Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

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sudhan
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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby sudhan » 22 May 2019 14:42

Parfarmans naarmal..

Another text book flung.. well done isro..

Rakshaks on BRF dont even want to post 'congrats ISRO':D

PSLV's legendary reliability has made news of its successful launches as interesting as a goods train successfully pulling into Chennai central 8)

Hats off to the heroes at ISRO

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby jaysimha » 22 May 2019 16:12

http://pib.nic.in/PressReleaseIframePag ... ID=1572359
Department of Space
PSLV-C46 successfully launches RISAT-2B
Posted On: 22 MAY 2019 9:31AM by PIB Delhi
India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C46) today successfully launched the RISAT-2B satellite from Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC) SHAR, Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh. This was the 72nd launch vehicle mission from SDSC SHAR, Sriharikota and 36th launch from the First Launch pad.

PSLV-C46 lifted-off at 05:30 Hrs (IST) from the First Launch Pad and injected RISAT-2B into a orbit of 556 km, about 15 minutes and 25 seconds after lift-off. After separation, solar arrays of RISAT-2B were deployed automatically and ISRO Telemetry Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC) at Bengaluru assumed control of the satellite. In the coming days, the satellite will be brought to its final operational configuration.

RISAT-2B is a radar imaging earth observation satellite weighing about 615 kg. The satellite is intended to provide services in the field of Agriculture, Forestry and Disaster Management.

ISRO Chairman Dr K Sivan congratulated the launch vehicle and satellite teams involved in the mission. “With this launch, PSLV lofts 50 tonnes to space by launching 354 satellites, including national, student and foreign satellites.”

Dr. K Sivan also commended the efforts of the team involved in the realization of the piggyback payload carried on board this mission namely, Vikram processor and low cost MEMS based Inertial Navigation System (INS) developed by Semi-Conductor Laboratory (SCL), Chandigarh and ISRO Inertial Systems Unit, Thiruvananthapuram respectively. “RISAT-2B is an advanced Earth Observation satellite with an advanced technology of 3.6m radial rib antenna”, he added.

A total number of 5,000 visitors witnessed the launch live from the Viewer’s Gallery, which is opened to the public.

ISRO is now gearing up for the launch of Chandrayaan-2 onboard GSLV MkIII during the window of July 09, to July 16, 2019, with an expected Moon landing on September 06, 2019.
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Varoon Shekhar
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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 22 May 2019 19:55

Nice job, ISRO. Is the X-band SAR made in India. More than 100 sub-systems were developed by ISRO with the help of domestic industry.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby deejay » 22 May 2019 20:23

This was a very significant addition to our Space based SAR capabilities. I believe there are 05 more planned this year. Well Done ISRO. Congratulations and All the Best for all future launches.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Kakarat » 22 May 2019 23:22

My First lot of my photos of the launch to be posted shortly


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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Kakarat » 23 May 2019 01:49

RISAT-2B: Radial Rib Antenna

Radial Rib antenna (RRA) is a world class technology demonstrated in-orbit today at 2:20 pm IST in the RISAT-2B spacecraft. This 3.6 metre antenna was folded & stowed during launch and later successfully unfurled & deployed in-orbit. The deployment was completed in 7 mins and 20 seconds.

Development of light weight structure, hinge mechanism, design of newer mesh, actuators etc., were some of the challenges involved in the realisation of this antenna. All such key technological elements require very high level of expertise in handling space based antenna system, excellent workmanship and building redundancy apart from managing the deployment in-orbit.

This antenna was realised indigenously by ISRO team in a record time of 13 months. Alternate import option would have taken about 3-4 years. Successful deployment of RRA in RISAT-2B establishes the combination of all skills mastered by ISRO indigenously.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby jaysimha » 23 May 2019 15:19

http://pib.nic.in/PressReleaseIframePag ... ID=1572415
Department of Space
Radial Rib Antenna of RISAT-2B
Posted On: 22 MAY 2019 9:00PM by PIB Delhi
Radial Rib antenna (RRA) is a world class technology demonstrated in-orbit on 22.05.19 at 2:20 pm IST in RISAT-2B spacecraft. This 3.6 metre antenna was folded & stowed during launch and later successfully unfurled & deployed in-orbit. The deployment was completed in 7 mins and 20 seconds.

Development of light weight structure, hinge mechanism, design of newer mesh, actuators etc., were some of the challenges involved in the realisation of this antenna. All such key technological elements require very high level of expertise in handling space based antenna system, excellent workmanship and building redundancy apart from managing its in-orbit deployment.

The antenna was realised indigenously by ISRO team in a record time of 13 months. Alternate import option would have taken about 3-4 years. Successful deployment of RRA in RISAT-2B establishes the combination of all skills mastered by ISRO indigenously.
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siddhu
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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby siddhu » 23 May 2019 15:31

Any pictures of indigenous RRA available?

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby JayS » 23 May 2019 17:11

noob question - why is ISRO using 600-700kg class sats for RiSAT series..? Why not says a 2Ton Sat with more powerful electronics or more onboard fuel..??

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Kakarat » 24 May 2019 22:17

https://twitter.com/kakarat2001/status/ ... 0523046912

PSLV C-46 Launch from First Launch Pad as seen from the Launch Viewing Gallery at Satish Dhawan Space Centre, SHAR, Sriharikota

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Their is also a video on my twitter page shot with a mobile by BobV
This time I was able to capture PSLV - first stage in flight after separation

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby jaysimha » 25 May 2019 15:20

siddhu wrote:Any pictures of indigenous RRA available?


Image
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2019/05 ... -risat-2b/
Indian PSLV rocket launches RISAT-2B

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby jaysimha » 25 May 2019 15:59

Image
https://www.jindalstainless.com/newsletter.php
News letter march 2019


Page 4
We recently received a prestigious order of special steel sheets from ISRO for Rocket Motor Booster Application (Satellite Launch Vehicle).This is the first time in India when ISRO has procured from an indigenous source, which involves rigorous qualification processes.

kudos...

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby jaysimha » 25 May 2019 16:11

Image
new letter July 2018
https://www.jindalstainless.com/newsletter.php
https://www.jindalstainless.com/pdfs/St ... uly_18.pdf


page 05
In 2016, we entered in a $2 million contract with ISRO for supply of 125 thousand litre (volume) liquid hydrogen tanks. It was a huge success as we faced strong competition from across the globe for this contract. Apart from this, we have also supplied to NASA which again is a proof of the quality of our work.

Varoon Shekhar
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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 25 May 2019 20:14

^
Was the hydrogen storage tank produced by Jindal or by the Indian unit of an Italian(?) MNC called VRV?

Largest liquid Hydrogen storage tank flagged off
CHITTOOR: Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) Secretary, DOS & Chairman, Dr. K Sivan, flagged off the shipment of India’s largest liquid Hydrogen storage tank at VRV Asia Pacific production plant at Sri City in Chittoor district on Wednesday. Addressing the gathering, Dr. Sivan congratulated the VRV and other teams for indigenously realising such an advanced version of the liquid hydrogen storage tank. “I consider this as only a beginning for our cooperation, and suggest to VRV to come forward to undertake the fabrication works of onboard tanks of rockets,” he said.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Kakarat » 25 May 2019 22:22

https://twitter.com/kakarat2001/status/ ... 9801792513
PSLV C-46 in flight as seen from the Launch Viewing Gallery at Satish Dhawan Space Centre, SHAR, Sriharikota

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https://twitter.com/kakarat2001/status/ ... 1796212738
PSLV C-46 First stage burnout and separation as seen from the Launch Viewing Gallery at Satish Dhawan Space Centre, SHAR, Sriharikota

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Varoon Shekhar
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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 27 May 2019 22:12

https://www.isro.gov.in/sites/default/f ... 018-19.pdf

ISRO annual report for 2018-19 is out.

jaysimha
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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby jaysimha » 31 May 2019 13:24

Space India 1989 booklet now on web. for record
https://www.dos.gov.in/sites/default/fi ... age-1.html

manjgu
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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby manjgu » 01 Jun 2019 07:40

apart from booking a place at the viewing gallery at ISRO campus , ( is it easy or hard to book?)... which other place affords a good viewing of the launch??

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Kakarat » 01 Jun 2019 11:17

manjgu wrote:apart from booking a place at the viewing gallery at ISRO campus , ( is it easy or hard to book?)... which other place affords a good viewing of the launch??


Booking for the viewing gallery is easy, but its kind of first come first serve. they allow 5000 registration now and the gallery is expanding.
the next best place to watch a launch is 13°43'21.7"N 80°07'29.4"E

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby disha » 02 Jun 2019 23:54

jaysimha wrote:Space India 1989 booklet now on web. for record
https://www.dos.gov.in/sites/default/fi ... age-1.html


^Above link is a keeper, particularly the chapter on Inertial Navigation Systems.

Mollick.R
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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Mollick.R » 06 Jun 2019 10:38

siddhu wrote:Any pictures of indigenous RRA available?


A quick google gives this result, not sure though if it is RRA or not . Gurus may confirm..........

https://instogram.pro/media/2051354279382634526_13451025354

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Vips » 08 Jun 2019 18:47

India to carry out its 1st-ever space war exercise in July.

After successfully testing an anti-satellite (A-Sat) missile in March and initiating the raising of a tri-service Defence Space Agency soon after, India plans to conduct its first-ever simulated space warfare exercise next month.

Named ‘IndSpaceEx’, the exercise will basically be a ‘table-top war-game’, with all stakeholders from the military and scientific community taking part in it, but it underlines seriousness with which India is taking the need to counter likely threats to its space assets from countries like China.
“Space is getting militarised, as also contested and competitive. The main aim of the exercise, to be held in the last week of July under the aegis of Integrated Defence Staff of the defence ministry, is to assess requisite space and counter-space capabilities that are needed by India to ensure we can protect our national security interests in this final frontier of warfare,” a senior official said.

“India needs credible deterrence in the space domain to prevent our adversaries from blinding and deafening our armed forces by taking out our satellites vital for surveillance, communication, missile earlywarning, precision-targeting and the like. IndSpaceEx will help us grasp strategic challenges in space that need to be handled,” another official said.

China, after testing an ASat missile against a weather satellite in 2007, has set a scorching pace in developing military capabilities in space in terms of both kinetic (direct ascent missiles, co-orbital kill satellites) as well as non-kinetic (lasers, electromagnetic pulse) weapons.

In yet another indicator of its ambitious programme that threatens the supremacy of US in outer space, China launched a rocket with seven satellites from a ship at sea just three days ago.

India, of course, cannot match China despite having a long-standing and robust civilian space programme that has witnessed over 100 spacecraft missions consisting of communication, navigation, earth observation and other satellites. The Indian armed forces, apart from two dedicated military satellites, largely use dual-use remote sensing satellites for surveillance, navigation and communication purposes.

The country took the first step towards developing a credible counter-space capability under ‘Mission Shakti’ when it launched a 19- tonne interceptor missile to destroy the 740-kg Microsat-R satellite, at an altitude of 283 km in the low earth orbit (LEO), in a ‘hit-to-kill mode’ on March 27.

DRDO chief G Satheesh Reddy subsequently said India was working to develop other counter-space capabilities like directed energy weapons (DEWS), lasers, EMP and co-orbital killers as well as the ability to protect its own satellites from electronic or physical attack as reported by TOI.

Since then, the new Defence Space Agency has begun to take shape by amalgamating the Defence Imagery Processing and Analysis Centre (Delhi) and the Defence Satellite Control Centre (Bhopal), with a two-star IAF general to be soon appointed to head it. “The agency will eventually grow into a full-fledged Space Command in the years ahead,” the officer said.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby souravB » 09 Jun 2019 11:49

#Gaganyaan
#HSP
#GSLVMKIII
ISRO successfully tested CE-20 engine, meant for the upper stage of GSLV MK-III. The engine is planned to be used in human rated GSLV MK-III launch vehicle (Gaganyaan Mission).


Official Twitter

Update on Manned mission

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby A Nandy » 10 Jun 2019 00:28

Image

Gaganyan model! looks TFTA onlee :D
Titanium grid fins?

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby SriKumar » 10 Jun 2019 01:58

The 'crew safety rocket system' module looks different in the full mockup vs. the partial mockup (of just that stage alone), located behind the black-haired guy. The shape/profile does not have a step in the partial mockup. Design still in flux?

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Indranil » 10 Jun 2019 02:49

How is this engine different from the CE20 which has been flying earlier?

Is it just my eye or does the third stage look longer?

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Ashokk » 10 Jun 2019 19:17

Chandrayaan-2 nearly ready for July launch
NEW DELHI: Isro has entered the last leg of testing of Chandrayaan-2 with integration nearly complete. Final tests are happening at Mahendragiri in Tamil Nadu and Byalalu in Bengaluru. The agency is looking at a July 9 launch.

As part of Isro’s present schedule, spacecraft will leave Bengaluru on June 19, and reach the launchpad in Sriharikota on June 20 or 21. From 3D mapping to finding water molecules, and from checking out minerals to landing where nobody has landed, scientists say Isro has prepared to land a “dream on the Moon”.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby hnair » 10 Jun 2019 19:30

The Pad-abort system looks same as the earlier tested one, maybe the stepped affect is caused by the smaller oval vents?


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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Ashokk » 12 Jun 2019 12:56

Gaganyaan mission: IAF to pick 10 potential astronauts in 2 months, Isro chief says
The Indian Air Force (IAF) will “screen and select 10 potential crew members for the country’s first manned space mission in two months”. Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) chairman K Sivan told TOI that the space agency will choose the final three astronauts from the ten people who the IAF would train.
The Isro chief said, “We have an agreement with the IAF for crew training at Isro’s Human Space Flight Centre in Bengaluru. IAF will screen around 10 crew members for the mission. This screening and selection will happen within one to two months. Isro will finally choose three members from these 10 crew members for the human spaceflight mission.”
Preparations for the country’s first manned mission to space are in full swing as Isro recently held its first meeting of the national advisory council (NAC), where representatives of all organisations and institutes involved in the Gaganyaan project participated. The agency also tested CE-20 engine, meant for the upper stage of human-rated GSLV MK-III, which will be carrying Indian astronauts to space.
Speaking to TOI, Sivan said, “In the NAC meet on June 8, Air Vice-Marshal R G K Kapoor, assistant chief of air staff operations (space), Rear Admiral D S Gujarl, assistant chief of naval staff, Defence Research and Development Organisation director G Satheesh Reddy, Hindustan Aeronautics Limited chairman and managing director R Madhavan and veterans of different institutes attended the meeting. All these agencies will play crucial roles in the mission. Whilel the IAF will handle crew selection and training, DRDO will provide the life support system for crew and Navy will help in recovering the human capsule once it re-enters the atmosphere and splashes down in sea.”

The Isro chairman said the meeting, also attended by former Indian astronaut Rakesh Sharma, discussed the overall plan, including crew training. “The NAC is mandated to meet once in six months to review the preparedness of the mission (scheduled to be launched before or by 2021). But we have decided to initially hold the review meeting once in three months in order to streamline the process,” he said.
On the Chandrayaan-2 mission, Sivan said “the integration of GSLV Mk III has been going on at Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota for quite some time. However, the lunarcraft will be on display at Bengaluru’s U R Rao Satellite Centre for the media for the next two days before being taken to Sriharikota for integration with the GSLV rocket”.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby JayS » 12 Jun 2019 13:13

Some announcement from ISRO on Chandrayaan 2 expected today.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Kakarat » 12 Jun 2019 14:27

https://twitter.com/writetake/status/11 ... 7511778304
#Chandrayaan2 launch on July 15 at 2 am 51 min. Sivan, space agency chief.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby A Nandy » 12 Jun 2019 14:34

Live now: https://www.republicworld.com/livetv

https://twitter.com/republic/status/1138728440935268354

Launch on July 15, 2:51 AM

ISRO Chairman Dr. K Sivan on Chandrayaan 2 Mission: The day we are going to land is either September 6 or September 7, that day happens to be the beginning of a lunar day. For one full lunar day, the lander & rover will be functioning & carry out scientific experiments.

Rover "Pragyan" will have Ashoka Chakra on one wheel and ISRO's logo on the other. Rover will also have tricolor on it while landing on the surface of South Pole of Lunar, where no country has reached as yet.

The cost of Chandrayaan 2 Mission mainly the satellite portion, including the support from foreign agencies as well as for navigation purpose, is Rs. 603 crore

The Chandrayaan 2 Mission contains three components & the composite body of Chandrayaan 2 is kept inside GSLV MK-III. The total mass of Chandrayaan 2 system is 3.8 ton; out of 3.8 ton, nearly 1.3 ton is the propeller.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby disha » 12 Jun 2019 20:36

Serial on ISRO's mangalyan and a very good article on image copyrights linked here.

https://thewire.in/space/ekta-kapoor-mangalyaan-altbalaji-isro-copyright

Posters for Ekta Kapoor's Mangalyaan Series Don't Show ISRO Rockets – Why it Matters

One poster shows the show’s protagonists flanking a Russian Soyuz launcher. Another shows their faces lined up over an ascending NASA Space Shuttle. However, ISRO had launched its Mars satellite on a PSLV XL.

Posters for Ekta Kapoor's Mangalyaan Series Don't Show ISRO Rockets – Why it Matters
Launch of the IRNSS-1E satellite on January 20, on board a PSLV XL rocket. Credit: ISRO

Vasudevan Mukunth

Bengaluru: Have you seen the GSLV Mk II? It’s one good looking rocket. It’s almost 50 m tall, has a sleek body, four L40 boosters on the first-stage and a cryogenic upper stage. Though the GSLV Mk I looks similar, its cryogenic upper stage was powered by a Russian engine. The Mk II is more ‘Made in India’ that way, which seems to matter to so many people these days, with an India-made cryogenic engine at the top.

This is just one reason the new posters for the TV show called M.O.M. – The Women Behind Mission Mangal, produced by Ekta Kapoor and distributed by AltBalaji, look strange. Released on June 7, one poster shows four women, presumably the show’s protagonists, flanking a large rocket in the centre that appears to be a Russian Soyuz launcher. Another shows their faces lined up over an ascending NASA Space Shuttle. However, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) had launched the Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) in November 2013 with a PSLV rocket in its XL configuration.

Kapoor wrote on her Instagram post, “This show is on the women who sent the mission [to] Mars – partly fictional keeping in mind the sacrosanct nature of ISRO. This is by far one of the most inspirational stories I have ever heard after millions of meetings with ISRO and a certain amount of sacrosanct secrecy that they would like us to maintain.” It would be reasonable to assume then that, after “millions of meetings”, Kapoor and her production team knew what the rockets actually looked like.

Update: At around 4:30 pm on June 12, AltBalaji issued a statement to The Wire saying that the show is a fictional adaptation and that, as a result, it is “legally bound not to use actual names or images of the people, objects or agencies involved”. The note added that “publicity material” of the show was designed with their “contractual obligations in mind”.

When asked why the show then used the official acronym – MOM – a spokesperson stated that it stood for “Mission Over Mars”, not ‘Mars Orbiter Mission’ as was supposed.

The GODL license

‘Sacrosanct’ is a troubling word because it should have no place where public outreach is important. In most other circumstances, and in keeping with its storied attitude towards public outreach, ISRO is simply not interested in publicising its achievements. This is why MOM was significant in more ways than one: its launch marked the sole occasion when ISRO insiders engaged in any significant public engagement – online and off; one group of space scientists even organised a Q&A session on Reddit.

Additionally, MOM was a technology demonstration mission; its primary objective was, and remains, to get into orbit around Mars, which it did in September 2014. So it is curious what its maker would like to be secretive about, especially as a civilian space organisation, when its more accessible peers NASA and the European Space Agency can tell you exactly what technologies would have to be used to get into orbit around Mars.

However, beyond the claims in Kapoor’s own post, there is a larger issue centred on confusion over reuse rights on images published by ISRO. For example, American federal law denies copyright to all images obtained by NASA’s instruments (a stipulation that leads to some tension in the 2015 film The Martian). On the other hand, India does not have a similarly free-ranging, and mandated, formal works-of-government exception to copyright.

Some images that ISRO has uploaded into the Wikimedia Commons library sport a Government Open Data License (GODL), published in 2017, with the following explanatory note:

Following the mandate of the National Data Sharing and Accessibility Policy (NDSAP) of Government of India that applies to all shareable non-sensitive data available either in digital or analog forms but generated using public funds by various agencies of the Government of India, all users are provided a worldwide, royalty-free, non-exclusive license to use, adapt, publish (either in original, or in adapted and/or derivative forms), translate, display, add value, and create derivative works (including products and services), for all lawful commercial and non-commercial purposes, and for the duration of existence of such rights over the data or information.

The NDSAP was advanced in 2012, so there are no ISRO images in the library from before that year. Additionally, Shashank Govindaraju, a senior associate at Factum Law, Bengaluru, said that the terms of this license elevate the images into the public domain. However, he acknowledged a difference from a jurisprudential point of view. “Imagine you own a house and you let your friend stay there. You still own the house but you are letting your friend have a free ride.” Similarly, “By retaining copyright, it enables [the government] to modify the terms of the license.”

If the images had been in the public domain, on the other hand, AltBalaji or any other producer for that matter could still have banked on the popularity of ISRO’s launch vehicles – and added to it in turn – without having to borrow from Russian and American albums.

Third, the GODL requires a clunky attribution format that might have been more at home in the academic literature:

[Name of Data Provider], [Year of Publication], [Name of Data], [Name of Data Repository/Website], [Version Number and/or Date of Publication (dd/mm)], [DOI / URL / URI]. Published under [Name of License]: [URL of License].

Finally, the number of images that are available with the GODL license and the NDSAP’s protection, at least on the Wikimedia Commons, is low. This is understandable since the act of uploading official images to the library seems to be discretionary; there appears to be no policy that mandates ISRO to ensure all its images are made available in this manner. A similar qualification is not visible on the ISRO website either, but its ‘terms of use’ clearly states:

The copyright of the material of ISRO contained in this website belongs to and remains solely with ISRO. If any user is interested to use the material of ISRO featured in this Website, then, the user is required to take the permission from ISRO.

One consequence of these factors has been that ISRO imagery just hasn’t been all over the internet the way visuals from NASA missions have been. For example, NASA images, GIFs and videos in the Wikimedia Commons and Flickr Commons libraries are either completely in the public domain, free of all copyright, or have a Creative Commons Attributions license (a.k.a. CC BY). In fact, many images of Indian missions, including two of the INSAT 1B (here and here), have been attributed to NASA and are completely in the public domain.

A suitable rocket

As it happens, media materials produced by Roscosmos, the Russian space agency, seem to be limited by restricted access, with multiple caveats about how such materials may be used. The Japanese Space Agency also provides restricted access, while the European Space Agency is more relaxed, though not entirely.

It is not obvious what the issue with placing all ISRO images, even if not all data, explicitly in the public domain would be. The counterargument that it would exacerbate misinformation, and fake news, is irredeemably flawed, as the NDSAP’s text itself confirms. Without access to these resources, and more importantly the clarity on their use/reuse, ISRO merchandise is virtually non-existent.

Setting aside the need to be ‘sacrosanct’ about anything, Leslee Lazar, a neuroscientist and visual artist, said, “The MOM show might not be angling for accuracy, but they should have been careful as rockets are the central theme, apart from the women. They could have easily got an illustrator to represent the correct ISRO rockets.”

In fact, the cover of Those Magnificent Women and Their Flying Machines, a 2019 book about ISRO’s women scientists by the author and journalist Minnie Vaid, shows a non-ISRO rocket on its cover. It looks like the Soyuz but it is painted like the PSLV, in alternating bands of white and deep red. A diminutive credit-line at the back of the book says the photos of Mars on the front and back covers are from ISRO and the “satellite” was the work of illustrator R.C. Prakash.

Given that a photograph of the PSLV C25’s launch is available on Wikimedia Commons under the GODL license, it is not clear why Speaking Tiger chose to commission their own image of a launcher. It had not responded to this question over email at the time this article was published. This article will be updated as and when it responds.

So on the one hand, we have an organisation that, actively or passively, has been pinching the supply of processed and unprocessed data into the public domain. On the other, we appear to have a demand for stories revolving around this data but which is accompanied by a strange (thus far, at least) reluctance to want to use that data when the opportunity presents itself. Perhaps even more importantly, neither group seems to mind – at least not publicly – so are we to believe there is even a problem here?

Note: This article was updated on June 12, 2019, at 4:38 pm to include AltBalaji’s clarification and modified to remove Prateep Basu’s quote.



My take: Indian film industry in general are bunch of morons. Lazy morons.

Prasad
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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Prasad » 12 Jun 2019 20:46

A name as big as Ekta Kapoor would've been denied commerical license to use ISRO copyright imagery?
Just sheer laziness, nothing else.

Karthik S
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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Karthik S » 13 Jun 2019 17:03

ISRO Announces Ambitious Plan For India To Get Its Own Space Station, Work To Begin Post Gaganyaan Mission


https://swarajyamag.com/insta/isro-anno ... an-mission

A Nandy
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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby A Nandy » 13 Jun 2019 21:24

https://www.news18.com/news/india/isro- ... 85173.html

The project will be an extension of the Gaganyaan mission, which aims to send an Indian crew to space in 2022.

"We have to sustain the Gaganyaan programme. So, subsequently, as a long-term plan, we are planning to have the space station in India. We are going to join the international community in manned missions to moon, asteroids. We have a clear plan for the space programme," Sivan said.

"We are planning to have a separate space station. We will not be a part of the ISS :twisted: . Our space station is going to be very small. We will be launching a small module and that will be used for carrying out microgravity experiments," he added.

The weight of the space station is likely to be 20 tonnes.

By planning a space station, ISRO is "not thinking of space tourism", he said. Sivan said the proposal will be sent to the government for approval after the first Gaganyaan mission by 2022 and it is looking at 5-7 years to execute the programme. He did not elaborate on the cost of the proposed space station.


Work on for 3 years on docking tech which is the key enabler for the space station:
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/ind ... 775029.cms

Mollick.R
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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Mollick.R » 14 Jun 2019 00:04

A Nandy wrote:https://www.news18.com/news/india/isro-chief-says-india-planning-to-have-own-space-station-2185173.html

The project will be an extension of the Gaganyaan mission, which aims to send an Indian crew to space in 2022.


Work on for 3 years on docking tech which is the key enabler for the space station:
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/ind ... 775029.cms



The revealed details of Docking Tech seems to be dual use technology.
Can be used for as ASAT weapon also. Grabbing and pushing the hostile enemy sat out of useful orbit.
Several technologies will be useful for this role also.
Isn't it ???
Or I'm reading too much between the lines.

sanjaykumar
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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby sanjaykumar » 14 Jun 2019 02:03

Docking technology should be developed prior to human space flight lest the astronauts be marooned.

Is there a common standard for docking mechanisms and interlocks? Note this is not essential for rescue but would make things easier.

Indranil
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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Indranil » 14 Jun 2019 03:00

There is. But it is up to us to conform or not.


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