India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

The Military Issues & History Forum is a venue to discuss issues relating to the military aspects of the Indian Armed Forces, whether the past, present or future. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
JayS
Forum Moderator
Posts: 4077
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby JayS » 22 May 2019 00:22

Poirjet is not from Kalyani group. Its a venture by owner of Intech.

Indranil
Forum Moderator
Posts: 7405
Joined: 02 Apr 2010 01:21

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Indranil » 22 May 2019 00:32

I thought they were in bed.

ramana
Forum Moderator
Posts: 52605
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby ramana » 23 May 2019 00:55

Looks like OFB has upgraded the RBU 6000 ASW rockets with longer range motor and insensitive explosive.
Very good new weapon with same form factor as the old.

https://twitter.com/I30mki/status/11309 ... 16032?s=19

JayS
Forum Moderator
Posts: 4077
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby JayS » 23 May 2019 01:49

Indranil wrote:I thought they were in bed.


Could be, but m not aware of that then.

Indranil
Forum Moderator
Posts: 7405
Joined: 02 Apr 2010 01:21

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Indranil » 23 May 2019 05:33

ramana wrote:Looks like OFB has upgraded the RBU 6000 ASW rockets with longer range motor and insensitive explosive.
Very good new weapon with same form factor as the old.

https://twitter.com/I30mki/status/11309 ... 16032?s=19

I think they are doing something with naval deployment of Pinaka as well. At least, part of its motor is being reused for a naval missile.


jaysimha
BRFite
Posts: 969
Joined: 20 Dec 2017 14:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 25 May 2019 11:47

Image
Image
http://pib.nic.in/PressReleaseIframePag ... ID=1572551
Ministry of Defence
DRDO Successfully Flight-Tested Guided Bomb
Posted On: 24 MAY 2019 5:58PM by PIB Delhi
Defence Research and Defence Organisation (DRDO) successfully flight tested a 500 kg class Inertial Guided Bomb today from Su-30 MKI Aircraft from the Pokhran test range in Rajasthan. The guided bomb achieved the desired range and hit the target with high precision.

All the mission objectives have been met. The weapon system is capable of carrying different warheads.
Nampi/Rajib/HS
(Release ID: 1572551)

ramana
Forum Moderator
Posts: 52605
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby ramana » 25 May 2019 12:09

Thanks. There was a tweet rhat showed all the four photos. The bomb landed dead center of the target and functioned.
Interesting it did not have any fins.

sivab
BRFite
Posts: 911
Joined: 22 Feb 2006 07:56

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby sivab » 26 May 2019 10:48

https://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/scien ... 246496.ece

Finally, IISc team confirms breakthrough in superconductivity at room temperature

Putting to rest all doubts and criticism, a team led by Prof. Anshu Pandey from the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bengaluru confirms that their material exhibits major properties of superconductivity at ambient temperature and pressure. A material is said to be a superconductor if it conducts electricity with nil resistance to the flow of electrons. Superconductors will help build very high efficient devices leading to huge energy savings. Till now, scientists have been able to make materials superconduct only at temperatures much below zero degree C and hence making practical utility very difficult.

Superconductivity at ambient temperature has been a holy grail in physics for about a century. This is where IISc’s work becomes particularly important. A revised article has been posted on May 21 in arXiv, a pre-print repository.

The material that exhibited superconductivity is in the form of nanosized films and pellets made of silver nanoparticles embedded in a gold matrix. Interestingly, silver and gold independently do not exhibit superconductivity.

The team examined 125 samples, of which 10 showed a drop in resistance signaling the onset of superconductivity. They attribute the unsuccessful results in the remaining 115 samples to oxygen exposure at the time of sample preparation and when the samples were taken for study.

“If this [result] is correct, it would be the greatest work done in India since the discovery of Raman effect,” says Prof. T.V Ramakrishnan, leading condensed matter physicist who is a distinguished Associate with the Department of Physics at IISc. “The material they have made is unbelievable — a tiny sphere of gold, placed 10-20 tinier spheres of silver inside it…This [material] they found shows a sharp drop in resistivity [reflecting superconducting state]. This is potentially amazing,” he adds.

Identical noise
The initial version posted in the repository on July 23, 2018 by a two-member team of Prof. Anshu Pandey and Dev Kumar Thapa attracted criticism, raising doubts about the data and hence the study. The reason: the presence of identical pattern of noise for two presumably independent measurements of the magnetic susceptibility. Noise, by its very virtue, will be random and so finding nearly identical noise in measurements made under different conditions is highly improbable. Dr. Brian Skinner, a physicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston was the first to notice this.

In one of his tweets in August 2018 Dr. Skinner said: “…They [IISc team] are really not backing down from their claims. They emphasize that they are focused on providing validation of their data…” And that is precisely what the IISc team has now done — provide validation of their data. On May 22, 2019, Dr. Skinner tweeted “…I am gratified, to say that least, that it is a scientific story now, and not a story about social scandal.”

Interestingly, the plots of magnetic susceptibility versus temperature in the new data still show the repeated “noise” in some instances. However, the researchers have clarified that the magnitude of the noise is well above instrumental resolution. “This suggests a possible physical origin related to the sample as opposed to instrument artefacts,” they write.

Referring to the “noise”, Prof. Arindam Ghosh from the Department of Physics at IISc and a co-author of the revised article says: “This is the data that we got. Further studies have to be done to understand this.”


The proof
“Two of the most important properties of superconductivity are dimagnetism and zero resistance. These two were seen in the material we studied. They seem to suggest that the material becomes superconducting below a certain temperature (286 K or 13°C). And it can go up to 70°C,” says Prof. Ghosh.

“At 286 K we have seen clear transition from a normal state to a superconducting state. This is more than anyone has reported,” Prof. Ghosh adds.

The revised version has provided the recipe for preparing the material, which was not included in the version post in July last year. The revised version also has plenty of data on the calibration of the setup. Besides retesting superconductivity, the authors tested it on another superconducting metal — lead. “[Unlike in the case of the original material] we did not see repeated noise,” Prof. Ghosh clarifies.


Researchers critically evaluating the revised version have raised some concerns. Prof. Pratap Raychaudhuri from the Superconductivity Lab at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) Mumbai has raised concerns that while the drop in mutual inductance is fairly sharp, it is at a lower temperature compared with resistance. “In superconductivity when the resistance goes to zero the diamagnetic drop should coincide with resistance drop. Here the resistance drops to zero at 175 K but the diamagnetic drop is at 165 K. This kind of difference [between resistance and diamagnetic drop] is unusual,” say Prof. Raychaudhuri.

Responding to Prof. Raychaudhuri’s observation on the sharpness of fall in mutual inductance Ghosh says: “We think there is long penetration depth (the depth to which the magnetic field penetrates inside the material) and so the change in mutual inductance can be very small.”

And about different temperature at which diamagnetic drops and resistance goes to zero, Prof. Ghosh explains: “We don’t have full clarity on this but there have organic superconductors where such discrepancies have been seen before.”

Soon after Dr. Skinner raised a red flag, there was criticism that authors were not sharing the samples with their peers for evaluation. “Our samples are extremely sensitive to environment. Samples degrade very rapidly and so measurements have to be made immediately after sample preparation,” Prof. Ghosh says, explaining why samples could not be shared with others. “We have now found a way of protecting the samples for a long time, which allowed us to do measurements over the last few months. Once we develop a protocol for better protection then we will be engaging and collaborating with other groups in India and abroad.”

Prof. G. Baskaran, a SERB Distinguished Fellow at The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, who works on the theory of superconductivity, was quick to provide a theory soon after the preprint was posted in 2018. In his theory, monovalent character of silver and gold and repulsion among electrons could produce room temperature superconductivity under certain restrictive conditions. Prof. Baskaran is excited that the Thapa-Pandey system precisely provides such conditions. “This looks like a case where granular superconductors play a role. I am excited that the key first step in this challenging field has been brought about by a systematic and detailed effort.”

The manuscript has been sent to a journal for publication and the first level of reviewing by editors has been completed. It is currently undergoing technical review by peer-reviewers. “We hope it will be published soon,” Prof. Ghosh says.


Will be one of the most significant discovery when confirmed.

jaysimha
BRFite
Posts: 969
Joined: 20 Dec 2017 14:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 04 Jun 2019 11:13

=general information=
THE INDIAN INSTITUTE OF METALS NMD ATM 2019
International Symposium on “Advanced Materials forIndustrial and Societal Applications” 13 November, 2019
https://www.iimnmdatm2019.org/downloads ... ochure.pdf
Kovalam, Thiruvananthapuram

jaysimha
BRFite
Posts: 969
Joined: 20 Dec 2017 14:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 04 Jun 2019 11:27

may be moved to correct dhaaga,

Image
http://pib.nic.in/PressReleaseIframePage.aspx?PRID=1571653

Ministry of Culture
India’s first global, Mega-Science Exhibition ‘Vigyan Samagam’ to begin on May 8th in Mumbai
After Mumbai, Vigyan Samagam to reach Bengaluru, Kolkata and New Delhi in its 11-month journey

Exhibition in Mumbai will be open for visitors from 8th May, 2019 to 7th July, 2019 at Nehru Science Centre
Posted On: 06 MAY 2019 6:26PM by PIB Mumbai
Mumbai, May 6, 2019

India’s first global, Mega-Science Exhibition ‘Vigyan Samagam’ is slated to begin at the Nehru Science Centre, Worli, Mumbai on May 8th, 2019. The exhibition will take visitors through the world from micro to macro, unveiling the efforts of the international community in understanding the Universe. It will showcase India’s participation in the world’s major Mega Science projects, where several developed countries are participating collectively.

Exhibition will be open on all days including Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays. At Nehru Science Centre, Mumbai, the timing will be from 10 am to 6 pm.

***

DJM

(Release ID: 1571653) Visitor Counter : 2009



Kakarat
BRFite
Posts: 1790
Joined: 26 Jan 2005 13:59

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Kakarat » 05 Jun 2019 13:30

chola wrote:^^^ I love the C-295 but since it is Airbus' we will never be able to do much more than local contracting for it. Meaning no exports, no variants, non real transfer of tech.

Ukraine is in dire strait and from what I read, Saudi Arabia would have been to produce the AN-132 without a cap in numbers and would have been able to exports. Profits split with Antonov of course. That is the kind of "ToT" I would like us to have.

That is not to say I wouldn't be happy with the C-295. The expectation though would be ownership and future development path being less under our control.


I think this would be a more appropriate thread to continue this discussion

I got your point the first time itself but now as we are getting close to 60 C-295 with a confirmed MPA and a proposed AEW variants I dont see a point investing in another aircraft of the same capability. Your point of it being a Airbus product and restrictions are all ok but still it wont be wise to get An-132 as C-295 would have already eaten into the numbers required of the type.
Instead by getting the type certificate license for An-178 similar to dornier Do228, we would have a aircraft close to a Y-8 and could also have a civilian variant flying in domestic airlines. We can not only export it but also tell the Ukrainians to get components for the aircrafts that they produce from us. We still have the MRTA requirement that is yet to be fulfilled

chola
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3572
Joined: 16 Dec 2002 12:31
Location: USA

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby chola » 05 Jun 2019 14:33

^^^ The AN-178 was never offered for partnership or else I would have jumped all over it. It seems Antonov wanted to keep that one as its own but the AN-132 was explicitly offered.

Saar, the C-295s are to replace the 55 or so Avros. We still have 100 old AN-32s. I think half of the AN-32s were "modernized" years ago but that program stalled for the other half. The instruments are so old that pilots literally needed to fly "by hand and Mark I eyeball."

I think there would be more than enough room and roles for the AN-132 if we can negotiate a good price.

Kakarat
BRFite
Posts: 1790
Joined: 26 Jan 2005 13:59

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Kakarat » 05 Jun 2019 15:05

chola wrote:^^^ The AN-178 was never offered for partnership or else I would have jumped all over it. It seems Antonov wanted to keep that one as its own but the AN-132 was explicitly offered.


EXCLUSIVE: Old Horse Antonov Unveils 3 New Indian Hopes
For starters, the company has mounted a hostile posture on the decaying Indo-Russian Multirole Transport Aircraft (MTA), opening a front with its An-178. The company says the An-178 “being under certification tests can be a basis for launch and joint fulfillment of the medium transport aircraft program in accordance with Indian customers’ requests.” (sic). Who better than the Ukrainians to know what’s going down at rival Ilyushin that partners India’s HAL on the so-far unmoving MTA programme?


Antonov Submits Its Offer In The Indian Transport Aircraft Tender. Will The Ukrainians Beat the Russian Proposal?

There are multiple articles of An-178 & An-77/188 being offered to arabs, chinese, etc. due to the condition of Ukraine at present there is noting that they wont sell

chola wrote:Saar, the C-295s are to replace the 55 or so Avros. We still have 100 old AN-32s. I think half of the AN-32s were "modernized" years ago but that program stalled for the other half. The instruments are so old that pilots literally needed to fly "by hand and Mark I eyeball."

I think there would be more than enough room and roles for the AN-132 if we can negotiate a good price.


I know that very well but what is the point in having two aircrafts with the same capabilities? when we will have 55 C-295 why invest again in An-132 which doesn't bring any new capability instead we should bargain for better tot with airbus for the bigger order. Also some of the requirement of An-32 should be converted to An-178 type. There is no point in having multiple types with same capability

jaysimha
BRFite
Posts: 969
Joined: 20 Dec 2017 14:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 05 Jun 2019 15:59

How this small group of women at NAL has been critical to the Saras program
https://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/ba ... 459167.ece

Image

chola
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3572
Joined: 16 Dec 2002 12:31
Location: USA

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby chola » 06 Jun 2019 13:17

Kakarat wrote:I know that very well but what is the point in having two aircrafts with the same capabilities? when we will have 55 C-295 why invest again in An-132 which doesn't bring any new capability instead we should bargain for better tot with airbus for the bigger order. Also some of the requirement of An-32 should be converted to An-178 type. There is no point in having multiple types with same capability


Kakarat ji, if the AN-178 is on the table then I am in total agreement!

I suppose I have become myopic in my pursuit of the AN-132. Somehow I missed the boat on the AN-178. In either case, I hope take advantage of the opportunity in Ukraine.

JayS
Forum Moderator
Posts: 4077
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby JayS » 06 Jun 2019 17:08


Nothing on RTA.

Indranil
Forum Moderator
Posts: 7405
Joined: 02 Apr 2010 01:21

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Indranil » 06 Jun 2019 22:23

There wasn't anything exciting in that report. There were only two things that caught my attention.
1. After the 55 and 65 HP wankel engines, they are now testing a 30 HP wankel engine. What could that be for?
2. There was wind tunnel model of a two stage missile/rocket. Nothing that I know of fits the bill.

Kakarat
BRFite
Posts: 1790
Joined: 26 Jan 2005 13:59

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Kakarat » 06 Jun 2019 22:32

Indranil wrote:2. There was wind tunnel model of a two stage missile/rocket. Nothing that I know of fits the bill.


How do you say its a 2 stage missile?
To my eyes it looks like a AAM and thought it could be Astra Mk-II

Gyan
BRFite
Posts: 1173
Joined: 26 Aug 2016 19:14

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Gyan » 06 Jun 2019 23:42

Note reference to SP 16 TO 20 and then next 20 LCA.

ramana
Forum Moderator
Posts: 52605
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby ramana » 07 Jun 2019 00:20

Jaysimha Thanks for the Hindu report on the role of women engineers in Saras Program.

I too was angry at cut off of funds after reading the crash report.
It was not a fault of the plane.
The govt panicked and the leaders were followers.

Indranil
Forum Moderator
Posts: 7405
Joined: 02 Apr 2010 01:21

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Indranil » 07 Jun 2019 00:42

Kakarat wrote:
Indranil wrote:2. There was wind tunnel model of a two stage missile/rocket. Nothing that I know of fits the bill.


How do you say its a 2 stage missile?
To my eyes it looks like a AAM and thought it could be Astra Mk-II

Too fat.

Aditya_V
BRF Oldie
Posts: 10789
Joined: 05 Apr 2006 16:25

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Aditya_V » 07 Jun 2019 10:18

The image on page 5, it could well be a AAM, we dont from the scaled down model. Given it has 8 external control surfaces, AAM would be a very likely candidate, with the 1 stage pushing the missile to MAch 4+ and dropping off the 2nd stage igniting to give end game energy to the missile.

JayS
Forum Moderator
Posts: 4077
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby JayS » 07 Jun 2019 11:16

It sure looks like mid or long range BVR AAM. Could be Astra MK2. It looks bit slender for 300km ARM.

Here is an image of Astra MK2 model, not exactly the same as the WT model:

Image

abhik
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2436
Joined: 02 Feb 2009 17:42

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby abhik » 07 Jun 2019 12:33

^^^
That model is from close to 10 years back (?). My bet is also Astra 2, AAMs on AMCA models also have the same AMRAAM like layout.

jaysimha
BRFite
Posts: 969
Joined: 20 Dec 2017 14:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 07 Jun 2019 15:00

drdo news letter
June 2019 | volume 39 | issue 06
Successful Technical Trials of Guided Pinaka Rocket System
User Demonstration trials of Corner Shot Weapon System
https://www.drdo.gov.in/drdo/pub/newsle ... une_19.pdf

Gyan
BRFite
Posts: 1173
Joined: 26 Aug 2016 19:14

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Gyan » 07 Jun 2019 19:34

Aditya_V wrote:The image on page 5, it could well be a AAM, we dont from the scaled down model. Given it has 8 external control surfaces, AAM would be a very likely candidate, with the 1 stage pushing the missile to MAch 4+ and dropping off the 2nd stage igniting to give end game energy to the missile.



Can it be AKASH NG ie AKASH Mk 2?

Indranil
Forum Moderator
Posts: 7405
Joined: 02 Apr 2010 01:21

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Indranil » 07 Jun 2019 22:03

Could be.

gaurav.p
BRFite
Posts: 225
Joined: 04 May 2018 23:02

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby gaurav.p » 08 Jun 2019 11:06

while desi dumb media are craving for onion and garlic. Someone missed this. The uni ppl should also start having contacts with media folks...

https://www.iisc.ac.in/indias-first-e-mode-gallium-nitride-power-transistor/
India’s first e-mode Gallium-Nitride Power Transistor

Why GaN HEMT?

All electronic devices that we use today have components made of semiconductors, mostly silicon. In recent years, gallium nitride (GaN), another semiconductor, is making its way into electronics as it is better suited for high power and high-frequency applications. Since GaN technology is still evolving, and it is less expensive to set up a foundry for manufacturing, it is touted to be India’s opportunity to mark its presence in the niche field of semiconductors. A interdisciplinary group of faculty members at IISc have developed India’s first-ever e-mode gallium nitride power transistor, whose performance is comparable to some of the best reports till date.

Power electronic systems that operate at high power and frequencies are projected to use specific transistors called High Electron Mobility Transistors or HEMTs. These transistors are made with gallium nitride, and they can operate at very high voltages, switch ON and OFF faster, and occupy less space when compared to silicon-based transistors. The projected market for HEMTs is projected to cross 5 Billion US$ and overall power device market is set to cross 18B$ mark by 2020, so one can say that GaN will acquire a major market share. With a growing market for electric vehicles in India, such an indigenous development to manufacture these transistors in India will save import costs and make us self-reliant for transistor technology.

What were the challenges with e-mode HEMT?

A High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) has a conducting channel between two terminals, source and drain, and the current through the channel is controlled by a third terminal called gate. The HEMT channel is in a conducting state, or ON, unlike some of the other transistors, so current can pass through it as soon as it is powered on. To stop the flow of current, negative voltage needs to be applied at gate. However, for a transistor to operate reliably in power electronic circuits, it needs to be in the OFF state when no gate voltage is applied, which can then be turned ON by applying a voltage at the gate. Such operation is called e-mode or enhancement mode operation.

Commercially available transistors use various techniques to keep the transistor in normally OFF state One such approach is to completely recess the channel—which results in reducing the channel size. However, this affects the stability, performance and reliability of the device. Another approach is to use a gate made of gallium nitride, doped with impurities that deplete electrons from the channels and switch it OFF. The challenge with this method is that the gate and the channel form a diode, which starts conducting current when a voltage greater than a certain value is applied at the gate, making the unusable. Therefore, there was a need to build a new kind of e-mode HEMT, which is in the OFF state by default and works like any other commonly used transistor . Besides, it must be stable, reliable, efficient and can operate in the desired high voltage.

What is the New HEMT Technology Developed by IISc?

With the hardwork of two years paying off, the team at IISc were able to develop the first-ever e-mode gallium nitride power transistor from India that operates at 600V. It has many advantages in terms of performance and power handling capacity over similar devices proposed by other researchers, some of which are now in the market. Given that the 600V class e-mode HEMT technology recently got commercialised, IISc’s competition was with industry-standard state-of-the-art power gallium nitride HEMT technology. Keeping system level requirements in mind, this group has developed both e-mode HEMT as well as GaN Schottky diodes. Their work has been published in the IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices.

The researchers explored oxides of copper, nickel, aluminium and titanium for using them to make the gate of the improvised HEMT. They zeroed in on titanium oxide as it had minimal leakage current and provided better control of the voltage needed to turn the transistor ON. They finally used aluminium titanium oxide as the percentage of aluminium could be controlled during the fabrication process, which acts as a ‘control knob’, regulating the voltage needed to turn the transistor ON. Since aluminium titanium oxide is stable, it results in high reliability of the transistor.

Interestingly, the addition of aluminium in the titanium oxide was an accidental discovery! The team was experimenting with titanium oxide, trying to finetune it to achieve optimal characteristics. A particular lot that they had developed displayed characteristics totally inconsistent with, but better than, any previous lots. Investigation showed that there had been aluminium contamination, after which, the team explored the use of aluminium doping in titanium oxide.

The researchers carried out rigorous design of experiments, processed over 200 process lots to develop this technology and tested more than 150 transistors per manufacturing lot to develop the confidence with statistics. They found that the gallium nitride transistors with aluminium titanium oxide gate had a 100 fold reduction in the leakage current and better gate control, while keeping it under e-mode, as compared to other conventional GaN HEMTs. Besides, the current carrying capacity of the transistor when it is turned ON was found to be at par with industry standards.

Who Funded this Project?

This project has been funded by the Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMT) initiative of Department of Science and Technology (DST), Govt. of India, with an initial support of 10.28 Crores. The key objective of DST’s AMT division, as far as this project is concerned, is to enable indigenous development of technologies, which are key to the nation’s economic and strategic growth. The GaN activity in IISc was seeded by the Ministry of Defence (MoD), which was subsequently supported by the Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology (MeitY) for the development of GaN based power electronics. These initiatives by MoD and MeitY on materials and devices have helped lay the platform for this advancement.


picture in the link posted above.

nam
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2350
Joined: 05 Jan 2017 20:48

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby nam » 08 Jun 2019 12:30

The report only mentions the GaN tech was seeded by MoD at IISc. Actuallly it was DRDO funding of 10 crores in 2008-09, that laid the foundation.

A joint private+public funded foundry, led by private industry could help us gate crash the semiconductor SC.

Karan M
Forum Moderator
Posts: 17952
Joined: 19 Mar 2010 00:58

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 08 Jun 2019 13:31

This is our second GaN effort.
Other one is DRDO's SSPL + GAETEC, also producting GaN devices.

Raghunathgb
BRFite -Trainee
Posts: 8
Joined: 23 Apr 2019 18:16

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Raghunathgb » 08 Jun 2019 18:09

This is old story. The team even kept the proposal of developing a fab at the cost of 2500 crores which was rejected by central government in Dec 18. The team had a alternate plan to pursue this by taking a loan of 300 CR for this. However it seems to be moving towards dead end with no further encouragement coming by.

gaurav.p
BRFite
Posts: 225
Joined: 04 May 2018 23:02

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby gaurav.p » 08 Jun 2019 19:58

^ if the tech is matching the state of the art. A possible way to go will be to team up with big fishes from friendly countries? (for the sake of validation of the baboons + greater political will + more funding).

This doesn't seem to be the old story. The linked research paper is published this year (march 19).

Karan M
Forum Moderator
Posts: 17952
Joined: 19 Mar 2010 00:58

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 09 Jun 2019 03:37

Raghunathgb wrote:This is old story. The team even kept the proposal of developing a fab at the cost of 2500 crores which was rejected by central government in Dec 18. The team had a alternate plan to pursue this by taking a loan of 300 CR for this. However it seems to be moving towards dead end with no further encouragement coming by.


This is not any old story. Please read the linked article again. The team was actually funded by multiple GOI agencies and has developed a working item. Clearly, GOI did not want to commit to an expensive fab before being sure they had working tech. in place.
Meanwhile, the DRDO has an alternate path inhouse. The IISC work is different and an enhancement over traditional GaN devices, hence the claim about e-mode (enhanced mode) GaN transistor etc.

Karan M
Forum Moderator
Posts: 17952
Joined: 19 Mar 2010 00:58

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 09 Jun 2019 03:53

2018 IISc Annual Report notes in Jan 2019:

Indigenous fabrication of gallium nitride based transistors for power electronic applications through collaborative efforts of CeNSE, EE and DESE faculty members has been underway.
https://52.172.193.27/wp-content/upload ... T-COPY.pdf

So, clearly, this development is new and subsequent to what is in the report.

Next:
This is the report from July 2018, which stated the Govt was still considering the proposals, which were BTW backed by NITI Aayog.
https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/sm ... s?from=mdr

“They (IISc) have prepared a detailed project report. It needs a different kind of appraisal —financial and sustainability and profitability. Everything has to be considered because fab you know is a very big project,” a Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology (Meity) official told ET. “The discussions are on between us, Niti aayog and the IISc team,” said the Meity official without specifying a timeline for the project approval. While India is taking initial steps with GaN semiconductor...
“There seems to be a huge barrier that semiconductor manufacturing cannot be done in India. I am pretty sure that perception existed before CeNSe (Centre for Nano Science and Engineering) came in. We showed that it can be done in India,” said Prof Srinivasan Raghavan, who leads the ten-member team from IISc for the project.
The team has gathered expertise from design of chips to building systems for applications. The two biggest applications are power electronics and RF electronics. In RF electronics, the two most common and visible applications, one would be military radar installations, wireless towers and cellphone towers for 5G. The ecosystem for GaN in terms of devices is there.
The IISc team has submitted two proposals: the first Rs 2,500 crore greenfield facility and managing it for five years. It includes design and roll out of a qualified product in 36 months. The second one is Rs 300 crore line in CeNSe facility and roll out of the first product in 24 months. “If we have to become leaders of this technology, the government has to fund it. That is the way they have done it in China, Taiwan and Korea. It has to be a government-funded and privately operated company,” The government is yet to finalise the funding mechanism, said the Meity official.


Meanwhile:
The SPICE model titled ASM-THEMT has been selected as the world's first industry standard model for GalliumNitrideHighElectronMobilityTransistor (GaNHEMT)bySiliconIntegrationInitiative's CompactModelCoalition(CMC).TheIndustry standard models are selected after rigorous evaluation andvalidationofmultipletechnologiesbythe semiconductor industry. The model will now be available in Electronic Design Automation software, and will be used by major semiconductor and EDA companies worldwide. GaN HEMT is widely used in RF power amplifiers and power electronics applications. GaN HEMTs will be key to design power amplifiers for future 5G technology. The Government ofIndia is considering setting up a GaN foundry near Bengaluru. DRDOandISROarealsoactivelyworkingon developingthistechnologyfordefenseandspace applications.

https://www.iitk.ac.in/new/data/Annual- ... 1-2018.pdf

Karan M
Forum Moderator
Posts: 17952
Joined: 19 Mar 2010 00:58

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 09 Jun 2019 03:55

Post elections, I suspect this proposal will gather steam. The Rs2500 crore proposal apart, the Rs300 crore one may get approved at the very least.

hanumadu
BRF Oldie
Posts: 4339
Joined: 11 Nov 2002 12:31

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby hanumadu » 09 Jun 2019 06:23

Advanced research in any particular field seems to be done in only one or two top tier institutes in India.
Like Semi Conductors in IISc and IIT Mumbai. Some research in etching process in semi conductor manufacturing is being done in IIT Mandi.
It's far too important a field to be left for only a few institutes.

darshan
BRFite
Posts: 801
Joined: 28 Jan 2008 04:16

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby darshan » 09 Jun 2019 07:54

GoI preferred 5G and RF backhaul links from security perspective should provide enough commercial interest for in house GaN technology.


Return to “Military Issues & History Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: brar_w, manoj_niketa, Neela and 49 guests