China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

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kancha
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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby kancha » 23 Apr 2018 15:21

kancha wrote:Folks, posted a thread on twitter on the Chinese peacekeepers running away under fire in South Sudan in July 2015. One of the few documented instances of the performance of the PLA in actual operations in recent past.
Do have a look

Twitter Link
Blog Link



Part II of the series - A first person commentary by one of our own who was there, and played a key role in rescuing the PLA Peacekeepers.

Twitter Link
Blog Link

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby chola » 28 Apr 2018 02:02

We are living in a day and age where chinis and the Americans (under competitive pressure from the chicoms) will soon be arming every sundry muzzie with precision weapons. What can possibly go wrong in this scenario?

http://foreignpolicy.com/2018/04/27/drone-wars-how-the-uaes-chinese-made-drone-is-changing-the-war-in-yemen/

How the UAE’s Chinese-Made Drone Is Changing the War in Yemen

An airstrike that killed a senior Houthi leader shows that the Emirates is growing more assertive in its military operations.

The United States had previously refused to export armed drones to the UAE, but this month the Trump administration released a new set of policies, loosening previous restrictions. “We will facilitate international partners’ access to U.S. [unmanned aerial systems] in situations where it will enhance those partners’ security and their ability to advance shared security or counterterrorism objectives,” the policy reads. With the UAE already operating Chinese drones in combat missions, and with an expanding Chinese presence in Djibouti, the Gulf could become a new front in the U.S. struggle for influence with Beijing.

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby kit » 28 Apr 2018 02:34

actually now the scenario is militants may well be armed with weaponized drones .. unless you game it you will get it big time

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Kartik » 01 May 2018 04:12

First clear image of J-15D Ching Chong Towering Glowering Showering Sea Dragon whatever. Carrier jet, notice the arrestor hook

Image

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Kartik » 01 May 2018 04:55

Z-8G

Image

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Sid » 01 May 2018 18:30

Kartik wrote:First clear image of J-15D Ching Chong Towering Glowering Showering Sea Dragon whatever. Carrier jet, notice the arrestor hook

Image


These got new jammer pods too, unlike stock ones which are super bulky.

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Austin » 02 May 2018 09:50

chola wrote:We are living in a day and age where chinis and the Americans (under competitive pressure from the chicoms) will soon be arming every sundry muzzie with precision weapons. What can possibly go wrong in this scenario?

http://foreignpolicy.com/2018/04/27/drone-wars-how-the-uaes-chinese-made-drone-is-changing-the-war-in-yemen/

How the UAE’s Chinese-Made Drone Is Changing the War in Yemen

An airstrike that killed a senior Houthi leader shows that the Emirates is growing more assertive in its military operations.

The United States had previously refused to export armed drones to the UAE, but this month the Trump administration released a new set of policies, loosening previous restrictions. “We will facilitate international partners’ access to U.S. [unmanned aerial systems] in situations where it will enhance those partners’ security and their ability to advance shared security or counterterrorism objectives,” the policy reads. With the UAE already operating Chinese drones in combat missions, and with an expanding Chinese presence in Djibouti, the Gulf could become a new front in the U.S. struggle for influence with Beijing.


The Chinese UCAV ( armed variant ) has been used extensively by Iraqi AF in its fight against IS in Iraq and Syria

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Austin » 02 May 2018 09:51

China Adds Capabilities To Y-9 Special-mission Aircraft

https://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news ... n-aircraft

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby tsarkar » 08 May 2018 13:14

ShauryaT wrote:@TSarkar: I agree in general, we should not use Indian money for foreign companies to build/mature their wares, but is there another time and risk mitigation option to the PAK-FA minus ceding strategic space or downgrading of our capabilities vs the PLAAF?


This post is for those who're concerned about Chinese quality and quantity of platforms and munitions.

Chinese photos carefully dont reveal actual capabilities but sometimes the truth comes out.

The Chinese are churning out Type 54A frigates with VLS SAM. But did anyone bother to check the SAM's carried?

Turns out the SAM's are old 9M38 missile carried by our Type 15 destroyers in the 90's / early 2000

Photo of 9M38 originally in INS Delhi http://pvo.guns.ru/naval/m22.htm (First photo in the webpage)

Photo of Chinese Type 54A frigate firing HQ-16 that is nothing but old 9M38 missile
http://chinesemilitaryreview.blogspot.i ... igate.html
http://chinesemilitaryreview.blogspot.i ... -054a.html
http://globalmilitaryreview.blogspot.in ... es-of.html
http://globalmilitaryreview.blogspot.in ... oming.html

The Indian Navy has since moved to newer 9M317 missile on Delhi, Talwar and Teg classes shown here

https://www.indiatoday.in/india/north/s ... 2014-07-19

It turns out EVERY photo of HQ-16 is the old decommissioned 9M38 missile.

Same goes for J-20 that is powered by AL-31 engines with an history of failures and unreliability.

The IAF has a point when it says Rafale with sensor fusion and advanced EW suite is better than J-20

Now, the reason Russia doesnt sell latest technology to China is not love for India but because Russian annexation of Siberia from Manchu Dynasty via the unequal Convention of Peking in 1860

https://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2 ... im-siberia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sino-Sovi ... r_conflict
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_c ... of_Siberia

Siberia is extremely resource rich but thin in people and is Russia's weak spot.

Similarly, there is a news item in Pakistan military thread that Fiza'ya is testing Turkish LDP. Which means no Chinese LDP pod available. The Turkish pod has Sensor Resolutions IR: 640x512 TV: 768x576
Source: http://www.aselsan.com.tr/en-us/capabil ... geting-pod
The Litening pod used by us has resolution of 1K for FLIR for IR and CCD for TV
http://www.rafael.co.il/Module/ImageDow ... 26A21366D1

Northrop Grumman, which resells Litening in US, says the following -
Full 1K FLIR and CCD, the highest resolution available in any fielded targeting pod

http://www.northropgrumman.com/Capabili ... fault.aspx

We use the Litening in A2A mode as well that is far far better than any Russian IRST
https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... ty-408161/
https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... od-426811/
An advanced version of the Litening 4 – the Litening 4 I – will be supplied. The improved system has been equipped with upgraded infrared cameras and a charge-coupled device colour camera to help identify targets on the ground, particularly dense areas, Rafael says.


BR Members & Moderators are free to use the above research to counter any domestic Dhoti Shivering or foreign saber rattling by Chinese with due credits to me.

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby JTull » 08 May 2018 14:26

tsarkar, thumbs up!

Are you saying the Su-30MKI IRST is not as good as Litening-4I in A2A mode?

India needs to find ways to incorporate a Litening pod built into the airframe of LCA-Mk2 itself, if it is serious about AMCA. As per wiki, Rafael is already working on a competing built-in version for F-35.

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Singha » 08 May 2018 14:42

in addition, there is a ton of videos on web of american, indian, russian, british and french ICBM tests, even credible pics and videos of iranian and north korean efforts.

can anyone point me to youtube videos of DF31, DF21D ASBM and DF41 launches from land?

this a fairly typical example - a df41 mockup on parade, a DF2, some kind of OTR21/iskander analogues, a SLV (!) , various stern stone faced operators .... where is the actual DF41 being fired ? and the caption says DF41. :lol:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3B1u5O9s4zE&t=154s

using parade pomp and drama of tight hordes marching through the forbidden city isnt going to impress anyone beyond a layman.
russia has large parades but backs that up with a frightening assortment of sticks that work and are well documented.

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Singha » 08 May 2018 14:49

>>Are you saying the Su-30MKI IRST is not as good as Litening-4I in A2A mode?

that is very possible. but the litening will get blocked by fuselage from the upper hemisphere which is where irst is effective in a2a vs cold sky background.
the SH moved from IRST infront of a centerline fuel tank to a more traditional F14D position under the nose
Image

ideally we need 2 IRST if cost and sw capabilities permit - 1 above the nose for best a2a and 1 under the nose to track agile targets on the ground and treetop level helicopters using a mix of IRST and SAR

we should pursue such ideas for Tejas mk2

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby JTull » 08 May 2018 15:19

Air dominance fighters like that F-14 and our own Su-30MKI can get away with an under-slung pod if they're in CAP role at 30,000+ft.

Otherwise, for Su-30MKI upgrades the new QWIP based OLS-50 could be considered (Link).

Tejas Mk2, and all future domestic aircraft should try to build-in as many sensors as possible to free up the weapons stations. Does CABS AEW have any EO/IR sensors?

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby kit » 08 May 2018 16:07

Singha wrote:>>Are you saying the Su-30MKI IRST is not as good as Litening-4I in A2A mode?

that is very possible. but the litening will get blocked by fuselage from the upper hemisphere which is where irst is effective in a2a vs cold sky background.
the SH moved from IRST infront of a centerline fuel tank to a more traditional F14D position under the nose
Image

ideally we need 2 IRST if cost and sw capabilities permit - 1 above the nose for best a2a and 1 under the nose to track agile targets on the ground and treetop level helicopters using a mix of IRST and SAR

we should pursue such ideas for Tejas mk2


Good idea. A deshi tandem IRST could be cheaper and more effective anti stealth solution

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Singha » 09 May 2018 00:27

We need lookup irst and third party vhf radar to id and kill LO drones flying up at 60000ft

Addl role of lookdown irst would be id and hand off data regarding low flying cruise missiles

Cannot depend on large sensors like awacs only . The network must form a compound eye like a insects

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby vina » 09 May 2018 06:51

Kartik wrote:First clear image of J-15D Ching Chong Towering Glowering Showering Sea Dragon whatever. Carrier jet, notice the arrestor hook

Image


Something funny. Why are there two large very fat "bamboos" (for want of a better word) on the wing tips of the J-15D ? And actually the tip of which is eerily shaped like the the head of a part of the male anatomy that cannot be openly mentioned in a family forum!

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby kvraghav » 09 May 2018 09:44

^^^
May be electronically steered directional jammers rather than using gimballed ones?

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Austin » 09 May 2018 10:39

Those are wing tip pod jammers common in flanker

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Austin » 09 May 2018 16:48


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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Manish_P » 11 May 2018 13:59

So much inferiority complex for a would be Super power, that they even copy the promo style of the big Khan

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Austin » 11 May 2018 16:01

Manish_P wrote:So much inferiority complex for a would be Super power, that they even copy the promo style of the big Khan


As they say imitation is best form of .................

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby rkhanna » 11 May 2018 16:07

China denies lasing American pilots in Djibout

"he Pentagon claimed last Thursday that two U.S. pilots had been injured as a result of Chinese nationals shining military grade laser pointers into their eyes as they came in to land at the U.S. base in Djibouti.

The injuries followed claims that a number of flights near the east African base had been affected by lasers, and U.S. officials have now issued a formal diplomatic complaint demanding Beijing investigates.

The U.S. issued a notice to airmen telling them “to exercise caution when flying in certain areas in Djibouti. During one incident, there were two minor eye injuries of aircrew flying in a C-130 that resulted from exposure to military-grade laser beams, which were reported to have originated from the nearby Chinese base.” The notice explained the origin of the concern saying it “was issued due to lasers being directed at U.S. aircraft on a small number of separate occasions over the last few weeks.”

"Chinese military observers tried to shift any blame on Wednesday telling the South China Morning Post that the lasers might have been used to scare off birds near the airfield or disrupt possible spy drones, rather than targeting foreign pilots—pointing out that China is a signatory to the Protocol on Blinding Laser Weapons, which bans the use of lasers that cause permanent blindness."


https://sofrep.com/102956/the-sino-file ... -djibouti/

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Austin » 12 May 2018 08:09

Video : J20 conducts first over sea flight

https://mobile.twitter.com/OedoSoldier/ ... 2904110086

This thing looks like eurofighter when taking off

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Manish_P » 12 May 2018 08:46

The 2-3 take-offs shown in the video are very conservative and bland.. nothing like the agile performance take-offs (quick gear retraction and a zoom climb) of the Typhoon, the Fulcrum, the Eagle, the Raptor.

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Indranil » 12 May 2018 09:58

Austin wrote:Video : J20 conducts first over sea flight

https://mobile.twitter.com/OedoSoldier/ ... 2904110086

This thing looks like eurofighter when taking off

It's a great feet achieved by the Chinese. Their aviation industry is off the blocks both in civil and military. They will overcome the engine deficiency in 10 years or so.

But the J-20 is a slow turner, refer 0:48 sec mark.

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Austin » 12 May 2018 18:22

Indranil wrote:
Austin wrote:Video : J20 conducts first over sea flight

https://mobile.twitter.com/OedoSoldier/ ... 2904110086

This thing looks like eurofighter when taking off

It's a great feet achieved by the Chinese. Their aviation industry is off the blocks both in civil and military. They will overcome the engine deficiency in 10 years or so.

But the J-20 is a slow turner, refer 0:48 sec mark.


Thats coz it on military power , most of the turns speed and vertical climb by fighters are done with full AB on hence they good that good on air shows.

I am not sure if J-20 is underpowered or just rightly powered but looking at the aircraft that looks to me like a ~ 40 T MTOW with easily ~ 12 T of internal fuel , Nice looking bird , it looks like Eurofighter when taking off when viewd from its tail end

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Indranil » 13 May 2018 03:23

I don't know Austin how you see the EF in the J-20 (the canard, the tail, everything is so different), but I am not going to argue on that. What I said about the turn rate was based on the chase plane being able to outturn the J-20. At least twice, the pilot eased up on the nose in order to not overshoot

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby ShauryaT » 13 May 2018 11:06

China's first home built carrier starts sea trials.

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby manjgu » 13 May 2018 13:39

too premature of judge the actual turn rate of the plane ... they will slowly expand the performance enevelope IMHO

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Singha » 13 May 2018 15:31

Austin wrote:Video : J20 conducts first over sea flight

https://mobile.twitter.com/OedoSoldier/ ... 2904110086

This thing looks like eurofighter when taking off


its role has always been designed as a long range , fast missile truck with a high persistence and big radar.
while itself releasing two ASMs/ALCM, its big radar and space for sensors will help guide other more A2A oriented fighters and supplement the radar of the AWACS flying well behind.

with 2 supersonic ASMs it will be a formidable threat due to LO reducing the radar horizon...esp coming in low over the himalayas, using valleys to mask their approach and then releasing GPS guided missiles from low level.

we will need to build a new grid in our NordWall....some kind of combined VHF + S/L band radar to track every mouse that come in off the valleys ... perhaps small mobile sensors in a distributed grid than big kit. and arrange for high flying unmanned awacs & OTH to catch them taking off from deep behind the himalayas

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Singha » 13 May 2018 16:32

China Has Already Won the Drone Wars
Chinese companies are proving that America is not first in the UAV export market. Can Trump roll that back?

By Sharon Weinberger | May 10, 2018, 1:10 PM

AMMAN, Jordan — At a military airfield on the outskirts of the Jordanian capital, three American businessmen stood admiring the star exhibit, which looked eerily familiar: a large drone, armed with weapons under its wings, with a domed front.

“They brought the Predator here,” said one, in reference to the ubiquitous U.S. drone used in wars from Bosnia to Iraq.

“That is not a Predator,” another countered.

The drone on display was, in fact, a Chinese unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) called the Rainbow CH-4, which has quickly spread around the world. Jordan bought the drone in 2015 but displayed it publicly for the first time this year at the Special Operations Forces Exhibition and Conference, known as SOFEX, a biennial event where companies market their latest wares.

Once upon a time, the sight would have been unthinkable: The MQ-1 Predator and its successor, the more lethal MQ-9 Reaper, were for more than a decade synonymous with armed drones. But that now is changing, not because Beijing has built a better drone but because it has been willing to sell them to countries where the United States wouldn’t.

For years, advocates of U.S. arms sales bemoaned tight export restrictions on armed drones, which has allowed China to move in on a lucrative market while depriving American companies of valuable business. Jordan had originally requested to buy the Reaper, made by San Diego-based General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, but was turned down. When Beijing subsequently secured the deal, Republican Rep. Duncan Hunter lamented in late 2015 that “China is seizing the opportunity.”

More than two years later, China’s growing share of the armed drone market is on display. To date, only the United Kingdom, France, and Italy have bought an armed version of the MQ-9 Reaper, while other U.S. allies, including Jordan, are flying Chinese drones, such as the CH-4.

The United States now belatedly is trying to recapture the armed drone market. For years, U.S. companies were restricted from such sales, in part as a result of the Missile Technology Control Regime, an international pact that aims to curb the export of certain long-range cruise missiles and drones. (China is not a signatory to the agreement.)

But last month, the Trump administration, as part of its “Buy American” push, announced a new policy intended to loosen export restrictions on armed drones. In announcing the changes, Peter Navarro, President Donald Trump’s trade advisor, blasted “Chinese replicas” of American drones “deployed on the runways in the Middle East.” Overly restrictive policies had put the United States in danger of losing out on an estimated $50 billion international market for drones, according to Navarro. “The administration’s [unmanned aerial systems] export policy will level the playing field by enabling U.S. firms to increase direct sales to authorized allies and partners,” he said.

But the new export policy doesn’t appear to have made any immediate impact. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, which makes the Reaper, had a modest exhibit at SOFEX and was advertising only unarmed versions of its aircraft.

“We’re still in the process of evaluating the recent Export Policy announcement and its impact on potential sales,” a spokesperson for the company wrote in response to a question about potential sales. “At this point, it’s too soon to comment.”

And though SOFEX featured an entire pavilion for U.S. companies selling weapons, none, other than General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, appeared to be offering drones, let alone armed drones.

Even U.S. officials say it’s unclear how the new drone regulations will be implemented.

“I don’t know the answer — that’s relatively new — and I don’t even have the talking points on how we’re supposed to respond to that,” says Dave Dornblaser, the director of the Washington field office for U.S. Army Security Assistance Command, when asked at SOFEX about the new regulations. “I can tell you there is quite a bit of interest in UAVs.”

Even with the Trump administration reforms, it may ultimately be too late to capture an export market dominated by China, as well as Israel.

“The Chinese have made a lot of inroads into the market, and U.S. export policy has definitely helped them, because the U.S. has stayed out of a lot of potential markets,” says Philip Finnegan, the director of corporate analysis at Teal Group in Fairfax, Virginia. “While some areas might be filled by Israeli manufacturers who are very active, the Middle East is one where the Israelis aren’t active for obvious reasons. And so the Chinese have filled the void.”

The CH-4, whose resemblance to the iconic Predator is no accident, follows a long tradition of Chinese technology manufacturing, whether in cars or smartphones: Make it look like a name-brand Western equivalent, but build it cheaper and good enough to get the job done. (Amusingly, a video at the show advertising the CH-4 called it “one of the best” UAVs in the world, as in, not the best.) Analysts have even suggested, albeit without proof, that China pilfered U.S. technical information for its drone program.

China’s sales have been buoyed by developing countries looking to fight insurgencies, and one of the factors driving recent buys, including Iraq’s, has been the war on the Islamic State, which has also proved an advertising boon to the Chinese.

At the exhibit area for China’s Aerospace Long-March International Trade Co., the maker of the CH-4, a video promoting the company’s drones featured extensive footage released by the Iraqi military showing strikes on Islamic State fighters. The Iraq military has already conducted at least 260 strikes against Islamic State militants using the CH-4, with close to 100 percent accuracy, according to a Chinese-language article. (A Jordanian military officer told Foreign Policy that his country’s CH-4s, which are armed with Chinese AR-1 anti-tank missiles, similar to the American Hellfire, have not fired weapons in combat yet.)

Since China doesn’t disclose all of its international customers, it’s hard to know the full extent of its sales, but a video on display at the exhibit acknowledged Algeria, Nigeria, Jordan, Zambia, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Ethiopia, Turkmenistan, Pakistan, and Myanmar as customers.

Notably absent from that list is the United Arab Emirates, which reportedly received its first CH-4 last year. FP reported last month that the UAE used its Chinese drone to assassinate a Houthi leader in Yemen.

While the Americans are just now moving forward with selling armed drones, China has been going full steam ahead. The CH-4 — a medium-altitude, long-endurance UAV — is part of series of Rainbow drones produced by Aerospace Long-March International.

While the CH-4 physically resembles the American Reaper, it is not as capable. It does not, for example, have a satellite link, which means it must be operated within line of sight, which limits its range and battlefield utility. China’s newest drone, the CH-5, will have a satellite link.

Aerospace Long-March International was also marketing smaller drones at SOFEX, including its CH-901, a minidrone that the company calls a “suicide UAV.”

While eager to sell its products, the company is also wary of scrutiny. Company representatives at the show declined to speak to a reporter and refused to give business cards to another visitor, an American who introduced himself as a “policy advisor.”

Another Chinese company, called Shenzhen Precision Technology Co., based in Shenzhen City, was at SOFEX advertising its small combat drone that can shoot grenades. The 35-kilogram vertical takeoff and landing drone can stay aloft for 20 minutes and has a range of 8 kilometers.

Xue Kun, the company’s executive director, says it took him four years to design the drone, which he’s selling, along with the ground station, for $300,000 each. He calls the concept an “air force in a truck,” because three can be loaded into a specially designed carrying case attached to a vehicle.

“If you buy many, you can get a discount,” he says. “I can also produce them locally, in your country.”

He hasn’t sold any of his combat drones abroad yet — he says they are used now only by Chinese police — but he hopes his attendance at SOFEX, his first opportunity to display a mock-up of the drone at an international arms exhibition, would help drum up sales.

Operating Chinese drones rather than American ones offers both economic and political advantages for some countries. The Chinese drones are much cheaper — typically a quarter of the price of similar American systems. China also is less likely to dictate how other countries use them, whereas U.S. exports can come with restrictions.

The problem with allowing allies to buy Chinese drones is not just financial. As Douglas Barrie, a senior fellow at the U.K.-based International Institute for Strategic Studies, points out, when foreign countries buy American weapons, the U.S. government has the ability to exercise some control over how that technology is used. “It’s a balancing act, and it’s very difficult to get right,” he says of U.S. export law.

The Chinese approach to selling weapons, he says, is much more “transactional.”

Now that the export restrictions are being loosened, the United States does have the ability to compete for more international sales, but the problem is that many countries have already found what they need in Chinese drones. Now, Barrie says, those countries might simply ask themselves: ‘‘Is the requirement fulfilled? This Chinese stuff is quite good.”

And then, even when they buy more drones, those countries may simply stick with China. “Once you open the door,” Barrie says, “there’s no guarantee you can close it.”

http://foreignpolicy.com/2018/05/10/chi ... d-project/

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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Austin » 17 May 2018 10:08

French Admiral Christophe on Chinese Navy

The admiral also noted a sharp increase in the number of ships of the Chinese Navy. According to him, only in the past four years, China has put into operation 80 ships, which equals the entire surface fleet of France. In addition, he said, China is already building an aircraft carrier.

РИА Новости https://ria.ru/defense_safety/20180516/1520721384.html

Austin
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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Austin » 17 May 2018 16:52

Hans Kristensen
‏Verified account @nukestrat

While US is officially committed to stay in the INF treaty, Adm Davidson, expected nominee to head PACOM, is telling Congress “the absence of the INF treaty would provide additional options" to counter China and others. INF puts US “at a disadvantage,” he claims.


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Singha
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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Singha » 17 May 2018 18:52

http://money.cnn.com/2018/05/16/technol ... index.html

private chinese co launches its first rocket into space.

chola
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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby chola » 17 May 2018 20:21

Singha wrote:http://money.cnn.com/2018/05/16/technology/onespace-china-spacex-startup/index.html

private chinese co launches its first rocket into space.



Their mix of a cut-throat private sector coupled with a focused authoritian state is a dangerous challenge.

The private sector should be an advantage to a free state like India. Just like it is a big advantage to the US and Japan.

But the thing is Commie Cheen has a private sector too. I’ve been looking at their entertainment industry recently (it is all the rage now on Wall Street.) It could not be achieved if they were a strict totalitarian state. They grew by letting in so much of the world’s material including Bollywood’s that its film market is now the far more attractive for the global companies than the US. It is really an incredible almost unbelievable thing.

They have a seething frothing competitive private sector from movies to drones to aerospace that allows ideas in from the rest of the world so they can force their private firms to compete while at the same time protecting core state enterprises. But even among state firms they create competitive situations.

That is why I am so eager for our private sector to get involved in our MIC. There can be no substitute if we want to compete. It is amazing that we even have to worry about the private sector being gapped by the one in a fvcking communist country.

But that is what we are facing.

kit
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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby kit » 17 May 2018 20:48

chola wrote:
Singha wrote:http://money.cnn.com/2018/05/16/technology/onespace-china-spacex-startup/index.html

private chinese co launches its first rocket into space.



Their mix of a cut-throat private sector coupled with a focused authoritian state is a dangerous challenge.

The private sector should be an advantage to a free state like India. Just like it is a big advantage to the US and Japan.

But the thing is Commie Cheen has a private sector too. I’ve been looking at their entertainment industry recently (it is all the rage now on Wall Street.) It could not be achieved if they were a strict totalitarian state. They grew by letting in so much of the world’s material including Bollywood’s that its film market is now the far more attractive for the global companies than the US. It is really an incredible almost unbelievable thing.

They have a seething frothing competitive private sector from movies to drones to aerospace that allows ideas in from the rest of the world so they can force their private firms to compete while at the same time protecting core state enterprises. But even among state firms they create competitive situations.

That is why I am so eager for our private sector to get involved in our MIC. There can be no substitute if we want to compete. It is amazing that we even have to worry about the private sector being gapped by the one in a fvcking communist country.

But that is what we are facing.


almost every other Hollywood blockbuster seems to be backed by some China based company .. probably one reason why you see at least a few Chinese actors in those movies.. with Indians being ridiculed to the bargain in some ( Deadpool 2 )
Last edited by kit on 17 May 2018 20:53, edited 1 time in total.

kit
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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby kit » 17 May 2018 20:50

Reliance does have its own backed movies .. but no even then they are not " Indian" the way Chinese do to their movies ..


chola
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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby chola » 19 May 2018 21:12

kit wrote:
chola wrote:

Their mix of a cut-throat private sector coupled with a focused authoritian state is a dangerous challenge.

The private sector should be an advantage to a free state like India. Just like it is a big advantage to the US and Japan.

But the thing is Commie Cheen has a private sector too. I’ve been looking at their entertainment industry recently (it is all the rage now on Wall Street.) It could not be achieved if they were a strict totalitarian state. They grew by letting in so much of the world’s material including Bollywood’s that its film market is now the far more attractive for the global companies than the US. It is really an incredible almost unbelievable thing.

They have a seething frothing competitive private sector from movies to drones to aerospace that allows ideas in from the rest of the world so they can force their private firms to compete while at the same time protecting core state enterprises. But even among state firms they create competitive situations.

That is why I am so eager for our private sector to get involved in our MIC. There can be no substitute if we want to compete. It is amazing that we even have to worry about the private sector being gapped by the one in a fvcking communist country.

But that is what we are facing.


almost every other Hollywood blockbuster seems to be backed by some China based company .. probably one reason why you see at least a few Chinese actors in those movies.. with Indians being ridiculed to the bargain in some ( Deadpool 2 )


This is all dictated by market size onlee. If China’s box office were not able to lap North America’s this year, the Hollywood wouldn’t be pandering (panda-ing?)

And market size in entertainment could only grow from ideas that catch the public. Commie nations can’t become box office majors even with captive audiences. You simply cannot have a market that is more dependent on free flows of ideas. This is why the PRC had to let in Bollywood and Hollywood. Why Marvel made $200M with Infinity War in three days last week and why AKhan made $200M on Dangal when he could barely get a tenth of that in India.

Desis might not understand how big this is because we are always taught that Bollywood is the world’s biggest movie industry. We make the most films but our market in monetary value is tiny. Since the dawn of modern entertainment, the United States has been the largest market for films.

The idea that this ultimate market of leisure, fashion and forward looking ideas, the Market of Dreams (i.e. The American Dream), could be overtaken by any other market was unthinkable. Much less one from commie china. This year could mark an epochal change.

Singha
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Re: China Military Watch - Sept' 2016

Postby Singha » 19 May 2018 22:09

https://twitter.com/PDChina/status/997386306660384768

a video has been released showing H6 ALCM bombers doing touch and go ops on some disputed SCS reef they have built a airstrip on.


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