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General Indian Military News & Discussion

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General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby Viv S » 05 Mar 2016 01:03

Starting a news & discussion forum for news that's not specific to the army, navy or air force.

To include budget issues, general procurements issues, developments in inter-services relations and other non-specific military news.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby Viv S » 05 Mar 2016 01:04

Defence Purchases: Govt Recalibrates FMS Account in US

The government has "recalibrated" the management of an account, which was used to pay money to the US under Foreign Military Sales route, after a review showed that nearly USD 2.3 billion had piled up without earning any interest, Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar today said.

The minister also said that the Defence Budget for the next fiscal, "nearly Rs 2.59 lakh crore" sans the pension allocation, was adequate and as per the ministry's requirement.

India and the US have now fine tuned the FMS procedure whereby rather than raising bills case-wise every quarter, all the funds against various cases have been pooled together in a corpus.

The corpus had been created in September last year, defence sources said.

A statement released by the ministry said that as and when funds are required to be paid per case, fullfilment of contractual liabilities, the said amount is being withdrawn from the corpus.

"Consequent to this creation of the corpus in consultation with the US government, no payments have been made in the last two quarters of the financial year 2015-16, against cases which necessitated payments, against the said contracts.

"Instead, payment is being effected from the corpus of 2.3 billion US dollars. It is hoped that no payments shall be required to be made till the amount of 2.3 billion US dollars is depleted and there is a necessity for us to replenish certain amount as required," the ministry said.

It said that this has happened through "scrupulous and holistic financial management".

Consequently, while the US government will continue to meet their contractual obligations, there will be no additional burden on the Indian government on this account.

It enables utilisation of scarce funds on other projects and hedges the country against adverse exchange rates, the ministry said.

Earlier in the day, Parrikar, who had put the corpus figure at about USD 3 billion, countered reports that the ministry has failed to utilise about Rs 11,000 crore from the capital budget of 2015-16. He said the country has actually saved money.

He said that even though the provision of capital acquisition in the budget was around Rs 77,000 crore, the actual anticipated spending will be around Rs 66,000 crore.

"We have taken measures by which Rs 11,000 crore saving appears there," Parrikar said, briefing reporters about the defence budget for the next fiscal.

The minister said this was the "first time" that Defence Ministry took stock of Foreign Military Sales under which defence equipment is bought from the US via a government-to- government route.

"We pay to the government in an account which is held by the US or managed by the government of US from where the payments, as per the contract, is made to private companies.

"Unluckily, because of ill management or lack of attention to the provision of this account, we had slightly less than USD 3 billion dollars (USD 2.3 bn) which had piled up in this account and was not earning any interest," Parrikar said.

He added that somewhere around May and June last year, the ministry held a "review" and realised that "unnecessarily money is lying with the US government without appropriate contractual obligation being carried out".

"And we are transferring the money without actually taking stock of the balance. So, it was a government of India account with the American government for FMS. I am happy to tell you that we have recalibrated the full management of the account," he said.

Parrikar said the amount in the account has now come down to around "USD 1.7-1.8 billion". Explaining how so much money got accumulated, he said the money is sent in stages as per the contract schedule.

"At times, for some reason the schedule gets disturbed. Sometimes, the amount is calibrated based on rough calculations and the actual expenditure is slightly less. Sometimes, it goes up but most of the time it is less.

"Suppose the issue is over and all payments have been made. Then we realise that about 2 lakh dollars are lying in that particular account.

"Secondly, is there is a disruption of staged payment... actual consumption is less. In nutshell, money got accumulated, disbursal was less. There was a delay in payment and we are now using it for clearing," he said.

Parrikar said that last year, the ministry paid about Rs 5,000-6,000 crore from this fund for the country's committed liability for supply against the US government's direct military sales route.

"Money has been paid, but the government is saving from its budget Rs 5,000-6,000 crore which we paid. We have saved USD 700-800 million precious foreign exchange that has been utilised from the fund which was lying there because of lack of management. We have now started managing it," he said.

Parrikar said that even though an expenditure was incurred, money did not leave its coffers.

"The money was already in someone else's pocket. We have only asked him to pay on our behalf," he said, adding that another Rs 2,000-3,000 crore was saved because the ministry is now strictly monitoring staged payment clauses.

"We are not allowing it to be loosely paid even to defence PSUs. So, these payments of committed liability have slipped," he said.

Talking about the budget for the next fiscal, he said there is Rs 70,000 crore for defence acquisition even though the actual capital budget is over Rs 86,000 crore. The spending through the capital route is over a period of time, he said.

As per new contracts being signed, nearly 10-15 per cent of the amount has to be paid at the onset, he added.

Parrikar explained that for the nearly Rs 1.20 lakh crore worth of contracts signed since the NDA government took over, it would have paid a maximum of Rs 17,000 crore.

"Acquisition funds provided is as per calibrated purchases which are going to be done. For the first time in Defence Ministry, we have carried out an extensive review of the next 10 years' cash flow position vis-a-vis the requirement of the military," he said.

Replying to a query on the Mountain Strike Corps, which was cleared by the Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS) in September, 2013, Parrikar said, "Whatever arrangements need to be made, have been done."

Asked about large sums to be spent on salaries and pensions in the wake of the expected decision on the Seventh Pay Commission, Parrikar said the "expenditure is inevitable".

He added that the government was keen on rationalising the strength of the army through a process undertaken by the force itself.

"We have asked army to undertake the exercise," he said.

Parrikar said another way of cutting down expenditure was to use simulators for training pilots and drivers.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby Viv S » 05 Mar 2016 15:36

Aditya G wrote:The cost of services and materials, aside maybe for POL will be higher in the US compared to India. Unless USN and USAF use our bases regularly I don't see how we can benefit from this. Though not for profit, payment for use of facilities will be considered as revenue.

See Srai's post. The cost of logistical support used by US forces will remain unchanged. We however can repay what we use in joint exercises and other overseas deployments in kind, instead of in cash (which would have been more expensive because of higher US prices).

Instead of paying for 10 days rations in dollars when we need it, we provide them with 10 days rations from our stocks when they need it (just an example for illustration, the actual accounting will of course won't be so crude).

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby Viv S » 05 Mar 2016 15:39

RKumar wrote:Why do we need profit from military facilities those for for the nation. I have not read the full agreement, but as per the public info US will have unresticted access to milltry installations, air force bases or INS bases.

No change in the level of access is involved. They're not getting access to our sensitive military installations and we're not getting passes to visit Area 51.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby NRao » 05 Mar 2016 19:01

Why do we need profit from military facilities those for for the nation. I have not read the full agreement, but as per the public info US will have unresticted access to milltry installations, air force bases or INS bases.


Additionally, the previous gov was reluctant based on political grounds, that someone may view it as an alliance.

There has never been concerns about snooping. BTW, US ships do use Indian facilities today too. Without any noise. And Indians train at various US facilities. And may I add they represent their nation extremely well.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby Viv S » 07 Mar 2016 19:02

Army got greater share in budget, navy and air force get the short end of the stick


Image


By Ajai Shukla
Business Standard, 6th March 16


Military planners have noted that their share of overall government expenditure has shrunk over the last two years from 13.15 per cent to 12.6 per cent, going by the traditional basis of calculation, which excludes defence pensions from the defence budget.

For the top brass, however, the key issue is: which service --- the army, navy or air force --- is getting a larger slice of the pie? A Business Standard analysis of the Budget allocations shows over the past three years, the army’s share has steadily grown.

With Washington wooing India as a key partner in its rebalance to the Indo-Pacific, it was expected that the navy and air force, both equipment oriented services that are instruments of power projection, would expand their share.

The numbers belie that expectation. The army’s share has grown from 46 per cent of the budget in 2014, to 51 per cent in 2015, to 53 per cent this year. Meanwhile the navy’s share --- which strategic planners predicted would rise to 18 per cent of the defence budget --- has dropped from 16 per cent in 2014, to 15 per cent this year.

The air force, which is keenly focused on procuring the exorbitantly priced Rafale fighter from France, finds that its share of the budget has dwindled from 23 per cent in 2014, to 22 per cent last year, to 21.5 per cent in this year’s defence Budget.

Even so, the navy and air force, both a fraction of the size of the army, spend a much higher percentage of their money on buying new equipment. As evident (see chart), the army spends around 85 per cent of its allocation on revenue expenditure --- which includes salaries, training, maintenance and running costs.

In contrast the navy spends less than half its budget on running costs, which leaves it with 54 per cent of its allocation for modernisation, like buying new warships and submarines. The air force will spend a similar percentage on capital procurement.

In real terms, the army will spend Rs 22,110 crore on new equipment this year, while the navy will spend Rs 20,715 crore. The air force, as always, will get the lion’s share of the capital allocations --- Rs 27,555 crore.

These figures exaggerate the actual buying power of the military, because some 90 per cent of the procurement budget is pre-committed towards paying instalments for equipment purchased in previous years. From this year’s capital allocation of Rs 86,340 crore, less than Rs 10,000 crore will be available for new contracts.

Typically, a defence purchase involves a 15 per cent down payment in the year it is contracted, with the balance paid over 5-7 years, or even longer depending upon the delivery period. Rs 10,000 crore would allow the military to contract for about Rs 70,000 crore worth of new equipment over the coming year.

This assumes that the military will not again face the perennial problem of a cash-strapped finance ministry putting a block on equipment procurement in the last quarter of the year.

Meanwhile, the army’s manpower costs are increasingly unsustainable. Some 60 per cent of its overall allocation will be spent on salaries, and there is little sign of change. The raising of a mountain strike corps and two armoured brigades continues, with the army’s numbers set to rise beyond 1.2 million.

“We must have more boots on the ground to patrol thousands of kilometres of remote mountainous border”, is the typical comment of an army general, responding to a question on whether India will follow the lead set by China, which just announced a manpower reduction of 300,000 soldiers.

Even so, the army’s capital allocation has prominently grown over the last two years, from just Rs 13,246 crore in 2014-15 to Rs 22,110 crore this year. Much of this will go on badly needed fire support means, especially artillery guns, and helicopters --- both armed and for mobility.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby Rahul M » 07 Mar 2016 19:29

please use the military miscellaneous. it's a stickied thread that could use more posters.
name can be changed if needed.
let me know what you think, in feedback thread.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby wig » 06 Dec 2016 16:34

India’s defence report card at 70 by Gen (retd)VP Malik

http://tribuneindia.com/news/comment/in ... 32738.html
INDIA’S defence report card of the past seven decades is more positive than negative. But the credit for that goes less to our policies and grand strategies; more to those responsible for operational planning and execution on the ground. The baptism started soon after Independence.

Yesterday
Barring the 1962 war with China, India's national defence has been ensured in all military engagements. But many a time, we have failed to convert-hard-won with much sacrifices-operational achievements into long-term politico-strategic successes. There is a need to analyse this aspect at this juncture. In hindsight, these reflect on India's poor strategic vision, guidance and directions, and lack of coordination amongst civil and military leaders. Let me end this part by stating, rather sadly, that the lack of political guidance on important security-related issues, its excessive dependence on bureaucracy in PMO, MEA, MoD, IB, RAW, and marginalisation of professional and critical stakeholder's military advice at the highest level of decision making, continues to be a major handicap even after 70 years.

Today
Externally, both our neighbours have established a very strong strategic nexus. Internally, although threats have declined the vulnerabilities persist. They persist due to polarising, violent, identity politics and contempt for constitutional norms.

Tomorrow
In this new age of heightened nationalism and unpredictability, no one can give an assurance of nuclear and high-level conventional wars. But recent trends show that there is a greater likelihood of sub-conventional, hybrid and limited border wars. Information technology has made the battle space larger, more inclusive and faster. The entire command-and-control mechanism depends on space satellite facilities. Cyber-attacks on civilian infrastructure would have far more significance than any damage to military installations.

Defence management
The separation between tactical, operational and strategic levels of warfare has blurred. A small military action becomes an issue for consideration and decision making at the highest level. We have a situation where a junior military officer is expected to understand political considerations, and the political leader to know the tactical and operational considerations.
Therefore, defence management requires greater, direct politico-military interface covering national security strategy, defence policy and planning, budgetary economy and common personnel and logistics. This requires a major overhaul of the Ministry of Defence and the higher defence-control system.

The roadblock
We have neither delivered a Chief of Defence Staff (CDS) nor addressed many organisational problems. By keeping the Integrated Defence Staff headless, it has failed to provide an integrated and joint paradigm; much less give integrated advice to the Defence Minister, Prime Minister or the CCS.
My feedback shows that there has been no change in the responsibilities, accountability and procedures, or in the attitude of civilian officers in the Ministry of Defence. Inter-Services cooperation remains weak. The bureaucratic wall between the political executive and the professional service chiefs has converted the concept of “civilian political control” into “civil bureaucratic control”. There is an urgent requirement to reorganise the Ministry of Defence and its business rules. The CDS appointment has become indispensable.

At others’ mercy
The Kargil war made me realise the importance of being self-reliant in arms and equipment. During that war, every country that we approached, either refused or took us for a ride by trying to sell their old weapons, ammunition and equipment at a high price. That situation is not very different today. We also carry the dubious distinction of being world's largest importer of defence equipment. Despite the latest changes in FDI, defence purchase norms and the PM's push on “Make in India”, it will take 20-25 years to make up deficiencies in our arms and equipment. This delay is unacceptable.

The to-do list
The strategy should include (a) facilitating the domestic defence industrial houses to expand their hi-tech base soonest (b) creation of skilled worker base (c) ensuring a level playing field for public and private defence sectors (d) an unambiguous export policy, and, most importantly, (e) sufficient defence budget for capital purchases.
We must place some orders for complete items as in the case of 36 Rafael fighters aircraft, lest we are caught in another Kargil war-like situation.

People count
The man behind the gun is more important than the gun. In last 70 years, there has been a steady denigration and erosion of the soldiers' status within the government, and therefore in civil society. This is reflected in the qualitative and quantitative dilution of the military rank and file, despite being the most dependable brand in the country. Honour, izzat, and comparable status in the government and society have sustained the armed forces and enabled them to draw the right kind of leadership. By taking away its pride and status, making the career unattractive, and not getting required weapons and equipment, the military is no longer a prime choice today. Next, it will affect their morale and fighting spirit. Our political leadership must introspect and correct this aspect sooner than later.

No silos
National security decision-making and higher direction of military conflicts require multi-disciplinary vertical and lateral consultations, and much faster decision-making. We need many changes in the national security structures, processes and procedures which can make it more efficient, resilient, and speedily responsive.
I hope we will pay serious attention to our strategic policies, higher defence-control organisation, forces'modernisation, capacities, and military morale. It is only then that we can be secure internally and externally, fully prepared to take on the role that we see for ourselves

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby svinayak » 10 Dec 2016 12:47

The Recent Declassification of India's Secret 'Long Telegram' Shows Why It Went Nuclear

The nuclear specter of China has always been India's overwhelming consideration.
Vivek Prahladan
December 9, 2016
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“The main argument in favor of India going nuclear is the Chinese threat” — L.K. Jha (Secretary to Prime Minister) March 5, 1967
“A nuclear stand-off with China is essential as soon as possible” — P.N. Haksar (Secretary to Prime Minister) 1968

The Counsel of History
Indian Defense Minister Manohar Parrikar recently made a controversial “personal” comment that perhaps India must revisit its no first-use nuclear policy. However, the only available document on Indian nuclear policy has been the “Draft Nuclear Doctrine,” which has fostered perpetual speculation on the vector and valences of Indian strategic doctrine. We have had little historical perspective on how Indian doctrine has absorbed Chinese and Pakistan nuclear threats ever since India carried out its first underground nuclear test — “Smiling Buddha” — in May 1974. There is still no consensus on what the historical reasons were for India to cross the no-bomb line or what internal discussions were taking place between the scientists and the prime minister’s office. However, newly declassified documents from the prime minister’s office, which include letters between the prime minister’s office and the Department of Atomic Energy, as well as correspondence between the prime minister and scientists help establish the specific considerations that went into the making of India’s nuclear doctrine. It revises arguments such as those of George Perkovich, that, in the second half of the sixties, “the (Indian) scientists acted without benefit of a national security strategy or requirement.” The documents reveal disquiet among India’s strategists about China’s repeated nuclear tests from 1964 onwards.
India’s “Long Telegram” and Crossing the No-Bomb Line
Perhaps the single most important document for establishing the evolving history of India’s nuclear weapons policy comes from P.N. Haksar, Secretary to Prime Minister Indira Gandhi that may be dated to 1968. The note is titled “Need for India In a Changing World to Reassess her National Interest and Foreign policy.”
The revealing document tends to defy most assumptions held about India’s nuclear policy regarding the level of “stand-off capability” that was being considered in the Prime Minister Secretariat. P.N Haskar wrote:
i. the making of nuclear arms in the shape of medium range (2,000-3,000 miles) capable, from sites within India’s frontiers, of striking with success not only a few chosen targets in Tibet but of ranging as far afield as the industrial heart of China in Manchuria and in the great river valleys south of it which include some of her principal industries and urban centers of population
ii. The development simultaneously of submarines driven by nuclear power fitted out to carry nuclear missiles
iii. This nuclear arms program should be based on adequate stockpiling of those sensitive instruments and machinery…. which will be difficult to import from abroad increasingly
Haksar distinguished between the role of nuclear India as opposed to other nuclear powers. Haksar also reveals his thought that India’s nuclear ambition should be clearly communicated with the United States at a relevant time. The nuclear specter of China remained the overwhelming consideration. Haksar seemed to appreciate nuclear balancing in Europe and wrote of India’s “own security require that she becomes a nuclear power to establish a genuine balance of power with China.”

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby ranjan.rao » 12 Mar 2017 20:17

Manohar Parrikar Resigns to be Goa CM, not a good development at a crucial time

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby Suresh S » 12 Mar 2017 21:18

Good news for Goa but bad news for India.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby ranjan.rao » 13 Mar 2017 04:20

Any insights whether Gen. VKS would support indigenous platforms?

It would also be a good move to assign some patriotic former techy like former heads of AEC/ISRO/DRDO or even among former advisors to RM who are more into scientific and less into politics.


http://www.indiastrategic.in/topstories628.htm

FWIW
He also sought more interaction between the armed forces and the DRDO, India’s premier defence research organisation, for the development of better artillery and missile technology to make the country’s defence self-reliant.
“Such concerted and coordinated efforts would surely lead to a technologically modernised Indian Army in a foreseeable future. However, such an approach can only be successful if there is a high degree of understanding amongst the partners,” he said, cautioning that “an element of ego in any of
the partners” will a “great setback” to the partnership.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby Philip » 13 Mar 2017 12:42

The big Q is whether the party will want Gen. VKS to head the min. as DM.It may want a strong party loyalist with a background from the organisation.
What could be done is to shift Gen Singh to the Def. Min. as Dy. Min/Def. Production, so that he could advise whoever is chosen as DM correctly. He would also be able to prevent babu B'sh*t from derailing and delaying decisions. MP must also advise his successor on the main issues that need immediate action and the line of action that he has proposed. The 3 chiefs also have their work cut out to get quick action on pending issues.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby rpartha » 13 Mar 2017 19:28

I think Suresh Prabhu will be a good option.. he has shown good changes in railways... VKSingh - even though an army hand - guess will be too controversial... but definitely a bad news for India as the expectation was military changes would be pushed thro immediately after the election. ..

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby ranjan.rao » 13 Mar 2017 20:55

TOI reporting Jet Li to be RM, he had totally uneventful stint as DM, he's not good technically, not sure of his military background rest all bhagwan bharose

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby sohamn » 13 Mar 2017 22:40

MP leaving RM post to Jetlee is a bad news. Jetlee looks everything from financial perspective and is not well suited for the post. We need an outsider with good inside knowledge- may be from a good candidate from BR should be nominated.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby shiv » 14 Mar 2017 08:28

sohamn wrote:MP leaving RM post to Jetlee is a bad news. Jetlee looks everything from financial perspective and is not well suited for the post. We need an outsider with good inside knowledge- may be from a good candidate from BR should be nominated.

By coincidence Jetlee may be the best for now. Yesterday there was news that Prikkar had mooted a scheme where funds set aside for defence were "non-lapsing" that is to say that if something was not spent in one financial year - it will not get gobbled up by finance. Thatidea has to be vetted/passed by the finance ministry
http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/d ... 449297.ece

A major defence purchase often takes years to complete, but the budget allocation lapses at the end of the financial year. As a result, the Ministry of Defence is often forced to return money meant for capital acquisition.

To overcome this, the MoD has sent a proposal to the Ministry of Finance proposing the setting up of a ‘Non-lapsable Capital Fund Account’. The Parliamentary Standing Committee on Defence notes in its latest report that the MoD proposal is with the Finance Ministry for its ‘in-principle’ approval.

Review of stand

The committee observed in its report, tabled in the Lok Sabha on Thursday, that it is “glad to note that the Ministry of Defence has now reviewed its stated position and has admitted that the utility of creation of a non-lapsable, rollover fund for capital cannot be completely negated as the same would help in eliminating the prevailing uncertainty in providing adequate funds for various defence capability development and infrastructure projects.”

The report noted that a proposal for obtaining ‘in-principle’ approval of the Finance Ministry on creation of the account has been sent on February 2 by the Defence Ministry after obtaining approval of the Defence Minister, and a “response from the Ministry of Finance is awaited.”

However, the Finance Ministry is still not in favour of creating a ‘Non-lapsable Defence Capital Fund Account’ to which the committee expressed its “disappointment” and pointed to the Non-lapsable Central Pool of Resources for the North Eastern region, which was constituted with the approval of Parliament in 1998-99.

Complicated process

The committee observed that defence procurement and acquisition is a complicated process, involving long gestation periods and funds allocated for capital acquisition in a particular financial year are not necessarily consumed in that year and ultimately have to be surrendered by the Defence Ministry. The committee stated that it “would like the Ministry of Finance to look at the matter afresh” and work out the modalities for creation of the account.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby ShauryaT » 14 Mar 2017 09:05

shiv wrote:By coincidence Jetlee may be the best for now. Yesterday there was news that Prikkar had mooted a scheme where funds set aside for defence were "non-lapsing" that is to say that if something was not spent in one financial year - it will not get gobbled up by finance. Thatidea has to be vetted/passed by the finance ministry
http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/d ... 449297.ece

Jaswant Singh started this in 2004, subsequently UPA did not continue with the practice. Hope it sticks this time.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby Kashi » 14 Mar 2017 09:37

I recall Parrikar saying that the contracts for SPH was supposed to be signed in this fiscal year i.e. before March 31.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/new ... 503589.cms

"The first lot will be ordered probably in the current financial year. This is one of the Make in India project. It is one step ahead of the Make in India. It is designed, developed and Made in India," he said.


Wonder if this will get done or pushed to the next financial year.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby rpartha » 14 Mar 2017 10:09

I don't think Jaitley will be there permanently - just a stop gap till they find an alternative. .. remember to begin with Jaitley had both defence and finance and he himself said too much workload...so there will be a shuffle probably after the budget session...

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby ShauryaT » 20 Mar 2017 20:43

Why Parrikar failed in Defence

He started out promisingly. The MMRCA race was decided by the time the Manmohan Singh demited office. It only remained for the incoming BJP government to sign on the dotted line of a contract for the Rafale aircraft that would enrich France, the French economy, the French aerospace sector, and specifically, Dassault Avions, without doing much for IAF’s fighting ability. He did the unexpected, showing the greatest reluctance to sign a contract, Parrikar pondered more economical options in lieu of the Rafale. He came to the obvious conclusion that the entire ‘medium’ category in combat aircraft is bit of a hoax perpetrated by IAF. This may be seen in his exploring a Hi-lo solution revolving around the Su-30 MKI license-produced by HAL in Nasik as the high end fighting platform, and the indigenous Tejas as the low end bulk combat compenent. His publicly observing that the price of a single Rafale can fetch the IAF three Su-30s, arguably the best multi-role fighter plane currently flying barring the F-22 Raptor, and his refuting the IAF’s charge propagated through the media that the Sukhois suffered from heavy downtime, by talking of its serviceability rate as comparable to any other aircraft in the fleet, suggested that here was a defence minister who was prepared to take Air HQes head-on......

In both cases, the usual rampaging waste of national economic resources was avoided but at the cost of weakening force readiness and modernization, by Parrikar because he permitted the civil servants to create an impasse at every turn, and by Antony because he deliberately avoided taking any decision at all.

Not sure whether Parrikar’s mode or the Antony operandi is better.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby darshhan » 20 Mar 2017 21:39


Article by bharat karnad. Not sure what more he expected MP to achieve in 2 years in a democratic setup while following cvc guidelines.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby shiv » 20 Mar 2017 22:06

In my opinion, Karnad is a bit like Barkha, Rajdeep and Sagarika Ghose. They can say what they like about anyone else and are insulated from criticism of their own faults. This is the difference between media and academics - the lack of accountability for one's words

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby ShauryaT » 21 Mar 2017 01:38

darshhan wrote:

Article by bharat karnad. Not sure what more he expected MP to achieve in 2 years in a democratic setup while following cvc guidelines.

Well, the biggest thing would be to not leave a process half done and be kicked down in the process. I mean if he never wanted the job why did come at all? Anyways, as the article says, the bureaucracy managed to wind him down and do not think he had the needed backing to do the shake up needed to clean up the mess. Back to wonderful solutions courtesy Jaitley to acquire 36 jets, when ask is for 126! CDS not done. Strategic Partnership not done...the biggest of all disinvestment of DPSU's not even started.

Have to thank him for getting Tejas production going, i am sure if he would have hung around and empowered he would have done some good things.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby shiv » 21 Mar 2017 08:00

Off topic but for the first time I saw, after Modi got elected, Indians behaving like Americans after a popular leader got elected president - the feeling that all problems would be solved. Americans grew out of that and became cynical after Clinton - which was the last time I saw that happen. The bureaucracy is stable and solid and one RM cannot change anything soon. The same criticisms are being levelled against Modi. Pacifist. Secular. New Nehru etc.

When one is paid to write articles one needs to churn out something and Karnad's article falls in that category. More blather on time as per publication schedule. In fact a more perceptive writer would go so far as to actually interview Parikkar (and perhaps Antony) and ask what the real hurdles are to change. He has actually mentioned that in early interviews. Writing about Pakikkar and Antony by observing their actions is no different from me writing about Karnad himself by observing his action (or lack thereof)

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby Hari Seldon » 21 Mar 2017 09:32

Image

Maj Rohit Suri of the special forces awarded the Kirti chakra for leading the Surgical strikes.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby arunsrinivasan » 21 Mar 2017 18:44

^^ Is it safe to share the names / pics of the people who lead / take part in covert ops?

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby Rakesh » 21 Mar 2017 20:28

Taking revenge (if possible) on one Special Forces officer is not worth the time for terrorists. Killing a few hundred people has way more value to them. That is how they think.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby Khalsa » 22 Mar 2017 01:06

There is an element of danger of exposing his identity.
The officer/ JCO/ Jawan knows this, the employer (RoI and Army) knows this.

There is another angle to this.
We don't hide our faces in our country.

Besides look at the best part in this (that just occurred to me).
The other side claims Major Suri and team never visited their country without a passport and a visa.
So why would they exact revenge and prove (out point) that Suri and Co did visit their country without a passport and visa.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby Rakesh » 22 Mar 2017 01:27

Good Point Ramanaji. +100 to you! :)

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby rkhanna » 23 Mar 2017 11:38

>>^^ Is it safe to share the names / pics of the people who lead / take part in covert ops?<<

It wasnt a covert operation if DGMO is announcing it to the world.

>>We don't hide our faces in our country. <<

yes we do. Ask J&K sOG is they want to be seen without covering their faces

As of now the only real threat (targeted assassination) to security forces is to local police units (J&K SoG, NE police etc). Our country is too large and central security institutions to voluminous.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby Rakesh » 24 Mar 2017 23:17

Rakesh wrote:Future wars will be complex, Indian Army needs modernisation
http://www.oneindia.com/india/future-wa ... 83425.html

Digitalisation of Indian Armed Forces is Top Priority
http://www.news18.com/news/tech/digital ... 63481.html

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby jayasimha » 30 Mar 2017 11:30

Image
I think this is the right place for this link

http://ddpmod.gov.in/documents/annual-reports

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby jayasimha » 30 Mar 2017 11:38

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE PRODUCTION
along with annual reports we get huge data
in the below link

http://ddpmod.gov.in/e-book

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby jayasimha » 30 Mar 2017 15:32

For those us who did not know this website.

http://www.makeinindiadefence.com/

Make in India defence production.
The web site has list of indigenous products to be developed

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby srai » 06 Apr 2017 09:22

Looks like Shiv Aroor has gone full time on LiveFist.
https://twitter.com/livefist/status/847782104679292928

Would be good to see a collaboration between Shiv Aroor (Livefist), Ajay Shukla (Broadsword), Anantha Krishnan (Tarmak007), Saurav Jha, Vishnu Som and maybe few others on Indian defense reporting. They would make a great team together.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby ShauryaT » 13 Apr 2017 23:09

Helming the MoD

Weapons and equipment purchase projects worth over Rs 1,50,000 crore have been accorded ‘acceptance of necessity’ (AON) by the Defence Acquisition Council (DAC) chaired by the Defence Minister since he took charge in late 2014. Contracts have been signed for acquisitions worth approximately Rs 90,000 crore. However, it will take three to five years before deliveries begin. In the army, artillery modernisation is yet to begin. There is an urgent need to acquire approximately 3,000 pieces of 155 mm/ 52-calibre guns to replace obsolescent guns and howitzers. So far a contract has been signed only for 145 pieces of M777 155 mm/45-calibre howitzers from the US. Air defence and army aviation units are also equipped with obsolete equipment that has degraded their readiness for combat and created vulnerabilities.

Modern wars are fought mostly during the hours of darkness, but most of the armoured fighting vehicles ~ tanks and infantry combat vehicles ~ are still ‘night blind’. Only about 650 T-90S tanks of Russian origin have genuine night-fighting capability. The infantry battalions need over 30,000 third generation night vision devices. Other requirements for infantry battalions include 66,000 assault rifles ~ a soldier’s basic weapon, carbines for close quarter battle, general purpose machine guns, light-weight anti-materiel rifles, mine protected vehicles, 390,000 ballistic helmets, and 180,000 lightweight bullet proof jackets. Action to acquire these items has been initiated and needs to be constantly monitored by the minister himself.

The Navy is in the process of building an air defence ship at Kochi to replace the aircraft carrier INS Vikrant, six Scorpene submarines at Mazagon Docks and 22 destroyers, frigates, corvettes and other ships such as fast attack craft, landing ships and support ships. However, India’s maritime security challenges are growing and the Navy not only needs to modernise but also expand its footprint in the Indo-Pacific region.

Modernisation plans of the air force are proceeding ahead, but at a snail’s pace. The MMRCA project to acquire 126 fighter aircraft to replace obsolete MiG-21s appears to have been shelved, except for the government’s plans to purchase 36 Rafale fighters from France for which a contract has been signed. Meanwhile, Lockheed Martin (F-16) and Boeing (F-18), both of the US, and Grippen of Sweden are reported to have jumped into the fray again with offers to produce their aircraft locally with transfer of technology (ToT). The IAF also requires two AWACS early warning aircraft, six mid-air refueller tankers, 56 transporter planes, 20 advance jet trainers, 38 basic trainers, 48 medium-lift helicopters, reconnaissance and surveillance helicopters, surface-to-air missile systems and electronic warfare suites. All three Services need to upgrade their C4I2SR capabilities to prepare for effects-based operations in a network-centric environment and to match ever increasing Chinese capabilities.

The serviceability state of warfighting equipment needs substantial improvement. Many frontline equipment are ‘out of action’ for want of spares. It is suspected that the delay in changing the old batteries of INS Sindhuratna could have been the cause of the accident that resulted in the death of two officers, injuries to seven sailors and irreparable damage to the submarine. The serviceability state of the SU-30MKI fighter-bomber fleet is reported to be just about 50 per cent. Numerous vehicles in the army are ‘off road’ for want of tyres, tubes, batteries and items likes spark plugs.
Financial management too needs a major overhaul. All of the required acquisitions are capital intensive and the present defence budget cannot support many of them. The defence budget for FY 2017-18 has dipped to 1.62 per cent of the country’s GDP ~ the lowest level since the disastrous 1962 War with China. Parliament’s Standing Committee on Defence and the armed forces have repeatedly recommended that it should be raised progressively to 3.0 per cent of the GDP if India is to build the defence capabilities that it needs to meet future threats and challenges and discharge its growing responsibilities as a regional power in Southern Asia. The budgetary allocations earmarked on the capital account for the modernisation of the armed forces will continue to be surrendered unless the government sets up a rolling, non-lapsable defence modernisation fund of approximately Rs 50,000 crore under the Consolidated Fund of India. Cutting down on wasteful subsidies from which the people do not really benefit in a meaningful manner would be one way to spare more funds for national security.

The armed forces are now in the fifth and final year ~ indeed the final month ~ of the 12th Defence Plan (2012-17). It was never formally approved with full financial backing by the Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS). The government also has not formally approved the long-term integrated perspective plan (LTIPP 2007-22) formulated by HQ Integrated Defence Staff.


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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby Tejas.P » 27 Apr 2017 19:42

Can gurus share some insight on this article?

http://www.firstpost.com/india/india-un ... 04356.html

It states in the article that a prelim draft on a joint tri services command was first issued in early 2000s. What is the feasibility of this happening in the next 5 years during the current political climate? It's bewildering to me that a country that has a highly professional military force does not seem to have a joint command to integrate assets between forces and intelligence agencies.

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Re: General Indian Military News & Discussion

Postby aditya » 02 May 2017 14:07

http://www.outlookindia.com/magazine/st ... her/298454

Not sure if this was posted. Particularly shocking account involving Jamia Vice-Chancellor, Lt. Gen. MA Zaki.

Chauhan recalls meeting Lt Gen Zaki on April 12, 1990, itself, to complain about the gold biscuits but Zaki “was livid and refused to accept the truth about the gold biscuits and instead questioned how a rec­ent inductee could find the temerity to complain about his senior,” he says. Lt Gen Zaki could have verified it with the jawans who had witnessed the seizure. Many of these same jawans had testified in court and during the court-martial, authenticating Chauhan’s claims.


The AFT noted that the role of his supe­riors, including the General Officer Commanding-in Chief (GOC-IC)—the highly-­decorated Lt Gen Mohammad Ahmed Zaki—commandant Colonel K.R.S. Panwar and associates, “seems to be not up to mark and suffers from extraneous considerati­ons” :eek: :shock:


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