India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

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JayS
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby JayS » 29 Sep 2018 12:22

Sid wrote:
Indranil wrote:HJT will be in the air soon.


Does HJT even have a use case for IAF? Best course will be to go China route and incorporate AJT tech into HJT.


IAF may go back to three stage trainer program if they have good IJT to buy. HAL can anyway try sell it outside.

But whats happening to HTT-40..? It should have had certification almost done by now.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Indranil » 29 Sep 2018 12:57

JayS wrote:
Sid wrote:
Does HJT even have a use case for IAF? Best course will be to go China route and incorporate AJT tech into HJT.


IAF may go back to three stage trainer program if they have good IJT to buy. HAL can anyway try sell it outside.

But whats happening to HTT-40..? It should have had certification almost done by now.

I don't know about HTT-40. I don't know about the plans for IJT either. In addition to what you said, can HJT-36 is the stepping stone to HJT-39. Either of which can become the testbed for the HTFE-25.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Indranil » 29 Sep 2018 13:00

JayS wrote:
Vips wrote:RInfra to deliver parts prototypes for Arjun Mark II ahead of schedule.

The weight of Mark II has been reduced to less than 50 tonnes.


Is that true or typo..? Do we have a corroboration for this one..? Looks too good to be true to me.

Typo.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Vips » 29 Sep 2018 19:32

HAL financials and total production for the year.

Despite challenges :rotfl: , Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) has achieved significant growth in revenue and profits, a top company official said Saturday.

"We have recorded the highest ever turnover of Rs 18,28,386 lakhs in 2017-18 financial year compared to previous year's turnover of Rs 17,60,379 lakhs," CMD R Madhavan said in a statement here. Profit before tax for the year was Rs 3,32,284 lakhs as against Rs 3,58,258 lakhs in previous year, Madhavan said adding the Profit After Tax (PAT) for the year was Rs 2,07,041 lakhs. (Less profits inspite of increase in turnover)

HAL produced 40 aircraft and helicopters covering Su-30 MKI, LCA Tejas & Dornier Do-228 in fixed wing and ALH Dhruv and Cheetal Helicopters in rotary wing, Madhavan noted. In addition, HAL produced 105 new engines, overhauled 220 aircraft :?: , helicopters and 550 engines, he said. Also, as many as 146 new aero-structures for space programs were produced during the period, he added.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby JayS » 30 Sep 2018 02:47

Vips wrote:HAL financials and total production for the year.

Despite challenges :rotfl: , Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) has achieved significant growth in revenue and profits, a top company official said Saturday.

"We have recorded the highest ever turnover of Rs 18,28,386 lakhs in 2017-18 financial year compared to previous year's turnover of Rs 17,60,379 lakhs," CMD R Madhavan said in a statement here. Profit before tax for the year was Rs 3,32,284 lakhs as against Rs 3,58,258 lakhs in previous year, Madhavan said adding the Profit After Tax (PAT) for the year was Rs 2,07,041 lakhs. (Less profits inspite of increase in turnover)

HAL produced 40 aircraft and helicopters covering Su-30 MKI, LCA Tejas & Dornier Do-228 in fixed wing and ALH Dhruv and Cheetal Helicopters in rotary wing, Madhavan noted. In addition, HAL produced 105 new engines, overhauled 220 aircraft :?: , helicopters and 550 engines, he said. Also, as many as 146 new aero-structures for space programs were produced during the period, he added.


Let's not take the profit vs turnover relation too seriously. If you see the numbers in Annual report for last decade you will know why.

Looks like almost 2000Cr are given back to GOI in form of divident and share buyback. RnD expenditure is >1600Cr i.e. >8% of turnover.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Sid » 30 Sep 2018 12:48

Indranil wrote:
JayS wrote:
IAF may go back to three stage trainer program if they have good IJT to buy. HAL can anyway try sell it outside.

But whats happening to HTT-40..? It should have had certification almost done by now.

I don't know about HTT-40. I don't know about the plans for IJT either. In addition to what you said, can HJT-36 is the stepping stone to HJT-39. Either of which can become the testbed for the HTFE-25.

<--OT-->
Unless there is a national goal/quest to convert all foreign defense equipment to desi products, both of these programs are dead. As these programs are viewed from commercial/financial lens, instead of capability building exercise, I still don't the point.

India is already talking about closing Su 30 line, while we don't know whats next. All that infrastructure/expertise will be lost. It should be evolved into Ajeet type program, as Dassault is in deep $hit and may be blacklisted by next gov.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 06 Oct 2018 11:14

https://drdo.gov.in/drdo/pub/newsletter/2018/Oct_18.pdf
DRDO news letter
october 2018 | volume 38 | issue 10
Anti Tank Guided Missile HELINA tested Successfully
Indian Air Force Carries Out First Ever Mid Air Refuelling of the Tejas Mk 1
Successful Flight Tests of Smart Anti Airfield Weapon

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Aditya_V » 06 Oct 2018 11:52

Page 21 also has some good stuff on Arjun Armoured recovery and repair vehicle

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Vips » 07 Oct 2018 15:16

These startups are keeping the military in top gear.

After the terrorist attack on the Pathankot air base in 2016, it was Bengaluru-based startup Tonbo Imaging that partnered with the armed forces to boost security with advanced imaging and night-vision systems. The startup, Tonbo Imaging, founded in 2008 by BITS-Pilani alumni Arvind Lakshmikumar, makes imaging and sensor systems that are mounted on tanks, drones and guns so soldiers can see better at night across distances.
The defence sector is one of the largest importers and a stronghold of legacy public entities, but startups have got a foot in the door in recent years, capitalising on the need for technology and innovation and on startups’ ability to deliver quickly.

The government too has streamlined policies — revisions to the defence procurement policy in 2016 made loud and clear the country’s preference for ‘Make in India’, and procurement procedures have been simplified. Now, projects not exceeding a development cost of Rs 3 crore are reserved for medium and small scale enterprises (MSME), like startups.

Recently, defence minister Nirmala Sitharaman launched the Defence India Startups Challenge (DISC), a call to individual innovators to solve 11 key challenges faced by the armed forces. The winners get a government grant, and the possibility of equity investment in the future. Five incubator partners — IIM-A Centre for Innovation Incubation and Entrepreneurship, Society for Innovation and Entrepreneurship at IIT- Bombay, T-Hub Hyderabad, Forge Coimbatore, and IIT Madras’ Incubation Cell — were signed up to drive DISC.

“Defence projects, by nature, are capital-intensive and have a high gestation period, making them less than ideal for startups,” says Sanjay Jaju, joint secretary, department of defence production. A challenge like DISC, says Jaju, is the first step to create an enabling environment for startups.

It was at a similar contest in the US that Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) spotted IIT-Bombay grads Ankit Mehta, Rahul Singh, Ashish Bhat and Vipul Joshi and their sophisticated drones. The four set up up ideaForge in Mumbai in 2007, and have been designing and making makes unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or drones) for border security, anti-terror ops, and disaster management.

Lakshmikumar of Tonbo Imaging says dealing with the government has been largely a good experience with payments being “absolutely prompt.” Tonbo sells directly to the Indian Army, Navy and Air Force, and also manufctures for defence forces in 25 countries. “We started selling our products in the US and Europe, and that’s how we captured the attention of our defence officials,” he says, urging startups to think global, and sell to other industries, in order to scale.

Axio Biosolutions, a medtech enterprise that counts Ratan Tata-led RNT Capital as an investor, works with over 500 military groups in the country, including the army, BSF, NSG and paramilitary forces. The company’s emergency bleeding control solution (a chitosan patch) saved lives of soldiers during the 2016 surgical strike. Leo Mavely, founder and CEO, says India’s defence sector must learn from the best practices of its global counterparts when it comes to dealing with startups. “The allocation of budgets and pace of decision making for medical products is a challenge in our country,” says Mavely, who also supplies the US Army.

Ankit Mehta, co-founder and CEO of ideaForge, admits that procedures tend to be “more protracted” while dealing with the government, and says “it’s definitely a challenging industry to work in.”

Sunderarajan Varadan, co-founder and CEO, Aadyah Aerospace, a provider of aeronautics, space and defence engineering solutions, has a similar view. “While the policies are really good, on the ground you still need to have proved your credentials to sell to the government,” he says, calling it a “chicken-egg situation” for startups. Varadan says that an initiative like DISC can help change this, and is glad that “the government is now opening its doors wider.”

Tushar Chhabra, co-founder and CEO, CRON Systems, a startup in Delhi making IoT-based intrusion detection systems, says defence-tech entrepreneurs need to start understanding the consumer. CRON Systems works with the armed forces on perimeter security, and has developed patented products after spending considerable time on the borders. Chhabra says a meeting with the right officials is no longer difficult to land.

Vishwanathan Sahasranamam, co-founder and CEO of Coimbatore’s Forge Accelerator (that’s already hosted one meet-up for defence startups) sees this as the key phase. Embracing a co-creation model, on the lines of Israel’s defence sector is “the need of the hour,” he says. Industry players are watching how the government navigates its way through the entrepreneurial interest, and how startups approach the sector.
Forge accelerator

“The challenge would be sifting through the large number of entries that come in for DISC, and judging the ideas purely on merit,” says Lakshmikumar of Tonbo Imaging, which has already been awarded “approval in principle” under the DISC challenge. ideaForge too is a recipient of such approval, and founder Mehta encourages startups to take advantage of the transforming sector. Aadyah Aerospace’s Varadan says DRDO should use DISC as a tool to build a talent pipeline.

The sector is not one anyone can just jump into, considering the technical prowess and patience needed, as well as the absence of champion investors. Mehta says the sector is a “genuinely hard place to survive, and entrepreneurs need a lot of tenacity and passion.” As Forge’s Sahasranamam puts it, success depends on how well the current dialogue between startups and armed forces goes, one where entrepreneurs “understand the voice of a soldier,” and the behemoth government sector indulges the needs of young innovators.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Neshant » 07 Oct 2018 22:22

One more useless post deleted. This thread is not meant to troll in.

- Karan


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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby ramana » 11 Oct 2018 00:24




Relevant info

..
Sources in the DRDO told this newspaper, “The two glide bombs are christened ‘Garuthmaa’ and ‘Garudaa’. The total indigenisation of the smart weapons has taken place in the labs in Hyderabad. Scientists here designed and manufactured its structures, aerodynamics, systems navigation and more. India has moved closer to self- dependence in precision-guided smart glide bombs as it conducted covert trials of these bombs successfully at the Pokhran firing range in Jaisalmer on August 17, 2018.”

For the induction of any weapons in the three wings of the defence, the weapons have to go through a cycle of extensive testing. Garuthmaa and Garudaa are likely to be inducted into the IAF's supersonic aircraft as soon as they are ready. It's important that the bombs suit the load capacity of the aircraft. In August the load testing of the two bombs turned out to be a success.


Don't know about drop tests.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Vips » 11 Oct 2018 05:06

BDL receives Rs 200 cr worth order from DRDO for Medium Range Surface to Air Missile.

Bharat Dynamics Limited (BDL), a Defence PSU Wednesday said it received order worth Rs 200 crore from State-owned Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) for supply of Medium Range Surface to Air Missile (MR SAM) rear section.

In a press release, BDL said MRSAM is a joint development project between DRDO and Israel Aerospace Industries, Israel with BDL as the Nominated Production Agency.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby pankajs » 16 Oct 2018 01:06

http://www.businessworld.in/article/Aim ... fw.twitter
Aiming To Be First AI Unicorn From India
To begin with, an agent-based Real AI Processor (RAP) invented by this software engineer, who chose to follow his heart by coming back to India after his higher studies, has created a new benchmark in AI applications.

RAP promises to revolutionise au­tomation by its application in drones, robots, autonomous vehicles, UAV, IOT analytics, cloud computing and even supercomputers.

We are the only AI chip company with complete R&D in India. If we are success­ful, it gives society a larger ambition to cre­ate more cutting-edge technology ventures,” Nagaraja shares with BW Businessworld.

Talking about his invention, he says, “Real AI is a net producer of data and information that benefits our society and enhances hu­man welfare as opposed to current weak AI systems which are net consumer of the data. We are advancing AI compute with our pat­ented technology called RAP, which would revolutionise the autonomous systems and help build the most powerful supercomputer in the world.”

Our company is growing very rapidly, as in the last 18 months we have got two prod­ucts working. We are now the world leaders in AI processor technol­ogy,” he proudly adds.

Nagaraja, along with Vinod Dham and Prashant Trivedi, found­ed AlphaICs in 2016 in Bangalore. With 25-plus team of scientists, hard­ware and software engi­neers, AlphaICs today is ready to capitalise on the newest opportunities at their India R&D centre.
According to him, AlphaICs has launched three new platforms with potential to dis­rupt the AI market. There is alphaDrive for the automotive platform. It will ensure bet­ter safety and autonomous driving, and drive the next generation of transportation.

Then there is alphaEdge for use in robot­ics, drones, gaming and IoT analytics. “For this, we are engaging with one of the biggest service providers in India for deployment in IoT analytics and home automation, and with the biggest Japanese OEMs for robotics and factory automation.”

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby ramana » 16 Oct 2018 04:05

PankajS, Please x-post in tech forum.
The report reads lots of hype to me.


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