was patently incompetent as recorded in CAG report, whether this delay was motivated by corruption can only be investigated by CBI. HAL got ToT for Shakti engine in 2010, they have not even located the place to put up the factory for engines. HAL management is only interested in acting as Gate Keeper for imports for obvious reasons.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Gyan » 21 Apr 2016 16:13

Karan M wrote:TLDR summary. No tangible units apart from Pipapav. Lots of JVs. Are depending on orders to come so they can do it. Have signed up ex-services folks to make things easier with target customers.

How Reliance Group Chairman Anil Ambani is readying his companies to target big-ticket defence projects

Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/art ... aign=cppst



Genuine R&D in defense products development requires gestation period of 10-20 years. I don't see Anil Ambani waiting that long. It will be rubber stamping of foreign products. Though I hope that DRDO ties up with Anil Group and I bet within one day all DRDO products even prior to design and development will be accepted by Military

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jayasimha » 21 Apr 2016 16:37

http://defenceaviationpost.com/2016/04/ ... -parrikar/

EXCLUSIVE Interview with India’s Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar

Headline: By 2017 India should cross Rs 1 billion in defence export: Manohar Parrikar

The face of the Indian defence industry and armed forces is changing rapidly with a strong focus on indigenisation. The man leading that change is Manohar Parrikar, India’s defence minister. Parrikar has worked extremely hard over the last one-and-a-half years to bring a complete turnaround in the defence establishment. In an exclusive interview with the DefenceAviationPost.com, which is also Parrikar’s latest interview so far, the minister spoke about his future plans and the key security issues facing the country.

Excerpts:

Q: The new Defence Procurement Policy is being referred to as a game changing policy for the sector. How do you see it altering the Indian defence growth story?

A: In the new DPP, we have tried to shift the focus on Make-in-India, to small and medium scale industry. Then, we are stressing on time-bound procedures.

The defence sector has a strange set of procurement procedures which do not normally exist for other procurements. One obvious reason is that products need to be tested as unless successful testing is done these costly equipment can’t be procured. So testing is a major criteria and this was so far not allowed to Indian private companies and was resulting into major delays. So the new DPP opens up testing facilities. Various defence PSUs are also offering facilities to the private sector. The new DPP will address these concerns of the industry in detail.

Q: Under the new policy, will companies have open access to testing facilities?

A: Yes. That’s right. But they will have a fee for it where you pay and test.

Q: The Make-in-India initiative is gaining ground. The new category of ‘Indigenously Designed, Developed and Manufactured’ (IDDM) equipment reverses the local mix from 70:30 to 30:70. Do you have any timelines for its implementation?

A: It won’t happen overnight. In the new DPP for IDDM it will be only now that things will be processed. Orders may be placed after one year and actual production will start after a year. So, it is in 2017 that we will start seeing the real impact. Of course, some push that we had given earlier would result in some shifting of the balance during the current year.

Q: We see a sudden rush from big corporates who want to invest big time in the defence sector, in manufacturing facilities and production. Already some 50 MoUs have been signed and over 350 licenses given. Is there any kind of a mechanism that you are going to put in place to monitor that everything that is being talked about actually takes-off?

A: Unlike other sectors the buyer is only one except for exports, which we have opened up. In fact, the recorded NoCs for export granted by us in spite of the fact that we have reduced the number of items under restricted export in defence, has almost tripled as compared to last year and grown by five times the earlier years. We are now touching around Rs 2000 crore this year. I expect growth of another 50%-100% because of offsets.

In the next year, we should cross Rs 1 billion in exports, which itself will be an achievement. Except the export part of it, the rest is produced and purchased by the Indian defence forces. These are part of preparations. These are not actual fructification. The fructification will happen in the current year for some in the private sector whom we are already placing orders with. In fact, Tata’s have developed 6×6 (truck for Indian army), Larsen & Toubro is in the final stage of getting the order for self-propelled guns.

Q: Will the entry of private companies affect the role of defence PSUs and DRDO?

A: PSUs are also part of Make-in-India. We are asking them to broaden their vendor base and get products outsourced so that the private industry also develops in course.

oie_w8E1l61qX0ky

India’s Defence Minister, Manohar Parrikar

Q: Indian defence companies say their products are comparatively much cheaper to, say those supplied by US companies, like for example the ultra-light weight howitzers developed by the Kalyani Group is around 50% cheaper than that manufactured in the US. Aren’t we spending a lot for importing equipments like these?

A: I am not aware of the costs but I will definitely find out. We are serious on indigenously developed products and I will talk to them.

Q: What are the key things in the DPP that make you happy?

A: One is more flexibility. We have drafted a preamble which can guide the DPP procedure so that bottlenecks don’t take place. The other is timeline. The RFP from AOM is only six months. Third is more flexibility in determining the required parameters.

Q: Will the DPP give preference to MSMEs?

A: Introduction of IDDM in the new DPP policy is the biggest game changer. If someone can develop a design and develop a product in India, even if we are now buying from a foreign source, the subsequent purchases will have to go to IDDM.

Q: Are you happy with the budget allocation? How would you in the present constraints of fund allocation priorities your plans on modernization?

A: I don’t see a big fund constraint. Let me put it this way, in a month if a family eats say 20 kg of rice they may consume around 500 grams a day — so budgets have to be seen in that angle. What do I require today? One is my committed liabilities. I am talking about capital acquisition so if I have placed orders with the vendors then as they supply I have to go and pay. For example, Apache Helicopter for which I placed the order in October. It will be supplied in 2018. Initially, I paid some 15%. The total including the weapon package was about Rs 21,000-22,000 crore. I paid only Rs 3000 crore. How much do I require as per the calibrated payment terms — maybe I will require another Rs 1500 crore this year and Rs 1500 crore next year and maybe some Rs 5000 crore or Rs 8000 crore the year after. So what I do today has its impact in next 5-10 years and what was done in 2012-13 is going to reflect now.

Q: So, you don’t see any deficit in funds?

A: This year whatever is available to us is probably ok. If there is some minor requirement you can always go and….but I don’t think there is any big shortage of funds.

Q: What are your expectations out from the DefExpo 2016?

A: One is obviously export. Let Indian capabilities be seen by everyone. I think many foreign companies might tie-up with Indian companies for purchase from India. If not the developed countries, may be developing countries. It is also an opportunity for Indian companies to tie up with foreign collaborators and may be in some cases, an opportunity for us. So, while I say that Make-in-India is a stress point it is not at the cost of operational capability of the army, the air force or the navy.

Q: What about China and Pakistan’s participation in the Defexpo?

A: I don’t see a big issue in inviting or not inviting. Traditionally they have not been invited but I think from China we had some people to visit if I am not mistaken. There is no calibrated decision specifically taken in this regard.

Q: You could have broken this trend and extended an invite to Pakistan this time around?

A: I think the atmosphere needs to be developed still better. In principle I want a very good relation with Pakistan. There are a few steps they have taken. I hope they continue with the steps. Today, I saw a statement from Sharif that they want to stop terrorism from their land. I am not born anti-Pakistan. Depending, like we are building up confidence bridges with the Chinese, slightly higher level may result into….. we buy so many things from Pakistan…. this may also result into a better (relations).

Q: Please tell us something about your upcoming visit to China next month?

A: It’s a normal visit which happens as per schedule. They had invited me. These are processes of getting the relations better and better. They are much better than what they were two years back. They can still become better. The day might come when they agree to settle the border dispute.

Q:The double finance scrutiny first by MoD and then by finance ministry is making defence procurement cumbersome. Why should there be a double scrutiny at all?

A: Ask that question to the finance ministry. If you ask me it is a triple level — MoD, then our own finance department and then the MoF. I think it’s a case for a higher delegated power. It will be taken up but I don’t see it as a big problem. I have no problem in finance expenditure going through it.

Q: Your comments on the government’s plans to cut foreign vendor contracts by 30% in the next two years?

A: We don’t intend to cut. We intend to purchase locally so automatically the procurement from outside will reduce.

Q: In Rafale jet deal pricing is a big issue? Even the law ministry has recently raised some objections?

A: Price is equally important. While I want the aircraft I will definitely be interested in the right price. The objections are being attended to.

Q: On statements from Rafale that it’s up to India to decide?

A: I will not comment on it.

Q: Any timeline you have fixed for the Rafale deal?

A: I don’t fix timelines but I am definitely interested in finishing it as early as possible.

Q: You have said even small incidents of terrorism must be treated as war. Can you please elaborate?

A: Why does someone engage in terrorist or guerilla warfare? Guerilla warfare is resorted to when the small enemy cannot bring down the big one so he continuously nibbles or bites the big enemy piece by piece. They (militants) know they are on suicide mission still they come because they want big publicity, they want to create some sort of psychological impact so if we treat it as a war and don’t start analysing it as we analysed Pathankot, I think that would stop the attacks. The full ecosystem of the attacks will be nullified.

Q: Is there a new strategy to handle such incidents?

A: It is the strategy of the press, the media, it is a strategy of operation. I was telling them don’t start too much questioning on such things because they only strengthen the enemy.

Q: Your government is completing two years in office? How do you think it has performed?

A: I am happy because this government is doing more than reasonably well. The foundation is already there and lot of things have been done by this government which had been in limbo for last 10-12 years so I feel that in another one year we would be very clearly reaping the benefits of the seeds that have been sown by this government and things that have been done by this government.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jayasimha » 21 Apr 2016 16:38

http://defenceaviationpost.com/2016/04/ ... atilsenio/

Anupama Airy

The New Defence Procurement Procedures (DPP) Policy –that was announced recently by Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar on March 28th at the DefExpo India 2016 in Goa– has helped usher in a new confidence amongst domestic and global investors. For the first time in the country’s history, the defence sector – that was earlier considered to a closed one with major participation coming essentially from the government owned PSUs, is currently witnessing big investment announcements from the private sector including leading global players in line with the Centre’s Make in India plans. Along with these dozens of new entrants waiting to make a dent in the sector, India also has a handful of established big players in the defence sector like Larsen and Toubro (L&T) who have been operating in the sector for nearly three decades.

L&T has delivered various successful projects for the Armed Forces and DRDO and its defence equipment manufacturing facilities, across the country leverage the latest design and manufacturing technologies.

The man steering L&T’s defence capabilities is its Senior Vice President, Head of Defence & Aerospace, Jayant D Patil. In a free-wheeling interview with the DefenceAviationPost.com, Patil—an Alumnus of IIT, Powai spoke in detail on the new DPP and its implications for the new and existing players.

Patil is responsible for the entire defence and aerospace strategic business sectors of L&T. He is also member of the Board of L&T Heavy Engineering as also Member of the National Executive of FICCI and Chairman of FICCI’s National Defence Committee.

Excerpts:

Q: What is there in the New DPP that was missing in the previous one? The present document has clearly been able to boost investment sentiments and industry’s interest. Your thoughts?

A: I want to congratulate the Defence minister, Manohar Parrikar and his team for this excellent and forward looking piece of policy document. The Government’s initiative of due and detailed consultations with all stakeholders to understand and address shortcomings and diligently simplifying processes is clearly visible in the immensely improved new DPP. Some of the bureaucrats who had been earlier cold to many problems of the Industry, seem to have also been now brought aboard as visible in the new policy stipulations.

First and foremost, is the inclusion of Indigenously Designed, Developed and Manufactured (IDDM) with precedence over all other categories. The merit driven acquisition is the next, which I had mentioned earlier. There is clear articulation in the policy on this merit-driven sourcing. So it says, there are Essential Parameters and then there are Enhanced Perfromance Parameters (where we can do better than the specification). If in all these EPP parameters, we surpass the requirements, we get a 10 % price preference by multiplying our bid price by 0.9 (for the purpose of L1 calculations). Thus MoD will pay premium for superior equipment by changing the evaluation process that would make evaluated price lower to the extent of superiority of the equipment.

This is phenomenal step that is completely objective and merit driven, and the game is no longer a pure L1 game. Now with L1, technical superiority will count. I believe that this will genuinely create force multipliers. The same quantum of money that the government spent will deliver extra capability because each equipment so sourced will have extra performance capability. This is undisputedly a very major change in the policy.

The other major changes are in the “Make” category where Parrikar ji has shaped an improved “Make” procedure. Earlier it used to be 80:20 cost share between the Government and the companies partnering in development. As our Make model has been taken from the US DARPA (The Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency of the U.S. Department of Defence responsible for the development of emerging technologies for use by the military), it does not recognise the cost of capital at the hands of the development partner. This is not a big deal in US as cost of borrowing is less than 0.5% and thus weighted cost of capital to corporates would be below 4-5%.

In India, the weighted cost of capital of corporates is 14 % to 16 %. Now, If you spent and government paid you later, all through the program, it would culminate in to additional cost of 20-30% (as borrowing cost) into your books. So while the government said that we give you 80 and you spend 20, we would actually end up spending 40-50. This was brought out to the attention of the minister and he understood and appreciated the extra cost and made necessary changes in the new DPP by changing cost share to 90:10, with 20% advance. This would ensure that the working capital issue would be well addressed and eliminated.

Another significant change in Make procedure is towards commitment to buy expeditiously. If “Make” program user trials are completed and the buy RFP is not issued within two years, the development partners would be refunded back the 10% investment made by them. So interpreting the document we can hear the Defence Minister saying that Industry got in to the development program as risk sharing partners and If we (Govt) are delaying acquisition or If we (govt) do not make timely decisions, we (Govt) will refund the investments the Industry made. So if RFP is delayed beyond 12 months, the 10% that we spent, would be refunded. This is an amazingly empathetic solution to a complex problem. So the modified “Make” procedure comes with some great facets: One is Advance, then the 10% additional cost share (80 to 90%) and commitment to return investments made for Governmental delays. This last stipulation will certainly drive decision making.

Then there is something more. Option clause in acquisition contracts used to be limited to 50% of contracted quantity. Thus when you did well and made a good system the government bought 50% additional numbers by exercising the option without having to go through a lengthy process of acquisition. This “Repeat order” clause can now be for yet another 100% numbers. The option contract can be placed within defined time limits of the start of original contract virtually without any time lost in protracted negotiations. This grants the Government the right to buy twice the quantity at same terms when exercised within the tenure of the original contract, subject to the User needing that equipment. So even two-three years later, as long as the original production line is still producing, the government can exercise right to double the contracted numbers at the same basic price. This helps both the parties… because of the scale it helps the industry maintain prices inspite of inflation if produced concurrently. The government gains on sourcing it at the same price without losing say three years in negotiations and all the associated processes.

Then the Defence Minister has targeted making the process much faster and focussed. Involving Industry in PSQR process will help cutting cycle times as well as cost of acquisition as what is achievable will start getting factored in to requirement formulation. Past has shown that just one requirement for no real tangible requirement can throw the acquisition cost out of proportion. Minimising the acquisition related approval levels to just two levels and asking RFP to be ready when User HQ proposal comes up for an AON… will actually make AON to RFP time limit of six months happen. This is again a very subtle grass root level but extremely positive change. What the new DPP clearly tells the User community, loud and clear, is that if the you have not made up your mind what you want, don’t come to DAC for an AON. You cannot have AON granted and then look for what is to be specified and be included in RFP’s… you asked DAC to issue an AON, Govt makes a commitment to buy and after that you cannot say I need time.

To top it up, the new policy allows Resultant Single Party clause getting extended to bidding stage as long as the RFP was issued to many (based on RFI responses). Such cases need to be approved by the DAC with appropriate justification by the User. This will save huge time in acquisition cycles, as experienced during the past decade.

The minister has included a Strategic Partnership chapter as a commitment to make that forward looking process happen with appropriate approvals. This initiative will make Private Sector system integrators happen to add to what the DPSUs can integrate and enhance indigenisation by cutting imports. This will help tierisation in Industry and with multiplier effect in the economy, add significantly to the GDP and jobs creation.

Very subtle but far reaching change by the Minister is that the DAC can invoke Fast Track Procedure anytime and not only at the times of war. This will help exigent situations at the hands of the User that he can justify to the DAC to invoke the fast track acquisition during peace time.

Having categorised 80-90 % AONs over past one and a half year in favour of various categories of procurement from Indian companies, the Minister has relaxed and made Offset mandatory for contracts in excess of 2000 Cr. Such offsets are to be specifically directed towards building India’s Military-Industrial-Complex.

These are the few significant new beginnings that I would say are very very bold steps taken by the RM. The preamble to the DPP, to me is like the 0th Law in physics. It addresses something fundamental to existence of the process, the basic fibre of the DPP, that it should facilitate (not deny) building self-sufficiency through intelligent use of the acquisition process and vice a versa. To me, these steps can truly compress time frames and make it far more beneficial for all the stakeholders, the User community, the Industry, and the government. That’s where I see genuine effort to create a win-win-win all the ways.

Q: With the new DPP, we see many new entrants and established corporates walking into the Defence sector? L&T has already been in this space for almost 30 years and an established track record. While the new entrants are announcing some big tie-ups with leading global players, can we actually call the latter arrangement as the true “Make in India” way?

A: As I see from the past experience, whenever a new sector opened up, there is a honey moon time that gets in many new entrants. Aviation sector is one such glaring example to point. All new entrants will use high pitch, try and create differentiators but they will have to eventually deliver promises through building shear track record through physical delivery on a sustained basis. There one needs to have far more than stating as to what my partner can do. Today the government’s policies are quiet clear that as an Indian Defence Company, you can’t just be a “front” and must build skills and capabilities to enhance indigenous content.

I am also acutely aware that there indeed are some serious players and to me they will create capabilities in the JV’s they set up as centres of excellence to enhance not only the indigenous content but gradually built sustainability through geographic spread of markets in a calibrated way. This is welcome as the Indian requirements are diverse and technologies constantly move with time needing fresh inputs in technology all the time. Our FDI norms will thus need to watch out for the real intents and the encumbrances on the technology flow through export controls and denial regimes to make Make-in-India a success.

Q: So how would those of you, who can offer a higher indigenous content, be treated vis-à-vis these new entrants?

A: That’s where it is logical that players capable of delivering far higher indigenous content should get a purchase preference. Although MoD has not yet done that in DPP, the Tier1 sourcing by DPSUs have begun this with a threshold of 20% lower import content to invoke purchase preference within defined limits. If one of the bidder is offering 60-70% indigenous content while others are 50% or below, there is a case for sourcing from him on a preferential basis. This purchase preference can be looked at two ways. One is that order will still be placed at L1 price or, secondly it can always be placed at some premium for creating jobs and paying taxes and duties (total of all Taxes paid) at far higher percentages in India and for doing so at far higher cost of capital that emanates from Govt policies. Now what is favour of this argument is that you need to incentivise Indian Industry for having spent the contract money in India as its multiplier effect contributes towards growing Indian GDP.

Q: So it is purchase preference, or price preference ?

A: Both. Firstly it is purchase preference that the Govt can do forthwith, followed by price preference which is an involved subject needing a lot of dialog and consultations. Logically speaking, notifying purchase preference does not grant any favours as Military buying is all about protracted trials and buying only qualified and proven equipment. So if two of us are bidding and you are 20% lower in import content than me, (if I am at the threshold of 40% as per policy and, you offer <32%) you get the order. The thresholds for price preference can be higher.

Q: In that case as L&T’s indigenous content is so far the maximum, you should be getting all the orders ?

A: No player can be efficient and play across all sectors and L&T won’t be an exception. L&T certainly has differentiators in some of them having spent as many as three decades in R&D, partnering with DRDO and inhouse R&D across select critical needs of the armed forces from weapon systems to sensors to engineering systems to platforms. We have developed and built 200+ systems and you can track it that we have unique breadth in weapon system development–from a Missile to Rocket to Torpedo launchers. All these we developed and make here with a differentiated indigenous content. Now, each of these capabilities didn’t come free. Lot of R&D has gone into it.

Post opening up of the Defence sector in 2001 and licensing it in 2002 we evolved from product development to serial production while continuing to build indigenous products of our own as well as in co-development mode. We invested the past decade in serialising a number of our products. We produce 17 systems today in serial production and the number is growing. We are today capable of building a system of system–say for instance, a submarine, a ship, complete communication solution; or a battle tank with a whole lot of weapon turrets. While we do that we work with all the DPSU integrators in Tier 1 mode on weapon and engineering systems.

Having built the knowledge and skills and centre of excellence over the years, we believe we have requisite capability and track record to build the conventional submarines with availability of basic design from a partner. With decades spent and nature of programs, we partnered with DRDO, complimented through inhouse R&D. I can say that we are already among the few ships and submarine builders that continue to evolve with differentiated indigenous value addition (through in-house efforts).

Over the years we built delivery capacities by investing in to multiple dedicated Defence Production facilities. So what I have been saying is that if we came ahead 10 steps and so have few Indian Private Defence Majors, it awaits to be leveraged especially when the Govt’s focus is to build indigenisation & self-reliance.

Q: Who all are you competing with in this FICV segment ?

A: The FICV EoI was issued to ten Indian players and some six responses, including ours have been received by the user. I would say, by and large, we are the solo respondent with completely indigenous solution. We understand and believe in the “Make Program” principles and chose to build an indigenous solution over offering a legacy solution leveraging foreign partner’s existing product and modernising it to evolve an FICV. We did the same in 2010 when the last EoI was issued and did well in the evaluation through a differentiated indigenous solution.

Our team continued to work and built much evolved solution over the interim period. The FICV solution we have offered is displayed right here in Defexpo. We have today created a state-of-the-art turret and hull, and what you can see are a complete set of GenNext software driven solutions. L&T has been the longest and largest player in building tracked hydraulic excavators for mining and off highway use since 1966. We leverage this heritage to add mobility solution to complete our FICV offering that is ours. It is an Indian solution with drive-by-wire technologies that are completely indigenous and home-grown. Consequently we expect to have completely differentiated indigenous content in our FICV offering, as other systems we build.

Q: But what about Tata’s and Mahindra’s, they are also focussing on FICVs?

A: Yes they are and we welcome competition. It only pushes everyone to do better in customer offering. Among serious private players, we see Tata Motor Bharat Forge have teamed up and are offering a solution with General Dynamics. As per media articles we understand that their solution integrator is General Dynamics. Tata Power has teamed up with Titagarh Wagons as a partner and offered a Korean solution from Doosan. Mahindra’s are offering a BAE solution. OFB seem to have teamed up with their traditional partner from Russia. OFB has been nominated as a development partner already subject to fulfilling all the EoI conditions. In addition, the evaluation process would short list two Private Players as development agencies.

Q: So how you view this period of ties being announced by new entrants shaping into concrete set ups?

A: My personal experience is that many JV’s have been negotiated and inked, but all of these don’t succeed till you have a definite program at hand (realised contracts within 2-3 years). Incidentally, we do have lots of partnerships and teaming arrangements but entered into just one JV. In fact, some other old timers in Indian market also entered into JVs without a program at hand and all such JVs exist but have remained dormant awaiting placement of contract to begin execution. Today new entrants are announcing JVs without even basic wherewithal on ground, but experience indicates that unless you have a program and facilities on ground, there won’t be any major investments on ground. Also in absence of nominated buying through long term contracts, combined with export control limitations by foreign Governments, little tangible results would be visible on ground in near term.

Q: Your thoughts on India’s sub-marines programme and Your capability in this respect? Does the new DPP address any issues in respect of such crucial programs?

A: Indian Navy needs submarines badly as the operational fleet is aged and depleting. We used to have an operational fleet of 18 submarines. What is operational now is much smaller fleet. Off these at least four + two need to get into medium refit and life extension. So we see a further dwindling with fewer left in operational fleet. Six submarines being built by Mazagon Dock Lmited (MDL) will be gradually inducted from 2017 to 2022, and even this will not build fleet size to bare minimum levels.

The need for a two lines of construction, which the cabinet had approved one and a half decade back is yet to be implemented fully. The first step was revival of the line at MDL in 2005, well over a decade back. The next steps have remained in Government files and debates even with committees after committees recommended way ahead. Implementing these needed bold decision making and a policy framework and has now been included in the new DPP. We hope and wish that the same is expeditiously cleared and implemented to harness indigenous capabilities built through Indian investments.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby member_22539 » 21 Apr 2016 18:32

Q: Who all are you competing with in this FICV segment ?

A: The FICV EoI was issued to ten Indian players and some six responses, including ours have been received by the user. I would say, by and large, we are the solo respondent with completely indigenous solution. We understand and believe in the “Make Program” principles and chose to build an indigenous solution over offering a legacy solution leveraging foreign partner’s existing product and modernising it to evolve an FICV. We did the same in 2010 when the last EoI was issued and did well in the evaluation through a differentiated indigenous solution.

Our team continued to work and built much evolved solution over the interim period. The FICV solution we have offered is displayed right here in Defexpo. We have today created a state-of-the-art turret and hull, and what you can see are a complete set of GenNext software driven solutions. L&T has been the longest and largest player in building tracked hydraulic excavators for mining and off highway use since 1966. We leverage this heritage to add mobility solution to complete our FICV offering that is ours. It is an Indian solution with drive-by-wire technologies that are completely indigenous and home-grown. Consequently we expect to have completely differentiated indigenous content in our FICV offering, as other systems we build.


How come no one came up with pics of the L&T FICV offering. Anyone got any info?

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Prem Kumar » 21 Apr 2016 21:29

Great interview!

I think Parikkar is doing a phenomenal job of undoing years of Sonia/AKA rot. However, what would've been nice is an explicit preference for "higher indigenous content" (if all requirements are met) in the DPP, as L&T suggests.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby member_23370 » 21 Apr 2016 22:13

How is Rs 1 billion a great achievement?? That's only 15 million USD? Wouldn't the Barracuda export to Mauritius itself cost more? It should be at least 100-200 million USD.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby durvasa » 22 Apr 2016 16:10

I think DM meant exports of $1bn, not Rs 1bn. In the same article he talks about current defence exports of 2000 crore ($300M+) expecting 50-100% growth next year due to offsets!

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby A Sharma » 22 Apr 2016 17:59

DRDO April Newsletter

ARDE establishes state-of-the-art Fixed Firing Stand Facility

Armament Research and Development Establishment (ARDE), Pune, has successfully designed, developed and commissioned a state-of-the-art facility in the form of a fixed firing stand, which will pave the way for generating experimental data and qualifying the sub-systems for final realisation of the 155 mm/52 caliber Advanced Towed Artillery Gun System (ATAGS).
The first dynamic firing of the integrated ATAGS Ordnance and Recoil System on the Fixed Firing Stand was conducted at Proof and Experimental Establishment (PXE), Balasore, during 19-20 February 2016. The results of the trials have established the successful design and manufacturing of the ATAGS Ordnance and Recoil System.

ATAGS is a major complex weapon system consisting of several sub-systems such as Gun Structural System, Ordnance and Recoil, Ballistics, Automation and Control, Automotive System, Sighting System and C4I. ARDE is the lead system integrator of the gun system being developed in collaboration with several industrial partners, PSUs, OFB and sister DRDO labs, viz., Vehicles Research and Development Establishment, Ahmednagar; Instruments Research and Development Establishment, Dehradun; Centre for Artificial Intelligence and Robotics, Bengaluru; Defence Electronics Applications Laboratory, Dehradun; Proof and Experimental Establishment, Chandipur and Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad.

CHESS develops High Speed Tracker Module for Directed Energy Laser System

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jayasimha » 23 Apr 2016 19:19

Indian Institute of Science is hosting EECS Research Students Symposium - 2016
on

April 28-28, 2016 (Thursday and Friday)
Venue: Faculty Hall, IISc Campus

Organized by the Indian Institute of Science (Departments of CDS, CSA, ECE, EE, and ESE)

http://www.ece.iisc.ernet.in/~divsympos ... index.html

EECS-2016 is an annual forum for presentations by final year Ph.D. and MSc (Engineering) students (expected to graduate in 2016) of the

Departments of Computational and Data Sciences (CDS),

Computer Science and Automation (CSA),

Electrical Communication Engineering (ECE),

Electrical Engineering (EE),

and Electronic Systems Engineering (ESE).

The highlights of EECS-2016 this year include 4 keynote talks, 5 invited

talks by faculty members of the participating departments, 48 short presentations by senior Ph.D. students, 56 poster presentations, and an alumni Event. The complete schedule is available at:
http://www.ece.iisc.ernet.in/~divsympos ... edule.html

The symposium offers a splendid platform for exchange of state-of-the-art research ideas and for networking among students, faculty, industry researchers, and alumni.

Many thanks and looking forward to seeing you at EECS-2016.

Dates: April 28-29, 2016
Venue: Faculty Hall, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore

Free registration for industry and alumni participants:
http://www.ece.iisc.ernet.in/~divsympos ... ipant.html

Free registration for alumni event:
http://www.ece.iisc.ernet.in/~divsympos ... event.html

The call for participation poster:
http://www.ece.iisc.ernet.in/~divsympos ... S_2016.pdf

Karan M
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 23 Apr 2016 19:36

Guys check out link below. First pic of ATAGS firing which is ALSO the same from the DRDO video posted above by Arun Menon on DRDO. ATAGs looks like a real compact system

Thanks Sharma and Menon saars.

A Sharma wrote:DRDO April Newsletter

ARDE establishes state-of-the-art Fixed Firing Stand Facility

Armament Research and Development Establishment (ARDE), Pune, has successfully designed, developed and commissioned a state-of-the-art facility in the form of a fixed firing stand, which will pave the way for generating experimental data and qualifying the sub-systems for final realisation of the 155 mm/52 caliber Advanced Towed Artillery Gun System (ATAGS).
The first dynamic firing of the integrated ATAGS Ordnance and Recoil System on the Fixed Firing Stand was conducted at Proof and Experimental Establishment (PXE), Balasore, during 19-20 February 2016. The results of the trials have established the successful design and manufacturing of the ATAGS Ordnance and Recoil System.

ATAGS is a major complex weapon system consisting of several sub-systems such as Gun Structural System, Ordnance and Recoil, Ballistics, Automation and Control, Automotive System, Sighting System and C4I. ARDE is the lead system integrator of the gun system being developed in collaboration with several industrial partners, PSUs, OFB and sister DRDO labs, viz., Vehicles Research and Development Establishment, Ahmednagar; Instruments Research and Development Establishment, Dehradun; Centre for Artificial Intelligence and Robotics, Bengaluru; Defence Electronics Applications Laboratory, Dehradun; Proof and Experimental Establishment, Chandipur and Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad.

CHESS develops High Speed Tracker Module for Directed Energy Laser System

Karan M
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 23 Apr 2016 19:51

Damn it, the Parliamentarians at LRDE - host of program updates on posters behind. No decent resolution pic of that. Instead low viz mugshot of dreary politicos.

Anyhow.
Very interesting snippets on what DRDO is working on via the NSD Oratory. These are all in development programs and products, some with first units developed or in other cases prototypes and in some, in development.

Shri Sachin Jain, Sc D, delivered NSD oration on
"New Generation Telemetry System."

Shri G Srinivasan, Sc F, gave NSD oration on
“Development of Indigenous Remote Controlled
Weapon Station for Main Battle Tanks and its Variants.”

Shri Ramakrishnan S, Sc F, delivered NSD oration on
"Development of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) –
Technology Challenges."

Shri Jawed Qumar, Sc E, delivered NSD oration on
"Multi-static Radar Extended to Multi Dynamic Radar
for Airborne Surveillance Systems."

Shri Mohamed Tabraiz
Pasha, Sc D, delivered NSD oration on "Development
of Safety-Critical Digital Engine Controller for Small
Turbo Fan Engine."

Karan M
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 23 Apr 2016 19:52

"Multi-static Radar Extended to Multi Dynamic Radar
for Airborne Surveillance Systems."

- from CABS, think Project India


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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Neela » 25 Apr 2016 17:22

In 5 yrs, HAL indigenised 14k systems, saved Rs 415-cr

(Rs.415cr is about $62 million)

HAL chairman T Suvarna Raju told TOI that the indigenisation of the 14,370 systems during the said period — 2011-12 to 2015-16 — has saved the firm a total of Rs 414.94 crore, with the majority of it (Rs 126 crore) coming in 2015-16.
"HAL is aggressively developing Indian vendors to take up its indigenisation programmes for implementation. More than 300 systems of avionics, Electrical, Mechanical and Instrumentation which are currently imported are hosted in HAL website to take up for indigenisation by private Industries," he said.


"For the first time, we've put in our own money to design and develop an aero engine, Hindustan Turbo Fan Engine (HTFE) with a power of 25kN and recently its core engine run has been successfully demonstrated. We've also diversified into unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) business and an indigenous development of a 8-kg class mini UAV and 10-kg class rotary UAV is under progress," he pointed out.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 25 Apr 2016 17:51

Cueing Gyan to call it all fake and also that T Suvarna Raju is actually Tomas Luigi al Brittanica, disguised as yumble yindoo SDRE. :mrgreen:

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Neela » 25 Apr 2016 18:10

Note the special mention of 2015-2016 savings Rs.126cr - must be somethign to do with changed defence policies.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 27 Apr 2016 22:20


Karan M
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 27 Apr 2016 22:32


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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby kmkraoind » 28 Apr 2016 10:37

http://pib.gov.in/newsite/PrintRelease.aspx?relid=142260

o 81 mm Anti Thermal Anti Laser Smoke Grenade
o Active Antenna Array Unit
o Air Defence Fire Control Radar
o Airborne Early Warning & Control System
o Akash Weapon Systems
o Anti G Suit Mk-III
o Aslesha Radar
o Auto injector Atropine Sulphate
o Bi Modular Charge System
o Bomb 120 mm ILLG
o Bomb 120 mm Mortar HE
o Bomb 81 mm Mortar HE
o Bomb 81 mm Mortar PWP
o Bomb Mortar 51 mm HE Mk-II
o Bomb Mortar 51 mm ILLG
o Bomb Mortar 51 mm Smoke
o Bomb Mortar 81 mm ILLG
o Bridge Layer Tank T-72 (BLT-72)
o Cartridge ERU for aircraft with Package
o Cartridge Primary for 120 mm Mortar
o Cartridge SA 5.56 mm Ball
o Cartridge Signal 16 mm 1A
o Cartridges 105 mm IFG NC
o Cartridges 22” RF Ball
o CBRNe Remotely Operated Vehicle
o Chemical Agent Monitor
o Coastal Surveillance Radar
o Commander’s Thermal Imager for T-90
o Commander’s Thermal Imager for BMP Tanks
o Commander’s Thermal Imager Mk-II for T-72
o Communication Link Controller
o Digital Radar Warning Receiver
o Display Processor
o E1 Link Encryptor
o Electronic Support Measure (ESM), Varuna
o EW Programme - Samudrika
o Explosive Detection Kit
o Explosive Reactive Armour Mk-II
o Fuze 213 Mk-V M2
o Heavy Drop System
o Helmet Mounted Thermal Imaging Camera
o Holographic Sights for Small Weapons
o Identification of Friend and Foe System
o Integrated Multi-function Sight
o Laser based Directed Energy System
o Mine AP M16 and AP NM-14
o Mission Computer
o Mobile Autonomous Robotic System
o Mountain Foot Bridge
o NBC Canister
o NBC Filter
o Optical Target Locator
o Personal Decontamination Kit
o Phase Control Module
o Pinaka Launcher Mk -II
o Radar Computer I & II
o Radar Warning Receiver
o Resin based Combustible Cartridge Case for 120 mm FSAPDS Mk-II Ammunition
o Revathi Radar
o Rotating Telemetry System
o Secure Adapter for Frame Relay Encryptor
o Secure Multi Interface Link Encryptor
o Shell 105 mm IFG BE Smoke
o Shell 105 mm ILG Mk-I
o Short Range Laser Dazzler
o Three Colour Detector
o Through Wall Imaging Radar
o Weapon Locating Radar (WLR)
o Wheeled Armoured Platform
o X-Band Microwave Power Module

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 28 Apr 2016 21:43

KMKRao Ind saar, most important point needs to be quoted too.

Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) is mandated towards design and development of strategic, complex and security sensitive systems for the Defence Forces. Over the past three years, DRDO has developed a number of products/systems which have either been inducted in the Defence Forces or in the process of trials/production/induction. Some of them are given below.


Very interesting list. Thanks for posting.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Vipul » 29 Apr 2016 21:11

OIS-AT to produce Precision-Guided Munitions domestically.


For the first time a domestic company will produce precision-guided and laser bombs in India for the country's defense forces.

Emerging private firm OIS Advanced Technology (OIS-AT) will partner with Sagem of France to manufacture the munitions, which India currently import from Israel, France, Russia and the United States for its fighters.

"OIS-AT has teamed up with Sagem of France to establish manufacturing for precision-guided guidance kits to meet domestic requirements," said Sanjay Bhandari, chairman and managing director of OIS-AT. "Separately, we also have plans to establish manufacturing for advanced munitions to meet Indian Air Force (IAF) requirements."

"We are pleased to collaborate with OIS-AT with our combat-proven, high-precision, AASM Hammer Guidance and Range Extension kit for aerial munitions for the Indian Air Force. With OIS-AT we have a partner with a core focus and appreciation of advanced technologies and innovation to advance our joint interests for the Indian Air Force," Sagem CEO Martin Sion said.

Since "the Indian and foreign private sectors are signing up for the 'Make in India' drive in true earnest, the Ministry of Defense (MoD) should now repay this faith by placing orders in value and size that reinforce the belief of the investing parties," said Ankur Gupta, a defense analyst with Ernst and Young India, referring to the government's campaign to boost domestic production.

For a decade, MoD has been asking Indian companies to establish joint ventures to manufacture precision-guided munitions (PGM) in India for use by the Indian defense forces. However no deals were signed, partly due to the capital investments necessary for such ventures.

"With the evolving procurement environment, joint production of PGMs in India will be encouraged in the future," an MoD official said. "We aim to buy a variety of homemade PGMs costing around $2 billion in the next 10 years."

In addition, India's defense research agency, the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), is negotiating with Sagem for the joint development of the New General Guidance Munition (NGPGM), a 1000-kilogram-class bomb compatible with the Indian Air Force's Mirage-2000H/TH. But the proposal has made no headway.

IAF welcomes joint development and production of PGMs in India as India cannot develop and produce everything on its own, an IAF official said.

"The OIA-AT-Sagem collaboration will chart the course for the future," the IAF official added.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 01 May 2016 06:34

http://www.miltechmag.com/2016/03/defex ... -2016.html

DEFEXPO 2016: Day Two (29 March 2016)

Getting Back to Basics: Industries in Collaboration Mode
Four sets of themes and issues marked the inaugural day of Defexpo 2016 at Goa on 28 March 2016 – a new venue coupled with new enthusiasm, a declaratory procurement procedure (DPP – 2016) for consideration by stakeholders, an avowed effort toward building an indigenous Indian defence industrial base with requisite foreign participation, and a concerted effort by India to attempt at an inclusive approach to national security that includes both national defence (armed forces) and internal security (paramilitary and police forces).

The second day of Defexpo-2016 witnessed three major activities – a) defence industry related intellectual activities through a series of conferences, specialized meets and exchange of ideas; b) and signing of MoUs or advancement in collaborative agreements between a few companies as well as exploratory talks.

Intellectual Stimulus at Defexpo:
Among the conferences organized by various agencies, a few stood out. An international seminar on ‘Advances in Shipbuilding Technology’, was organized by NIRDESH (National Institute for R&D in Defence Shipbuilding) where the Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar addressed the high powered gathering. He said, India has a lot of potentiality in shipbuilding and added that it has to be rightly tapped by adopting and exploiting the newer technology. There are around 200 warships and sub-marines in the Indian Navy and Coast Guard and of them 30 are to be replaced. India is a peculiar nation, which is actually at its peak not only because of Make in India, but because it has a strong consumer base. I think that the advanced technology can assure a biggest shift. Shipyards in India are in a distress at the moment. Defense should be linked with shipbuilding to ensure that the shipbuilding industry becomes robust. Technology can developed only if industry is healthy.’’ Vice Admiral P Murugesam said, ‘India’s progress depends on oceans. Nearly 45 different types of ships including the fighter ships are under construction, adding that the Indian Navy is growing.'

It was the Global Investors Summit on “Make in India in Defence Sector”, organized by ASSOCHAM – a national level industry body, which drew wide attention. Inagurated by the Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar, this summit was focused on how best to use indigenous efforts to create a globally competitive industrial base. On the occasion, Parrikar said, “defence equipment and weapons cannot be sourced 100 percent from the private sector. The Ordnance Factories Board (OFB) and other defence public sector units needed to be an essential part of the defence manufacturing ecosystem”. Elaborating on the same, he said, ”the first target of my ministry is not procurement. The first target is to ensure that the armed forced are provided with the best equipment and the quantity adequate that they remain effective.” He was blunt enough to say, “the private sector was driven by profits and it was only the government which was in a position to sustain skilled manpower, equipment-manufacturing infrastructure over prolonged periods of time even to produce small quantities of equipment or weaponry”.

Another industry body – FICCI – organized two interactive sessions – India-Korea Defence Cooperation & Business Meet and Interaction with Deputy Chief of Army Staff (P&S) during the Defexpo as well. In addition, CII – a top level national industrial body is slated to host delegates in a seminar on Defence Offsets on 30 March, details of which are awaited.

Collaborations Gather Momentum
First two days of the event witnessed quite a number of formal announcements by various companies in terms of memoranda of understanding (MoUs), joint ventures (JV), exploratory talks and informal engagements. A few notable announcements are placed here.

SAAB and Indian company Tata Power Strategic Engineering Division (Tata Power SED) have started the process of manufacturing Self-Protection Systems for Land-based Platforms, for the Indian market and for export to Saab’s global market. The partnership will also involve joint development of the next generation Self-Protection System. “Saab is fully committed to working with Indian industry to Make in India, and this partnership is another step in that direction. Tata Power SED’s strengths in Defence Electronics manufacturing are a perfect complement to Saab’s expertise in Electronic Warfare systems, sensors and self-protection systems for all domains”, says Jan Widerström, Chairman and Managing Director, Saab India Technologies. “Tata Power SED is excited to be a part of this synergetic collaboration that has already been kicked off by Saab and us. Given the long-term potential for self-protection systems for combat vehicles, both in India and abroad, we see this collaboration with Saab as an important milestone in boosting India’s capabilities in building defence systems. It is perfectly aligned with the actual essence of “Make In India” initiatives being implemented by the Indian government”, says Rahul Chaudhry, CEO, Tata Power SED.

CONTROP – a company specializing in the field of electro-optics (EO) and infrared (IR) defense and homeland security solutions – announced an agreement with the Indian company, Defsys Solutions Pvt. Ltd, just a few days before the Defexpo began, which was announced again during the event. According to the agreement, Defsys will market and locally produce CONTROP’s advanced electro-optical solutions for the Indian market. According to Mr. Dror Sharon, CONTROP’s President & CEO, “We are delighted to partner with the Indian company, Defsys, a supplier of electro-optic solutions to the Indian Ministry of Defense. The company has very advanced manufacturing facilities that will allow us to produce our products in India, and thus meet the ‘Make in India’ policy promoted by the Indian government. According to Mr. Dmitry Bernadiner, Defsys’ Executive Director, “We are proud to partner with CONTROP ­– a global leader in electro-optics – and to manufacture CONTROP’s unique solutions in India.”

BEL – Bharat Electronics Limited and Rosoboroneexport (part of Rostec State Corporation) have signed an MoU at Defexpo 2016. As per the framework of agreement signed BEL and Rosoboroneexport will co-operate for the joint development of various sub-systems of major defence projects under the offset clause of the defence procurement procedure (DPP) of the Ministry of Defence.

RELIANCE Defence Systems and Rafael have announced a Joint Venture at the Defexpo 2016. The JV is the biggest between an Indian and a foreign company. The deal has a potential value of more tha $10 billion dollars.
The new joint venture will collaborate in the field of air/air and surface & air missile systems. Another area of the collaboration will be large aerostats. Rafael Advanced Defense systems have already supplied the aerostat systems to the Indian Air Force. 
The JV will assist to complete the follow on orders of such systems. In the JV Reliance will have 51% holding with Rafael holding the rest 49% as per the current guidelines of the government of India. Dhirubhai Ambani land Systems Park in Pithampur, Madhya Pradesh is selected as the location for the joint venture. The project will have the intial capital investment of around $200 million which does not include the cost of technology transfer.

THALES and BEL-Thales Systems Limited (BTSL), the joint venture between Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL) and Thales, have signed a partnership agreement during Defexpo for the joint development of the Pharos fire control radar. This joint development will strengthen the co-operation of Thales and BTSL in the field of innovative technologies. The responsibility of overall system design will be borne by Thales. BTSL will develop the mechanical design and radar processing modifications while Thales will
be responsible for the design and production of the radar antenna. The jointly developed Pharos system will cater to both domestic Indian and international market requirements. "We are pleased to work in close collaboration with BTSL for the development of this new type of fire control sensor to address the needs of the Indian and global markets. This strategic step goes
beyond the co-development partnership; it reaffirms our commitment to the country and to actively contribute to the ‘Make in India’ policy,” said Serge Adrian, Senior Vice President of Surface Radars Activities
at Thales.

MKU and Russian company JSC Shvabe signed an memorandum of understanding during the ongoing Defexpo to manufacture Electro Optical Devices in India, with production facilities to be situated in Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, MKU’s headquarters. This joint venture is not only focused on manufacturing of electro optical (EO) devices but has also to cater in-service EO equipment with the Indian Army and Ministry of Defence at large. EO devices from Shvabe are in use by the Indian army for sometime now and many of these devices require upgradation, refurbishment and maintenance to keep up with the changing combat theaters and its intense requirements. As per the MOU Shvabe will train and assist in setting up of EO manufacturing and servicing unit in India with MKU. Training initially will be given to technical persons from MKU to carry out maintenance and repair of the in-service EO units, which will give a kick start to the JV and later graduating to a full fledged manufacturing unit by mid of 2017. “The company has exported defence eqipment worth Rs 300 crore from India and has registered a turnover of over INR 400 crore during 2015-16. In next two years our target is to export equipment worth INR 500 crore as we are a registered supplier to the United Nations and the NATO,” said Mr Rajesh Gupta, Senior Manager, Business Development, MKU.

Astra Microwave Products Limited and Rafael Advanced Defence Systems Limited have announced the formation of a private joint venture company (JVC) under the name of Astra Rafael Comsys Private Limited. The new JV company will have Astra holding 51 percent and Rafael holding 49 percent, while in future it may convert into a 50:50 by Astra and Rafael subject to regulatory approval. Astra Rafael Comsys will become operational from September 2016 and about USD 40 million is expected to be invested jointly by the promoters in the next 3 to 4 years of operations. It will have its manufacturing facilities in Hyderabad with a marketing office at Delhi, it was announced by Astra and Rafael during the press release at Defexpo.

Astra Microwave Products Limited of India and Unique Broadband Systems Limited of Canada have announced the formation of a joint venture to do business in the areas of UHF broadcasting, satellite up linking and medical imaging products for India and other international markets. The JV is expected to do business of about USD 50 to 70 million in next five to seven years and also expected to create more than 200 new jobs. The new venture – Astra UBS Technologies Private Limited is expected to benefit Canadian and Indian economies, it was stated through a press release at Defexpo 2016.

OIS Advanced Technology (OIS-AT) and SAMP of France have entered into a Joint Venture agreement where OIS-AT and SAMP have agreed to manufacture proven, advanced Penetrator Bombs in India, and to conduct research and development for India’s customized requirements. This will utilize advanced technology from SAMP, which is a proven supplier in this field. “We are pleased that SAMP has agreed to support establishing a joint venture with OIS-AT to manufacturing, and research and develop a portfolio of advanced penetrator bombs in India. We believe that these also directly support and advance the Government of India’s Make In India program”, said Sanjay Bhandari, Chairman and Managing Director of OIS Advanced Technology. “We are pleased with our Joint Venture relationship with OIS-AT to establish an advanced penetrator bomb manufacturing facility, and to establish a research and development facility for customized local requirements. We will provide the necessary technology transfer to OIS-AT and the Joint Venture to develop and manufacture a range of penetrator bombs for Indian requirements to serve the requirements of the Indian military”, said Christian Martin CEO of SAMP.
Dena Mohanti
Posted by MILITARY TECHNOLOGY at 12:33

Karan M
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 01 May 2016 06:38

http://www.miltechmag.com/2016/03/defex ... fying.html

DEFEXPO 2016: Rafael Intensifying Partnerships in India

Interview with Giora Katz, Executive Vice President Marketing & Business Development, Rafael Advanced Systems Limited at Defexpo – 2016, Goa, 30 March 2016

What isnyour impression of this Defexpo?
Katz: This Defexpo at Goa has thus far been a very pleasurable experience. Goa is a beautiful place and me and my team have enjoyed the warm hospitality of people here. Local and MoD officials have done a great job. They have been able to organise this event on a grand scale in a short time. I complement them.

What are your broad plans and strategy for Indian defence sector?
Katz: Rafael is an old established player in India. Rafael believes in team efforts. When I say team, I mean partnerships with Indian entities in trues sense of the term. We have always had a win-win situation in India for the very simple reason that we believe in joint development, manufacturing and sell. We have come with an impressive set of very advanced items for Indian customers. As part of our strategy to expand our international partnerships and strengthen its ties with local companies in India, we present the following systems at partners' booths:
SPIKE MR+SIMULATOR (at BDL),
SAMSON 30mm Advanced Remote Weapon stations (RWS) designed for high performance and survivability with SPIKE LR – Precision Missile Systems (at Bharat Forge Limited), PROTECTOR Unmanned Surface Vehicle + Typhoon and mini-Typhoon naval RWS (at Reliance Defence / Pipavav), BNET SDR FAMILY - Broadband MANET IP Software-Defined Radio for ground and air applications and TacMAX - family of base, relay and mobile stations delivers high quality broadband video, data and voice services to ground forces. (at Astra Microwave Limited). In addition, we have displayed the following items: Trophy heavy vehicle (the world's only combat-proven Active Protection System for armored vehicles), Samson 30mm Advanced Remote Weapon stations (RWS) designed for high performance and survivability with SPIKE LR – Precision Missile Systems, Spyder SR/MR – Family of Short and Medium Range Air Defense systems using the i-Derby and Python-5 missiles and Spike family - Multi-Purpose, Tactical, Guided-Missile Systems (including a Helicopter Simulator), Python-5 - Full sphere air-to-air IR missile and air defense missile, I-Derby – Beyond-Visual-Range, SDR seeker, air-to-air and air defense missile, I-Derby ER – Innovative active radar air-to-air missile. The missile incorporates the innovative I-Derby software-defined RF seeker, combined with a unique increase of kinematic performance, with ranges of up to 100 km, C-Dome - Active Air Defense for ships and other naval and land assets, Naval EW systems, Sea Spotter - Naval IR Staring and Tracking system (IRST) and Toplite EOS - Electro-Optical Surveillance, Observation & Targeting System. You will find all these impressive items at our stall as well as our partners’ stalls. Our intention is not selling alone, it goes beyond and includes partnerships.

You talked about joint development and manufacturing. Does it include joint design as well? Are you willing to share your design expertise with Indians?
Katz: When I say ‘joint development’, it includes ‘joint design’ as well. Yes, we share our knowledge with Indian teams.

You have an established relationship with DRDO. What plans do you envisage further with DRDO?
Katz: Yes, we have excellent relationship with DRDO for a long time. DRDO is a wonderful professional organization and I can tell you their technological knowledge is excellent and world class. We, being a technology dependent company, we obviously jell well with our counterparts in DRDO. We intend to further intensify our relationship and we are discussing all possibilities. I would not like to divulge into details. Our policy is not to reveal things unless our partners do.

What kind of partnerships do you have with Indian private companies?
Katz: We are a unique company, a 100 percent government owned entity with many national R&D centers in Israel and highly technology driven with commercial orientations. Our pride is our superior technological capabilities. We prefer all kinds of partnerships. In India, we have partnered Bharat Forge (for land systems), Reliance Defence (for air defence systems as well as naval applications with Pipavav, now a Reliance company), Astra Microwave Limited (for communication systems and EW systems), Bharat Dynamics Limited (for Spike missile system), Mahindras (for FICV), Bharat Electronics Limited (for various EW systems). Reliance Defence has already identified a site for manufacturing of air defence system in Madhya Pradesh. We are also talking to a few more Indian companies, but as I said earlier, it would not be proper for me to divulge further details.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Bhurishrava » 01 May 2016 11:30

http://www.thehindu.com/business/Indust ... 537838.ece

Reliance Defence has signed an agreement with three Ukrainian state-owned firms — Ukroboronprom, Spetstechno Exports and Antonov — to collaborate on a range of military products including transport aircraft, armoured vehicles, maritime gas turbines and unmanned aerial vehicles.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby shiv » 01 May 2016 12:29

Yusuf Unjhawala of DFI giving a talk about "How to make India a great power" with emphasis on military manufacture in the later part.

He has a good grasp of issues that jingos like us discuss - but few of us get to talk to a mango audience. All in all a good talk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usYQmvoDtpc

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Yusuf » 01 May 2016 13:33

shiv wrote:Yusuf Unjhawala of DFI giving a talk about "How to make India a great power" with emphasis on military manufacture in the later part.

He has a good grasp of issues that jingos like us discuss - but few of us get to talk to a mango audience. All in all a good talk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usYQmvoDtpc


Thank you for the kind words Shiv Saar.


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