India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

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Singha
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Singha » 20 Mar 2019 08:40

Ajay Kumar
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TurboTech #Defence & #Aerospace will produce, at its #Bengaluru plant, "Oil Cooling System and components" for @SAFRAN Helicopter Engine (Ardiden 1U Engine), for the EU & Indian markets from June 2019.

https://www.business-standard.com/artic ... 325_1.html

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 21 Mar 2019 11:31

4th Indian Conference on Applied Mechanics July 3-5, 2019 at IISc Bangalore
http://www.mecheng.iisc.ac.in/~incam/

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 22 Mar 2019 16:35

big kumbh mela in hyd http://www.aesihyd.in/isb2019/index.php
INTERNATIONAL BALLISTICS SYMPOSIUM
November 4 - 8, 2019 | Hyderabad, India
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Vips » 22 Mar 2019 17:23

Tata Power SED bags Rs 1,200 cr contract from defence ministry.

Tata Power Strategic Engineering Division (SED) has bagged a Rs 1,200 crore contract from the defence ministry for supply of ship-borne 3D Air Surveillance Radars.

Tata Power SED has signed a deal with the Ministry of Defence to supply 23 ship-borne 3D Air Surveillance Radars to the Indian Navy over the next 10 years, a Tata Power statement said Friday.

The contract was signed under the Buy & Make (India) category of the Defence Procurement Procedure (DPP) 2013 that will be offering the Indian Navy a proven solution, with a production arrangement in India under Transfer of Technology (ToT).

The contract will be executed by Tata Power SED as the prime contractor with foreign OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) partner Indra Sistemas, Spain.

In November 2017, Tata Power SED had signed a contract with the defence ministry for supply of Portable Diver Detection Sonar (PDDS) for Indian Naval applications.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby JayS » 22 Mar 2019 18:05

^ Is this their inhouse development..?

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Zynda » 22 Mar 2019 18:15

^^Doesn't look like it.
The contract was signed under the Buy & Make (India) category of the Defence Procurement Procedure (DPP) 2013 that will be offering the Indian Navy a proven solution, with a production arrangement in India under Transfer of Technology (ToT).

The contract will be executed by Tata Power SED as the prime contractor with foreign OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) partner Indra Sistemas, Spain.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 22 Mar 2019 22:46

JayS wrote:^ Is this their inhouse development..?


The contract will be executed by Tata Power SED as the prime contractor with foreign OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) partner Indra Sistemas, Spain.

https://www.indracompany.com/sites/defa ... ja_5_1.pdf

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 22 Mar 2019 22:54

BTW this is a huge win for TATA SED and a wake up call for BEL.
First time a pvt company has got an order for a deal of this magnitude, fully justifies TATA SED's expenditure on its mfg. facility. Earlier, this sort of TOT deal was a captive market for BEL.
Second, we are firmly moving away from Russkie 3D "radiator" radars to western ones.
Third, shows still so many "gaps" which LRDE/DRDO have not and cannot fill in the short term, with their resource constraints.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby hanumadu » 25 Mar 2019 17:00

https://twitter.com/SJha1618/status/1109817531785609216
Saurav Jha

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Optical Target Locator (OTL) - 300 developed by @DRDO_India for sniper scope detection. Developed by LASTEC, OTL-300 uses an infrared laser to detect active and passive optical threat located up to 300 metres away.

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Image

https://twitter.com/SJha1618/status/1109856998021959683

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Saurav Jha Retweeted Saurav Jha
OTL-1500 has been developed as well. It has a range of 1500 metres.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 29 Mar 2019 18:12

4 th International and 19th National Conference on Machines and Mechanisms (iNaCoMM 2019) December 5-7, 2019 ,IIT Mandi
http://iitmandi.ac.in/iNaCOMM2019/

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 02 Apr 2019 14:44

Dr.Vijay Kumar Saraswat, shares his experiences in missile development mission
https://www.sctimst.ac.in/About%20SCTIM ... 202019.pdf
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 03 Apr 2019 11:39

drdo news letter
april 2019 | volume 39 | issue 4
https://www.drdo.gov.in/drdo/pub/newsle ... ril_19.pdf

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Aditya_V » 03 Apr 2019 11:48

jaysimha wrote:drdo news letter
april 2019 | volume 39 | issue 4
https://www.drdo.gov.in/drdo/pub/newsle ... ril_19.pdf


Page 19 gives the details of the Small Turbo Fan Engine a.k.a Manik, it says 3kw thrust- ~ 400 Kg thrust class engine.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 03 Apr 2019 12:43

Symposium on
'Critical Non-Ferrous Metals: Establishing the value chain'
April 15-16, 2019
Venue : VMCC, IIT Bombay, Powai
https://www.me.iitb.ac.in/~cnfm2019/


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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 10 Apr 2019 12:16

DRDO Boards ,,,,,,,,for record and info pls.
https://www.drdo.gov.in/drdo/boards/

ARMAMENT RESEARCH BOARD (ARMREB)
https://www.drdo.gov.in/drdo/boards/arma.shtml

LIFE SCIENCES RESEARCH BOARD (LSRB)
https://www.drdo.gov.in/drdo/boards/lsrb.shtml

NAVAL RESEARCH BOARD (NRB)
https://www.drdo.gov.in/drdo/boards/nrb.shtml

AERONAUTICS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD (AR&DB)
https://www.drdo.gov.in/drdo/boards/aero.shtml

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 10 Apr 2019 18:28

Aerospace Industry development association of tamil Nadu
http://aidat.in/about-aidat/

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 13 Apr 2019 16:35

International Conference on Advanced Materials and Processes for Defence Applications.
Sept 23-25, 2019
Courtyard by Marriott, Hyderabad, India
https://www.admat2019.in/

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby kit » 13 Apr 2019 16:53

Does any Indian company manufacture HY 100 or HY 130 steel? Arcelor Mittal USA makes the HY100 but subject to export regulations

Apparently, the IN wants to source all its future steel requirements indigenously

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Picklu » 15 Apr 2019 23:16

Bhilai does iirc

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 15 Apr 2019 23:24

Kit we use local DMR249A steel and DMR249B steel for surface ships and surface ships and submarines both respectively. They are superior in terms of weld management to HY100 steel.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby ramana » 17 Apr 2019 00:53

Do we have the spec sheets for HY100 or DMR 249B steel?
In particular yield strength and fracture toughness, elongation also would b nice to know.

DMR 249B is produced as deck plate for IAC.
it has > 20% elongation and high impact energy of 78 Joules. It also has high yield strength of 588 Mpa.

This will make excellent penetrator case material as it hs very good weldability.

kit,

Bhilai and Bokaro steel plants make this in quantity.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby souravB » 17 Apr 2019 03:11

For submarine applications specifically SAIL makes DMR292A steel.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby kit » 17 Apr 2019 03:18

Karan M wrote:Kit we use local DMR249A steel and DMR249B steel for surface ships and surface ships and submarines both respectively. They are superior in terms of weld management to HY100 steel.


i thought the DMR249 is equivalent to HY80 which has definitely easier welding property, the 100 and 130 are much trickier to weld ?

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby kit » 17 Apr 2019 03:32

HY80 alloy steel, which has good ductility and excellent notch toughness and weldability.

Chemical Composition
The chemical composition of HY80 alloy steel is listed in the following table.

Element Content (%)
Iron, Fe 93.1 - 96.4
Nickel, Ni 2.0 - 3.25
Chromium, Cr 1.0 - 1.80
Copper, Cu ≤ 0.25
Molybdenum, Mo 0.20 - 0.60
Silicon, Si 0.15 - 0.35
Carbon, C 0.12 - 0.18
Manganese, Mn 0.10 - 0.40
Phosphorous, P ≤ 0.025
Sulfur, S ≤ 0.025
Titanium, Ti ≤ 0.020
Vanadium, V ≤ 0.030
Physical Properties
The following table shows the physical properties of HY80 alloy steel.

Properties Metric Imperial
Density 7.87 g/cc 0.284 lb/in³
Melting point 1424°C 2595°F
Mechanical Properties
The mechanical properties of HY80 alloy steel are outlined in the following table.

Properties Metric Imperial
Tensile strength, yield ≥ 552 MPa ≥ 80000 psi
Modulus of elasticity (typical of steel) 205 GPa 29700 ksi
Shear modulus (typical of steel) 80 GPa 11600 ksi
Poissons ratio (calculated) 0.28 0.28
Other Designations
Related Stories
High Strength Steel
Composition, Application and Distribution of High-Yield Steel Plate Products
Comprehensive Market Research Report on US Steel Industry
Other designations that are equivalent to HY80 alloy steel include the following:

MIL S-16216
MIL S-21952
Fabrication and Heat Treatment
Machinability
HY-80 steel can be machined in the quenched and tempered condition.

Forming
HY-80 may be readily cold or hot formed by conventional bending, or forming, processes.

Welding
HY-80 steel can be efficiently heated with metal-arc process using low hydrogen electrodes of type E-11018 or E-10018. HY 80 steel, except for heavy section, does not require pre-heating. Post-heating is not required.

Heat Treatment
Heat treatment is not required for HY-80 steel as it is supplied in quenched and tempered conditions. If necessary, it may be heated at 649°C (1200°F) for 1 h followed by slow furnace cooling and air cooling.

Forging
HY-80 alloy steel should not be reheated for forging as it is supplied in the heat treated and tempered condition.

Hot Working
Hot working of HY-80 steel can be performed at temperatures ranging between 93 and 316°C (200 and 600°F).

Cold Working
HY-80 steel can be cold worked using conventional methods.

Annealing
HY-80 steel can be annealed at 649°C (1200°F) and then furnace cooled at a temperature ranging from 93 to 260°C (200 to 500°F).

Tempering
HY-80 steel is tempered with 80 ksi minimum yield strength.

Hardening
HY-80 steel can be hardened by cold working.

Applications
HY-80 alloy steel is best suited for use in shipbuilding for welded hull plates.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Chemical Composition
The following table shows the chemical composition of HY100 alloy steel.

Element Content (%)
Iron, Fe 92.8 - 96.2
Nickel, Ni 2.25 - 3.50
Chromium, Cr 1.0-1.80
Copper, Cu ~ 0.25
Molybdenum, Mo 0.20 - 0.60
Silicon, Si 0.15 - 0.35
Carbon, C 0.12 - 0.20
Manganese, Mn 0.10 - 0.40
Vanadium, V ~ 0.030
Phosphorous, P ~ 0.025
Sulfur, S ~ 0.025
Titanium, Ti ~ 0.020
Physical Properties
The physical properties of HY100 alloy steel are given in the following table.

Properties Metric Imperial
Density 7.87 g/cm3 0.284 lb/in3
Mechanical Properties
The mechanical properties of HY100 alloy steel are outlined in the following table.

Properties Metric Imperial
Yield strength 689 MPa 100000 psi
Shear modulus (typical of steel) 80 GPa 11600 ksi
Elastic modulus (typical of steel) 205 GPa 29700 ksi
Poisson's ratio 0.28 0.28
Other Designations
Other designations equivalent to HY100 alloy steel include MIL S-16216 and UNS K32045.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Chemical Element Typical 4130 Typical Navy HY-130 Plate Material Typical ESAB Spoolarc 140 Welding Wire/Rod Typical MIG Weld with ESAB 140 Wire in HY-130 Plate

Carbon 0.30 0.12 0.08 0.10
Manganese 0.80 0.75 1.70 1.50
Silicon 0.20 0.25 0.4 0.30
Nickel 0 5.0 2.4 2.6
Chrome 0.95 0.60 0.90 0.70
Moly 0.20 0.45 0.60 0.60
Copper
- 0.25 - -
Sulfur (impurity) 0.04% Max
- 0.005% Max -
Phosphorous

(impurity) 0.04% Max
- 0.006% Max -
Yield Strength
-
130,000 to 150,000 psi
- 135,000 psi
Ultimate Strength
95,000 psi Normalized Condition - - 145,000 psi
Toughness;

Charpy Test
- 90 ft-lbs CVN @ 30 deg F


--------------------------------------

Welding-HY-Steels refers to processing a family of steels that owe their name to High Yield Strength.

This was the main property designed into the materials as they were developed in the form of thick plates.

That occurred in the sixties of the past century, at the request of the US Navy, mainly for fabrication of ship hulls and submarines.

Within this class, that includes HY-80, HY-100, HY-130 and HY-180, which are high strength and toughness, quenched and tempered, martensitic steels.

The single materials are identified by the numbers that represent their yield strength, expressed in ksi (kilo or 1000 pounds per square inch).


Precautions for Welding-HY-Steels
Welding-HY-Steels of these classes of high impact resistance require strict welding conditions to realize their characteristic potential also in the welds and in their heat affected zone (HAZ).

In particular low hydrogen electrodes should be used, with due precautions in keeping them dry and heating them before use in suitable ovens to drive away any moisture.

Otherwise the welds may become prone to Hydrogen Induced Cracking (HIC).

Furthermore Welding-HY-Steels should be performed with minimal heat input, in small stringers without weaving.

The lower yield steels of this class are welded by SMAW with low hydrogen electrodes of Type E-10018 or E-11018.

The higher yield ones are best welded by GTAW and Plasma arc welding with special filler metals of extremely low impurity levels (oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon, sulfur and phosphorus).

For applications requiring Welding-HY-Steels for service exposure to temperatures from 0 to (minus) -195 °C, the ferritic steels with high nickel contents are typically used.

Such applications include storage tanks for liquefied hydrocarbon vapors (gases) and structures or machinery designed for use in cold regions.

These steels utilize the effect of nickel content in reducing the ductile to brittle transition temperature, thereby improving toughness at low temperatures.

Double normalized and tempered 9% nickel steel is covered by ASTM A 353, and quenched and tempered 8% and 9% nickel steels are covered by ASTM A 553 (types I and II).

For quenched and tempered material, the minimum lateral expansion in Charpy V-notch impact tests is specified at 0.38 mm.

These steels remain ductile at the lowest testing temperatures.

The 5% Ni steel retains relatively high fracture toughness at -162 °C and the 9% Ni steel retains relatively high fracture toughness at -196 °C.

These temperatures are the lowest at which these steels may be used, but Welding-HY-Steels requires to develop and follow very strictly suitable welding conditions.

The 5% Ni alloy steels for low-temperature service include HY-130 and ASTM A 645.

Preheating is required for the thicker plates to slow down the cooling rate after welding.

This helps in avoiding HAZ cracking and weld cracking, reducing the amount of untempered martensite, provides the conditions for hydrogen to escape, and limits residual stresses.

Preheating of naval steels of these classes (with a specified minimum yield strength ranging from 80 to 130 ksi) while Welding-HY-Steels is often required to overcome susceptibility to Hydrogen Induced Cracking in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ).

This form of cracking occurs especially in high strength steels that have the potential to form high-carbon twinned martensite when the following conditions are simultaneously present:

a source of dissolved hydrogen;
a susceptible (martensitic) microstructure;
high residual tensile stress;
a temperature range that does not allow significant solid-state diffusion of hydrogen from the steel; and
a time delay following welding that allows hydrogen to accumulate at internal flaws in the steel.
Preheating, interpass temperature control and post weld heating operations, individually or in combination, essentially reduce the dissolved hydrogen content.

This occurs by allowing the hydrogen to escape by diffusion from the steel while also allowing transformation of the weld metal.

More importantly the adjacent HAZ (Heat Affected Zone) becomes a less susceptible microstructure that might reduce the peak residual tensile stress as well.

Nevertheless, preheat, interpass temperature control and post-soak temperature control during Welding-HY-Steels

are quite expensive,
add to welder discomfort
reduce the overall productivity.

It was soon realized that the strict conformance to precise practices, while achieving acceptable properties in Welding-HY-Steels, resulted in low productivity and high fabrication costs, especially for large structures.

Therefore renewed efforts, again initiated by the requirements of the US Navy, resulted in the development of a new family of materials called High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels that allowed more economic fabrication because their modified microstructure is more tolerant of less strict welding conditions.

Apparently the very high cost of the sea wolf subs is attributed to the HY100

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Katare » 17 Apr 2019 08:58

HY_80 and HY-100 are one and the same steel, if you can make one you can make the other too. Problem lies in complexity, risk and cost associated with the welding process not in making the alloy itself. The difference comes from the tempering temperature, higher you go more ductile/weldable/formable/machinable it becomes at the cost of loosing brittleness and yield strength. Just after quench, steel has enormous strength and hardness which makes it useless brittle lump which can than he tempered into different grade of usable products.

HY-80 is gold standard, rest is masa grade maya only.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby kit » 18 Apr 2019 20:57

http://idrw.org/india-has-the-mother-of-nuclear-bombs-pm-modi-on-calling-paks-nuclear-bluff/#more-198495


Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Wednesday said he did not fall prey to Pakistan’s nuclear blackmail, because India has the “mother of nuclear bombs”. Addressing a campaign rally at Surendranagar in Gujarat, Modi was referring to the surgical strikes and air strikes conducted by the country’s forces inside Pakistan in response to terrorist attacks in Uri and Pulwama.



if i am not too literal there is the H bomb for you :mrgreen:

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby ramana » 18 Apr 2019 21:10

He knows his maal better than ABV.
First PM to understand the maal.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Vips » 19 Apr 2019 17:54

L&T commisions ICGS Veera ahead of schedule.

Yet again another Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV) ICGS Veera for the Indian Coast Guard (ICG) is commissioned ahead of time which has been built by Larsen & Toubro Ltd (L&T) Kattupalli Yard.

The company has been building vessels under Warship License since receiving first Ministry of Defence (MoD) contract in March 2010, all the designing and construction is done in house and indigenously.

As part of the government’s ‘Act East’ policy, the company is also building High-Speed Patrol Vessels for a friendly Nation in the south-east region.

In the case of ICGS Veera, as in other platforms, the built was on and ahead of the contractual schedule and 3rd OPV in the series of seven within a span of 11 months and the 11th platform delivered during the financial year 2018-19. And is built under an MoD contract of 2015.

On these vessels the percentage of completion of pre-outfitting has increased, reducing the overall cycle time, thus enabling to accelerated delivery of defence ships in line with the requirements of the fleet expansion plans of the Indian Navy and the Coast Guard.

As has been reported by the Financial Express Online earlier, the first two vessels ICGS Vikram and ICGS Vijaya was delivered ahead of contractual schedule to ICG last April and August respectively. Fourth of the series OPV was launched in Nov 2018 and is presently being readied for sea trials.

The company has so far made major investments for undertaking indigenous design, manufacturing and construction of advanced defence platforms and systems across multiple newly established work centres dedicated to the defence sector.

It has also undertaken to the upkeep of Indian Naval and Coast Guard fleets by carrying out repairs/refits and upgrades including emergency repairs and inspection using the 21500-ton class Ship Lift at the Yard.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Kanson » 19 Apr 2019 21:19

kit wrote:http://idrw.org/india-has-the-mother-of-nuclear-bombs-pm-modi-on-calling-paks-nuclear-bluff/#more-198495


Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Wednesday said he did not fall prey to Pakistan’s nuclear blackmail, because India has the “mother of nuclear bombs”. Addressing a campaign rally at Surendranagar in Gujarat, Modi was referring to the surgical strikes and air strikes conducted by the country’s forces inside Pakistan in response to terrorist attacks in Uri and Pulwama.



if i am not too literal there is the H bomb for you :mrgreen:


Similar expression, MOAB - Mother of all bombs(GBU-43/B), is the largest conventional bomb used by US. I believe he is not referring to any surgical strikes.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 22 Apr 2019 11:25

International Conference on Atomic, Molecular, Optical & Nano Physics with Applications (CAMNP 2019)
December 18th - 20th, 2019
Organized by Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, New Delhi, India http://www.camnp2019.com/Default

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby gaurav.p » 23 Apr 2019 02:42

Welcome AJIT, a ‘Made in India’ Microprocessor
https://researchmatters.in/news/welcome ... oprocessor

Some highlights from the article...
IIT Bombay) have developed a new microprocessor called AJIT—the first ever microprocessor to be conceptualised, designed, developed and manufactured in India...first time in the country’s history where the industry, academia and the government have come together

“We have been working on this processor design for more than two years now. The design has been tested on programmable semiconductor chips before we began our effort towards fabricating the processor,” says Prof. Desai.

AJIT is a medium-sized processor. It can be used inside a set-top box, as a control panel for automation systems, in a traffic light controller or even robotic systems
...
will cost as less as ₹100 when it is produced en-masse! AJIT can run one instruction per clock cycle and can operate at clock speeds between 70-120MHz, comparable to its competitors in the market.

- AJIT has been manufactured in the government-owned Semiconductor Laboratory (SCL), Chandigarh, with a technology that offers the smallest building block of the size 180 nanometers
- also plan to commercially manufacture the processor using more advanced techniques that provide the smallest building block of size 65 nm or 45 nm, which is the current state of the art
...
“Fabricating this using 180nm technology is the first step. Although this may not be the state of the art technology, it is enough for most of the targeted applications. Using advanced technology for large manufacturing quantities—tens of lakhs—would bring the cost per piece down”, remarks Prof. Desai.

It’s not done yet; there are tougher challenges ahead for the team to make the processor commercially viable to make this a grand success story. “For AJIT, we need to get more people to use it. Primary tests have indicated that the specifications of the processor match many in the competition and the new processor would also be cost-competitive. If the business community at large would own this processor, build systems around it so that users, as well as supporters, see value in this and can make money from the effort, then this effort can remain sustainable”, says Prof. Desai.

We could push the usage of this new microprocessor by introducing it as a part of the syllabus in engineering colleges. A well-designed single-board computer system could be made available at a low cost for students and other enthusiasts to experiment with”, suggests Prof. Desai
SAMEER (Society for Applied Microwave Electronics Engineering & Research), an independent lab under MeitY, Government if India is planning to use AJIT in the receivers being developed for NAVIC or IRNNS (The Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System), an indigenous navigation system for the Indian subcontinent.


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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 23 Apr 2019 16:43


jaysimha
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 23 Apr 2019 16:48

april 2019 | volume 39 | issue 4
DRDO Newsletter
https://www.drdo.gov.in/drdo/pub/newsle ... ril_19.pdf

Varoon Shekhar
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 23 Apr 2019 19:26

...AJIT, made in India processor"

Good achievement, but is it accurate to say that this is first ever made in India chip/processor? SCL, which is mentioned in the article, has produced several chips before this. There could be another foundry(?) in India that has developed an ASIC in the south.

ramana
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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby ramana » 23 Apr 2019 22:48

Its microprocessor based on SPARC architecture. And yes its true.

its like a 80386 level.

They hope to reduce the size and make it go faster.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Supratik » 24 Apr 2019 01:46

IIT Chennai has produced Shakti microprocessor.

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby ramana » 24 Apr 2019 04:05

ARM based right?

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 24 Apr 2019 12:09

Aerospace & Defence Manufacturing Show 22nd & 23rd August
HAL conventional center Bangalore
Image
http://www.aeromag.in/adms.php

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Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby ranneel » 24 Apr 2019 12:28

ramana wrote:ARM based right?

RISC-V with Intel's help for fabrication. RISC-V is gaining a lot of momentum and new paradigm in open core development.
There are a lot of flavours with these cores with minimalistic cores for IoT devices (RTOS/Baremetal) to sophisticated devices with MMU for running Linux.
We need Indian IC design companies to start using these cores even though ARM cores come at a dirt cheap licensing fee.


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