US military, technology, arms, tactics

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brar_w
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Re: US military, technology, arms, tactics

Postby brar_w » 11 Sep 2019 21:22

Some major themes are lots of unmanned enablers, AI and a LEO basee space constellation that aids in Air Superiority..

USAF’s Dogfight Power Curve


“China and Russia understand the value of stealth,” said retired USAF Lt. Gen. David A. Deptula, head of the Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies. “They are working very hard to replicate that capability. They may not have figured it out to the degree we have, operationally, but they will get there eventually.”

USAF is responding with more than a dozen major initiatives on the books to rapidly develop or insert new capabilities into its existing fighter force, and with others to advance the state of the art in next-generation air dominance.

Looking further ahead, the Air Force is also developing future concepts, ranging from a stealthy successor to the MQ-9 Reaper—because the MQ-9 cannot operate in defended airspace—to a family of systems that will make up the future Next-Generation Air Dominance concept.

The Air Force requested more than $1 billion dollars for NGAD in its fiscal 2020 budget to fund development of a new, undetermined platform as well as a number of other approaches to control the air.

Will Roper, assistant secretary of the Air Force for acquisition, technology, and logistics, has proposed developing a “new Century Series” of aircraft, recalling the rapid development of fighters designed in the 1950s and ’60s. Each took a slightly different approach to dogfighting and ground attack, making incremental improvements along the way. None of those aircraft were ever intended to be 30-year platforms, but neither were they disposable.

Because these new aircraft won’t be built for a 20,000-hour service life and won’t need the logistics train to support that, the jets could be developed more affordably, Roper said.

NGAD will also make use of remotely piloted, and potentially autonomous, aircraft to complement the fifth-generation F-22 and F-35. In USAF’s “loyal wingman” concept, RPAs would fly in the vicinity of manned fighters, either providing extra missiles or carrying out their own missions independently. Dubbed “Skyborg” by Roper, the concept is being tested on the XQ-58 Valkyrie, which flew for the first time in March, and on other testbeds.

These unmanned systems would be “attritable” aircraft, meaning combat losses would be acceptable, or at least less costly to lose than manned platforms.

Swarms of such autonomous, attritable aircraft “could do things on behalf of a manned fighter, to either go into areas that pose too high a threat or to provide more dilemmas for the adversary,” according to Pacific Air Forces Director of Air and Cyber Operations Maj. Gen Scott L. Pleus.

In fact, Air Force leaders have consistently said NGAD need not produce a new fighter, but could yield something else entirely.

“If we were to characterize it as a fighter, we would be …thinking too narrowly about what kind of airplane we need in a highly contested environment,” Pleus said. “A B-21 that also has air-to-air capabilities” and the ability “to work with the family of systems to defend itself, utilizing stealth—maybe that’s where the sixth-generation airplane comes from.”
....

Reclaiming clear air superiority is not simply a matter of building another next-generation fighter. Instead, the Air Force is pursuing a “family of systems” that “really does diverge away from a platform-centric way of doing air superiority,” said Pleus, the former director of plans, programs, and requirements at ACC.

Traditionally, the Air Force approached air superiority as a numbers game. “More airplanes equal more capability,” he said. But that may not be the case in the future.

“We’re going to have to up our game in all areas,” Pleus said. Stealth, sensors, and connectivity will be key attributes, increasing situational awareness both for pilots and commanders. Converging air, space, and ground-based sensors creates “the ultimate in synergy” and an “unbelievable edge in dominating in the air superiority realm,” Pleus noted.

Active electronically scanned array radars, infrared search-and-track systems, ground-based sensors, bistatic radars, and satellites­—plus the ability to fuse all that situational insight together into a single operating picture—will give the US a speed advantage and force adversaries into a reactive posture.

That means F-35s and F-22s would penetrate contested airspace and “vacuum up” information, passing it undetected to heavily armed fourth-generation aircraft outside of the contested area. Those aircraft will need longer-range missiles, Pleus said, and the Air Force is “teaming with industry” now to develop jam-resistant multimode sensors to guide those weapons and more powerful motors to increase speed and extend range.

“With the scramjet technology … missiles go much longer, much higher, much faster,” he said.

The Air Force and Lockheed Martin are developing the AIM-260 Joint Advanced Tactical Missile—a faster, longer-range replacement for the AIM-120 AMRAAM—which has been the undisputed dogfight champ since the early 1990s.

Brig. Gen. Anthony W. Genatempo, USAF program executive officer for weapons, stated in June that said flight tests are to begin in 2021, with initial operational capability targeted for 2022. The missile will fit in the F-22 and F-35 weapon bays, just as the AMRAAM does today.

AMRAAM has a range in excess of 50 miles. The range of the JATM is not yet known. But to counter China’s PL-15 long-range air-to-air missile, Pleus said the US needs something far more capable.

“I would love to see us get a missile that would get us in excess of 150 miles,” he said.




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Re: US military, technology, arms, tactics

Postby NRao » 11 Sep 2019 21:51

AFWERX hosted a two day gathering in Las Vegas in July.

MULTI-DOMAIN OPERATIONS (MDO) CHALLENGE

In some scenarios, MDOs will have less than 15 minutes to receive incoming data, orient data into useful information, make decisions, and then disseminate situational awareness to the relevant people who will perform multiple actions to create a dominant effect.


And a lot more.

AFWERX with SBIR AF are moving very fast.

They are considering allowing resources from India to participate through the company's making a proposal.

Technology wise everything is on the table. GPU, FACE, RTOS, .............. ML, CNN, ......... Hardware and OS vendors have already responded to this call.

Nikhil T
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Re: US military, technology, arms, tactics

Postby Nikhil T » 12 Sep 2019 06:33

Poland buys 32 F-35A for $6.5B

https://www.dsca.mil/major-arms-sales/p ... r-aircraft

So nearly $200 million per bird, without any weaponry.

brar_w
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Re: US military, technology, arms, tactics

Postby brar_w » 12 Sep 2019 06:43

Nikhil T wrote:Poland buys 32 F-35A for $6.5B

https://www.dsca.mil/major-arms-sales/p ... r-aircraft

So nearly $200 million per bird, without any weaponry.


That is not a sale. That is an FMS notification based on the maximum amount of resources the US is willing to offer to Poland. It also includes the GOTUS estimate for future contractor PBL cost which is very difficult to estimate this out in the future (since Milestone C is just round the corner) and hence is likely a highly conservative estimate.

Following this, there will be long negotiations where Poland will pick and chose their package and then inform then JSF JPO of their schedule and then the JPO will club their orders in when it comes time to place aircraft on order, generally 2-3 years before delivery. The FMS notification is just giving the US Congress an estimate of a pre negotiation top end of what a potential sale could like. It neither means that Poland has “bought” the F-35, nor that they have agreed to go ahead with package as laid out by GOTUS at the present moment.

There is also no way for GOTUS to be certain of what top lime $ the JPO will arrive to an agreement at in the future so these estimates tend to be conservative and reflect the upper limit of a possible future deal. In the past I’ve shared examples of actual negotiated contracts being 30-50% below FMS top line numbers owing to a different package being negotiated or estimates being off as program has had a milestone transition in between FMS notifications and actual contract complete.

Here's an example of this at play -

FMS Notification for SIngapore's purchase of Counterfire AESA radars -

The Defense Security Cooperation Agency notified Congress today of a possible Foreign Military Sale to Singapore of 6 AN/TPQ-53 (V) Counterfire Target Acquisition Radar Systems and associated equipment, parts, training and logistical support for an estimated cost of $179 million. LINK


And the actual contract award, some 4 years later -

The US government has awarded Lockheed Martin a USD63 million firm, fixed-price contract in support of a Foreign Military Sales (FMS) procurement effort of six AN/TPQ-53 counter-fire target acquisition radars destined for Singapore, according to federal contracting documents reviewed by Jane's on 21 August.

The contract – which was signed on 13 April 2017 – includes options that would bring the cumulative value of the order to USD81 million if exercised by the Singapore government. Work on the radar systems is expected to be completed by 13 March 2019, with the US Army Contracting Command-Aberdeen Proving Ground (ACC-APG) in Maryland functioning as the contracting activity...The original DSCA notification of 8 October 2013 for FMS to Singapore involved USD179 million for the purchase of six AN/TPQ-53 radar systems, including all options. The fall in cost to USD81 million reflects a drastic reduction in unit cost of the radar due to full-rate production (FRP). On 30 March 2017, Lockheed Martin was awarded a USD1.59-billion, indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity (ID/IQ) contract for the radar, which included full-rate production of up to 127 radars – including 70 radars for the US Army, 50 for FMS and/or US requirements, and the remaining seven for obsolescence and production. ~ SOURCE - JANE'S International Defense Review 25-Aug-2017



So what changed? FMS notification went through as the system was at a milestone transition i.e. production was ramping up, costs were projected to come down but the FRP contracts had not yet been negotiated with the vendor. In such cases GOTUS is conservative and errs on the side of using a higher number so that their are no surprises to what the Congress has had no objection too.

Having said that, a package for a first time operator (not someone topping up) with GOTUS and contractor support, spares, and a PBL for a block-4 F-35 will probably run 2x of URF and above so a unit price of around $160 Million won't be far fetched once negotiations are complete and they arrive to a package and price that fits their budget.

Chinmay
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Re: US military, technology, arms, tactics

Postby Chinmay » 13 Sep 2019 18:41

Fascinating glimpse into the future.

Chinook Teamed Up With Bomb-Slinging Drone In Complex AI-Enabled Test

Personnel flying onboard an MH-47 Chinook special operations transport helicopter directly controlled an MQ-1C Gray Eagle drone, which then launched a GBU-69/B Small Glide Munition at a target. Other individuals on the ground then redirected the small glide bomb to another target mid-flight. Altogether, this single experiment offered a window into U.S. military advances in manned-unmanned teaming, networked munitions, and artificial intelligence.


The munition, delivery platform, primary operator and secondary operator are all networked and backed up by AI which prioritizes the targets.

NRao
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Re: US military, technology, arms, tactics

Postby NRao » 13 Sep 2019 20:33

Air Force Test Center

Hypersonic test at mach 8.6


brar_w
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Re: US military, technology, arms, tactics

Postby brar_w » 15 Sep 2019 18:28

Air Refueling Capable E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Joins U.S. Navy Fleet


An E-2D Advanced Hawkeye capable of aerial refueling landed at Naval Station Norfolk Sept. 9, officially marking the arrival of this upgraded aircraft to the fleet.

The aerial-refueling-capable E-2D joined the “Greyhawks” of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 120.VAW-120 is only the first step in rolling out this new capability. The U.S. Navy will transition two operational fleet squadrons to aerial refueling capable E-2Ds by 2020.

VAW-120 is a Fleet Replacement Squadron attached to Airborne Command & Control and Logistics Wing commanded by Capt. Matthew Duffy. Its mission it to train naval aviators, naval flight officers, Navy aircrewmen and qualified maintainers to safely and effectively operate E-2 and C-2 aircraft.



Image

The US Navy receives its first E-2D Advanced Hawkeye which France would like three copies


France plans to buy three copies to replace the three planes of the 4F Lann-Bihoué (photo above US Navy). These three old planes have been modernized (the last plane is waiting for its re-launch scheduled for next Tuesday, according to the Navy) in order to be able to fly until the arrival of their successors whose order is foreseen in the current law of military programming. , for a delivery between 2026 and 2028. Negotiations would drag a little, the fault at the high cost of this new aircraft.

brar_w
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Re: US military, technology, arms, tactics

Postby brar_w » 15 Sep 2019 18:37

Sneak peek: Next Generation Jammer Mid-Band on a Growler

Below are the first images of Next Generation Jammer Mid-Band on the EA-18 GROWLER. NGJ-MB is a high-capacity and high-power airborne electronic attack weapon system. It will protect air forces by denying, degrading and disrupting threat radars and communication devices.

In July, Raytheon delivered the first Next Generation Jammer Mid-Band Engineering and Manufacturing Development pod to the U.S. Navy to begin ground and aircraft integration testing.


Image

Image


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