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Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Hari Seldon » 28 Jan 2017 06:45

Apols if this is the wrong dhaga to post this in, but this if true could revolutionize space programs the world over...

'Metastable' Metallic Hydrogen created at Harvard

Now this is the money quote:

The best rocket fuel we currently have is liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, burned for propellant. The efficacy of such substances is characterized by “specific impulse,” the measure of impulse fuel can give a rocket to propel it forward.

“People at NASA or the Air Force have told me that if they could get an increase from 450 seconds [of specific impulse] to 500 seconds, that would have a huge impact on rocketry,” Isaac Silvera, the Thomas D. Cabot Professor of the Natural Sciences at Harvard University, told Inverse by phone. “If you can trigger metallic hydrogen to recover to the molecular phase, [the energy release] calculated for that is 1700 seconds.”

Metallic hydrogen could potentially enable rockets to get into orbit in a single stage, even allowing humans to explore the outer planets. Metallic hydrogen is predicted to be “metastable” — meaning if you make it at a very high pressure then release it, it’ll stay at that pressure. A diamond, for example, is a metastable form of graphite.


SSTO, eh? Time perhaps for ISRO to start a program to synthesize this miracle material?

Oh, BTW, It has other spinoff uses too ...

Metallic hydrogen has also been predicted to be a high- or possibly room-temperature superconductor. There are no other known room-temperature superconductors in existence, meaning the applications are immense — particularly for the electric grid, which suffers for energy lost through heat dissipation. It could also facilitate magnetic levitation for futuristic high-speed trains; substantially improve performance of electric cars; and revolutionize the way energy is produced and stored.


Oh, read it all.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Amber G. » 28 Jan 2017 14:36

^^^^ The article looks impressive but from what I think after skimming the article in Science, I will be very skeptical about their claim about metallic hydrogen. (some other scientists who are in the field have also are doubtful about the claim and have issues with the research).

Basically they (Silvera and Dias) have only one single measurement (of reflectivity -- which may indicate metallic H but may be something else) and rushed to publicize (IMHO) rather than wait.. so let us wait and see.

The paper is here: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2017/01/25/science.aal1579





.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby rsingh » 29 Jan 2017 00:06

Hari Seldon wrote:Apols if this is the wrong dhaga to post this in, but this if true could revolutionize space programs the world over...

'Metastable' Metallic Hydrogen created at Harvard

Now this is the money quote:

The best rocket fuel we currently have is liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, burned for propellant. The efficacy of such substances is characterized by “specific impulse,” the measure of impulse fuel can give a rocket to propel it forward.

“People at NASA or the Air Force have told me that if they could get an increase from 450 seconds [of specific impulse] to 500 seconds, that would have a huge impact on rocketry,” Isaac Silvera, the Thomas D. Cabot Professor of the Natural Sciences at Harvard University, told Inverse by phone. “If you can trigger metallic hydrogen to recover to the molecular phase, [the energy release] calculated for that is 1700 seconds.”

Metallic hydrogen could potentially enable rockets to get into orbit in a single stage, even allowing humans to explore the outer planets. Metallic hydrogen is predicted to be “metastable” — meaning if you make it at a very high pressure then release it, it’ll stay at that pressure. A diamond, for example, is a metastable form of graphite.


SSTO, eh? Time perhaps for ISRO to start a program to synthesize this miracle material?

Oh, BTW, It has other spinoff uses too ...

Metallic hydrogen has also been predicted to be a high- or possibly room-temperature superconductor. There are no other known room-temperature superconductors in existence, meaning the applications are immense — particularly for the electric grid, which suffers for energy lost through heat dissipation. It could also facilitate magnetic levitation for futuristic high-speed trains; substantially improve performance of electric cars; and revolutionize the way energy is produced and stored.


Oh, read it all.

Under high pressure. Devil in details. No not going to happen.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Prem » 30 Jan 2017 01:49

http://www.financialexpress.com/lifesty ... at/527219/

Vampire’ star caught in the act by Indian space observatory ASTROSAT

India’s first dedicated space observatory, ASTROSAT, has captured the rare phenomenon of a small, 6-billion-year-old “vampire” star “preying” on a bigger celestial body. Scientists say the smaller star, also called a “blue straggler”, feeds off its companion star by sucking out its mass and energy, causing its eventual death.“The most popular explanation is that these are binary systems in which the smaller star sucks material out of the bigger companion star to become a blue straggler, and hence is called a vampire star.“The small star becomes bigger, hotter and bluer, which gives it the appearance of being young, while the ageing companion burns out and collapses to a stellar remnant,” said Annapurni Subramaniam, a Professor at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics.Though this phenomenon is not unheard of, the observation of the entire process through the telescope will provide insights that will help scientists in studying the formation of ‘blue straggler’ stars.This discovery also highlights the capabilities of the telescopes on ASTROSAT, a dedicated space observatory satellite launched in September 2015.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby disha » 30 Jan 2017 04:15

Please - do not quote entire articles to make a small one liner point.

On metallic Hydrogen., yes - it is a holy grail and it will revolutionize many things and maybe rocketry. But first it is purported to revolutionize high temperature superconductivity. Here is a better link: http://www.universetoday.com/133097/harvard-physicist-creates-metallic-hydrogen-using-diamond-vise/

And yes., take the above news with a huge bag of non-existent metallic hydrogen. The team at harvard might have just succeeded, but first replication and more measurement needs to be done. And scaling from few atoms of metallic hydrogen to say several tonnes of it is going to be a challenge that will get solved but not till at least the end of next decade or two decades.

On AstroSat., this article http://www.dnaindia.com/scitech/report-the-data-from-six-filters-of-uvit-were-used-to-estimate-2298282 also has some details.

Congrats to ISRO. For capturing the entire process of a blue-straggler or so called 'vampire star' through a telescope. This will give even more insights into inner workings of stars.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby SSridhar » 30 Jan 2017 08:40

Atomic clocks on indigenous navigation satellite develop snag - Madhumathi D.S., The Hindu
NavIC, the indigenously built satellite- based positioning system, has developed a technical snag in the atomic clocks on its first satellite.

In the NavIC, a constellation of seven satellites, one of the three crucial rubidium timekeepers on IRNSS-1A spacecraft failed six months ago. The other two followed subsequently.

A. S. Kiran Kumar, Chairman of the Indian Space Research Organisation, confirmed the glitch in the clocks but clarified that the satellite was otherwise all right, and the rest of the satellites were performing its core function of providing accurate position, navigation and time. However, without its clocks, the IRNSS-1A “will give a coarse value. It will not be used for computation. Messages from it will still be used.

ISRO, he said, was trying to revive the clocks on 1A and readying one of the two back-up navigation satellites to replace it in space in the second half of this year. {As our space-based services expand, we should become more prepared for repalcements at short notices}

“There are some anomalies in the atomic clock system on board. We are trying to restart it. Right now we are working out a mechanism for operating it,” he told The Hindu .

He added, “The problem is only with the clock system of one spacecraft. The signals are all coming, we are getting the messages, everything else is working and being used, except the stability portion which is linked to the clock.”

Mr. Kiran Kumar said a minimum of four working satellites was sufficient to realise the full use of the navigation system”.

NavIC has 21 atomic clocks on seven spacecraft. “How would the other clocks fare? Would ISRO reconsider the supplier of its atomic clocks? Such questions are not easy to answer. Generally any [space] hardware is an issue. We have to find ways of going around it,” he said.

The troubled IRNSS-1A spacecraft was put in space in July 2013 and has an expected life span of 10 years. The seventh navigation satellite, IRNSS-1G, was launched in April 2016.

The satellites of the Rs. 1,420-crore NavIC, short for Navigation with Indian Constellation, and also known as the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System, give precise information on position, navigation and time (PNT) of objects or persons to users on ground, sea and air.

The system has a restricted military component.

Similar glitches

Mr. Kiran Kumar agreed that the problem on NavIC was similar to the atomic clock glitches that struck the European navigation constellation Galileo.

On January 18, Jan Woerner, Director General of the European Space Agency (ESA), which is putting up the 26-satellite Galileo system, made their problem public. Galileo has placed 18 spacecraft in space and is now deciding whether it should launch the four satellites as planned this year. He had also said they were in touch with ISRO after nine of their clocks developed snags.

ESA’s and ISRO’s clocks reportedly come from the same Swiss company.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby JTull » 30 Jan 2017 17:21

ISRO Successfully Tests C25 Cryogenic Upper Stage of GSLV MkIII

The stage carries 27.8 tons of propellants loaded in two independent tanks


So, C25 is actually C27.8!

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 30 Jan 2017 21:51

^
Very good, so it is actually more powerful, with more thrust, than the numbers indicate. Now, the task is to launch the thing! It was first supposed to go up in Dec 2016, then January 20th was stated quite emphatically as the launch date. Nothing happened. The rescheduled mission is in early March. I just hope that when March rolls around, we don't read a release that goes like "The C-25 stage recently underwent a full test, in preparation for the GSLV Mark 3 launch scheduled for its maiden development flight in August". Please, no. Yes, I realise there are reasons, but still..

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Lisa » 31 Jan 2017 00:30

Apologies if already posted,

India-China rivalry reaches into orbit and beyond
Regional giants chase prestige, power and prosperity in space race

GO YAMADA, Nikkei senior staff writer and SHUHEI YAMADA, Head of Nikkei's China Headquarters

http://asia.nikkei.com/Politics-Economy ... and-beyond

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby SaiK » 03 Feb 2017 04:14

Our future mission should launch a GPS 3 equivalent all advanced and powerful, completely mini/micro-satellites. Say 25 of them launched in one go! They take positions and we would have GAGAN II in one launch. possible? what are the challenges?

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby prasannasimha » 03 Feb 2017 20:02

How will you package the wave traveling tubes and atomic clocks etc in a microsatellite.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby PratikDas » 04 Feb 2017 00:09

SaiK wrote:Our future mission should launch a GPS 3 equivalent all advanced and powerful, completely mini/micro-satellites. Say 25 of them launched in one go! They take positions and we would have GAGAN II in one launch. possible? what are the challenges?


prasannasimha wrote:How will you package the wave traveling tubes and atomic clocks etc in a microsatellite.


A travelling wave tube amplifier shouldn't be necessary for an arrangement with just 26 W of RF power + high antenna gain (13 dBi). That much power+gain can easily be achieved with a semiconductor chip amplifier and a 0.6 m / 2 ft dish antenna
Source:http://gpsinformation.net/main/gpspower.htm

How much POWER do the GPS Satellites output on the 1575mhz L1 frequency?
One of our anonomous newgroup readers gave this correct answer..

In the frequency allocation filing the L1 C/A power is listed as 25.6 Watts. The Antenna gain is listed at 13 dBi. Thus, based on the frequency allocation filing, the power would be about 500 Watts (27 dBW).


I'm guessing the atomic clock + fuel for orbit maintenance are the voluminous components.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby SSridhar » 04 Feb 2017 12:53

ISRO ready for launch of next generation GSLV Mark-III - The Hindu
The first ever flight of GSLV Mark –III was poised to take place in the first half of this year, P. Kunhikrishnan, Director, Satish Dhawan Space Centre, SHAR, Sriharikota said here [Trichy] on Friday.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby prasannasimha » 04 Feb 2017 14:17

They have to do a full duration hot test and they may ahve t do some other tests before they can certify it to fly.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby JTull » 04 Feb 2017 15:52

Any news on the progress with Semi-Cryo engine?

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby krishGo » 04 Feb 2017 18:21

JTull wrote:Any news on the progress with Semi-Cryo engine?


Facilities for Launching Satellites

Currently, the project for the development of Semicryogenic engine has been approved and the Semicryogenic engine is under development. The various activities carried out towards the development of the Semicryogenic engine include- (i) Indigenous realisation of 35 materials and 22 coating processes (ii) Qualification of indigenous bearings for turbo pumps (iii) Fabrication of the first hardware for three engine subsystems including low pressure turbo pumps and one high pressure turbo pump through industry (iv) Design validation of the low pressure turbo pumps through cold flow trials. 
 
An advanced space launcher that can deliver ten-tonne and heavier communication satellites to space requires a booster stage with clustered Semicryogenic engines. After the successful qualification of the Semicryogenic engine, the development of the Semicryogenic booster stage with clustered engines is expected to be initiated. 

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 04 Feb 2017 20:58

prasannasimha wrote:They have to do a full duration hot test and they may ahve t do some other tests before they can certify it to fly.


Spaceflight Now, and another Indian Defense and Security site, is giving April as the launch date. It was delayed from December, Jan 20th and March.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby rsingh » 05 Feb 2017 00:05

We were supposed to launch 80-100 sats in one go. No news about that.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby krishGo » 05 Feb 2017 00:25

Varoon Shekhar wrote:
prasannasimha wrote:They have to do a full duration hot test and they may ahve t do some other tests before they can certify it to fly.


Spaceflight Now, and another Indian Defense and Security site, is giving April as the launch date. It was delayed from December, Jan 20th and March.


It depends on, among the other things (like C25 flight qualification), what will next be launched out of SLP. What we know is the LVM3 core had already reached SDLC and the boosters were also ready.

If ISRO wants to take up the GSLV launch before the LVM3 launch then LVM3 can only be launched in the second quarter (assuming 2-3 months is the shortest possible turn around time). Since the C25 has yet to be fully flight qualified, the GSLV launch (for the South Asia sat) might come before the LVM3 launch from SLP.

I believe that there is no confirmation from ISRO about what is being assembled in the VAB currently.


rsingh wrote:We were supposed to launch 80-100 sats in one go. No news about that.


Possible launch around the 15th of February. If it is indeed the case, we should have the NOTAM notification shortly.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby symontk » 05 Feb 2017 17:35

JTull wrote:ISRO Successfully Tests C25 Cryogenic Upper Stage of GSLV MkIII

The stage carries 27.8 tons of propellants loaded in two independent tanks


So, C25 is actually C27.8!


it should gradually go to 40T

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 05 Feb 2017 22:43

krishGo wrote:
Varoon Shekhar wrote:
Spaceflight Now, and another Indian Defense and Security site, is giving April as the launch date. It was delayed from December, Jan 20th and March.


It depends on, among the other things (like C25 flight qualification), what will next be launched out of SLP. What we know is the LVM3 core had already reached SDLC and the boosters were also ready. "

Clear and fair enough, but the question is, what made ISRO quite confident about launching the GSLV Mark 3 on Jan 20th, after first mentioning, for several months before that, a December 19th/2016 date. What happened in that span, to announce the revised January launch? They were basically saying, it's just a relatively minor issue, which will be resolved in one month. Then January 20th came, and we're now hearing of a March launch, followed most recently by an April. Even a possible mid-year date, if the Hindu article quoted the ISRO spokesman accurately.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby krishGo » 06 Feb 2017 02:26

Varoon Shekhar wrote:
Clear and fair enough, but the question is, what made ISRO quite confident about launching the GSLV Mark 3 on Jan 20th, after first mentioning, for several months before that, a December 19th/2016 date. What happened in that span, to announce the revised January launch? They were basically saying, it's just a relatively minor issue, which will be resolved in one month. Then January 20th came, and we're now hearing of a March launch, followed most recently by an April. Even a possible mid-year date, if the Hindu article quoted the ISRO spokesman accurately.


Since it is a new launch vehicle, there are a lot more variables deciding the launch date.

Even for a workhorse like the PSLV, with fully developed structures, ISRO usually revises the launch date multiple times (for example the next launch of the PSLV (Cartosat 2D) as per my memory was initially scheduled for later half 2016, then January, then early February and now mid February).

So, the fact that the amount of delays that will be there for a new launch vehicle will be much greater can be for seen. If my memory serves me right, when the LVM3 project was sanctioned (then called the GSLV-Mk III) their target year for the first launch was late 2000s and has been getting delayed ever since. Large delays were present even in GSLV program.

The reality is the that organizations come up with a target date and work towards achieving it. Whether the method of coming up with these dates is accurate enough, is a different topic of discussion, and one which is not unique to ISRO.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby krishGo » 06 Feb 2017 02:30

symontk wrote:


it should gradually go to 40T


There was some speculation on ISRO possibly working on a C50 stage with 2 clustered CE-20 engines. It would be for the upper stage of the HLV (10 tons to GTO targeted) that ISRO plans to develop.

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Postby prasannasimha » 06 Feb 2017 09:27

The long term plan is to develop C60 and C100 for something akin to the centaur stage

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby SSridhar » 06 Feb 2017 11:14

In ISRO’s launch of 104 satellites next week, 88 will be from U.S. - Madhumathi D.S., The Hindu
The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) is on the cusp of making history when it sends 104 satellites into orbit on its PSLV-C37 rocket on February 15. Only three of them are Indian satellites.

Notably, in ISRO’s first mission of 2017, a single U.S. Earth imaging company, Planet, has made an eye-popping bulk booking for 88 of its small ‘cubesats’.

No space agency has launched such a large number of satellites in a single flight so far.
(While ISRO’s PSLV launched 20 satellites last year, Russia’s Dnepr launcher holds the record for lifting 37 satellites to orbit in June 2014.)

The PSLV will carry a main remote-sensing satellite in the Cartosat-2 series and two small spacecraft, all for ISRO, and 101 small foreign commercial satellites.

The 88 cubesats are part of Planet’s earth observation constellation of 100 satellites. They weigh around 5 kg each and are called ‘Doves’ or Flock 3p. For California-based Planet, too, it will be the record largest number of cubesats to be flown in a single launch, according to one of its executives.

Planet, an earth observation company formed in 2010 by former NASA scientists, has chosen ISRO’s PSLV launch for the second time. It got its earlier set of 12 ‘Doves’ launched in June last year.

Cartosat-2 & INS-1

The main passenger on PSLV-C37 will be the fourth in the Cartosat-2 series, a very high resolution Earth observation satellite of about 650 kg, and occupies roughly half the space in the launch vehicle. It will carry two more Indian nano satellites, INS-1A and INS-1B, each weighing about 10 kg. They have a short lifespan of six to 12 months.

All the payloads will totally weigh around 1,500 kg, according to an ISRO official who did not want to be named. The 88 Doves would be released in sets of four cubesats. The other co-riders are cubesats or small specialised satellites of customers from Israel, the UAE, Kazakhstan, the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany. They will be released separately into their orbits at around 500 km from Earth. While ISRO has been cagey about giving details of its customers, Planet’s executive Mike Safyan announced on Friday, “In February, we are launching 88 satellites — the largest fleet of satellites launched in history. The Dove satellites, collectively known as “Flock 3p,” will ride aboard a PSLV rocket from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, India.”

Biggest launch

“This is the 15th time Planet is launching Dove satellites; and it will be our biggest launch to date. Combined with the 12 satellites of Flock 2p operating in a similar orbit, this launch will enable Planet’s 100-satellite ‘line scanner’ constellation of Doves,” Mr. Safyan said.

Since September 2015, the PSLV has launched 18 small U.S. earth imaging satellites in a total of 79 foreign spacecraft — which earns it some revenue and an increasing global market share.

The Planet series comes even as COMSTAC, (Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee under the U.S. FAA) is considering if U.S. satellites can be sent to space on Indian launchers. Sources said PSLV’s U.S. clients were being approved on individual basis.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby AdityaM » 06 Feb 2017 13:06

Does ISRO validate every customers satellite to ensure it is really what they claim it to be?
'What if' one of those 88 sats are programmed to explode thus causing the loss of Cartosat & crush PSLV image in the market.

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Postby prasannasimha » 06 Feb 2017 14:27

All satellites that are to be deployed have to undergo testing including thermoacoustic vibration testing Xray imaging etc when they reach ISRO to see if they are within launch requierements and within safety parameters. So you can't just pop in a bomb. It is not just fill it shut it and forget it. Remember that the PSLV itself is nothing but a controlled explosion and all satellites with propellants are themselves filled with explosive materials..

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 10 Feb 2017 19:36

http://www.isro.gov.in/launcher/pslv-c3 ... -satellite

Launch of Cartosat 2D and 103 other satellites on February 15th. Nice details here.

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Re: prasannasimha

Postby symontk » 10 Feb 2017 23:08

prasannasimha wrote:All satellites that are to be deployed have to undergo testing including thermoacoustic vibration testing Xray imaging etc when they reach ISRO to see if they are within launch requierements and within safety parameters. So you can't just pop in a bomb. It is not just fill it shut it and forget it. Remember that the PSLV itself is nothing but a controlled explosion and all satellites with propellants are themselves filled with explosive materials..


They also check if the satellite does some interference or not

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby SSSalvi » 11 Feb 2017 03:20

Based on the NOTAMs a graphic has been prepared depicting the flight path.

Image

Left part shows the path as seen from top while the right hand part shows the altitude aspect
The Dog-Leg-Maneuver to avoid Srilankan Landmass is clearly seen.

16.5 minutes after ignition the rocket attains its intended orbit of 510 Kms and The 1st satellite to be released 17.5 minutes after the rocket ignition is Cartosat 2D, followed immediately by the remaining 2 Indian satellites INS 1A and INS 1B.

A minute later the release of other satellites starts and all of those are released in next 10 minutes thus achieving the record launch of 104 satellites in a single flight

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby krishGo » 12 Feb 2017 05:26

SSSalvi wrote:Based on the NOTAMs a graphic has been prepared depicting the flight path.
....


Very interesting visualization Salvi sir! Especially the altitude plots for the different phases in flight!

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby prasannasimha » 12 Feb 2017 08:29

At what point can we launch in Inida(If any ) that removes the dogleg maneuver ? (Thugh that site would immediately disqualify it for an equatorial launch as the angle of the orbit change would probably be excessive)

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby SSSalvi » 12 Feb 2017 10:31

Any place South of Rameshwaram will avoid SL. But for safety of Indian landmass west of Kanyakumari is good.

But this will be against the advantage of Earth Rotation that we have with East coast.

That disadvantage vis a vis SL roundabout needs to be weighed.

That perhaps is the reason that sometime back ISRO had zeroed in a place slightly North of SHAR for the future facility development.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby krishGo » 12 Feb 2017 16:15

SSSalvi wrote:Any place South of Rameshwaram will avoid SL. But for safety of Indian landmass west of Kanyakumari is good.

But this will be against the advantage of Earth Rotation that we have with East coast.

That disadvantage vis a vis SL roundabout needs to be weighed.

That perhaps is the reason that sometime back ISRO had zeroed in a place slightly North of SHAR for the future facility development.


For launches to GTO/GSO North of SHAR ie moving further away from the equator would lessen the extra velocity imparted by Earth's spin. Also, depending the location maneuvers might be necessary to keep away from the Indonesian archipelago (I believe it also the case for GTO flights from SHAR).

Northern Andhra Pradesh, Southern Odisha & Southern Tamil Nadu seem like the reasonable candidates taking all this into consideration.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Nick_S » 12 Feb 2017 16:25

Good article -

How Axiom Research Labs has emerged as India’s first private aerospace company
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/sma ... 101170.cms

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby disha » 13 Feb 2017 00:39

krishGo wrote:Northern Andhra Pradesh, Southern Odisha & Southern Tamil Nadu seem like the reasonable candidates taking all this into consideration.


And thus SHAR becomes the perfect location.

It is not just 'efficiency' of the launch vehicle that is material. Among several factors.,

- the relative remoteness at the same time very accessible location of SHAR. A very controlled access to the island is possible. Further it is several kms (25) away from the nearest large inhabitation of sullurpeta. Extremely difficult for prying eyes or unwanted elements to gain access to SHAR

- The bay of bengal., provides excellent testing waters. The major towns of kakinada in north and Batticaloa in the south (basically the left and right arms) providing almost 140* angle in front of the SHAR are some 500-600 kms away. Rest of the habitations are behind this arc!

- Port blair is 1200 km away. This provides an area of 1450000 sq. km of open water testing.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby SSSalvi » 13 Feb 2017 02:46

^^^
Very True.

That's the reason ISRO chose Gullalamoda in Andhra Pradesh in 2012 for a contingency location for launchpad.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Rakesh » 13 Feb 2017 03:39

U.S. launch companies lobby to maintain ban on use of Indian rockets
http://spacenews.com/u-s-space-transpor ... n-rockets/

India's PSLV rocket in September 2015 launched four commercial U.S. satellites in one of several waivers of the U.S. policy prohibiting such launches. U.S. launcher interests want to maintain the policy.

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Re: Indian Space Programme Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby SSSalvi » 13 Feb 2017 07:14

***
This a stale article. An year old report.

But nothing has changed .. no US launcher has since come up to compete PSLV costing. In fact Space X had a few serious hiccups which it overcame and had a successful launch only in January this year.

By that time ISRO could gather several satellites through ISIS culminating in this world record launch of 104 in one go.

( But one fails to understand how could ISRO could recover only half of the launch cost in spite of such a large number of co-passengers. Although Indian satellites weigh about 700 Kgs and foreign sats weigh 500 Kgs ISRO could have bargained for full cast recovery )

Of course we don't know what is in next agenda item in US policies after H1B and Travel bans.

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Postby prasannasimha » 13 Feb 2017 17:50

If you overcharge they will go elsewhere. One thing is by appropriate costing they are recovering 50% of launch cost including the added weight. If the other satellites had not been launched we would have to pay for entire launch cost. Assuming 10000$/Kg (not sure what is current cost) we are doing well if 50% of the coat was made up by additional packages . More than anything else imagine the PR generatedby the launch regarding technical ability. This will throw up the mini satellite launch market in a big way. In fact there are more planned mini satellites than available launchers mailing it a lucrative business. US ,EU Russia and China are only interested in heavy payloads so this niche market will be lucrative. With satellite weights coming down this will expand our market.


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