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China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

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DavidD
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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby DavidD » 11 Aug 2017 23:30

At Avidart:

Image

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby AdityaM » 15 Aug 2017 23:49

As per Shiv Aroor on twitter:


Disturbing reports in of confrontation between Indian & Chinese troops in Ladakh. Pelted stones at each other early this morning. 1/n

Incident took place in Four Finger area straddling Pangong Tso frontier. Chinese troops entered. Stopped by ours, they pelted stones. 2/n

The confrontation lasted about 30 min. Chinese troops have 'retreated'. No official comment from govt or security forces. 3/n

Unusually ill-tempered incident. Troops crossing each other not uncommon. This time stones came flying when challenged. Ours retaliated. 4/4

https://twitter.com/shivaroor/status/897515584748834816










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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby anupmisra » 16 Aug 2017 02:52

AdityaM wrote:As per Shiv Aroor on twitter:


Disturbing reports in of confrontation between Indian & Chinese troops in Ladakh. Pelted stones at each other early this morning. 1/n

Incident took place in Four Finger area straddling Pangong Tso frontier. Chinese troops entered. Stopped by ours, they pelted stones. 2/n

The confrontation lasted about 30 min. Chinese troops have 'retreated'. No official comment from govt or security forces. 3/n

Unusually ill-tempered incident. Troops crossing each other not uncommon. This time stones came flying when challenged. Ours retaliated. 4/4

https://twitter.com/shivaroor/status/897515584748834816


Zee News video on Pangong lake (a year old Youtube video). Gives you a sense what the ground situation there is like.


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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby shiv » 16 Aug 2017 07:40

anupmisra wrote:Zee News video on Pangong lake (a year old Youtube video). Gives you a sense what the ground situation there is like.


Interesting video except for "God save the qyoon" used as dramatic sounding music

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby shiv » 16 Aug 2017 07:55

The Chinese highway G 219 that goes through Aksai Hind is close to the Eastern end of Pangong lake which is itself about 120 km from where we saw the action on the video. The Chinese have roads running north of Pangong lake.

Nearby is the town of Rutog which serves as supply base with storage areas and petroleum storage tanks. About 60 km away is Ngari and 40 km further is Ngari airfield.

Both these places are at the end of a very long logistics chain. But some stuff will come south from bases in Xinjiang. There is a military base on the G 219 just north of Aksai Hind

Relevant videos:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-CKlBQdWTI




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNqlLSUg5p8

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby niran » 16 Aug 2017 07:58

shiv wrote:Interesting video except for "God save the qyoon" used as dramatic sounding music

the lake is longish as opposed to circular till early 2017 cheeni would boat in Indian side of the lake and go back last year ;which the video depict IA ran knots around cheeni boats with their spiffy new Israeli boats, and this year IA fired few warning shots over their heads,

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Singha » 16 Aug 2017 10:38

see the other thread, the boats are american made and india has pushed back since atleast 2012 after getting these boats.

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Singha » 16 Aug 2017 10:42

is that a re-enactment because the so called Cheen boat looks to be same as our boat. i think it was re enacted for the benefit of zee news to show what happens. not that they cannot buy these boats or 'clone' them but they already had 20 boats of similar size albeit less tfta looks

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Austin » 17 Aug 2017 12:28

Crash of the Chinese deck fighter J-15

http://bmpd.livejournal.com/2788977.html

Image

The J-15 fighter piloted by the deputy commander of the 10th Aviation Regiment of the 4th PLAC Navy Air Division Senior Colonel Yuan Wei encountered a flock of birds during the start of the training flight. The plane got damage to the left engine. The pilot managed to land a fighter. There are no victims.

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Aditya_V » 17 Aug 2017 14:28

Looking at the Hotan Airport there seems to be a squadron fighters parked, to my eye they look like J-8's. Can experts here confirm what aircraft they are?

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby shiv » 17 Aug 2017 16:26

Aditya_V wrote:Looking at the Hotan Airport there seems to be a squadron fighters parked, to my eye they look like J-8's. Can experts here confirm what aircraft they are?

Look like Q-5s to me

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby chola » 17 Aug 2017 20:04

Austin wrote:Crash of the Chinese deck fighter J-15

http://bmpd.livejournal.com/2788977.html

Image

The J-15 fighter piloted by the deputy commander of the 10th Aviation Regiment of the 4th PLAC Navy Air Division Senior Colonel Yuan Wei encountered a flock of birds during the start of the training flight. The plane got damage to the left engine. The pilot managed to land a fighter. There are no victims.

Image
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Lol. Too bad it wasn't actually on their carrier.

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Aditya_V » 17 Aug 2017 23:15

:mrgreen:
shiv wrote:
Aditya_V wrote:Looking at the Hotan Airport there seems to be a squadron fighters parked, to my eye they look like J-8's. Can experts here confirm what aircraft they are?

Look like Q-5s to me


Given the proximity of Hotan to Askai Chin 250km from DBO and relatively low altitude 4700 feet one wonders how come Chinese don't have J10's and J11's there and more importantly how we can neutralise Hotan. It seems to a big headache as unlike the other sectors our low altitude airfields are far away

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Lisa » 17 Aug 2017 23:23

^^ Has anyone ever heard of a bird strike on the tail of an aeroplane before. I haven't.

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Shankas » 18 Aug 2017 02:19

Lisa wrote:^^ Has anyone ever heard of a bird strike on the tail of an aeroplane before. I haven't.


Lisa, I wouldn't make fun of it. It can happen, birds can rear end into jet fighters, especially if they happen to be flying faster than the J-15. :)

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Rakesh » 18 Aug 2017 05:55

Lisa wrote:^^ Has anyone ever heard of a bird strike on the tail of an aeroplane before. I haven't.

Then you have not seen this...happened in the late 80s.

Boar Reportedly Ruins Pakistani F-16 Jet
http://articles.latimes.com/1987-01-03/ ... _wild-boar

The pride of the PAF destroyed by an animal that is 'haram' to the Land of the Pure.


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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Aditya_V » 18 Aug 2017 11:34

Thinking about Hotan Airbase, the best way for IAF to neutralise it would be Jets attacking with Stand off PGM weapons taking from Awanitipura airbase? But looking at the airbase in Google maps all aircraft seem to be kept in small blast proof pens suited for Mig 21 size aircraft, SU-30 's will have to be kept in the open exposed to PAF and PLAAF.

The other option is to refuel Aircraft taking off from the plains over Kashmir.

As per Google maps flying distance from Awantipura airbase to Hotan ~560km, around 280 km in enemy territory. PGM's can shorten the distance our aircraft have to ingress in hostile territory.

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Singha » 18 Aug 2017 12:02

as of now KH59 from su30 is our only standoff weapon at that combat radius , and one more is Mirage2000 with external fuel tanks and Popeye. we lack a useful arm since the KH31P are really old and Matra Armat on m2k may be EOL.

air launch Brahmos is yet to IOC, 1st live fire was supposed to be in july.
NGARM not even captive trials have started yet.

after the Nuclear attack on Bhutan, Ahuja sir took down Hotan and one more base in that region with N-tipped Agni1

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby rkhanna » 19 Aug 2017 13:20

With New Satellite, China Leads the World in Quantum Entanglement


https://www.inverse.com/article/34094-q ... ion-micius

China has sent an "unbreakable" code from a satellite to the Earth, marking the first time space-to-ground quantum key distribution technology has been realized, state media said on Thursday.

China launched the world's first quantum satellite last August, to help establish "hack proof" communications, a development the Pentagon has called a "notable advance".

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Rakesh » 23 Aug 2017 04:41

How a luxury Hong Kong home was used as cover in deal for China’s first aircraft carrier
http://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomac ... eal-chinas

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby chola » 23 Aug 2017 12:15

Rakesh wrote:How a luxury Hong Kong home was used as cover in deal for China’s first aircraft carrier
http://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomac ... eal-chinas


Ukraine approached India about buying the Varyag before the auction. We turned down the opportunity for whatever reason. In the end it was sold for a $20M pittance and jumpstarted Cheen's carrier program.

There is a similar story of intrigue in the PRC's acquiring of the Su-33 protypes T10K-3 and T10K-7 (read this on Sinodef.) This happened during their negotiations with Russia at the time for 50 Su-33s in 2004 when the production line was still open. Grabbing the two stranded T10Ks from Ukraine allowed Cheen to cancel the Su-33 order and begin the J-15 at Shenyang which was license producing the Su-27 as the J-11. This saved Cheen billions and also gave them full control of their naval air development instead of dependency on Russia. It also doomed the Su-33 line in Russia by depriving it of life saving funds from the contract.

Two things here:
1) we lost an opportunity to buy a superior AC design in the Varyag and this had put us down the road to the horrible Kiev carrier cruiser which is a VTOL design more related to a LHD than a more conventional carrier like the Kuznetsov class. Us getting the Varyag would have also set back the chini carrier program for decades if not outright killed it,

2) Cheen prefers to support its own MIC rather than Russia's. The PRC has ToT with Russia in their Flanker program as we do with the MKI, yet they are able to use the same chini-flanker production facilities in Shenyang to produce the J-15.

And Cheen doing the above has not diminish Russian support since Russia is supplying engines for three critical programs -- J-20, J-31 and JF-17 -- and it has sold Cheen a squadron of the Su-35.

There is no reason why we could not do the same thing at HAL's MKI line even as the PSU has begun to fret about work coming to an end within three years with the last 35 MKI left on the contract onlee.

Why can't HAL do the same as Shenyang? Build our Indi-Flankers in as many variants and for as long as we see fit. That is true ToT. If Russia protests then twist arms, lie, cheat, who cares. It is national security.

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby shiv » 23 Aug 2017 14:25

All Xi’s men: China’s armies get new commanders
China recently confirmed 26 new commanders in the People’s Liberation Army’s 13 group armies that saw not a single leader staying with his old unit, with most receiving postings to far away regions from their theater of command.

Why the shake up in its armed forces, the world’s largest with 2.3 million personnel, when there are conflicts brewing on China’s left and right flanks?

In April, the PLA eliminated five group armies, in keeping with its modernization plan to prune the ground force to make it a more versatile and combat-capable organization.

At present, each of China’s five theaters of command control two to three group armies.


Each has combat and non-combat units divided into the following: infantry, armor, artillery, anti-aircraft warfare, anti-chemical warfare, cyber warfare, army aviation, engineer, communications, transportation, pontoon bridge construction, education and training, military hospitals, and arts troupe.

The size of a group army varies from 30,000 to 80,000 men. We know little about the new commanders besides their brief biographies, but some of the transfers are quite baffling.

For example, Major General Fan Chengcai, the new commander of the 76th group army responsible for Tibet, previously had a long career in the 14th group army of Yunnan Province, a subtropical region very different from the Roof of the World.

His comrade-in-arms, the political commissar Major General Zhang Hongbing served mostly in Henan Province, famous for its open plains. They could be experts in high-altitude, cold-weather warfare, but their background doesn’t indicate that.

There is an alternative explanation to how these decisions were made. While increasing combat effectiveness may be the long-term goal, the immediate concern of the PLA’s commander-in-chief Xi Jinping is about domestic politics.

The personnel reorganization is Xi’s attempt to curb military factionalism, better rendered in Chinese as “mountaintopism” or shantou zhuyi.

Influential Chinese military chiefs tend to build their leadership team based on personal loyalty. Turning the party’s army into their personal army, these commanders become in the words of Mao Zedong “mountaintops” that pose a challenge to the PLA’s cohesion as well as the supreme leader’s authority.

The Qing dynasty fell because a powerful general acquired total control of the New Army. Similarly, Chiang Kai-shek’s defeat on the mainland has been blamed on his failure in containing military factionalism.

The last thing Xi wants to see is collusion between generals and political opponents to derail November’s 19th party congress, when Xi will be crowned China’s paramount leader.

The last thing Xi wants to see is collusion between generals and political opponents in derailing November’s 19th party congress, when Xi will be crowned China’s paramount leader.

Since early this year, Xi has accelerated the promotion of his own generals to the PLA’s highest echelons. In July and August, Xi promoted several dozens of generals, lieutenant generals and major generals to add weight to his control.

Then, to reduce the threat from regional commanders, Xi employed Mao’s old trick of removing them from their familiar environment and away from confidants.

The brand-new unit designations for the 13 group armies, numbering from 71 to 84, also shows Xi’s ambition in tearing down existing loyalty networks and rebuilding the army entirely as his own.

Like all other armed forces, the PLA’s unit designations carry history and esprit de corps. But fresh designations convey new allegiance.

According to the PLA Daily, the number 71 represents July 1st or the Chinese Communist Party’s founding day. The message is clear here — the party leader is the PLA’s nucleus, not the regional commandants.

Although expanding combat effectiveness is the group army reform’s premier goal, the assurance of loyalty is equally important.

The great army personnel overhaul reveals Xi is taking another step towards absolute control over the PLA top brass as he prepares to strengthen his power at the 19th congress.

Follow the author on Twitter @MrZiYang.


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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Prasad » 24 Aug 2017 12:24

https://twitter.com/globaltimesnews/sta ... 0637128705
The first group of pilots trained by the Chinese Navy to operate a new aircraft completed solo night navigations in the #SouthChinaSea

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Austin » 24 Aug 2017 12:35



Aditya_V
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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Aditya_V » 24 Aug 2017 16:37

Another sector we might need to watch North Sikkim and Gamba area of Tibet, the Border area looks flat with Mountains in India. And what are the Major Airbases in Yunan, cruise Missiles, Air attacks could be staged across Myanmar into India. Bombers can take off from Chengdu and fire cruise Missiles from 200-300KM from the Indian Border.

We have hopefully gamed for these scenarios and should probably amend our Nuke doctrine to state any country allowing overflight rights to hostile forces is equally responsible for such hostile acts.

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Manish_P » 24 Aug 2017 20:24

No fizzy drinks: Chinese army tells recruits to shape up

In an online post, the People's Liberation Army (PLA) blamed over consumption of fizzy drinks, excessive computer gaming and even masturbation for the poor health of young people.


Cut out fizzy drinks and alcohol: approximately 25% of all candidates failed blood and urine tests

Spend less time in front of screens: 46% of candidates failed eyesight tests, which the outlet blames on "reliance on mobile phones and other electronic devices"

Exercise more: 20% failed because they were overweight

Cut down on computer games and/or masturbating: 8% failed because of abnormalities in the scrotum as a result of sitting too much, it said

Develop better sleeping habits: 13% failed because their blood pressure was too high

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Iyersan » 24 Aug 2017 22:28

Aditya_V wrote:Another sector we might need to watch North Sikkim and Gamba area of Tibet, the Border area looks flat with Mountains in India. And what are the Major Airbases in Yunan, cruise Missiles, Air attacks could be staged across Myanmar into India. Bombers can take off from Chengdu and fire cruise Missiles from 200-300KM from the Indian Border.

We have hopefully gamed for these scenarios and should probably amend our Nuke doctrine to state any country allowing overflight rights to hostile forces is equally responsible for such hostile acts.

Can we put the war start timing by 2nd week September?

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby chola » 25 Aug 2017 03:35

PLAN do propaganda a whole lot better than IN. Their training carrier is all over youtube and the mil forums.

Slick Hollywood trailer with pounding rock music:


Documentary style news story of the fueling crew:

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby chola » 25 Aug 2017 03:46

Meanwhile, the one operational fixed wing carrier in Asia the Vikramaditya subsists on fan based videos.

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby DavidD » 25 Aug 2017 10:47

Warfare is changing, drones are the future, and China and the US are racing ahead. Aircrafts, carriers, and tanks truly emerged in WWII though they were all present a couple decades prior during WWI. I expect the same to happen to drones, where they're present now but won't truly emerge until the next major war.

https://www.ft.com/content/302fc14a-66e ... 38dcaef614

China prepares for an era of asymmetric warfare
Beijing split over pursuit of low-cost hybrid systems such as drone swarms to add to its conventional arsenal
AUGUST 25, 2017 by: Emily Feng and Charles Clover

With their tiny propellers buzzing, the fleet of Chinese aircraft, little larger than model planes, are flung into the air one at a time by huge rubber bands. Soon the sky is full of toylike drones flying in formations over unidentified mountains in China.

This unlikely spectacle could represent a revolution in military affairs. The June 11 demonstration of “swarm” technology by China Electronics Technology Group, a state-owned high-tech company, included 119 drones. That made it the world’s largest-ever swarm, according to CETC, breaking a US-held record.

Each tiny aircraft — bought online for a few hundred dollars — is loaded with software and sensors capable of communicating with the other drones in the swarm. Developers are working towards a future where thousands could operate in sync, identifying and attacking targets. In theory, such swarms could feature drones fitted with missiles or warheads capable of sophisticated attacks designed to overwhelm defences with their sheer numbers.

“This goes all the way back to the tactics of Attila the Hun,” says Randall Steeb, senior engineer at the Rand Corporation in the US. “A light attack force that can defeat more powerful and sophisticated opponents. They come out of nowhere, attack from all sides and then disappear, over and over.”

China’s two-decade effort to modernise its military has seen it develop stealth fighters, guided missile destroyers and ballistic “carrier killer” missiles, while also reducing troop numbers. It will spend at least $152bn this year on its military, but only in a few areas has it come close to surpassing US technology. Beijing is now betting that swarms of drones, low-tech hardware knitted together with high-tech artificial intelligence, will become a weapon of the future.

The gamble is that they can be effective both as a lethal and non-lethal weapon. Thousands of cheap, 3D-printed drones, for example, could swarm aircraft carriers or fighter jets, which currently have no countermeasures for such attacks. They can also be effective, say experts, without being lethal by crossing the line into a shooting war — a valuable form of deterrence, especially for weaker countries.

For example, swarms of autonomous boats could appear when a US ship sails close to a disputed island in the South China Sea and block its path. Referred to by the US military as “grey-zone threats”, they could leave a superior military with a dilemma about how to respond without appearing to be the aggressor.

“Swarming is currently considered to be one of the most promising areas of defence technology development in the world,” says Vasily Kashin, an expert on China’s military at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow. “The Chinese are prioritising it.”

As is Washington. “Clearly the US and China are in some sort of weird swarm race,” says Paul Scharre, a senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security who writes on military robotics. “A swarm with 10 more individual drones isn’t necessarily better. What matters are the things you can’t see. It’s the algorithms that govern the swarm behaviour.”

China insists it is now on an even footing with the US on drones, with CETC saying it has “made some major breakthroughs”. But experts warn that mature swarm technology is still a long way off and will require developing the necessary technology to boost communication between the drones, methods to keep them in the air longer and a modern military capable of deploying the swarms effectively.

It is hard to assess the claim that China’s technology is superior to that of the US, says Mr Scharre. The US military operates about 7,000 drones. Analysts say there could be at least 1,300 currently in operation between the Chinese army and air force, although none have been used in offensive missions.

However, Chinese-made drones have seen combat in war zones around the world, in the hands of importers such as Iraq and Saudi Arabia. These drones are not autonomous, however, and require aircrews of at least three to operate them.

Swarms take the might of drones one step further. “The essence of a swarm is co-operation,” adds Mr Scharre. “Having a hundred or a thousand small cheap drones that can’t communicate and co-ordinate behaviour isn’t worth much. What’s valuable is if they can communicate and work cooperatively. That’s a difference between a wolf pack and just little wolves.”

The past 25 years have witnessed a period of US military dominance built on advanced technology in areas such as stealth and precision weaponry.

The US, which outspends China, its closest rival in military spending, by nearly four times, retains primacy through small amounts of highly sophisticated weapons. But as laggards catch up with cruise missiles and stealth fighters of their own, the US has been focused on even newer technologies. That has driven a new era in weaponry, where robotics, directed energy weapons and 3D-printed kit will feature on the battlefields of the future.

The advent of swarm technology heralds a period that could reverse the trend of the past quarter of a century, which has seen the deployment of fewer but more advanced — and expensive — weapons platforms. The next generation of weapons may see sophisticated technology systems outdone by the sheer numbers of autonomous swarms.

“The result [of swarm technology] will be a paradigm shift where mass once again becomes the decisive factor on the battlefield, where having the most intelligent algorithm may be more important than having the best hardware,” says Mr Scharre.

The US has prioritised expensive, highly advanced hardware such as Global Hawk drones that require a team of dozens to keep them in the air. The advantage of swarms is that they require comparatively low-tech hardware knitted together with advanced software. Some in China see robotics as part of an asymmetric warfare in which an opponent whose overall capabilities are regarded as technologically inferior can defeat a superior one.

“The People’s Liberation Army anticipates that swarm intelligence and swarming tactics could serve as an asymmetric means to target high-value US weapons platforms,” says Elsa Kania, an independent researcher on Chinese military affairs.

This is creating tensions within the ranks of China’s defence establishment, where the competition for resources and funding is intense amid a radical overhaul of the services. Military leaders want expensive planes and ships that rival American weapons. But a growing faction within the PLA favours committing more resources to next-generation weapons.

Wang Weixing, a military research director at the PLA, is one of a number who argue that Beijing’s focus on matching the US in technology — stealth fighters, carrier killer missiles, aircraft carriers — is wrong-headed and that it should adopt an “asymmetric” strategy focused on drones.

“As people are still preparing for a high-tech war, the old and new are becoming intertwined to become a new form of hidden complex ‘hybrid war’,” he wrote in June in a front-page commentary in the PLA Daily, the military’s flagship publication. “Unmanned combat is gradually emerging. While people have their heads buried in the sand trying to close the gap with the world’s military powers in terms of traditional weapons, technology-driven ‘light warfare’ is about to take the stage.”

China, which is at the centre of the commercial drone industry, has some advantages as the era of unmanned systems dawns. Manufacturers such as DJI, Zerotech and Ehang dominate the global consumer drone industry and many of these private sector companies have been co-opted to work for the PLA.

“It is increasingly blurred what is civilian and what is military, especially in areas like UAVs [unmanned aerial vehicles],” says Tai Ming Cheung, director of the Institute on Global Conflict and Co-operation at the University of California, San Diego.

For example, the drone used by CETC in the June swarm demonstration was the X-6 Skywalker, a commercial model that can be easily customised. One US drone engineer, who asked not to be named, says: “If the military advantage is going to the country that can make the largest amounts of cheap commodity electronics, then watch out for China.”

Chinese leaders have trumpeted technological advances even as the country’s armed forces plan to shed 300,000 personnel by 2018, becoming more streamlined and combat-ready. Autonomously operating swarms would require far fewer active troops.

Swarm technology, say defence experts, is attractive to Beijing as it would allow China to project force with a lower probability of military confrontation. Drones, unlike fighter jets or aircraft carriers, are less threatening and can be shot down or captured without triggering a military escalation. In December, China seized a US underwater drone in the South China Sea, which the PLA then handed back after a few days. This would have triggered a major crisis had it been a manned vehicle.

China is also pushing into other areas of robot technology including an imitation of Boston Dynamics’ “Big Dog” troop support robot, which resembles something out of Star Wars and is designed to carry equipment into battle. Developed by arms conglomerate Norinco, Mr Kashin likens it to “a $1m donkey”. Yunzhou Tech Corporation, based in Zhuhai, displayed an unmanned boat armed with a machine gun turret at a military technology exhibition in Beijing last month. A Chinese website recently published photos of a torpedo-carrying autonomous vehicle that skims the surface of the water. The product could be used to target submarines. “These are not like anything anyone else has,” says Mr Kashin.

“China has come a long way in its development of unmanned systems in a relatively short period,” says Michael Chase, a senior political scientist at the Rand Corporation.

Jack Midgley of Deloitte’s defence consulting practice says that, judging by China’s poor record of integrating technologies and new organisational models, the inherently conservative attitude of its military may put it at a disadvantage. “The natural risk aversion of military commanders is why it takes years or decades to integrate new technologies,” he says.

China is not alone in this — some service branches in the US are also resistant to drones taking away human roles such as pilots. But Beijing’s attitude to new defence technology may be evolving. In 2001, the PLA created its first training curriculum for UAV personnel. Today, at least three out of the five PLA branches, the army, navy and air force, have incorporated UAV units into their operations and training.

“The PLA may not have as many qualms [as the US] about having UAVs become a much larger part of its war structure,” says Ms Kania. Ultimately, she says, it is not the country that invents the latest technology but the one that figures out how best to integrate it on the battlefield that will have the most success. The new arms race may not be about driving technological change, so much as adapting to it.

Singha
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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Singha » 25 Aug 2017 11:29

the concept of a carrier/tank regiment killer swarm of 1000+ small, cheap drones has been debated to death on online forums for atleast a decade, first in context of iran and now china has joined the bandwagon.

the problems are many, including obviously
- range
- cost it quickly climbs once you making it big and powerful like reaper and ghawk
- abilities in bad weather
- ability to complete mission if links are jammed or "hive mind" network intelligence is disrupted

very soon to pose a threat you end up with a costly product like the US x-planes / ghawk and not the DJI phantom MKK+ you started off with.

countermeasures could vary from relatively simple ones like powerful jamming , EMP bursts, CIWS/AA rigged to fire shotgun pellets than explosive cannon shells and my favourite one

Image

if killing mobile armour/carriers were so easy, millions of man hours and billions of money would have found such solutions in the 1950s.

at the tactical level how survivable are herons and predators against any semblance of proper SAM system like SA15 or Akash - their chances upto 40,000ft are 0 ... look cool firing hellfires on isolated swarms of middle east jihadis in hollywood films

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby niran » 25 Aug 2017 12:00

DavidD wrote:“Swarming is currently considered to be one of the most promising areas of defence technology development in the world,” says Vasily Kashin, an expert on China’s military at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow. “The Chinese are prioritising it.”


FYI swarming is as old as warfare itself, to win you need to swarm your foe with whatever you have from verbal curses to nookes.

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby DavidD » 25 Aug 2017 12:14

Certainly, it's really just the last few decades (of relative peace, btw) that warfare started to concentrate on relatively fewer and very expensive capital gear. I wonder this current trend really would've survived actual large scale warfare. If the F-22s, J-20s, or Su-57s were pitted against simple, MiG-19-like jets, barebone except the ability to carry say a Meteor and a lot of fuel, backed by special radar plans ala a modified AWACS, how effective would they be?

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Khalsa » 25 Aug 2017 14:20

Image

Cut down on masturbating & Coca Cola: Says Chinese Army to its potential recruits

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-41039233

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby chola » 25 Aug 2017 18:16

Lol. Wankers.

Gagan
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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Gagan » 26 Aug 2017 04:16

China has 5 locations for LPAR radar.

Image

1. Bayingol: 41°38'28.13"N, 86°14'14.83"E. Known PLARF site with missile regiments deployed east of this location.
2. Dawu Shanpu: 25° 7'33.73"N, 118°45'4.67"E. Known radar site tracking Tiwanese airspace. Some people doubt this is an LPAR from the images on google earth
3. Fotang: 30°17'11.68"N, 119° 7'44.32"E
4. Shuanbai Forest: 36° 1'31.06"N, 118° 5'33.46"E
5. Zhongxu Changliu Branch: 46°31'39.98"N, 130°45'20.41"E

6. Historic Tech Development site first set up in the 1970s, now dismantled: 40°26'49.42"N, 115° 6'59.22"E

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby kit » 26 Aug 2017 04:39

i would just like a smart electronic net to swat down the drones . :twisted: even if i dont see you you will be in it


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