India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

The Military Issues & History Forum is a venue to discuss issues relating to the military aspects of the Indian Armed Forces, whether the past, present or future. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
Karan M
Forum Moderator
Posts: 18677
Joined: 19 Mar 2010 00:58

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 12 Sep 2019 17:04

Great find Jay. The presentation is from >3 years back, wonder where they are now. That SAL (4km+) is a bit low for autonomous lock on at launch, but with say a Litening type system designating from distance, and the missile guided to within a launch basket can still be very useful. Opens up the possibility to make cheap guided munitions out of MANPADS range (bulk of Pak weaponry).

Karan M
Forum Moderator
Posts: 18677
Joined: 19 Mar 2010 00:58

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 12 Sep 2019 17:05

IAF iirc also ordered a handful of systems from IRDE which are ground launched laser designators. These are presumably to be used by SF on ground to designate targets, likely the Garud (who else!).

JayS
Forum Moderator
Posts: 4373
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby JayS » 12 Sep 2019 17:11

A talk by VEM CEO giving overview of their product line up.


Interview of VEM CEO from AI 2019 -


VEM CEO says their vision is to become Lockheed Martin of India and they want their own Aircraft flying by 2029. :D

Prasad
BRF Oldie
Posts: 7392
Joined: 16 Nov 2007 00:53
Location: Chennai

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Prasad » 12 Sep 2019 17:12

Didn't Alpha make them?
Also Jays,
looks like the IR detector is being procured from semiconductor devices? So atleast then, no desi fpa. It is in the works though.

JayS
Forum Moderator
Posts: 4373
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby JayS » 12 Sep 2019 17:16

Alpha also have their own RF seeker. I remember seeing one seeker meant for Brahmos and one meant for AAM, during AI2017. Someone was saying on twitter that DRDO is been working on FPAs now. But I don't know about it.

Karan M
Forum Moderator
Posts: 18677
Joined: 19 Mar 2010 00:58

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 12 Sep 2019 17:31

The DRDO FPA is for the hand-held thermal imager, basically an IIT program which they funded/were involved in.

ramana
Forum Moderator
Posts: 53478
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby ramana » 13 Sep 2019 01:23

There is a very nice history of ATGM development by DRDL from the early days. Will post first link here.

Very asinine attitude of IA killed it.
Better than imports but not good enough.

https://twitter.com/VinodDX9/status/117 ... 53056?s=19


Also description of a first derivative of K 13 AAM.

https://twitter.com/VinodDX9/status/117 ... 37762?s=19

ramana
Forum Moderator
Posts: 53478
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby ramana » 13 Sep 2019 01:26

Read and weep.


German and Swiss version:

Cobra:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cobra_(missile)

French private industry version
SS 10
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS.10

and French govt version

Entac:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ENTAC


For reference the Soviet AT-1 Snapper!!!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3M6_Shmel

The DRDL program used the shell from this weapon as its warhead:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M40_recoilless_rifle


And this rifle had already defeated M-48 Pattons and others in 1965 and 1971.
And hence was a proven warhead for starters.
Note 376 development tests and 100 user trials yet IA found it not useful.

ramana
Forum Moderator
Posts: 53478
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby ramana » 13 Sep 2019 01:29

BTW, Willi Meserrschimdt was released from detention and set up MBB. One of their first products was Cobra wire guided anti tank missile.
The French as their share of Nazi war booty got plans for similar missile.
And called it SS10. Led to a whole family of weapons.

JayS
Forum Moderator
Posts: 4373
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby JayS » 13 Sep 2019 11:31

A thread on some interesting data from HAL's latest Annual Report 2018-19:

https://twitter.com/nileshjrane/status/ ... 1526014977

jaysimha
BRFite
Posts: 1084
Joined: 20 Dec 2017 14:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 13 Sep 2019 11:57

http://www.aesihyd.in/isb2019/index.php
INTERNATIONAL BALLISTICS SYMPOSIUM
November 4 - 8, 2019 | Hyderabad, India
Image

updated brochure with speakers
http://www.aesihyd.in/isb2019/docs/Second-Brochure.pdf

I think ASAT will be discussed in a big way......

ramana
Forum Moderator
Posts: 53478
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby ramana » 13 Sep 2019 20:39

Jaysimha, Thanks. Are the papers online per 30 May 2019!

Would love to hear some of the talks!!!!

Vips
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2264
Joined: 14 Apr 2017 18:23

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Vips » 14 Sep 2019 00:46

In a 1st, Bengaluru firm designs, develops two sniper rifles.

As India pushes for increased participation of the private sector in defence production, a firm in Bengaluru’s Koramangala has, in a first for an Indian firm, designed and developed two sniper rifles prototypes meant for the armed forces, indigenously.

SSS Defence, which has begun work on constructing an 80,000 sqft arms factory at Jigani, 28km from Bengaluru, is hopeful of putting the two
weapons on trial with the special forces soon, even as it has its eyes locked on the export market.

“We are the first to indigenously design and develop sniper rifles. We’ve not acquired ready-made technology from abroad to only assemble. And that we are not only going to offer the weapon, but also provide a complete solution giving users ammunitions, optics and other accessories necessary to operate the weapon, makes us unique. As on date the armed forces buy all of these from different companies,” Vivek Krishnan, CEO, SSS Defence, told TOI.

India opened up arms manufacturing to private firms only in the previous term of the Narendra Modi government. While there
have been reports of some firms being in talks with foreign arms makers to get manufacturing rights for arms, no company has
so far announced design and development of any rifle, let alone those meant for sniping.
The army has been looking to acquire sniper rifles, which has been delayed because of the 20 firms that participated in a tender issued last year, none offered ammunition.
SSS Defence has developed two rifles: Viper, chambered for .308/7.62x51mm cartridge and Saber, chambered for .338 Lapua Magnum cartridge. While Viper has proved its accuracy from a distance of more than 1,000 metres, Saber has proved it on a 1,500 metres range. The Minute of Angle (MoA), which is used to measure the accuracy of rifles, the firm claimed, is best in the class, comparable to global weapons.

“Rifles chambered for 7.62x51mm NATO and .338 Lapua Magnum calibers are popular among military and law enforcement snipers across the world,” Satish R Machani, managing director, SSS Defence, said, adding that their weapons provide precision to long range rifle to shooters.

Stating that the design is based on the armed forces’ most recent requirements, Machani said they have already tested the weapons in the US, where it met all requirements. The rifles have modular, lightweight and ergonomically adjustable sniper chassis, which is rugged, reconfigurable, low maintenance, and manufactured from aerospace grade aluminum alloys. The firm said they are impervious to foul weather conditions, and hot/cold temperature extremes.

“The rifle has an ergonomically adjustable shoulder stock, which will prove very useful for our armed forces, which have men and women from different parts of the country who are built differently,” Krishnan said. So far, the firm has invested nearly Rs 20 crore in the business if small arms, optics and ammunition and has started work on building an 80,000 sqft arms factory at Jigani.

“This facility will be manufacturing arms and have a capacity to make 15,000 arms per annum from day one of the first phase. Capacity will then increase to 45,000 arms per annum in the second phase (January 2022) and 80,000 per annum in some years in the third phase,” Krishnan added.
Besides, Machani said that the firm has also acquired an 80-acre plot for an ammunition factory near Anantapur in Andhra Pradesh, some 200km from Bengaluru. “This factory will manufacture multiple ammunition calibers — 9mm, 7.62x39mm, 7.62x51mm, .338 Lapua and 12.7mm for export markets and domestic demand,” he added.

Karan M
Forum Moderator
Posts: 18677
Joined: 19 Mar 2010 00:58

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 14 Sep 2019 17:50


JayS
Forum Moderator
Posts: 4373
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby JayS » 15 Sep 2019 00:29

^^ What a waste of opportunity that video is. Why can't our people understand that its the slides which need to be shown not speaker's face all the time.

Anyhow, they shown one slide at least which shows seekers for various projects. Here is the least that I could make out from the bad quality image.

RF Seekers:

Ku Band - Astra, QRSAM, AKASH-1S
X Band - SLCM, NASM
W Band - SANT, PRALAY, NGARM, RUDRA-M
Ka Band - Project AD

IIR Seekers:

NAG = 384x288 MWIR Gear Drive Seeker
HELINA = 384x288 MWIR Direct Drive Seeker
MPATGM = 120 micro-meter MWIR Direct drive Seeker
BMD = 128x128 LWIR (this line is not visible properly due to overlapping text, but he mentioned BMD while talking)

Indranil
Forum Moderator
Posts: 7777
Joined: 02 Apr 2010 01:21

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Indranil » 15 Sep 2019 00:33

My pet peeve. Stop vyakti puja. Even if he was the most handsome person in the world, I dont care to see for more than 1 minute. I know who is. I know what he is capable of.

Karan M
Forum Moderator
Posts: 18677
Joined: 19 Mar 2010 00:58

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 15 Sep 2019 00:45

Jay - I know, what the heck. :-?
At least we got the video.

Indranil - lol, see the dignitary + flower pot pics in most visits to establishments.

Nalla Baalu
BRFite
Posts: 119
Joined: 24 Aug 2006 07:16
Location: Yerramandi, Dhoolpeta

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Nalla Baalu » 15 Sep 2019 00:49

Reminds me of similar such interaction of Dr. Reddy immediately after ASAT test earlier rhis year. The press corps with cameras had full access to all the visuals, but the official cameraman freezes the frame of the DRDO chief. Apparently
resident editor/producer has not heard of picture-in-picture facility

JayS wrote:^^ What a waste of opportunity that video is. Why can't our people understand that its the slides which need to be shown not speaker's face all the time.
...

Karan M
Forum Moderator
Posts: 18677
Joined: 19 Mar 2010 00:58

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 15 Sep 2019 03:12

Ok, lets also focus on what he says:

Till 35:00
AEW&CS is being heavily used by IAF
Guided Pinaka is in induction. Big news.
WHAP - Wheeled Armor Platform - is no longer just a testbed, but IA etc are in discussions how to use it.
MMG Shivalik - industry has taken up the tech & will be inducted in large numbers
FSAPDS & warheads - PCB/Concrete penetrators of different kinds for different depths in development, production
Radars - we are confident of our tech, done very well, many radars have been developed in the country, including a couple of radars earlier imported for BMD apps now developed in the country, HPR development is going on, LRTR for BMD has been developed, mentions industry is strong here and working with DRDO for many items
EW - Himshakti, Samyukta for IA, Sangraha, Varuna etc for IN, Divya Drishti; Girishakti in devpt, S-Band terminals for GSAT-6, SDR developed for IN in multiple form factors..soon we'll be able to do it for others as well.. mix of waveforms (indigenous + imported), match existing ones is harder than making our own
Sonars- HUMSA, USHUS, Abhay inducted ..ALTAS in developmental trials, Diver Detection System etc
Torpedos -TAL, Varunastra, Mareech - accepted by Navy, working on NG ALWT, electric heavy weight torpedo, AIP we are confident
Devices - TRM, MEMs based pressure sensors/accelerometers, Transmitters, SoC - we could make all this

Karan M
Forum Moderator
Posts: 18677
Joined: 19 Mar 2010 00:58

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Karan M » 15 Sep 2019 03:35

This gent is really sensible, and has his priorities very right. Right man for the job.

Nalla Baalu
BRFite
Posts: 119
Joined: 24 Aug 2006 07:16
Location: Yerramandi, Dhoolpeta

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Nalla Baalu » 16 Sep 2019 02:03

Upfront there was a disclaimer that he is not getting into indigenisation of strategic systems.

Significant detail on kind of collaboration with academia and industry. Mentions which universities have got what going on. Talked on modes of industrial hand holding: built-to-specs, built-to-design, foreign-collaboration, inhouse production (niche, critical IP). A mention about 150 problems out on the website (?) that they would like to work with industry and academia.

Emphasized need to get the act together on materials and manufacturing. Provides an example of hypersonic missile being a question of materials. On related note, makes a comment that he visited NIT - Warangal and found that 37 out of a batch of 40 (presumably) mechanical engineers took IT jobs. Goes on to add, he has seen youngsters pivot towards these two fundamental challenges in last 3-4 years.

Detail on ASAT subsystems and video which looks similar to what was put out after the test.

A slide ( not clear on the video) on what portion on forces needs are met by DRDO products, approx. 2.7 L crore. A significant part portion of imports are due to bulk orders of large systems like submarines, fighter aircraft etc.

Karan M wrote:Ok, lets also focus on what he says:

Till 35:00
AEW&CS .
WHAP
FSAPDS & warheads -
Radars -
EW -
Sonars-
Torpedos -
Devices -

Picklu
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2036
Joined: 25 Feb 2004 12:31

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Picklu » 16 Sep 2019 03:47

Karan M wrote:I have been reading about the casualties that the IA has taken - especially its SF elements, and I have to say despite the "IA knows best" blowback which is invariably the case whenever anyone even moderately attempts to point out lacunae in IA etc, there is a clear case to be made for their lack of firepower, and sensors. The casualties all follow a predictable pattern - bullet hitting an undefended area, the troops getting pinned down in an indefensible position and unwilling/unable to retreat, lack firepower in depth. They are usually on par with their opponents. No mention of sophisticated hand-held UAVs (first look), or heavy usage of RLs or underslung grenade launchers like above, BPJs are like old-school flak jackets with limited coverage. I can only hope things change. Otherwise we are throwing pearls before swine.



Going through india's most fearless 1 & 2 and one pattern emerges. Our RR boys have pathetic self protection gear. Almost anytime the terr bullets find them, they are toast. They survive because the terrs have terrible shooting skill most of the time. Even the well trained terrs are merely capable of maintaining the volume of fire using the SSG taught drills, the less said about marksmanship the better.

So, at this point, i do not want any fancy drone, wall penetrating radar, wire mounted camera and corner shot weapon. Improved BPJ, helmet and enhanced protection for limbs in case of CQB is all I ask for. However, I have a doubt that alone will solve the problem and the reason for my apprehension is below.

From reading the books, I get the feeling that our boys have the same fatalistic chalta hai attitude similar to every other helmet-less 2 wheeler rider and hence do not always follow the SOP on all self protective gears ostensibly to save time to suit up and also to avoid bulky get up.

My personal opinion, gallantry rewards policy should be changed to have a checkpoint on whether all self protective gears were worn by the intended recipient or not. A life of an officer is too precious to waste in exchange for a 2 bit jihadi and the decision to wear or not should not be left to the individuals. In case of an operation, self protective gears should be treated as uniform and must be worn, period.

ramana
Forum Moderator
Posts: 53478
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby ramana » 16 Sep 2019 05:18

Jay s, Why did ARDE come up with 80 mm rocket? Needs a whole new eco-system. Did force ask for it?

sankum
BRFite
Posts: 679
Joined: 20 Dec 2004 21:45

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby sankum » 16 Sep 2019 05:53

80mm rocket system being used in Russian origin fighters and Helicopters.

Vips
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2264
Joined: 14 Apr 2017 18:23

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Vips » 16 Sep 2019 06:58

Defence ministry takes a shot at the startup game.

A picturesque village with green paddy fields and swaying coconut trees seems far removed from the world of deep tech hardware and startups. But Pattimattom in Kerala’s Kunnathunadu panchayat is the home of EyeROV Technologies, which makes underwater drones. The drones swoop into waters too dangerous for divers, inspect what lies beneath, and report back in detail.

The rover can spot a crack in a dam 30 meters underwater or live stream corrosion in pipelines transporting oil. Data analytics and visualization help make timely decisions based on what the drones record. Soldiers sometimes have to cross treacherous rivers in a hostile environment. The waters are often ice-cold, currents strong, and visibility near nil. An underwater drone could go in first and tell the troops what to expect.

EyeROV and 11 other startups are part of a new initiative for defence innovation at the Forge incubator in Coimbatore. The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) was the first to use EyeROV’s drone at its Naval Physical and Oceanographic Laboratory to conduct underwater experiments in December 2017. EyeROV’s founders, IITians Johns T. Mathai and Kannappa Palaniappan P., had pitched their months-old product to a group of DRDO scientists and it was chosen over competitors from around the world.

“The feedback from DRDO was crucial," Mathai recalls. The scientists wanted the drone to carry a 2kg payload. This helped later when EyeROV took its drone to Bharat Petroleum, Mumbai Port Trust, coastal police and dam operators last year.

Now, EyeROV’s underwater drones will help the Navy in reconnaissance and repair. The startup was picked by the defence ministry after a country-wide call from Innovations for Defence Excellence (iDEX), a programme started in April 2018 to equip the armed forces with cutting-edge technology by fostering startups.

The Defence Innovation Organisation—a not-for-profit company formed by public sector undertakings—got the army, navy and air force to come up with 11 requirements to kick off iDEX. These included unmanned underwater and airborne vehicles, see-through armour, body protection systems and new materials. It threw the challenge open to innovators.

PROCUREMENT TO INVESTMENT
Thousands—from startups to research scientists—made pitches and 44 winners were chosen a few months ago. These winners, including EyeROV, will receive ₹1.5 crore from iDEX to develop and commercialize products or technologies in close consultation with the armed forces.

“This could be the beginning of some Lockheed Martins from India," Mathai says, eyes twinkling. He visited the Lockheed Martin facilities in Washington DC and Boston last October. He came away impressed with how the company, now the world’s largest defence contractor, built its first product 24 years ago with help from US government. He believes iDEX could do that for India.

“How can we get more Indian engineers to look at problems of defence and help reduce the cost of import, rather than just making the next Swiggys or Flipkarts? True, they created value, jobs and got the spirit of entrepreneurship going. But Indian engineers are second to none and you would want them working for defence. This was the premise on which we started creating the iDEX structure," says Mudit Narain, programme director at NITI Aayog.

With experience as the founding manager of Atal Innovation Mission, Narain could speak the language of startups as well as government. “I saw myself as a translator—I could help these universes talk to each other and achieve innovation instead of indigenization, which is mostly reverse engineering oriented towards low-cost import substitution," he says.

Traditionally, defence has had a procurement mindset—you choose from what’s available out there. So you buy a product instead of identifying a need and developing a product to meet that requirement. India is the world’s largest defence equipment importer and the procurement process favours mature companies with ready products. Indigenous innovation was confined to R&D labs funded by PSUs.

“You need to step away from this mindset for real innovation to happen. The user and the innovator have to ideate and iterate on products several times. That’s why the principles of co-creation, open innovation, and an investment model are wired into the core of iDEX," Vishwanathan Sahasranamam, co-founder and CEO of Forge, explains. Forge is one of the six incubators iDEX is partnering with. “In India so far, defence has been doing a lot of indigenization but it’s not the kind of transformative innovation we would ideally want to gain a competitive edge," he says.

Vips
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2264
Joined: 14 Apr 2017 18:23

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Vips » 16 Sep 2019 06:59

Meet the go-to guy for defence, space, nuclear tech indigenization.

India came within 2.1km of becoming the fourth nation—after Russia, the US and China—to make a soft landing on the Moon and release a rover to explore new regions of the lunar surface. The nation let out a collective sigh when the lander Vikram veered off with the rover in its belly.

But Chandrayaan-2, which deployed an orbiter circling the Moon, was still a remarkable achievement for a third world nation. One of its standout elements is frugality—the $140 million spent on Chandrayaan-2 is minuscule compared to the billions of dollars that the US and China put into their space missions each year.

The lower cost comes from indigenization. India made a virtue out of the necessity of learning to be self-reliant in its space, nuclear and defence programmes. And Indian entrepreneurs with engineering prowess are helping to fill critical gaps.

Bengaluru-based Sunlux Technovations Pvt. Ltd, for example, specializes in making smart sensors for a variety of deep tech applications. One of these was to automate the testing of Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) satellites, including the orbiter in Chandrayaan-2, in a chamber where the harsh environment in space is simulated. Earlier, these satellites had to be sent to Europe for testing, which would hike costs as well as delays.

“It was customized to our requirements," says a senior Isro official, who did not want to be named. “We have tested nearly 100 satellites using this system," he says, adding that visiting National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa) scientists were impressed with the state-of-the-art technology.

Sunlux is also deploying “life-critical systems" for the navy which will enable “strategic import substitution," says founder Ram Kerur, who is not at liberty to go into details about defence projects. These systems are replacing Russian ones we depended on, at a quarter of the cost.

Radioactive zones
Kerur’s journey as a deep tech entrepreneur mirrors that of India’s space and nuclear programmes, which have been a struggle every step of the way. His first exposure came in the eighties when he worked at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research after getting an M.Tech in industrial electronics. He collaborated on projects with scientists at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre.

His first big break after setting up Sunlux in 1989 was a contract to build a master-slave robotic system to work in radioactive zones where humans could not go. This was at a time when India faced hurdles getting access to technology after carrying out missile tests. “We were the first in Asia to do this after India was banned from importing (such robots)," he says.

He recalls sitting on a beach in Mamallapuram with an atomic energy official and working out solutions. It was an era before the advent of Google, when information was harder to find, wireless systems hadn’t matured, and robotics was in its infancy. “We went through many iterations because the materials available were limited," says Kerur. He remembers going to Belagavi, which had casting specialists, to find alternatives. “We had to improvise but deliver the same level of accuracy."

The robots for the nuclear programme demonstrated Sunlux’s frontier engineering capability, but almost put it out of business. The cost of the project turned out to be so much more than the contracted amount that it took Kerur four years to repay the debts.

A personal crisis compounded the financial crunch. Treatment of his father’s cancer wiped out the family’s savings. Job offers were attractive, but Kerur’s passion for making deep tech products kept him on the entrepreneurial path. The defence project to replace imported systems with homegrown controls and automation has taken nearly a decade to develop, test and validate.

Use in industry 4.0
The pay-off comes from new opportunities for Sunlux’s expertise in sensors, controls and automation. Industry 4.0 where machine data is analysed for everything from improving processes to preventive maintenance puts the company at the heart of change across sectors. “For anything to be intelligent, we need sensors and connectivity," he says. Smart cities and HVAC (heating, ventilation and air-conditioning) is an emerging domain where Sunlux’s sensor-based products are finding uses. Its automated test equipment has several applications in the electronics industry. And these are systems which have passed the test of robustness from demanding clients like defence and space organizations.

In a country known mainly for its software, entrepreneurs like Kerur have taken the road less travelled to create an ecosystem for deep tech at the cusp of hardware and software, whether its industrial IoT or the space programme. A labour of passion, more than a desire for quick bucks, drives this kind of entrepreneurship.

SaiK
BRF Oldie
Posts: 36394
Joined: 29 Oct 2003 12:31
Location: NowHere

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby SaiK » 16 Sep 2019 15:01

=° good start-up game with caveats. Nice

JayS
Forum Moderator
Posts: 4373
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby JayS » 16 Sep 2019 16:27

ramana wrote:Jay s, Why did ARDE come up with 80 mm rocket? Needs a whole new eco-system. Did force ask for it?

As sankum noted, we use Imported 80mm rockets. Russian 80mm S-8 for example.

LCH/RUDRA use 70mm Thales FZ90 rockets.

These rockets are large volume requirements and low hanging fruit. I think this is one of the indigenization initiative and one from the effort to give Munition MFG to pvt industry. Its a good opportunity for SME to cut their teeth on. Once they can make unguided ones, they can diversify into guided variations on their own. Some of them like VEM already has proposed Rockets. Someone like the can make good of this opportunity.

We could make 70mm rockets too for out attack helis or switch to 80mm and kill the imports there.

csaurabh
BRFite
Posts: 756
Joined: 07 Apr 2008 15:07

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby csaurabh » 16 Sep 2019 21:20

"Eyerov Technologies" is a scam. Their "product" is nothing other than the well known world-famous "Bluerov" underwater submarine, and their "technology" amounts to not much more than importing Bluerov's components into India and assembling them. Oh and they make a slightly different outer frame. Big whoopy doo. Software used is ArduSub - which is open source.

As a comparison point I would suggest the IITM startup PLANYS. Like Eyerov, PLANYS is also based on Bluerov and ArduSub : but a) They acknowledge this (Eyerov doesn't ) and b) PLANYS has significantly more upgrades and customization done to make it useful to Indian industries. Give it a couple of years and I predict that PLANYS will blow this shoddy ripoff right out of the water.

The fact that "Eyerov" has won awards (and cash) from DRDO and IDEX speaks volumes about the cluelessness of the Indian defence establishment and their unwillingness to do any background research. This is hurting true innovators- something I learned the hard way from my experiences at IDEX.

ramana
Forum Moderator
Posts: 53478
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby ramana » 16 Sep 2019 23:44

Yes, I forgot the S-80 rockets from FSU.
Can you post the specs here for completeness?

Neilz
BRFite -Trainee
Posts: 81
Joined: 02 Dec 2008 21:09

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Neilz » 17 Sep 2019 00:42

Picklu wrote:
So, at this point, i do not want any fancy drone, wall penetrating radar, wire mounted camera and corner shot weapon. Improved BPJ, helmet and enhanced protection for limbs in case of CQB is all I ask for. However, I have a doubt that alone will solve the problem and the reason for my apprehension is below.

From reading the books, I get the feeling that our boys have the same fatalistic chalta hai attitude similar to every other helmet-less 2 wheeler rider and hence do not always follow the SOP on all self protective gears ostensibly to save time to suit up and also to avoid bulky get up.



To my humble submission. It has been discussed in this forum a long time ago that even if the BPJ/Helmets are available most of the time forces involved in THE action chose not to wear them........ precisely because it hinder with agility and maneuverability of them.

Most of the action described in the books are from JK&L (Jammu + Kashmir + Ladakh) region. An altitude where even one extra kilo can make or break a human being. So it was always a choice between Extra ammo for offence or Extra layer of protection for defense.

Also, as these 2 books repeatedly described most of the time its "rush" to reach a vantage point to lay a KILL BOX seize... At those altitude it will be difficult for any human to walk freely with heavy battle load let alone run/jump/climb like most of us do in plain.

Picklu
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2036
Joined: 25 Feb 2004 12:31

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Picklu » 17 Sep 2019 01:51

Neilz wrote:
Picklu wrote:
So, at this point, i do not want any fancy drone, wall penetrating radar, wire mounted camera and corner shot weapon. Improved BPJ, helmet and enhanced protection for limbs in case of CQB is all I ask for. However, I have a doubt that alone will solve the problem and the reason for my apprehension is below.

From reading the books, I get the feeling that our boys have the same fatalistic chalta hai attitude similar to every other helmet-less 2 wheeler rider and hence do not always follow the SOP on all self protective gears ostensibly to save time to suit up and also to avoid bulky get up.



To my humble submission. It has been discussed in this forum a long time ago that even if the BPJ/Helmets are available most of the time forces involved in THE action chose not to wear them........ precisely because it hinder with agility and maneuverability of them.

Most of the action described in the books are from JK&L (Jammu + Kashmir + Ladakh) region. An altitude where even one extra kilo can make or break a human being. So it was always a choice between Extra ammo for offence or Extra layer of protection for defense.

Also, as these 2 books repeatedly described most of the time its "rush" to reach a vantage point to lay a KILL BOX seize... At those altitude it will be difficult for any human to walk freely with heavy battle load let alone run/jump/climb like most of us do in plain.


I know it has been discussed. I also know the time and agility aspect. Precisely the reason why I mentioned "to save time to suit up and also to avoid bulky get up"

However, the exchange ratios are not very favorable and hence probably merits a rethink.

After all, despite the rush, they don't forget their uniform, do they?

While not discounting the drawbacks in agility, also need to keep in mind the lure of convenience of less weight and then justify the same in operational terms.

If you think only the civilian population can be fatalistic about use of helmet, please check why insas plastic magazines used to break often for soldiers on siachen petrol.


JayS
Forum Moderator
Posts: 4373
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby JayS » 17 Sep 2019 14:52

Please take the discussion on Indian Army Fatalities et al in appropriate thread


jaysimha
BRFite
Posts: 1084
Joined: 20 Dec 2017 14:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 17 Sep 2019 15:48

PHD Chamber of Commerce and Industry in collaboration with ITPO is hosting a three days “22nd India International Security Expo 2019” from 3-5 October 2019 at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi
Image

jaysimha
BRFite
Posts: 1084
Joined: 20 Dec 2017 14:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 17 Sep 2019 15:51

BEML and Wipro Infrastructure Engineering in strategic partnership
https://www.business-standard.com/artic ... 445_1.html
State-owned BEML and Wipro Infrastructure Engineering have signed a pact to work together in aerospace, industrial automation, 3D printing, artificial intelligence and hydraulic system engineering.

jaysimha
BRFite
Posts: 1084
Joined: 20 Dec 2017 14:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby jaysimha » 18 Sep 2019 16:43

ramana wrote:Jaysimha, Thanks. Are the papers online per 30 May 2019!

Would love to hear some of the talks!!!!


Sure sirji,, will check for it,, meanwhile one more general information

Aeronautical Development Agency
Workshop on Compact Heat Exchangers
3rd International Workshop on Compact Heat Exchangers (CHEs)
https://www.ada.gov.in/workshop/chew-2020.pdf

2 nd & 3rd January 2020
Jointly organized by
Aeronautical Development Agency, Bangalore &
Dayananda Sagar University, Bangalore

ramana
Forum Moderator
Posts: 53478
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby ramana » 18 Sep 2019 22:45

Twitter account of OFB Board praises a OFB officer for developing the explosive train of their new Electronic Point Detonating Fuze.
Will post here.

Vips
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2264
Joined: 14 Apr 2017 18:23

Re: India's R&D in Defence DRDO, PSUs and Private Sector

Postby Vips » 20 Sep 2019 03:57

Rajnath Singh inaugurates BEL’ s ₹220-cr product development & innovation centre.

Bharat Electronics Ltd (BEL) has opened its Product Development and Innovation Centre (PD&IC) in Bengaluru with an investment of about ₹220 crore.

“The centre will focus on IPR (intellectual property rights) creation in strategic areas, reducing external dependence for critical subsystems, and standardisation of subsystems,” said Gowtama MV, CMD, BEL.

The centre will contribute to the ‘Make in India’ initiative of the government and is expected to provide a single window interface for DRDO and other R&D houses, and strengthen transfer of technology (ToT) processes and collaborative design efforts through involvement of start-ups and MSMEs.

The centre was inaugurated by Defence Minister Rajnath Singh. Speaking on the occasion, Singh said that the new centre will contribute to the ‘Make in India’ initiative through indigenisation efforts aimed at self-reliance.

The PD&IC is equipped with facilities and resources to design, develop, prototype and generate manufacturing documents for systems and sub-systems, which can be marketed as standalone products or used in the development of larger systems or system-of-systems by the Strategic Business Units/Units of BEL. Centres of Excellence (COEs) have already been created in PD&IC in the areas of Communication, Electro-Optics & Lasers, and Radar & Weapon Systems.

The centre is constructed on a 26-acre land with 45,000 sq m of floor space, which can house about 750 engineers.

High-power transmitter
Singh unveiled a high-power transmitter for Akash-NG RF seeker, designed by the Microwave Tube Research & Development Center (MTRDC), a DRDO lab, and concurrently developed along with BEL, based on a production order from the Research Centre Imarat (RCI).

Speaking at the ‘Engineers Conclave’ (EC-2019), organised jointly by the Indian National Academy of Engineering (INAE), BEL at the Bharat Electronics Academy for Excellence (BAE), Bengaluru,, Singh reiterated the government’s commitment to reach out to remote villages through the Digital India initiative. He added that the development of critical and cutting-edge technologies in defence would help save forex, which can be used for other development activities.

The Engineers Conclave is an annual event aimed at bringing together engineers from across the country to identify, discuss and deliberate upon issues of national importance.


Return to “Military Issues & History Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: g.chaks, nithish, ravikr and 57 guests