Russian Weapons & Military Technology

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Austin
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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Austin » 28 Oct 2018 09:22

K-433 Svyatoy Georgiy Pobedonosets: Nuclear Triad Workhorse


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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Singha » 28 Oct 2018 09:56

Polyna good point

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Manish_P » 28 Oct 2018 11:36

Holy S%^$ :shock:

Image

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Khalsa » 28 Oct 2018 14:16

Manish_P wrote:Holy S%^$ :shock:

Image


Okay I have seen everything now.
Switch off the Internet

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Austin » 28 Oct 2018 15:54


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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Manish_P » 30 Oct 2018 11:51

Huge Floating Dry Dock Holding Russia's Only Aircraft Carrier Has Accidentally Sunk

Details remain limited and are likely to change, but what we do know is that one of the world's largest floating dry docks, known as PD-50, has sunk while Russia's aircraft carrier Amiral Kuznetsov was aboard. According to reports, the dry dock began to sink suddenly, collapsing cranes onto the carrier's deck and sending shipyard workers scrambling for their lives.


Image

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby chola » 31 Oct 2018 06:15

^^^ Russian carrier aviation is becoming a tragi-comedy of errors.

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Kartik » 02 Nov 2018 04:33

Leaked images show Kamov's new design for an advanced attack helicopter

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From AW&ST
Pictures of a Kamov design for an advanced attack helicopter have appeared on a Russian website.

The images appear to have been leaked amid competition between the Kamov and Mil Moscow Helicopter design bureaus within Russian Helicopters to develop the country’s future high-speed combat helicopter, called SBV.

Russian Helicopters announced at the Army 2017 forum in Moscow last September that it had signed a two-year contract with the Russian defense ministry to refine concepts for a high-speed attack helicopter, with both Kamov and Mil working on designs.

The leaked photographs show Kamov General Designer Sergei Mikheyev presenting the bureau’s concept, a winged coaxial-rotor, twin-turbofan compound helicopter reportedly capable of up to 700 kph (380 kt.) This compares with a speed of more than 400 kph claimed for Mil’s single-main-rotor design.

Images from the presentation to an unknown audience first appeared on the Russian online forum airbase.ru. They may have been leaked to promote Kamov’s more advanced design over the Mil concept, thought to be a conventional helicopter that draws on the Mi-24LL high-speed testbed, which is reported to have achieved an unconfirmed speed of 405 kph in 2016.

The Kamov design has side-by-side seating like its Ka-52 Alligator combat helicopter. The aircraft has a small canard foreplane and an aft-mounted wing with cranked leading edge and straight trailing edge. Swept vertical fins and strakes are located inboard on the wing aft of the trailing edge.

Propulsion is provided by what appear to be a pair of turbofans mounted in the aft fuselage and driving the rotor gearbox via a pair of shafts that project forward from the engines—an arrangement reminiscent of the shaft-driven lift fan in the Lockheed MartinF-35B.

The engines likely direct most of their power forward to shaft-drive the rotors for takeoff, hover and low-speed maneuvers, then shift more of the power to thrust as forward speed increases. The rotor system has a pair of contra-rotating three-blade rotors with swept tips.

The rotors are likely slowed as speed increases to prevent the tips going supersonic, as happens in Sikorsky’s S-97 Raider, which has a rigid coaxial rotor and pusher propulsor on the tail. Rotor-hub fairings and a de-rotated interhub “sail” fairing reduce rotor drag at high speed.

The rotors on Kamov’s design do not appear to be spaced as closely as they are on the S-97, suggesting they may not be as rigid as on the Raider’s lift-offset rotors. But they do appear to be closer together than the coaxial rotors on the Ka-52, which has a lower maximum speed of 315 kph.

Other leaked images from Mikheyev’s presentation show both attack and assault versions of the Kamov design. The two-seat attack version has two internal weapons bays in lower-fuselage sponsons, shown deploying eight Hellfire-sized air-to-surface missiles.

The assault version has a different, more conventional cockpit and forward fuselage, with a windowed cabin door amidships. This version has two weapons pylons under the aft wing; the attack variant is shown with four or six external stores stations under the wing.

Other images of the attack version show the design has retractable tricycle landing gear, movable control surfaces on the wing and vertical tails, fuel tanks forward and aft of the rotor gearbox, and room for what may be a radar in the nose.

While the Kamov and Mil design bureaus vie to develop the SBV, there is no guarantee Russia will be able to afford a new high-speed combat helicopter. For now, it is trying to keep pace with the U.S. Army, which has plans to acquire high-speed armed-scout and medium-assault rotorcraft under the Future Vertical Lift initiative.

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Indranil » 02 Nov 2018 10:27

Has to have TVC to rover. This is a very complex machine. If you think F-35B is a complex machine to design and maintain, think about this one.

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby darshhan » 02 Nov 2018 11:41

Indranil wrote:Has to have TVC to rover. This is a very complex machine. If you think F-35B is a complex machine to design and maintain, think about this one.


But then russians have lot of experience with TVC technology. Although I have my doubts on affordability of this system. Will probably not make it past the prototype stage, if at all

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Austin » 02 Nov 2018 12:36

Not sure why it needs a TVC , It mentions in that article

""The engines likely direct most of their power forward to shaft-drive the rotors for takeoff, hover and low-speed maneuvers, then shift more of the power to thrust as forward speed increases. The rotor system has a pair of contra-rotating three-blade rotors with swept tips"

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Indranil » 03 Nov 2018 04:42

How can a turbofan transfer most of its power to a shaft? We are speaking of an engine which transitions from being a turboshaft at hover and turbofan in forward flight?

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Austin » 03 Nov 2018 09:52

I dont think they will use a turbofan engine , Never saw any mention of it by any other project in works for High Speed Program. Most of the speed gains upto max 400 km/hr is in terms of new rotor design and other aspect.

The new Kamov design would be 6th Gen design or concept something that would come only after 2 decades from now when the 5th gen high speed helicopter has seen years of service , At best they will build a prototype to study this new aspect of design as you say the transistion from turboshaft to turbofan. More of R&D work for next 20-25 years of research program.

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby ramana » 03 Nov 2018 13:05

List_of_modern_Russian_small_arms_and_light_weapons


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of ... ht_weapons

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Prem » 04 Nov 2018 02:56

https://russiandefpolicy.blog/2018/11/0 ... et-part-i/
Nuclear Subs Starving the Fleet
“On 25 September the lead nuclear-powered submarine of project 885M ‘Kazan’ went to sea for factory underway trials. This event didn’t go unnoticed in foreign media or ours. Taking into account the fact that the lion’s share of resources allocated to the Navy go to the nuclear submarine fleet, there’s sense in sorting out the real effectiveness of the expenditures.”“The ‘Borey’ — ‘Bulava’ program is the megaproject of recent history. A lot of copy about its utility has been ripped up. According to the facts we have, six years after completing state testing of the lead boat and three years after transferring the first series vessel to the Pacific Fleet not a single firing of a ‘Bulava’ SLBM from the Pacific Ocean from ‘Aleksandr Nevskiy’ or ‘Vladimir Monomakh’ has taken place. According to media information, the lead SSBN ‘Yuriy Dolgorukiy’ doesn’t carry a combat load and, evidently, is being used as a floating stand for developing and tweaking ‘Bulava’.”“Traditionally they say quietness is the main quality of a submarine. What does this actually mean? The foreign comparative graphic [trans. link added] of the reduction of noise in USSR (RF) and U.S. submarines is well-known. Comparing this graphic with data on the noise of subs of the first-fourth generations it’s obvious that the given levels for our fourth-generation lag U.S. Navy multipurpose nuclear submarines by not less than 10 decibels.”
“Project 885 ‘Yasen’ is the only modern multipurpose submarine which retains the propeller screw, all remaining ones have gone to water pumpjets. The reason is requirements for significant increases in low-noise speed, up to 20 knots. But as research shows, at the same noise level, the speed of ‘Severodvinsk’ and ‘Kazan’ is, obviously, much lower than that of the American ‘Virginia’ and ‘Seawolf’ [trans. SSN-774 and SSN-21 classes respectively]. And this is an extremely serious tactical flaw, the consequences of which are not fully understood by us.”“Meanwhile now our ‘partners’ [trans. the U.S.] are developing new ways of detecting submarines. Submarine officers in Severomorsk laid down the flight track of an American ‘Orion’ reconnaissance aircraft on a map of the disposition of our nuclear submarines in the course of exercises. And all ten turning points of its route precisely followed the disposition of our submarines. In fact it didn’t even search, but went to the exact point. The ‘Orion’ went precisely to our nuclear submarine without any tacking, dropped a buoy and went to the next one.” :eek: “The scope of threats from enemy aircraft aren’t recognized by us because domestic anti-submarine aviation is catastrophically behind the foreign level. The concept of even the newest Russian airborne search-targeting systems are from the 1970s. ‘Novella’ (‘Leninets’), as was officially announced, guarantees ‘an increase in the effectiveness of the Il-38 by four times.’ The problem is the Il-38’s capability against low-noise submarines was close to zero.

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Austin » 04 Nov 2018 06:45

Who writes those crappy articles , YD as test platform , not a single slbm fired , Bulava tweaking , Orion tracking ....what else AK cannot fire a single bullet :lol:

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Austin » 04 Nov 2018 08:32

Gorshkov Class Testing its new Long Range SAM 9M96 at Barrent Sea


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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Zynda » 09 Nov 2018 20:10

Russians are equally good at presentation of their MIL hardware. Awesome Su-57 PAK-FA footage of its low-level photoshoot :). The plane does look really good.


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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Avarachan » 21 Nov 2018 06:33

http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/24 ... p-to-syria

In addition, earlier in November 2018, Viktor Murakhovsky, military expert and editor-in-chief of Russia’s Arsenal of the Fatherland magazine, also claimed in a social media post that his sources had indicated that the Pantsir-S1 point air defense system had been virtually worthless in defending Khmeimim. He said that between April and October 2018, the vehicles, which have a combination of radio command-guided surface-to-air missiles and a pair of 30mm automatic cannons, hit less than one-fifth of their intended targets. In the same period, the Tor-M2U short-to-medium range surface-to-air missile systems at the base had an 80 percent hit rate. Murakhovsky has since deleted his post, possibly under pressure from Russian authorities, but there has also been no further confirmation of his claims.


https://defence-blog.com/army/expert-wa ... syria.html
Well-known Russian military expert and editor-in-chief of ‘Arsenal of Fatherland’ magazine Viktor Murakhovsky posted on his Facebook page the post which mentions the failure of the Pantsir-S1 anti-aircraft missile systems protecting the Russian Hmeimim Air Base in Syria.

According to Viktor Murakhovsky post, in Syria, it came to light that these Pantsir-S1 anti-aircraft missile systems practically “do not track” low-speed and small-sized targets, which include drones, but at the same time regularly spotted big birds flying around the base, which is confusing for operators.

Early, the Russian military faced with a drone attack launched by terrorist groups against its permanent Hmeimim Air Base in Syria’s western coastal province of Latakia, from where Russian fighter jets carry out airstrikes against militants.

During the attack, the Russian Pantsir-S1 anti-aircraft missile systems showed not the best result, which drew sharp criticism from military expert.

But 24 hours later, Murakhovsky was forced to remove the criticism post, according to Lenta.ru citing another Russian military expert Alexey Khlopotov.

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Avarachan » 21 Nov 2018 06:36

^^ It seems that the Pantsir has teething problems. Nonetheless, the previous-generation Tor missile system performed well (an 80% success rate).

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby John » 21 Nov 2018 06:58

Avarachan wrote:^^ It seems that the Pantsir has teething problems. Nonetheless, the previous-generation Tor missile system performed well (an 80% success rate).

Not surprising, Both Army and Navy have ran into issues with Pantsir’s predecessor Tunguska and Kashtan. As a result they refused to fund subsequent procurement after that incl Pantsir.

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Austin » 21 Nov 2018 10:54

Heavy military transport aircraft Il-76MD-90A, Il-76MD and AWACS A-50 , Drone View ,shot in the city of Ivanovo


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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Prem » 21 Nov 2018 11:11


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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Pratyush » 21 Nov 2018 12:20

Khalsa wrote:
Manish_P wrote:Holy S%^$ :shock:

Image


Okay I have seen everything now.
Switch off the Internet



Then you should see the Ah64 concept with 4 harpoon missile of the mid 80s.

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby chola » 21 Nov 2018 12:42

Russkies fast becoming a green water fleet onlee.

https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/why-russian-navy-could-be-serious-trouble-35592

Why the Russian Navy Could Be in Serious Trouble

The sinking of the Russian navy's biggest drydock could spell trouble, and change, for the world's third-biggest navy.

PD-50, a huge floating dry dock at the 82nd Repair Shipyard in Roslyakovo, Russia, accidentally sank on Oct. 29, 2018 after an electrical malfunction resulting in pumps overfilling the dock's ballast tanks.

...

Even before PD-50's sinking, the Russian fleet was slowly replacing big, old ships with much smaller new ones that can't sail as far or carry as much weaponry, but which are cheaper and easier to operate and repair than the old vessels are.


...

The Russian navy was already becoming a "green-water" force optimized for near-shore missions in support of ground operations along Russia's periphery, as opposed to a "blue-water" force like the U.S. and Chinese navies are.

Without PD-50, the Russian navy could become a green-water fleet even faster, forcing the Kremlin to reconsider its overall naval ambitions. "In many ways, this reinforces the view that Russia's naval future is not that of major power-projector, but rather significant harassment force," Eric Wertheim, author of Combat Fleets of the World, told The National Interest.


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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Kartik » 22 Nov 2018 00:39

Phazotron NIIR readies new AESA radar for Russian fighter trials

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Phazotron-NIIR's Zhuk-AME - also known as the FGA50 - active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar is poised to begin trials, an industry source has confirmed to Jane's .

The new radar will be installed into the Russian Aerospace Forces' new MiG-35 multirole combat aircraft and retrofitted as part of an upgrade programme for the MiG-29 'Fulcrum'.

"Phazotron-NIIR is completing manufacture of the first AESA radar for the MiG-29," the source said. "In December we will assemble the unit and deliver it to the RSK MiG corporation that will integrate it onto a specially prepared fighter jet … and trials are scheduled for early 2019."

"The whole process is planned to be finished in two years - we will manufacture four radars, integrate them onto fighters and conduct [further] tests," said the source.


An export version of the Zhuk-AME - known as Zhuk-AMEh - was unveiled at Airshow China in 2016. According to the source, several foreign MiG-29 operators have expressed interest in the sensor, with one of these potentially fielding AESA-equipped 'Fulcrum' before Russia.

Performance details of the new system are scant, but the manufacturer claims the Zhuk-AME can detect aerial targets that are around 160 km away and can simultaneously track up to 30 targets.

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Austin » 24 Nov 2018 18:45

First Prototype of Mi-38T flew


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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Khalsa » 27 Nov 2018 01:32

Austin wrote:First Prototype of Mi-38T flew



Really ? I thought the Mi-38 prototypes has been flying for a while now since December 2003.

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Austin » 27 Nov 2018 12:49

More like MOD ordered Military Transport Variant for series production ....there are other non-military variants too as in civil types.

The first flight of the militarised version of the Mi-38T helicopter is a long-awaited event in the process of fielding the 15.6t helicopter in production and testing for its launch customer, the Russian Defense Ministry.

“The Mi-38T, which today performed its first flight, is the version, which the Group [Russian Helicopters], the Factory and the Mil Design Bureau were making under a technical assignment approved by the Defense Ministry. This helicopter has been made on the basis of the civil rotorcraft whose production has been organized at the Kazan Rotorcraft Factory. This is the helicopter that has actually all the basic certificates of Rosaviatsiya [the Russian aviation watchdog]. This is a continuation and a possibility to enter a new market for us. This work is very important for the Group, both for the Design Bureau and the Factory, because this will help utilize the enterprise’s capacities, create jobs and ensure tax receipts in the region,” Russian Helicopters Group CEO Andrei Boginsky told media.

As Deputy Managing Director of the Kazan Rotorcraft Factory Vadim Ligai told journalists, the helicopter can take up to 40 passengers on its board. The rotorcraft is 99% made of domestic components.

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Austin » 28 Nov 2018 11:14

The first flight prototype of Il-112V light transport aircraft has been handed over to the flight test station in Voronezh aviation plant

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Last edited by Austin on 28 Nov 2018 11:50, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Indranil » 28 Nov 2018 11:38

This was my favourite for the LTA. HAs such great stretch potential. The C-295 is kinds of as stretched as it can be.

WE have missed two buses now: MTA and LTA.

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Singha » 28 Nov 2018 12:30

Is it funding or lack of design expertise in hal so they want to piggyback on nearly done designs and license make?

I suspect its the latter. NAL atleast produced a flying pax plane.

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Kartik » 01 Dec 2018 01:49

From AW&ST

MOSCOW—The first prototype of the Ilyushin Il-112V light transport was rolled out Nov. 27 at the Voroznezh-based VASO facility, a subsidiary of Russia’s United Aircraft Corp. (UAC).

The aircraft was moved to the flight test center to be prepared for the first flight.

Neither UAC nor its subsidiary Ilyushin revealed when the new aircraft would take off. The Russian Defense Ministry reported earlier this year that this was expected to happen by year’s end. This now looks a bit challenging, but it is not the first delay for the first designed-from-scratch Russian military transporter in the post-Soviet era.

Development of the Il-112V started in 2004 when the Russian Air Force selected the aircraft to replace aging Antonov An-26 transports. The draft design was completed in December 2004. The first prototype was expected to roll out at the Voronezh-based VASO facility in 2010, but the Russian military suspended the program the year before it was assembled. The program resumed in 2014, and now first deliveries are planned for 2020.

Il-112V has a maximum takeoff weight of 21 tons and a maximum payload of 5 tons. It is powered by a pair of new 3,000 hp Klimov TV7-117ST turboprops. The Il-112V avionics suite is developed on the basis of the Kotlin-Novator Kupol-3 digital flight control and navigation system and will be common with those of the air force’s new Il-76MD-90A heavy transports.

The aircraft will be able to accommodate two light vehicles or 50 soldiers or 26 armed paratroopers. The new transport will be able to fly for 2,400 km (1,491 mi.) with 3 1/2 tons of load aboard. It will have a cruise speed of 450-500 kph and a maximum ceiling of 7,600 m. The required runway length is just 1,200 m (3,937 ft.).


Ilyushin said the aircraft will be able to operate from unpaved runways in manual mode.

The Russian government’s rearmament program calls for the purchase of 22 new transports through 2025. But a defense ministry official promised earlier this year that the order could be increased to more than 100 aircraft.

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Kartik » 01 Dec 2018 05:05

more details on the new AESA radar to be tested on the MiG-29. An absolute wealth of details that needs to be saved somewhere, for reference purposes. This will be something to keep an eye out for as well, for the MiG-29K that will be offered for the IN's MRCBF requirement and for the possible mid-life upgrades to the existing 45 MiG-29Ks of the IN. it would be a horrendous waste of money and resources, if those jets' service lives are not fully utilized, at least in a land based role if not a carrier based role.

From AW&ST

GDANSK, Poland—Russia is planning the resumption of trials of the active electronic scanning array (AESA) radar made by Phazotron-NIIR on MiG-29 family fighters.

The FGA35 Zhuk-AE radar would be installed on a test aircraft in December for flight trials, an industry official said.

The Zhuk-AE radar in a downsized experimental version, FGA29, was tested on a MiG-35 10 years ago for India’s Medium Multi-Role Combat Aircraft competition that was aborted and later won in part by the Dassault Rafale. The AESA radar was one of India’s basic requirements in that tender.

The FGA29 was switched on in a two-seat MiG-35D fighter for the first time in June 2008 in a demonstration configuration, with 240 transmit-receive (TR) modules only, and in October 2008 in full configuration with 680 modules. These were the first-ever flight tests of an AESA fighter radar in Russia. In April 2010, the fighter, equipped with FGA29 radar, shot down a practice aerial target with an active-radar RVV-AE (R-77) AAM at the Akhtubinsk evaluation center. The Zhuk-AE radar uses TR modules developed by the Tomsk-based Micran company and manufactured by Semiconductor Instrument Research Institute (NIIPP) in the same city of Tomsk.

The aircraft currently is set to get a larger version of the radar, the FGA35, with 1,016 modules and a declared range of 99 mi. (160 km), versus the 81 mi. (130 km) of the FGA29 in air-to-air mode.


Phazotron-NIIR has proposed its AESA radars for the MiG-29M and MiG-35 aircraft to the Russian Air Force and for export for some time. But both valid contracts—for 46 MiG-29M/M2 fighters for Egypt signed in April 2015 and for six MiG-35S/UB fighters for the Russian Air Force from August 2018—are for aircraft with slotted planar array radars of Phazotron-NIIR’s Zhuk-M family. When the contract was signed in August, the Russian defense ministry said it planned to buy a total of 20 fighters. Perhaps it will select an AESA radar for the subsequent aircraft.

The MiG-35 lost the MMRCA competition in India. But Russia again is offering India the MiG-35 fighter, this time negotiating a purchase omitting the tender procedure.[b] Last summer a group of Indian media was invited to the MiG facility in Lukhovitsy to see the MiG-35 production line. The recent order by the Russian Aerospace Forces also supports the export chances of the aircraft.

Another possible customer is Algeria. Russian sources claim Algeria is interested in purchasing 14 MiG-29M fighters to replace currently operated MiG-29s. (The aircraft designation, MiG-29M or MiG-35, is assigned depending on the marketing. The variant for Egypt is MiG-29M, while the variant for Russia or India is MiG-35, although the differences between them are insignificant).
[b]
In 2016, Phazotron-NIIR unveiled the FGA50 Zhuk-AME radar which used new transceiver modules by the NIIPP company made with low-temperature, co-fired ceramics technology. The process makes the antenna much thinner and lighter than the previous one. The TR module has a depth of 13 mm, far less than the previous those in the FGA29 and FGA35. The antenna is air-cooled (the previous one was liquid-cooled) and the power of impulse of a single module is 5 watts, like it was previously.


Another Russian AESA fighter radar, the Sh121 (or N036) for Su-57 (PAK FA), is a separate work led by different companies. The Sh121 is being developed by Tikhomirov NIIP in Zhukovsky. Its TR modules are made by NII Istok in Fryazino.

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Austin » 04 Dec 2018 12:17

Over-the-horizon detection radar "Container" will take up combat duty in 2019

10-100 meter wavelength OTH Radar , Range 3000 km , Covers most of Europe . The receiving antenna radar system 29B6 "Container" in Kovylkino consists of 144 antenna-feeder masts 34,155 m high and has a length of 1300 m and a depth of 200 m. The detection range of air targets is more than 3000 km, the viewing sector is 240 degrees.


https://bmpd.livejournal.com/3439420.html

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https://bmpd.livejournal.com/3439420.html

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Peregrine » 04 Dec 2018 23:31

Details remain limited and are likely to change, but what we do know is that one of the world's largest floating dry docks, known as PD-50, has sunk while Russia's aircraft carrier Amiral Kuznetsov was aboard. According to reports, the dry dock began to sink suddenly, collapsing cranes onto the carrier's deck and sending shipyard workers scrambling for their lives.
Image

Manish P Ji :

More forgotten industrial heritage: Admiralty Floating Dock No.35 – The Indian connection

I believe this Floating Dock could service Vessels of over 100,000 Tonnes Displacement

Cheers Image

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Manish_P » 07 Dec 2018 13:00

^ What a history. Thanks for sharing, sir ji!
(the article though seems incomplete?)

Peregrine
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Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Peregrine » 08 Dec 2018 02:18

Manish_P wrote:^ What a history. Thanks for sharing, sir ji!
(the article though seems incomplete?)
Manish P Ji:

Sorry. It took me all this time to get the Second Part of this Story :

More forgotten industrial heritage: Admiralty Floating Dock No.35 – Return to the Far East

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HMS Ocean enters the dock on September 22, 1948.

Admiralty Floating Dock (AFD) 35 was ready for use in July 1948 but the hulk of AFD 8 was still at the berth planned for it at Magazine Wharf. It was ironic that the Royal Navy had ships stemmed for docking but was unable to use its newest and largest asset.

An operational berth was created in Dockyard Creek by removing buoys and several craft to make space for the huge structure. Dockyard Creek being shallower than Magazine Wharf, the dock had a reduced operational working draught of 28 feet compared to a maximum of 40 feet at the latter.

The move from Boiler Wharf to Dockyard Creek was carried out on the morning of August 2. The Times of Malta reported that the operation seemingly blocked the harbour. The length of the dock was roughly the distance from South Street to St John Street. Then, “this floating mass of steel and intricate machinery, linked by 46 miles of cable and some 10 miles of copper tubing, was on the move again, this time tugged and patted to the berth it will occupy in Dockyard Creek until such time as Malta’s old dock, one of the early victims of the blitz, is cleared… By mid-afternoon the operation appeared to be complete, a solitary mooring vessel busy in mid-stream laying the final anchor.”

After a month of tests and sinking trials, the aircraft carrier HMS Ocean was docked on September 21. Were it not for photographs of the floating dock blocking the creek for 15 months it would be hard to believe these are the same waters where sleek, luxury yachts now berth at the Cottonera Waterfront.

After the successful salvage of AFD 8, the new floating dock was moved from Dockyard Creek to Magazine Wharf on the morning of October 24, 1949. The civil engineering chief bucket dredger St Albans had deepened the seabed to enable the dock to sink to its maximum depth. Another month of adjustments, tests and sinking trials followed until November 25, when HMS Glory was docked for the first time.

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The departure on June 6, 1965.

The Suez Crisis of October-November 1956 was the last occasion when Malta-based British forces were used as a spearhead for an attack on a neighbouring country. It was also the last time that the Dockyard would be called to rise to the occasion by meeting deadlines and carry out urgent refits and repairs. The debacle that followed marked the end of Britain as a world power, and led to a decision to whittle down and even close overseas bases, notably the massive Malta Dockyard establishment.

Were it not for photographs of the floating dock blocking the creek for 15 months it would be hard to believe these are the same waters where sleek, luxury yachts now berth at the Cottonera Waterfront
On March 29, 1959, part of the Dockyard was leased to C. H. Bailey, a Welsh ship repair firm. The next morning, 6,300 men clocked for work with their new civilian employer. All the docks, except for AFD 35, were transferred to Bailey (Malta) Ltd. The floating dock continued in operation, with the Admiralty responsible for docking, and Bailey providing labour on commercial ships. AFD 35 was tested to the full with the docking of some very large oil tankers, such as the 53,000-ton George F. Getty in February 1961.

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Countdown before the sale.

Bailey undertook massive Dockyard development by enlarging Nos. 4 and 5 docks, lengthening Boiler Wharf, and building a tank-cleaning farm at Ricasoli. The company failed to see its projects materialise when, on February 14, 1963, it was relieved from the concession owing to alleged financial irregularities. Bailey (Malta) Ltd continued to exist on the books but Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson was appointed manager of a new entity, Malta Drydocks.

In August 1964, the Ministry of Defence issued tenders for the sale of AFD 35. The tender was awarded on September 9 to C. Bajada & Son, Coal Importers, established in 1898. Although Bajada was technically the new owner, there was one final naval docking, that of HMS Lion on September 25, to inspect damage sustained in a collision with HMS Lowestoft in the Firth of Forth on September 4.

Efforts to retain the dock for use in Grand Harbour failed. Bajada asked for government support and then offered to enter into partnership with Swan Hunter who, with its dockyard expansion programme completed, was not interested. The dock was expensive to maintain, was labour intensive, and the berth at Magazine Wharf was distant from its facilities in French Creek.

In January 1965, Cantieri Navali Santa Maria of Genoa entered into negotiations with Bajada to purchase the dock. The sale was concluded on March 11, but delivery was delayed until June 5 when the government issued an export licence. The Italians commissioned Bugsier, a German towage company, to tow the dock to La Spezia.

A lot of planning went into the operation. The dock had arrived in two sections; it would be leaving as one. Departure was postponed twice owing to strong winds on Wednesday and Saturday. On Sunday, June 6, several people lined the bastions and the barrakkas to watch the German ocean tugs Pacific and Heros, assisted by Admiralty and civilian tugs, tow the massive structure out of harbour. At Corradino, Magazine and Laboratory wharves were revealed for the first time after years of being hidden behind the dock walls.

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A draught of 41 feet reached during sinking trials on November 16, 1949.

The day after the departure of AFD 35, the chairman of C Bajada & Sons spoke to the Times of Malta, expressing regret that the dock had not been retained. He said they had not originally intended to sell, but admitted it was uneconomical to run, even if shipyards at Palermo and Piraeus competed for work with Malta Drydocks with similar floating docks.

AFD 35 arrived at La Spezia on June 9. In September it was sold to C.Y. Tung, a Hong Kong-Chinese shipping magnate. Once again, the sections were separated, fore/aft and centre for the long voyage east to Yokohama. The fore/aft section left La Spezia under tow on October 26, arriving at the Mitsubishi yard on March 18, 1966. The centre section was towed out on October 31; it arrived at Yokohama on March 26.

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The USS Salem in dock.

The sections were rejoined. Now renamed Chung Shan, the dock served Mitsubishi until 1971. Between 1971 and 1982 it was operated at Hong Kong by Overseas Drydock Corp. at the Tsing Yi Yard, and subsequently by Hong Kong United Dockyard. In 1995 it left Hong Kong for demolition in Xinhui, China.

By another fluke of history, Malta continues to have a connection with Admiralty floating docks. On a visit to Coal Wharf below Corradino, it is still possible to see two former Admiralty reinforced concrete floating docks (RCFD). At 550 tons they are tiny compared to AFD 35. Reinforced concrete reduced the use of much-needed steel during wartime; they were completed in six months by less skilled workers for a fraction of the cost. The 16 RCFDs that were built cost £1.48 million.

The original name and date of arrival of one of the RCFDs is still to be traced. The other was the former AFD 52 built by Holloway Brothers at Gravesend in 1944. It was also planned for Trincomalee but never left the UK and was sold to Dutch owners at Vlaardingen in 1946. It was sold to S. Bezzina & Sons and arrived in Malta under tow from Rotterdam on September 5, 1967. It is still in use after 64 years – a testimony to the durability of reinforced concrete.

(This is the conclusion of an article the first part of which was published last Sunday.)

Michael Cassar is an eclectic author whose fascination with his motherland’s rich heritage has led to the production of several books and articles.

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One of S. Bezzina’s reinforced concrete floating docks.

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Rakesh » 11 Dec 2018 09:31

John or someone identity these Russian beauties for me. The bigger vessel is bloody gorgeous!

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Re: Russian Weapons & Military Technology

Postby Singha » 11 Dec 2018 09:52

The big one is what they call Leader class cruiser
Kirov size

No signs of building the first but will replace the udaloy and slava classes as flagships of the fleet.


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