International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Austin » 13 Apr 2019 10:39

Visit to Mig-31 air base , shows the Mig-31 with latest R-37M and R-77-1 AAM


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Austin » 13 Apr 2019 11:50

Mi-28 crash one pilot managed to save his life the other died

https://twitter.com/EmirLouise/status/1 ... 0352764932

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby tushar_m » 13 Apr 2019 12:00

Hungary has failed to sell off 19 of its MiG-29 fighters along with 20 spare engines as no one made a bid for them.


http://asian-defence-news.blogspot.com/ ... g-29s.html

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Singha » 13 Apr 2019 12:02

Must be really old stuff not worth our time

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby tushar_m » 13 Apr 2019 12:22

In mid-1993, three batches of MiG-29s were delivered from Russia.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian ... _inventory

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Austin » 13 Apr 2019 16:39

Size Comparision , Blackjack vs Backfire

Image

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 13 Apr 2019 18:44

NRao wrote:Lands all three cores and inserts sat into proper orbit:


Image

https://twitter.com/LaunchPhoto/status/ ... 2640884737

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 13 Apr 2019 19:34

Stratolaunch first flight may happen shortly -

Image

https://twitter.com/thejackbeyer/status ... 7414224901

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 13 Apr 2019 20:05

In the Air -

Jack Beyer


@thejackbeyer
17m17 minutes ago
More
WOW. First flight of the worlds largest airplane. History is made. @Stratolaunch @NASASpaceflight #stratolaunch


Image

Image

Image

Video - https://twitter.com/thejackbeyer/status ... 0169034752

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby MeshaVishwas » 14 Apr 2019 08:58

Japan Plans to Sell Off 100 of its Homebrew F-15J Eagles to Pay for More Stealth Jets
https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/japan-plans-sell-100-its-homebrew-f-15j-eagles-pay-more-stealth-jets-52167

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Prithwiraj » 16 Apr 2019 20:17

nachiket wrote:^^Maybe he was thinking of Falcon Heavy, which uses liquid fueled core stage and boosters.


For the first time only in second launch of Falcon Heavy they recovered all three stages !!! It is no short of science fiction --- hats off to Elon Musk and Space X team. This video is for everyone who loves space technology. They are far ahead of rest of the competition


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 16 Apr 2019 20:28

Prithwiraj wrote:
nachiket wrote:^^Maybe he was thinking of Falcon Heavy, which uses liquid fueled core stage and boosters.


For the first time only in second launch of Falcon Heavy they recovered all three stages !!!


They also recovered the fairing for the first time. However, it appears that the center booster has been damaged due to rough seas on the journey back to land so it won't be reused.

Image

SpaceX successfully landed all three of Falcon Heavy's boosters after its most recent launch, but it won't be able to reuse one of them. The company lost the core booster that landed on its drone ship "Of Course I Still Love You" to rough seas as it was making its way back to Port Canaveral.LINK

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby Nalla Baalu » 17 Apr 2019 00:21

Prithwiraj wrote:
nachiket wrote:^^Maybe he was thinking of Falcon Heavy, which uses liquid fueled core stage and boosters.


For the first time only in second launch of Falcon Heavy they recovered all three stages !!! It is no short of science fiction --- hats off to Elon Musk and Space X team. This video is for everyone who loves space technology. They are far ahead of rest of the competition



Incidentally, yesterday when I was watching a video of this, YouTube app recommended an amateur video of how SpaceX manages the accuracy. Among other things like restartable motors, fine control thrusters, lattice vanes, most striking part was very structured product development with grasshopper(?) tech-demonstrator that started 6-7 years ago.


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Austin » 17 Apr 2019 12:30

Defense Ministry of Turkey: Israel’s F-35 touch S-400 in Syria, but there are no complaints about Israel

https://vpk.name/news/272785_mo_turcii_ ... i_net.html

S-400, acquired by Turkey from Russia, will defend Ankara and Istanbul. This statement was made by the Minister of Defense Hulusi Akar.

The Minister of National Defense, speaking to journalists on Tuesday, April 16 regarding the supply of the Russian anti-aircraft missile system S-400, said that the system would defend the two main cities of the country - Ankara and Istanbul.

The minister gave his comment during Akar's important visit to Turkey to Washington. The minister stressed that he extremely appreciates the connection that he managed to establish in the US capital in the process of resolving the crisis around the purchase of the Russian air defense system. He also noted that he hopes to resolve the conflict.

Turkey today recalls that it faced serious air and missile threats that prompted it to enter into a contract with Russia

- designated Hulusi Acar.

The Minister of Defense also pointed out that the contracts for C-400 and F-35 cannot be interconnected.

No one expresses concern when the F-35 comes into contact with the C-400 in the SAR, when the Israeli air force operates there. If the United States demands, we will change the parameters of our C-400. But only if America proves a threat

- said a Turkish official.

The Defense Ministry of Turkey stressed that in respect of Israel, which through the military departments is in contact with the Russian Federation, there are no complaints, including on the use of F-35 in the same zone of action of the S-400 air defense system.


Turkey promises not to integrate Russian complexes into the NATO defense system, since the C-400 is part of the local air defense system.


According to the representative of Ankara, in the event of a resumption of deliveries, the F-35 will be deployed at the air base in the city of Malatya.

The Turkish government has a negative attitude to linking the issue of acquiring a fifth-generation American fighter with the delivery of the C-400, which, according to Ankara, will take place in spite of everything.

Pre-Turkey is going to get 4 complex S-400 "Triumph", designed to destroy targets of medium and long range. The total amount of the contract concluded in 2017 is about 2.5 billion dollars. The main part - the loan funds of Russia itself.

When asked by journalists about the prospect of reselling this system to a third party, the Turkish minister noted that such a question is not worth it. He also firmly noted that Ankara should not talk from a position of strength and put pressure on her.

Despite the expectation of C-400 deliveries, Turkey continues negotiations with the United States on the supply of Patriot air defense systems.

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Re: Indian Space Program: News & Discussion - Sept 2016

Postby kit » 18 Apr 2019 23:38

Prithwiraj wrote:
nachiket wrote:^^Maybe he was thinking of Falcon Heavy, which uses liquid fueled core stage and boosters.


For the first time only in secohttps://forums.bharat-rakshak.com/p ... =2343940nd launch of Falcon Heavy they recovered all three stages !!! It is no short of science fiction --- hats off to Elon Musk and Space X team. This video is for everyone who loves space technology. They are far ahead of rest of the competition



amazing video ! .. its a thrill to watch those side boosters land by themselves

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 19 Apr 2019 03:06

Good interview with Gripen pilot on Hushkit. I found the following responses to be truly enlightening in terms of the movement towards BVR combat and moving away from guns. He mentions that the one feature he would want most on the Gripen is MAWS and the AESA as well as the AI algorithms that would predict the best maneuvers to protect the pilot from incoming missiles or SAM threats.

Flying and fighting in the Gripen - interview with a Swedish AF pilot

Pilot comfort

“Very Good. You sit great, though not as leaned back as in the F-16. The suit is also great and give you enough support to make 9g fairly tolerable. The small number of gauges and knobs and the good reachability of everything you need to touch during a sortie makes the aircraft wonderful to work with. A side stick would give it a perfect score, but I know pilots that does not share my view on this.”

Instantaneous turn rate

“Perfect. You get 9g almost instantaneously for combat speeds, at most relevant altitudes. The care free manoeuvring means you can pull the stick as fast and hard as you want, and the aircraft will respond with 9g within a second or so, given you don’t have something hanging that make the flight control system automatically limit max g. No need for more here.”

Sustained turn rate

“Good. The Gripen “carves” very well through the air, much because of its all-moving canards and leading-edge slats. Even though it doesn’t have the thrust-to-weight ratio that for instance the Russian Su-35 have, it can hold it own. A pilot always wants more power of course, but if one is looking at the return on investment for more power to get combat effectiveness out of sustained turn rate, a bigger (i.e. heavier and more fuel consuming) engine is a hard sell.”

Climb rate

“Good enough. This is basically thrust-to-weight ratio. I’ve never felt the need to climb faster. I think max speed is more important since a higher speed means a lot in BVR combat. You can fire your weapons at longer distances and go further into an enemy’s WEZ if you have a higher speed.”


Combat effectiveness

“Very good, with a possible trajectory to become stellar. The large screens on the Gripen makes it formidable for Situation Awareness (SA). Given that air operations are moving into more of a chess game than Top Gun turn and burn, the advantage is moving towards aircraft with great SA. Saab struggled initially, but in the long run it was a rewarding path to certify the on-board software in different levels. They call this app-thinking, and it means that all except the critical systems (like flight control software) run software that is not more critical than normal computer software. This can make it much (and I really mean much) cheaper and faster to develop new functionality for the Gripen. However, change is hard to achieve within a large organisation. If the mindset is still the same as for all other fighters in the world – that software for fighters should be developed like it always has been – the advantage will go away. Our company has bet on the prediction that Saab can and will make that mindset change and accept innovative features from external (and internal) suppliers.


Was there any upgrades or equipment you wanted when you were on the Gripen?

“Lots! But that might be because I have been an inventor and innovator in this field for the two years. Many of the things are also now in the Gripen E. First and foremost, I would’ve liked to have a Missile Approach Warner (MAW) in the C/D. In a hostile environment you have to spend too much time looking at the ground without one, and the MAW is better at it anyway and never gets tired or distracted with pilot shit. I think the Gripen E’s AESA radar would be my next choice. The much greater search volume is nice, but I’m more excited about the increased flexibility in radar programs, anti-jamming, better low observability target tracking (de-stealthing) and such that AESA gives. When it comes to software, I’m probably most excited about the increased survivability our new optimal evasive manoeuvre AI algorithm HUMAN would give. It takes an incoming missile and calculates an optimal trajectory for the aircraft, given any number of overlapping priorities, like staying in doppler-zero* , aiming your Electronic Warfare System antennas towards it or just physically be as far away from the incoming missile as possible. Few pilots react perfectly when you might have seconds to live and an automated or semi-automated system might do a lot for pilot survival. Would it be too self-serving to also ask for our AI decision support system Rattlesnake? It keeps track of all known enemies and their history, our own capability and conduct massive parallel simulations (now off-line due to our patented AI) to be able to show the pilot (or fighter controller) how to fly to stay away from enemy missiles and how to manoeuvre for an optimal shot. I honestly want it as it would make me almost invincible in a BVR environment. I could go on and on here, but maybe we should save that for a specific innovation interview?”


...


Very interesting interview.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 19 Apr 2019 03:28

Interesting PR themes from SAAB and Gripen pilots. AESA radars (as large or larger aperture than Gripen-E's) have been on fighters since at least 19 years, as have MAWS (quite a while now) and high power AESA based EW/EA self protection suites. More than 1600 AESA equipped fighters are currently in service around the world.

Though it is commendable how they've been able to modify the Gripen-E over the baseline aircraft, the E/F variant merely keeps it relevant for the times and really does not go beyond in terms of a credible capability against threat systems like the Su-35 and Su-57 leave aside S-300+ or S-400 air defenses that it may have to contend with in an offensive scenario.

Of the western suppliers the Gripen-E will be quite low in the preference order. Rafale is the medium weight aircraft to go if you can't get or can't afford the F-35 and then the Gripen-E so besides a few customers (Swiss being the most promising IMHO given it is literally the best product for their need) I don't see much hope for it in the long run with cheaper Gripen-C and even second hand Typhoons likely to be made available next decade.

For all their hype at the air-show and trade show circuit many years ago, both Dassault and Boeing will beat them to operational service with a GaN AESA based Electronic Attack self-protection suit.

SAAB has been making moves to align itself as a partner on Low Observable aircraft programs over the last several years. From the nEUron to the Tempest. They probably realize that future cash flows will require them having some business interest in a LO UAV or fighter since unless they offer throw away prices (which they can't) interest in the Gripen is likely to wane into the 2020's and 2030s. Follow on orders from Brazil, and an order from Switzerland will probably be the extent of their success outside of the leasing market with current Gripen-C operators.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 20 Apr 2019 22:38

Update: BAE begins Meteor and SPEAR integration for F-35 ; Gareth Jennings; Jane's Defense Weekly; March 2019


BAE Systems has begun integrating the next tranche of UK-specific weapons onto the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning combat aircraft.

The company announced on 18 March that it had been sub-contracted by Lockheed Martin to begin integrating the MBDA Meteor beyond visual range air-to-air missile (BVRAAM) and the Selected Precision Effects At Range (SPEAR) 3 air-to-surface missile aboard the aircraft. Integration is expected to continue up to 2025.

As noted by BAE Systems, the Meteor and SPEAR 3 work is part of a wider package that includes further integration of the MBDA AIM-132 Advanced Short-Range Air-to-Air Missile (ASRAAM) and the Raytheon Paveway IV laser-guided bomb (LGB) in support of delivering initial operating capability (IOC) for the UK. While all of this work is being done specifically for the UK customer, Cliff Waldwyn, head of Combat Air, Group Business Development of MBDA, said that it also added additional capability choice for international customers.

Speaking at a press conference on 20 March, MBDA UK managing director Chris Allam told Jane’s that the move supports the UK’s prosperity agenda and enables the company to work in the international domain.

“Some of the European countries are extremely interested in the kind of capability you can get from Meteor, so having it integrated is a fantastic thing to do and it lets you step into that market. We will then pursue campaigns where we see the customer wants a Meteor-style capability with [the] F-35, having the backing of the UK, and the backing of the US through Lockheed Martin [with] BAE Systems standing behind us. There will be many weapons integrated onto [the] F-35, and being the first of that beyond US weapons is a great place to be.”

Allam said that in addition to recent countries that have selected the F-35 for their fighter aircraft procurements, such as Belgium and Denmark, Italy is also a potential customer for integration of Meteor and other MBDA systems onto their F-35 fleet.

Operated jointly by the Royal Air Force (RAF) and Royal Navy (RN), the UK’s Lightning Force is based at RAF Marham. The UK has to date committed to 48 short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) F-35Bs for its two new Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers, of which 17 have been delivered. A further 90 will be acquired to be flown from land bases, although whether these additional aircraft will be the STOVL F-35B or another variant has yet to be determined.

The Lightning force declared IOC Land in January, which was marked by the aircraft being cleared to carry the Raytheon AIM-120 Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM), the ASRAAM, and the Paveway IV. IOC maritime is set for 31 December 2020, which will add the Paveway IV fitted with the tactical penetrator warhead. Full operating capability (FOC) for the F-35B will be declared in 2023.


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 23 Apr 2019 02:25

I would imagine that Pakistan will take a keen interest in this Kh-35 derived cruise missile developed by Ukraine. They have a somewhat close defence relationship with Ukraine given that Russia is not really very viable, plus given Ukraine traditionally has been strong in certain areas of defence.

From AW&ST


Ukraine Tests Ground-Launched Cruise Missile


Ukraine has tested a ground-launched cruise missile that officials say can strike ground targets 300 km (180 mi.) away.

The Neptune system appears to be adapted from the Russian-made Kh-35 (AS-20 “Kayak”) turbojet-powered anti-ship missile originally developed by Zvezda and uses the same design as the Bal truck-mounted coastal launcher.
Trials of the system were revealed by the National Security and Defense Council of Ukraine (NSDCU) on April 5 and detailed by the state defense material agency Ukroboronprom.

Developed by the Kiev State Design Bureau, the weapon has been designed primarily as a coastal defense missile but can also be used by land forces to strike ground targets.

The system includes a self-propelled launch station, a vehicle for transporting missiles, a missile reloading system, and a command vehicle, all developed in-country, according to Oleksandr Turchynov, the NSDCU secretary.

“Today we are creating a fundamentally new weapon, which the Ukrainian army had never had. . . . The new mobile cruise missile systems can quickly be ready to conduct a missile strike in minutes,” Turchynov says.

Training has already begun, with the aim of equipping army and navy units with the system, says Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, who also viewed the trials.

—Tony Osborne in London

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Re: Tejas Mk.1 & Mk.1A: News & Discussions: 23 February 2019

Postby mody » 23 Apr 2019 16:56

Don't know if this is the appropriate thread or not. There used to be a movie/multimedia thread. Can't find the same. I the mods feel, it shouldn't be here, please feel free to move the post to the appropriate thread.

Below is the link to movie 'The Arrow' based on the Avro Arrow aircraft from the late 50s and 60s. Could have been the best high speed high altitude interceptor in the world at the time.
Many parallels can be drawn to the Tejas program and indeed many other indigenous programs like Arjun.
Also, lays out the damage that vested political interests can do to such defence programs of a country.
Hope the right party wins the election and the chors and thugs that froze and scuttled our defence programs in past, never again occupy positions of power. Interesting movie to watch, but nearly 3 hours long.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PMnlnq ... jreload=10
Last edited by JayS on 23 Apr 2019 21:28, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Post moved to appropriate thread.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 24 Apr 2019 23:19

Lockheed Martin transfers F-16 production to South Carolina


While 4,588 F-16s have been produced to date over a 40-year period, Lockheed Martin said that demand is increasing for both new production and upgraded F-16V Block 70/72 variants, which has led to the company investing in the production of the type by moving it to Greenville, which also provides more capacity for F-35 Joint Strike Fighter production at Fort Worth.

This newest F-16 configuration includes the Northrop Grumman AN/APG-83 active electronically scanned array radar, plus a new mission computer, electronic warfare suite, and automated ground collision avoidance system.

In March it was announced that Morocco had received approval by the US state department to acquire 25 new-build Block 72 aircraft, as well as the upgrade of 23 existing F-16C/D Block 50/52s to the V-model standard.

Bulgaria is also negotiating the purchase of new Block 70 aircraft with the US, while Slovakia signed a letter of agreement for 14 Block 40s in December 2018, and Bahrain was the first customer for the variant when it signed a contract for the aircraft in June 2018.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 25 Apr 2019 02:41

Here is something that will certainly be of interest to the Indian Navy for their MH-60R Sea Hawks.

Navair eyes magnetic anomaly detector fit for MH-60R

Plans are being developed to introduce magnetic anomaly detection equipment onto US Navy (USN) and Royal Australian Navy (RAN) Lockheed Martin/Sikorsky MH-60R helicopters, the US Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) has revealed.

In a sources sought notice issued on 17 April, NAVAIR advised that it was seeking eligible companies “capable of performing the software development, manufacture, and integration of an engineering change proposal [ECP] for the technical insertion of a digital magnetic anomaly detection [DMAD] capability into the MH-60R aircraft procured by the NAVAIR Multi-Mission Helicopter Program Office [PMA-299]”. It added, “The proposed ECP shall include both hardware integration into the aircraft and software integration into the Avionics Operating Program [AOP], a Lockheed Martin proprietary product.”

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby NRao » 25 Apr 2019 11:19


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Austin » 27 Apr 2019 12:28

First Mig-35UB for RuAF

Image

https://russianplanes.net/id248027

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby NRao » 29 Apr 2019 02:37


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby NRao » 30 Apr 2019 23:00


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 30 Apr 2019 23:41

Antonov stalls An-132D programme with Saudi partners

The development of the Antonov An-132D twin-turboprop transport has been put on hold following a breakdown between the Ukrainian and Saudi Arabian development parties.

In an interview with Ukraine's Unian news agency, Antonov president Alexander Donets revealed that the collaboration with Saudi Arabia over the development and manufacture of the aircraft had been suspended.

According to Donets, the company had fulfilled an initial contract with King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) for a demonstrator aircraft and had been approved to undertake construction of an assembly facility in Taif in conjunction with Taqnia Aeronautics. However, a change in programme partner took place in Saudi Arabia, leading to the suspension of the programme.

Donets added that a military customer had also changed the requirements for the aircraft, thereby leading to the preference of another platform to fulfil the acquisition. The Royal Saudi Air Force (RSAF) had previously committed to six aircraft - four in a search-and-rescue configuration and two for electronic warfare - with Antonov hoping for further orders for configurations such as military transport and gunship.

Despite the setback, Donets said that the company had been working to pitch the aircraft to India, which already operates the predecessor aircraft, the Antonov An-32 'Cline'. A major upgrade of the Indian Air Force's An-32 fleet began in 2009 but experienced delays following Russia's annexation of Crimea and its effect on the component supply chain.




Sadly for Antonov, the deal for the HS-748 replacement may also be out of reach, with reports of the IAF proceeding with the C-295 airlifter contract in a few months time.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Indranil » 01 May 2019 00:31

HAL should see whether it can develop a good turboprop civilian aircraft with Antonov short-circuiting the never finishing NCAD program.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 01 May 2019 03:26

Yes it would give HAL access to Antonov's extremely valuable institutional knowledge on the design and testing of rugged turboprops. Antonov would very likely be very amenable to that, given the condition it is in now, with the An-132D program stalling.

Which brings me to the point- who did Antonov try to partner with when the original HS-748 replacement program began? And would it be worthwhile to explore the possibility of pushing that program further behind to allow Antonov to enter the fray? Would the MoD entertain that possibility, given the likelihood of gaining a lot of IP related to the An-132D if it were to be chosen to replace the HS-748.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 01 May 2019 03:29

From AW&ST

F-16 SLEP program goes into production phase. Check out the time that even an airframer like LM expects to take for the SLEP for each F-16. Just saying, given how critical some people were about the time HAL took to upgrade IAF Mirage-2000s, which AFAIK, included some Service Life Extension.

This kind of program will also allow operators like the PAF to buy used F-16s from all over and then have TAI upgrade them with avionics and SLEP to give them another 2 decades of F-16 usage.

A six-year-old service life extension program (SLEP) for Lockheed MartinF-16s is transitioning from the proof-kit stage to the full production phase at the government depot at Hill AFB, Utah, a company official said on April 24.

Lockheed inducted the first proof-kit aircraft—an F-16D Block 42 trainer—in June 2016 to begin a painstaking, 34-month SLEP process, said Christopher Crowley, a Lockheed aeronautics engineer stationed at the Hill AFB depot. The proof-kit is a term for a prototype used to test the repairs and inspections called for by the list of SLEP tasks.

Since the first SLEP induction, the pace of proof-kit installations has increased significantly. The depot next inducted two F-16 Block 52s acquired from the Thunderbird demonstration team. The first aircraft entered the depot in September 2016 and emerged 18 months later, Crowley said. The depot completed the second Thunderbird aircraft in 14 months. A fourth and final proof-kit F-16 entered the depot in September 2018 and remains in the SLEP process eight months later, he added.

The program’s goal is to reduce the time required for each aircraft SLEP to nine months by the time the seventh F-16 enters the program, Crowley said.
More depots will be stood up elsewhere to support F-16s operated in the Pacific region and Europe, he added.

The U.S. Air Force plans to extend the service life of 300 F-16s to keep the fleet active through 2046.

In 2013, the Air Force launched the SLEP program by assigning Lockheed to perform a full-scale fatigue test of an F-16 Block 50 with 1,834 effective flight hours. Lockheed’s engineers spent the next two years applying loads that simulated the effective of 27,712 effective flight hours, Crowley said.

The fatigue testing caused more than 200 structural cracks throughout the aircraft, which resulted in 39 recommended modifications for the F-16, Crowley said. Sensing that the initial proposal was too costly, Lockheed developed a process to scrub recommendations that reflected “requirements creep,” he added. The final modification package was whittled down to 12 structural replacements, the lower bulkhead where the main landing gear meets the wing, canopy sill longerons and a bulkhead that supports the vertical tail. The inner and outer support beams for the horizontal tails are also being replaced, Crowley said.

The roughly $3 million per aircraft for each SLEP extends service life by 73%, Crowley said.


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 01 May 2019 04:22

US citizen of Chinese descent indicted on charges of technology espionage at General Electric

AW&ST

A U.S. grand jury has charged a U.S. citizen of Chinese descent and a relative of his in China with theft of General Electric technology for gas and steam turbines, including know-how applicable to aviation.


U.S. citizen Zheng Xiaoqing had been employed by GE’s power-generation division, according to an indictment unsealed by the Department of Justice on April 23. The charges against him include economic espionage and conspiracy.

The stolen technology specifically related to turbine blades and combustors for gas turbine engines and to turbine seals for gas and steam turbine engines, according to the indictment.

Regarding one transmission to China, the indictment states that “the information contained within these documents could be adapted to allow for manufacture of metal brush seals used in steam and gas turbines, including gas turbines used in aircraft.”

Zheng allegedly committed the thefts in 2017 by encrypting electronic files, hiding them within others and transmitting them by email to his relative Zhang Zhaoxi. Zheng and Zhang were trying to establish a business in China to make aeronautical components and develop gas and steam turbines.

The pair knew their economic espionage would benefit the Chinese government and foreign entities, including the Shenyang Aeroengine Research Institute and Shenyang Aerospace University, according to the indictment.

GE discovered in 2017 that Zheng had encrypted files on his work computer. The company monitored the computer and in 2018 determined that it stored encrypted files related to sealing and optimizing turbine technology. Zheng is alleged to have confessed to the FBI in August 2018.

Zheng’s and Zhang’s company entered into a strategic cooperation agreement with the university in July 2018. The accusations also indicate that before the thefts, the two men briefed the state’s Aero Engine Corp. of China on their progress in setting up their business, which received funding from the Chinese government.

The indictment links the theft with Beijing’s Made in China program to promote industrial development in various sectors including aviation, aerospace and power generation.
Made in China is only part of the much larger Chinese economic development effort embodied in the country’s current five-year plan, its 13th.

—Bradley Perrett in Beijing

brar_w
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 01 May 2019 04:36

Kartik wrote:
F-16 SLEP program goes into production phase. Check out the time that even an airframer like LM expects to take for the SLEP for each F-16.


Lockheed Martin is not conducting, only developing and supporting, the SLEP effort which is going to be conducted by the government at government owned depots staffed by service and civilian personnel. The pace of these is largely dictated by two things 1) The scope of the upgrades and inspections required which can be variable depending upon different batches or even airframes depending upon where it is in its lifecycle and overall impact over the life of the aircraft and 2 ) the capacity, infrastructure and training of those staffing the depots to execute on the plans.

Only a handful of USAF depots that support the F-22, F-35 and B-2 programs are modernized to current OEM level standard and even there it is only the aspects which support the newer aircraft are likely to be up to that standard. The remaining are about a decade behind where they need to be. Additionally Ogden is also supporting other programs (F-35 block 3F and block 4 for example) so may be capacity and manpower constraint.

The fastest way to get this done would be to route all global F-16's through the OEM at South Carolina. Lockheed has already secured work for F-16 block 70 upgrades which includes a SLEP, though that is not as extensive as the one USAF is doing. That is not how it is done in the USAF as there is usually excess capacity at the depots so it is cheaper to route life-extensions and even type upgrades through there as apposed to the OEM.The same is the case on the F-15E upgrades which are actually more technically challenging (AESA Radars + New Mission Computers + Upgraded electrical/power management, Increased thermals, and New EW Suite) than the F-16 SLEP. Those too are being done at the depots with the OEM only acting in a supporting capacity.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Zynda » 01 May 2019 11:33

Antonov is possibly in a bad shape with recent news of Saudis pulling out of the -132 program. Like they say, strike the iron when hot, can we induce one of the giants of Indian Private entities to acquire some stake or do a deep IP transfer of -132 design, manufacturing & assembly in India? Would give us a decent foot holding on a semi-indigenous turboprop platform which can be used by us to expand in to various roles & upgrades what not. I am really hoping that which ever Govt comes this May, having this kind of foresight & going through with it is quite important...

I think replacement of An-32 itself with An-132D would be a massive contract from Antonov's POV. India operates close to 110 An-32...order size will be twice that of Avro's.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Vips » 01 May 2019 18:19

I hope Reliance(Mota Bhai) or Adani comes in and buys the rights to 132 program. Only country which has access to jet engine technology and would be willing to offer for cash the total transfer is Ukraine. Only a private sector company would have the Baniya sense and the wherewithal to get it. Something akin to what the Kalyanis did when they bought a Howitzer factory Lock, Stock and Barrel (Pun :) )

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 02 May 2019 02:09

brar_w wrote:
Kartik wrote:
F-16 SLEP program goes into production phase. Check out the time that even an airframer like LM expects to take for the SLEP for each F-16.


Lockheed Martin is not conducting, only developing and supporting, the SLEP effort which is going to be conducted by the government at government owned depots staffed by service and civilian personnel. The pace of these is largely dictated by two things 1) The scope of the upgrades and inspections required which can be variable depending upon different batches or even airframes depending upon where it is in its lifecycle and overall impact over the life of the aircraft and 2 ) the capacity, infrastructure and training of those staffing the depots to execute on the plans.

Only a handful of USAF depots that support the F-22, F-35 and B-2 programs are modernized to current OEM level standard and even there it is only the aspects which support the newer aircraft are likely to be up to that standard. The remaining are about a decade behind where they need to be. Additionally Ogden is also supporting other programs (F-35 block 3F and block 4 for example) so may be capacity and manpower constraint.

The fastest way to get this done would be to route all global F-16's through the OEM at South Carolina. Lockheed has already secured work for F-16 block 70 upgrades which includes a SLEP, though that is not as extensive as the one USAF is doing. That is not how it is done in the USAF as there is usually excess capacity at the depots so it is cheaper to route life-extensions and even type upgrades through there as apposed to the OEM.The same is the case on the F-15E upgrades which are actually more technically challenging (AESA Radars + New Mission Computers + Upgraded electrical/power management, Increased thermals, and New EW Suite) than the F-16 SLEP. Those too are being done at the depots with the OEM only acting in a supporting capacity.


Thanks for the info brar_w

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 02 May 2019 02:12

US looking at possibility of restarting parts production for Taiwanese F-5 fighters

link

The United States is considering recommencing parts production for the Northrop F-5 Tiger II fighter aircraft to support Taiwan's ageing fleet.

Having previously sought to source surplus parts, the US Air Force (USAF) on 30 April issued a request for information (RFI) for new-build parts to sustain the Republic of China Air Force's (RoCAF's) single-seat F-5E and twin-seat F-5F platforms that have been in service since 1974 and 1976 respectively (having originally received 242 F-5E and 66 F-5F aircraft, it is unclear how many remain operational today).

"The Proven Aircraft Program Office, located at Hill AFB, Utah, is anticipating the award of a contract to procure F-5 unique parts from qualified manufacturers. Parts must be factory new or new manufacture and not from aftermarket vendors," the solicitation said.

A total of 1,771 parts are required, although the USAF did not specify what they might be. The service said industry responses are due by 10 00 h MST on 29 May, and that it plans to begin the effort in fiscal year (FY) 2020.

The USAF's search for new parts for the RoCAF's F-5 fleet comes about six months after it issued an RFI for surplus parts. At that time it said it was looking to source 45 items ranging from windshield panels through to circuit cards.

As the original equipment manufacturer (OEM), Northrop Grumman will be the most likely candidate to fulfil the USAF's requirement for F-5 spare parts for Taiwan. However, the F-5 is an old platform, and while there are about 1,000 of the type still in service globally, the company has previously admitted that it has not provided the level of sustainment and support for this aircraft that would normally be expected from an OEM. In 2010 Northrop Grumman announced that it was teaming with RUAG Aviation and Astronautics to launch an F-5 and T-38 Talon support and sustainment programme, in a belated attempt to re-engage in providing through-life support for the legacy aircraft.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 04 May 2019 02:00

From AW&ST

A device called Sidekick will allow a U.S. Air Force or Navy version of the F-35 to carry six AIM-120 missiles internally instead of four, a Lockheed Martin official says.

The comments by F-35 test pilot Tony Wilson on May 1 come as the program continues to define the details of a 10-year modernization program for the F-35 called Block 4. The upgrades are expected to allow the F-35 to carry improved sensors and new weapons.

But it’s also possible that the F-35 will be able to carry more air-to-air weapons in the internal bays, which preserve the aircraft’s ability to avoid being tracked by an enemy’s fire control radars at long range.

“What we’ve done is essentially completed trade studies, design and development” of Sidekick, a Lockheed spokesman added. “What is left to be fielded would be things like software integration, weapons separation testing, flight testing and airworthiness testing.”

Lockheed hasn’t released details of the design of the Sidekick mechanism. The F-35A and F-35C are equipped with two internal bays, with each carrying two AIM-120s or a single AIM-120 and a large bomb such as a 2,000-lb. GBU-32 Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM). The lift fan aboard the F-35B limits each internal bay to carrying either two AIM-120s or one missile and a 1,000-lb. JDAM.

It’s possible the Sidekick replaces the AIM-120 launch adapter in the high section of the internal bay with a mechanism that can store two of the Raytheon-built, radar-guided missiles in the same space as one now.

The idea of equipping the F-35A and F-35C with a six-missile load-out in the weapons bay has been around for over a decade. Until Wilson’s comments during a scheduled media briefing, Lockheed hadn’t discussed the idea publicly in several years.

“Lockheed Martin has gone out on its own and developed this capability,” Wilson said. “And now we’ve let the [joint program office] know that it’s out there. It will be over to [business development] and other people to decide how and when it gets implemented. Lockheed Martin stands ready to help the customer implement it when they want it.”

...

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 04 May 2019 02:54

^ The sidekick rack was actually designed a few years ago and has likely been offered as a candidate upgrade to the various operators.

From 2017 -

One example is the aircraft manufacturer's own project "Sidekick" which is about stacking Amraam [poor translation] missiles on top of each other, allowing the F-35 to fly with six such air-to-air missiles internally instead of four as today. Lockheed Martin has a prototype that will soon be transferred to operational testing.. LINK


The internal bays were always designed to accommodate 3 Aim-120 AMRAAM sized missiles each and 6 Aim-120 carriage (dubbed "Expanded AMRAAM carriage") can be found in future upgrades lists in F-35 program documents going back to the 2000's. It's just a matter of when the primary operators want this capability. Right now, the US services and partners are probably more interested in integrating current and future A2G weapons (SDBII, AARGM, SiAW, SPEAR III, JSM, JAGM-F, AGM-X and future hypersonic weapons) but once that testing pace draws down they can probably work on this..Once IOTE and FOT&E are over there will be about 20-24 aircraft in the Intgegrated Test Force that will then pick up some of this work, but for now their are only about 2-4 aircraft available to support development, the rest are all focusing on IOTE and will later help with FOTE for Block 4 C2D2.

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Last edited by brar_w on 04 May 2019 07:53, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 04 May 2019 03:43

From AW&ST

Turkey plans to have TF-X first flight in 2026. Previously planned for 2023, which was wildly optimistic.

ISTANBUL—Turkish Aerospace (TUSAS) has revised the timetable for the development of the TF-X indigenous fighter jet, delaying the first flight by three years to 2026.

Despite hopes of flying the aircraft during the Turkish Republic’s centenary in 2023, the company now is planning to roll out a prototype in that year, TUSAS President and CEO Temel Kotil told Aerospace DAILY during the IDEF defense show here May 2.

“Ground testing” then will follow before a flight in 2026, Kotil says. He is hopeful that initial batches of aircraft could enter service in 2029.

The timetable adjustment had been reported by some specialist Turkish media previously and is hardly a surprise given the challenging timescales associated with the program.

The TF-X is planned to be a fifth-generation fighter with a 60,000-lb. maximum take-off weight aircraft and powered by a pair of 25,000-30,000-lb.-thrust-class engines.

Kotil describes the program as a “monster”—he is building the company to have 10,000 engineers working on the program by the mid-2020s. The fighter program also now has its own separate division within the organization.

TF-X prototypes will be powered the General Electric F110, a powerplant with which Turkey has intimate knowledge through its operations with the F-16 Fighting Falcon.

Operational aircraft would be powered by an indigenous engine developed by TR Motor, a joint venture company of which TUSAS and BMC—an automotive company—are shareholders.

Britain’s BAE Systems also is supporting TF-X development efforts through a contract signed in 2017. Some 100 British engineers are working with their Turkish counterparts.

During the IDEF show here, TUSAS showed off a concept of future cockpit technologies. Currently envisioned is the use of a single wide-area display like that seen on the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, but this would be supplemented by a helmet-mounted sight capable of projecting augmented reality displays that can be manipulated through hand gestures.

Artificial intelligence would support a flight leader providing the pilot with data and suggestions on which aircraft in the area would be best suited to attack a particular target.

The IDEF event also saw a contract signed for the development of a supersonic wind tunnel facility to be established at the company’s Ankara base to support not only the development of the TF-X but also the Hurjet jet trainer the company hopes to fly around 2021. The wind tunnel will be built by Canadian firm Aiolos. Kotil says more infrastructure work is to follow, with tenders upcoming for the development of a radar cross section range.

More detail about the TF-X is expected to emerge at this year’s Paris Air Show, where TUSAS is expected to display a full-scale mock-up of the aircraft.


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