Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby wasu » 08 Dec 2018 21:59

https://www.isro.gov.in/update/08-dec-2 ... ed-gsat-11

After the successful launch of GSAT-11 into a Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit by Ariane 5 VA246 vehicle on December 05, 2018, three orbit raising manoeuvres have been performed by firing the satellite’s onboard propulsion system for a cumulative duration of more than four hours. Consequently, the orbit of GSAT-11 with a perigee (nearest point to earth) of 32,657 km and an apogee (farthest point to earth) of 35,850 km, is very close to its designated Orbit. One more manoeuvre will be performed tomorrow (December 09, 2018) to achieve the operational circular geostationary orbit of 35,786 km.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 08 Dec 2018 23:56

^
Thanks for the update! One suspected things were going well with the satellite, but it's nice to receive confirmation!

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 08 Dec 2018 23:58

when can we expect an image from that new camera, the GSHR camera, onboard the GSAT-29?


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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Haridas » 09 Dec 2018 10:38

Amber G. wrote:Find the following values for "soil" from any standard handbook of Physics and Chemistry (or measure it yourself) (Of course you can use 'skin' or other material :))

let ϵ ,μ be the electric and magnetic permeability of "soil" ( look up the value for type of soil you have)
ω = 2pi*(frequency of the photon) = 2*pi* c/(wave -length) of spectrum you are interested in.
σ = Electric conductivity of the "soil")

Then penetration depth k = k(ω)=ω *sqrt(ϵμ/2)*sqrt(√(1+(σϵ/ω))+1) (simple formula - plug in the values)

Now how far into the soil depends on the value of "k" and how good is the your detection system. because for every depth of "k" the intensity of the EM radiation (or number of photons of that particular energy) reduces to about 1/e^2 (= 16%) of the value.
(In other words, you can "see" more (or less) than "k" inside the soil depending on how few (or more) photons you need to detect)

Hope this is helpful in estimating what kind of wavelength you can select for maximum depth..

Been there done that for living ! Does not help support what the honerable prof asserts what hyperspectral sensor in EOS can do.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby prasannasimha » 09 Dec 2018 15:21

India will not be changing the PSLV architecture in the near future. It is going in a different way. Small satellite launch vehicle for small payloads and the GSLV Mk 3 type and derivatives for heavy launch.So when SC200 comes we will be using that structure whch wil be part of the ULV series. Once that series comes up the core alone config will be the PSLV replacement. Lets us be clear space exploration goes for time tested versus flashy new. Take for example their electronics -they are many generations behindthe latest smartphone and PC chips all over the world. Reliability is foremost in their minds and they will only tweak existing good performer as far as possible. See the Soyuz - still works well but they will be upgrading in series. No one wants to go the space shuttles way. Even Elon Musk has been warned that you just cannot do what you want - safety and reliability counts. Yes he is allowed to dream but not crazily. With our budget scenario (The budget of ISRO is less than for eg just one lab JPL which technically is a Caltech Lab ! So we have to use our resources carefully. We may be plodding in our own way but then we are indeed moving forward. There are already planned tests for vertical landing, bagged landing of boosters and fly back landing of boosters.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Gyan » 10 Dec 2018 10:17

It seems that weight of even heaviest commercial satellites is stabilising around 6 tons in foreseeable future. Hence our GSLV using single SCE with lift capacity of 6-7 tons GTO may evolve as workhorse like PSLV.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Indranil » 10 Dec 2018 10:46

As Haridasji said, the race is not for capacity, but price! ISRO, like others, have to crack that. From all signs GSLV Mk2 will be retired once Mk3 stabilizes for the same reasons. They are currently designing multi payload adapters for Mk3.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby disha » 10 Dec 2018 10:53

ISRO has the ULV/HLV planned since early 2000s. By the time SCE 200 comes, it will be post 2025.

The goal for SCE 200 + S250 + C50 would be to lift 10 Tonnes to GTO. Now that is really a big rocket. Question is, is there a need to do 10 tonne to GTO? For what purpose? GSAT-11 itself topped off at 5854 Kgs. So the question does arise, why does one need 10 tonnes to GTO? And how often such HLV needs to be launched? Is there a requirement to launch HLV every month? Ariane 5 (which generally lifts 10 t to GTO) serves a global market and is doing on an average 5 launches a year. Why should ISRO develop a specific HLV as direct competition to Arianne 5? Does the Indian sat market absorb capacity of 10 GSAT 11 class sats every year for 30 years with each 15 year lifetime? That is 300 GSAT 11s.

GSAT-11 itself was delayed by 2 years for various reasons. Point is as sats are moving towards miniaturization, the market for heavy and super-heavy sats is shrinking. Hence the reasons for HLV to launch 10 tonnes to GTO is a very narrow market.

My take has been consistent., reduce the per kg cost of launch to space. By 2025 ISRO should aim to half it and by 2030 aim to half it even further.

ISRO last flew its RLV in 2016. In 2019 it will do a drop glide test of RLV for autonomous landing. ISRO should have quadrupled the RLV budget and asked for a drop glide test in 2017 and a scaled down test to outerspace with a dummy in 2019.

By 2025, ISRO should be sending scaled up (planned sized) RLV regularly. It can use GSLV-Mk II. Point is ISRO is behind in kick starting RLV.

This leads to the second path. I have been saying that ISRO should look at Metho-LOX engine. In GSLV-Mk II and CUS-12, ISRO already has mastered staged combustion technology. A staged combustion cryo CH4-LOX would be a great break through. Further, this metho-lox engine should be targeted for reuse like what spaceX and blue-origin plan to do.

Instead of SCE-200, focus should be on the metholox engine with 2mN (2000 kN) thrust with restarteabeility and reuse. In orbit mating and fuel transfer in zero g.

This should go into GSLV-Mk III HR (Human Rated) and ability to launch 10 tonnes to LEO. Coupled with RLV+GSLV MkII and GSLV Mk-III HR and GSLV Mk-II Cargo (& fuel supply) with in orbit mating and zero g fuel transfer, reusable and restartable engines., ISRO will have the assembly in place to go to moon and set up a moon base. ISRO can do it by 2030.

https://swarajyamag.com/technology/isro-should-kick-on-with-developing-reusable-launch-technology

The above article as well says something similar.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby disha » 10 Dec 2018 10:56

Indranil wrote:As Haridasji said, the race is not for capacity, but price! ISRO, like others, have to crack that. From all signs GSLV Mk2 will be retired once Mk3 stabilizes for the same reasons. They are currently designing multi payload adapters for Mk3.


It will be very sad and useless thing to retire GSLV Mk II. GSLV Mk II with staged combustion can be used as a test bed to try out S-200, S-250 and metholox clustered engines with restart and reusability and can evolve into a cargo carrier. If it is human rated then it can carry RLV and become a pre-cursor to TSTO. For example a TSTO-lite. Instead of Two-stage to orbit, it can be three-stage to orbit with an expendable solid stage and reusable boosters.

And for all inter-planetary payloads and space astronomy, GSLV-Mk II is a powerful rocket!

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby SSridhar » 10 Dec 2018 14:12

Next, GSAT-11 awaits ₹200 crore ground system - Madhumathi D.S., The Hindu
Now that GSAT-11, the third and latest Internet-boosting communication satellite, is up in space, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) says it is in the process of readying a ₹150-200-crore ground infrastructure across cities to use it.

A Ka-band hub or gateway each is being set up in Delhi, Bengaluru, Ahmedabad and Ranchi to deliver high-speed broadband services via the giant satellite.

K.Sivan, Chairman, ISRO, said, “The activity of establishing the ground system is on and it may happen over some more months.”


The nearly six-tonne heavyweight satellite was launched in December 5 on a European launcher. Along with its older HTS mates — GSAT-19 and GSAT-29 — it forms an Indian quartet of high-throughput satellites (HTSs). Each of them has a different space location over India and must have its own ground systems.

The ground systems are being put up by external agencies chosen through competitive bidding. They will also be operated and maintained by them for five to seven years. Dr. Sivan admitted that there were “procedural delays” in completing the system with outside support.

The use of the Ka band will be new in the country. In 2017, ISRO’s payload developing unit, the Space Applications Centre (SAC) in Ahmedabad, had put out a search or RFP (request for proposal) for companies that could set up GSAT-11’s Ka-band ground systems.

About the HTSs, Dr. Sivan said, “Our target is to deliver close to [a Net data speed at the rate of] 100 Gbps through them. We have planned a fourth one, too — the GSAT-20. It will be a four-tonne-class HTS and will be launched towards the second half of 2019 on our GSLV MarkIII vehicle. With that, our current national requirement should be met.

Remote areas

The fleet is designed to mainly serve the remote and hilly northeastern States, and Jammu & Kashmir, which are starved of reliable Net services. “Our concentration is on those areas, where it is not possible to establish terrestrial cables as in cities,” Dr. Sivan said.

Referring to the consecutive launches of GSAT-29 in November and GSAT-11 in December, Dr. Sivan said, “Within a matter of about 20 days, we have already beefed up the requirements of VSATs (very small aperture terminals) by putting up two satellites suited to them.”

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby manjgu » 10 Dec 2018 18:45

I happened to see a vid where pallavBaagla said gsat will.not make any dramatic increase in Internet speeds but more importantly bring the Internet to remote places ... where having reasonable connectivity is more imp than blinding fast net. I hope net connectivity improves in ladhak ...ne.india...other remote places

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Amber G. » 11 Dec 2018 08:28

Slightly OT but there is some interesting recent news about something which we discussed in this thread recently.
(NASA’s Voyager 2 spacecraft has crossed into interstellar space, agency officials announced today.)
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/voyager-2-spacecraft-enters-interstellar-space/

Now since ISRO has sufficiently powerful rockets may be not too distant in future India may like to send a messenger like that too ..

(Recent discussion I was referring was) is this:
Amber G. wrote:This recent discussion brought me a thought - The space record (see discussion above wrt to Sagan) with greetings in hundreds of languages spoken is on the way to other star systems. Greetings in Rajasthani (spoken) is some thing like .."Ram Ram pahunche.. ham sabhi athe kushi ho, tum vahan kushi raho".
("Ram, Ram (Greetings). We are happy here, and you be happy there" :) )

I wonder would "Ram" as a form of greeting cause some discussion among media now?
(Sagan was a little amused as various other greetings talked of peace, invites, and grand plans - Rajasthani greeting was short and sweet)

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby SSridhar » 11 Dec 2018 13:03

From Space Review This Week,

Even with the delays some companies have experiences, the small launch vehicle industry faces a bigger question: how many vehicles can the market sustain? The companies developing the vehicles point to the burgeoning interest in cubesats and other smallsats, and believe that developers will be willing to pay a premium in order for a dedicated launch.

Whether that is the case remains to be seen. Many smallsat companies are continuing to rely on secondary launch opportunities on larger vehicles, like an Indian Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle mission in late November than placed 30 smallsats into orbit along with the Indian remote sensing satellite that was the mission’s primary payload.

There’s also so-called “dedicated rideshare” missions where the entire payload of a larger launch vehicle is devoted to smallsats.
Such a mission took place a week ago, when a Falcon 9 launching from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California placed 64 smallsats into orbit on a flight arranged by Spaceflight Industries called SSO-A. (There was room for more, too, but some satellites weren’t ready and dropped out at the mission progressed towards launch.)

Even without rideshare options on larger vehicles, the demand for small launch vehicles is unlikely to meet projected supply. Dozens of such vehicles are under development for launch in 2019 and beyond, and many of them have visions of high flight rates. Rocket Lab, for example, plans to be able to launch one Electron a week, while Orndorff said Vector has plans to be able to produce 100 or more rockets a year within a few years.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby disha » 11 Dec 2018 22:28

^There are several changes happening in the space launch industry.

With the evolution of material technology, evolution of manufacturing techniques, proliferation of good scientists and engineers and in general advance of computing power and technology., it has become easy to cater to multiple markets at the same time and also specialize in some markets.

Gone are the days that one can sit down and take 2-3 years to plan for the next 2-3 decades. With that, nimble players will cut the market right under you. Gone are the days that you launch a super heavy lift launcher and wait for another 2-3 years to launch another. A failure will put back the operationalization of that launcher by a decade. This plays havoc with planning where a sat has to wait for another launch or another launch has to wait for a sat.

"Reliable, Reusable, Restarteable" is not new but getting another major impetus. "Small reliable precision Launchers" is another, the market was already there but unreachable and is now exploited in a big way.

The article above ignores the fact that with democratization of space, newer ways to launch reliably actually opens up new market. Think about drones. It is democratization of "flying observation platforms". It is nowadays used anywhere from monitoring traffic to monitoring crops to monitoring infrastructure projects.

Same is happening with small sats. As different launchers demonstrate that they can launch reliably and on a schedule, the market is going to explode. And with multiple launches, a failure of one is not catastrophic. Take PSLV itself as an example. An odd event interfered with HSS. This did not derail its schedule other than a RCA was done, fixed around and back to the cadence.

Uses of small sat is going to be immense. Imagine a constant eye in sky monitoring the shipping lanes of the world. Imagine a constant eye in the sky monitoring farm output. Or even traffic. Or have a web of small sets offering hi-speed global network connectivity. You do not need Iridium, your own smart phone in future might be using the sat coverage with a local backhaul to connect to anybody in timbuktu.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Singha » 11 Dec 2018 22:52

UK is a big player in smallsats. cunning. we should figure out what they are doing and replicate.

UK always has a good nose on the money trail.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 11 Dec 2018 22:52

https://www.isro.gov.in/gslv-f11-gsat-7a-mission

https://www.isro.gov.in/gslv-f11-gsat-7 ... launch-kit

Nice info, press kit, pics of upcoming GSLV Mark 2/GSAT 7A mission on December 19.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby disha » 12 Dec 2018 07:15

^It will be sad to see ISRO throwaway its very energetic naughty boy, the CE '7.5' staged combustion engine. ISRO must embark upon a methalox engine based on CE 7.5 and come up with a higher chamber pressure (>100) and higher thrust (>= 1000 KN). In a clustered combination, it can easily replace the lower solid stage of GSLV Mk-II.

With metholox strap-ons (of the same engine type), it can be "reused" on 1st stage separation. The second stage can also be reused. The final stage is of LOX/LH2 with higher ISP and is discarded.

The base (minus the strap ons) can become a winged staged for TSTO. Another reusable 5 MN thrust cluster on top of it can loft a winged RLV. This is your space shuttle.

What I am advocating is a 'new' cargo space launch system with 5-10 tonnes to LEO. It can be used for Polar launches (where will we land the stages? Lakshadweep). It can be used for interplanetary missions. And it can also do GTO launches of 2-3 tonnes. In short, it will replace the workhorse PSLV designed in 1980s/90s.

More importantly, it can be used to send payloads to asteroids. And if methane or CO2+H2 or CO2+H20 is discovered on any of the asteroids (or moon), then the sabatier process can be used to build fuel for onward journey.

GSLV Mk III (Human Rated) can have its own road map. Including using a methalox stage replacing current L110 in lieu of SCE.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Singha » 12 Dec 2018 07:58

We need a few kh12 type sats looking downand streaming hd video

15 tons to Leo on a mk3-mki

Need to build such a powerful imaging system first though

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Vips » 13 Dec 2018 03:13

In a first, Isro will make dead rocket stage ‘alive’ in space for experiments.

Can a dead rocket in space be anything but debris? Isro believes it might actually be useful. Feted for its frugality and tech savvy, the Indian Space Research Organisation is working on a new technology where it will use the last stage of the PSLV rocket for space experiments. It will perform a technology demonstration of this new system when it launches the PSLV C44 in January.

Talking to TOI here, Isro chairman K Sivan said, “Normally, the last stage of a PSLV rocket after releasing the primary satellite in space becomes dead and categorised as debris. It remains in the same orbit as that of the released satellite. Now, we are working on a new technology where we will give life to this “dead” last stage of PSLV, also called PS4 stage, for six months after its launch. This rocket stage will double up as a satellite. This will be the most cost-effective way to perform experiments in space as we don’t have to launch a separate rocket for the purpose.” He said that “India is the only country in the world that is working on this new technology”.

Explaining the technology, the chairman said, “The rocket stage of PSLV C44, which will be carrying a microsat as the primary satellite in January, will be made alive with the help of new systems that will include batteries and solar panel. Even after the primary satellite separates from the PSLV, the last stage of the rocket will remain active and can be used as an experimental platform for new space technologies. Students or space scientists can use this “alive” rocket stage for space experiments for free. They can attach their small experimental module or satellite (micro or nano) in the last stage and can perform experiments in space once the PSLV delivers the primary satellite into its orbit.” He said that Isro “can do the same with the GSLV rocket as well where we can use its last stage as an experimental platform”.

Sivan said Isro is going to make an "announcement of opportunity in a few days to invite proposals from students and space scientists to make use of this new technology."

Till now, space agencies around the world can use a rocket only once to deliver satellites in space. Elon Musk-promoted SpaceX is the only exception as the US private space agency has mastered the technology of repeating the same rocket stage for relaunches. However, SpaceX’s experiments with its Falcon 9 rocket are confined to the first stage of the rocket. It has also never experimented with the last stage.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby disha » 13 Dec 2018 03:32

I came to post the above news and you beat me to it.

Jai Ho on ISRO's decision -> https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/in-a-first-isro-will-make-dead-rocket-stage-alive-in-space-for-experiments/articleshow/67067817.cms

Now here is the DDMitis

Can a dead rocket in space be anything but debris?


There is no "dead" rocket in space. You have 'spent' stage or debris. Instead of treating the last PS4 stage as 'spent'., ISRO is planning to "re-use" it as micro-satellite.

Now what does a micro-satellite need to function (other than orbiting earth, which PS4 stage is already doing)? It will be made 'alive'
The rocket stage of PSLV C44, which will be carrying a microsat ... will be made alive with the help of new systems that will include batteries and solar panel.


This was expected. Here is the ISRO's experiment with PS4 earlier https://www.isro.gov.in/pslv-upper-stage-engines-ps4-successfully-restarted-space

With PS4 restart, the following parameters were validated:

Mission Planning and Overall Guidance algorithm for orbit change manoeuvres
Reconditioning of upper stage engine and stage systems for restart
Overall thermal management including fluid circuits, control components, actuators and on-board avionics systems
Additional powering requirements for on-board electronics
Ceramic servo accelerometer for better orbital parameters


So now you can submit a proposal to ISRO that will last say 6 months and re-purpose the last spent stage of PS4 as a micro/nano satellite to do space experiments. ISRO will provide the solar panel and the batteries.

My proposal for an experiment? Take two PSLV PS4 stage and mate it. Basically refine algorithms for successful identification & chase and near parking of spent PS4 stages. Since a PSLV launch is effective every month, one can string together 5-6 PS4 stages and perform dock/undock/fuel transfer maneuvers. A spent stage is discarded and a new stage acquired every month. Different in-space in-orbit dock/undock/fuel transfer/restart/shutdown maneuvers can be performed and perfected.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Vips » 14 Dec 2018 09:31

After PSLV-C43 success, Isro centres set for GSLV-MK II launch on Dec 19.

Jubilant at the success of PSLV-C43, Isro centres in Kerala are focussed on the launch of advanced military communication satellite Gsat7A solely for Indian Air Force strategic purposes on board GSLV –MK II rocket on December 19. Preparations are in the full swing after the upper stage assembly of indigenous cryogenic engine last Saturday. It will be followed by the launch of the second moon mission Chandrayaan-2 and PSLV-C44 in January 2019.

“PSLV-C43 was a highly successful launch that placed all 31 satellites including India’s first hyperspectral imaging satellite in orbit, which is an earth observation satellite. Of the 30 commercial satellites, the health of 27 satellites has already been confirmed as perfect. It requires no corrections in the future. Now, the focus is on GSLV-MK II to launch the 2.2-ton communication satellite Gsat-7A for strategic uses. It will be followed by the Chandrayaan-2 mission in January first week and PSLV-C44 mission for the launch of a remote sensing satellite in mid- January,” Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC) director S Somnath told TOI on returning to Kerala after the PSLV-C43 launch from Sriharikota on Nov 30. He said, seven missions are lined up in 2019 and work is also on the human spaceflight mission Gaganyaan by 2021.

“PSLV-C43 was a challenging task to launch all the 31 satellites in various orbits including India’s HySIS satellite and commercial satellites of eight countries,” VSSC senior scientist and GSLV MK III Vehicle director J Jayaprakash told TOI. Now, all preparations are on for the GSLV-MK II mission with its upper stage assembly of the indigenous cryogenic engine.

India’s heavy geostationary communication satellite weighing 5.7 ton was launched from France’s Guiana Space centre, he said.

Two more satellites are planned for launch on board GSLV-Mk II rocket which include Geo-Imaging Satellite, GISAT 1, a planned Indian geo-imaging satellite for providing images quickly during disasters by the first quarter of 2019 and a communication satellite GSAT-7C by 2020.

For the human spaceflight Program Gaganyaan as announced by the Prime Minister on August 15, he said work is on for launching the Indian crewed orbital spacecraft with a mass of 7,800 kg by 2020. Ahead of that two unmanned missions are planned with ground tests, reliability tests for a smooth landing and various tests will be done to ensure that its human-rated vehicle valid to carry humans in terms of safety in technology design. Inter-planetary missions including Mangalyaan-2 to Mars, Shukrayaan to Venus and Aditya to Sun’s orbit are in the pipeline.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Varoon Shekhar » 17 Dec 2018 07:10

There's a cyclone in the Bay of Bengal, which will make its landfall in the next 1-2 days. Would this impact the GSLV Mark2/GSAT-7A launch?
Oh and has anyone noticed:-) that the GSLV Mark 2 will use the new upgraded cryogenic stage, the C-15?

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby disha » 17 Dec 2018 09:27

Varoon Shekhar wrote: Oh and has anyone noticed:-) that the GSLV Mark 2 will use the new upgraded cryogenic stage, the C-15?


Yes the stage has additional @2-3t of propellants, GSAT 7A will be lofted to some 280 kms (additional 50 kms compared to the GSLV F-09 mission) and there is some additional @25-50 kgs on satellite GSAT 7A. I think the velocity imparted will be also greater*

I think it is done to increase the life of the satellite mission.

If GSLV MkII can start going >2500 kg and into @3 tonne range, that will be a great thing.

*PS: quoting from memory, please do not hold me to exact numbers.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby jaysimha » 17 Dec 2018 14:57

https://nrsc.gov.in/

Kumbh Mela in NRSC, Balanagar, Hyderabad (UIM-2019)
22nd and 23rd January 2019 at NRSC Balanagar Campus, Hyderabad
Online registration will be announced shortly
brocure
https://nrsc.gov.in/sites/all/pdf/uim20 ... ochure.pdf

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby nandakumar » 17 Dec 2018 15:55

Varoon Shekhar wrote:There's a cyclone in the Bay of Bengal, which will make its landfall in the next 1-2 days. Would this impact the GSLV Mark2/GSAT-7A launch?
Oh and has anyone noticed:-) that the GSLV Mark 2 will use the new upgraded cryogenic stage, the C-15?

The cyclone has already made landfall some time in the afternoon. It is expected to move along the coast in north easterly direction. It is also rapidly dissipating.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby JTull » 17 Dec 2018 20:01

https://twitter.com/isro/status/1074651714190376961

The countdown for the launch of communication satellite GSAT-7A on-board GSLV-F11 will begin at Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota tomorrow. Launch scheduled on 19 December. Updates to follow. #ISROMissions


The brochure is out. CUS15 stage is indeed longer by about 1.5m

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby PratikDas » 18 Dec 2018 05:27

Image
Click for hi-res

Phenomenal panoramic picture from preparations for GSLV-F11 launch

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Gagan » 18 Dec 2018 13:48

As high as 23 story building, the two VABs are

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby jaysimha » 18 Dec 2018 14:48

2ND INTERNATIONAL KUMBH MELA
ON
INDIAN SPACE PROGRAMME: TRENDS & OPPORTUNITIES FOR INDUSTRY
MARCH 7-8, 2019 | NEW DELHI
http://www.indiaspacetech.in/
http://www.indiaspacetech.in/brochure.pdf

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby chola » 18 Dec 2018 14:56

PratikDas wrote:Image
Click for hi-res

Phenomenal panoramic picture from preparations for GSLV-F11 launch


Wow! Looks like an epic sci-fi painting. Incredible.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby JTull » 18 Dec 2018 19:47

Btw, busy upcoming 24 hours for launch business.

SpaceX Falcon 9, Blue Origin, Soyuz also launching during this period besides GSLV-II. Rocket Lab and Virgin Galactic have just launched during previous week.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby JTull » 18 Dec 2018 20:53

SpaceX, Blue Origin, ArianeSpace Soyuz launch postponed to Wednesday.

ULA still scheduled for their Delta IV launch. Busy day indeed!

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Vips » 19 Dec 2018 02:33

Why Isro's Gsat-7A launch is important for IAF.

The communication satellite will enable the Indian Air F enable the Indian Air Force (IAF) to interlink different ground radar stations, airbases and AWACS aircraft

Gsat-7A will not only interlink all airbases, but it will also boost drone operations

It will boost the air force’s network-centric warfare capabilities and enhance its global opertions

What is the need to launch a dedicated satellite for IAF?
Once GSLV-F11 (GSLV Mk II) rocket launches Gsat-7A satellite from the second launchpad at Sriharikota at 4.10 pm on Wednesday in the geo orbit, the communication satellite will enable the Indian Air Force (IAF) to interlink different ground radar stations, airbases and AWACS aircraft. It will boost the air force’s network-centric warfare capabilities and enhance its global operations.

Why is Gsat-7A important for IAF?
Gsat-7A will not only interlink all airbases, but it will also boost drone operations as it will help the force upgrade from existing ground control stations to satellite-control of military unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The transition will boost the range, endurance and flexibility of UAVs. This comes at a time when India is in the process of acquiring American armed Predator-B or Sea Guardian drones, which are high-altitude and long endurance satellite-controlled UAVs that can fire at enemy targets from long distances.

What are the features of Gsat-7A?
Costing around Rs 500-800 crore, the communication satellite is configured on the standard 1-2K Bus with bi-propellant chemical propulsion system for orbit rasing and in-orbit maintenance. Its four solar panels are capable of generating around 3.3 kilowatts of electrical power.

How many dedicated communication satellites Isro has launched for the military?
Before the scheduled launch of Gsat-7A, Isro had launched Gsat-7, also called ‘Rukmini’, on September 29, 2013 exclusively for the Navy. ‘Rukmini’ has helped the Navy monitor the Indian Ocean Region (IOR) as the satellite has a nearly 2,000 nautical mile ‘footprint’ and provides real-time inputs to Indian warships, submarines and maritime aircraft. The IAF is also likely to get another satellite Gsat-7C, within a few years that will boost its network-centric operations.

What are the space assets of our Indian military?
India currently possesses around 13 military satellites. Most of these remote-sensing satellites like Cartosat-series and Risat satellites are placed in the near-earth orbit which help in better scanning of the earth. However, some of these military satellites have also been put in the geo orbit. The forces use these satellites for surveillance, navigation and communication purpose. The remote sensing satellites had also helped the military in the surgical strike against Pakistan to destroy terror launchpads.

How many military satellites are there in the world?
Currently, there are 320 military satellites orbiting the earth, with the US owning half of them, followed by Russia and China. Of late, China, considered to be India’s biggest rival, has taken huge strides in developing military assets in space, testing even ASAT (anti-satellite) weapons against “low-earth satellites” in January 2017.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Jayram » 19 Dec 2018 05:26

Vips wrote:Why Isro's Gsat-7A launch is important for IAF.

The communication satellite will enable the Indian Air F enable the Indian Air Force (IAF) to interlink different ground radar stations, airbases and AWACS aircraft


A question on the security implications of this information... Should India be giving out this information.. for China or others to keep track of these satellite for targeting at all time esp however during wartime? Or is this just paranoia?

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby disha » 19 Dec 2018 06:12

^Paranoia.

China does not have the capability to do a ASAT for GEO. And let us say if it does a ASAT at GEO, then they have screwed up spaces for all of humanity for 1000s of years. Even their GEO Sats will be in danger. And then they will end up taking out all geosats and we will go back to dark ages. Maybe S. Barbaria will be happy.

Now for LEO/MEO if they use anti-satellite, our military sats are strategic sats and they will invite immediate nuclear retaliation.

ASAT is just that, an ability to say boast. But at a very high cost. It shows you up as a belligerent juvenile.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby disha » 19 Dec 2018 06:33

Instead of paranoia, please read articles from Astrosat here -> http://astron-soc.in/outreach/all-apoms/

Of course this is a good start -> http://astron-soc.in/outreach/2018/09/astrosat-picture-of-the-month-012/

And disseminate the above information.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Haridas » 19 Dec 2018 12:17

disha wrote:.....China does not have the capability to do a ASAT for GEO. And let us say if it does a ASAT at GEO, then they have screwed up spaces for all of humanity for 1000s of years. Even their GEO Sats will be in danger. And then they will end up taking out all geosats and we will go back to dark ages. Maybe S. Barbaria will be happy.....

IMHO it won't be that bad. ASAT debris will pollute the orbit just above GSO (my guess >98% mass)
Debris remaining on GSO will after few years eventually drift into graveyard longitude. Freeing up usable slots. The problem debris will be those in elliptic orbit that trespasses circular GSO orbit. This largely is debris of interceptor warhead, which will be very small compared to satellite weight.

Will not be surprised when after few years Kejriwal sweepers are sent up to nudge all debris to above GSO orbit. I wish ISRO sends AAP to orbit sooner than 2019. :twisted:


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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Singha » 19 Dec 2018 16:16

cheen is actually experimenting with ground based lasers dont know what range.


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