International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

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brar_w
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 04 May 2019 20:32

Wouldn't be surprised if this slips from 2026 to 2030. That is probably more realistic even under the most optimistic scenario.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Mukesh.Kumar » 06 May 2019 10:38

Sukhoi Superjet-100]Sukhoi Superjet-100 belonging to Aeroflot catches fire at landing after reporting technical problems



Forty-one people were killed after a Russian plane made an emergency landing and burst into flames at Sheremetyevo airport in Moscow.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Rakesh » 07 May 2019 03:08

https://twitter.com/livefist/status/1123897299464261633 ---> For the first time in aviation history, BAE Systems Air says an aircraft (the MAGMA UAV) has been manoeuvred in flight using supersonically blown air, removing the need for complex movable flight control surfaces.

Successful demonstration of breakthrough blown-air flight technologies to revolutionise future aircraft design
https://www.baesystems.com/en/article/m ... n=SocialCT

Image

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Rakesh » 07 May 2019 03:15

https://twitter.com/GarethJennings3/sta ... 2969756672 ---> Qatar to arm F-15QA Advanced Eagles with the Harpoon Block 2 anti-shipping missile. Integration contract anticipated Q4 FY 2021, work to last 26 months. Story to come...

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby MeshaVishwas » 08 May 2019 18:13

#DidYouKnow that after a 1,400 hour flight simulation, the Eurojet engine produces the same operating performance as a brand new engine. #facts #technology #avgeek #capabilities

https://twitter.com/eurofighter/status/1126067994721910789?s=19
Very impressive.I just don't like the simulation part.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Rakesh » 10 May 2019 01:39

Right On Cue, Russia Says It's Ready To Offer Turkey Su-57 Fighters In Place Of F-35s
https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/2 ... e-of-f-35s

https://twitter.com/MSuchkov_ALM/status ... 4410330112 ----> Sergey Chemezov, Head of Rostec, company that expedited S400 deal, says Russia "ready to cooperate" with Turkey over production of Su57 fighters should #Ankara's participation in the production of F-35 is suspended.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby A Nandy » 12 May 2019 10:56

Flat packed satellites with no dispenser - 60 sats * 200 kgs

https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-starli ... ry-design/

According to Musk, SpaceX has actually entirely gotten rid of a satellite-dispenser middle-man, instead relying on the structure of the satellites themselves to act as their own launch adapters and deployment mechanisms. This has been done in the past on a far smaller scale – typically with 2-3 several-ton satellites – but has never been attempted at the scale SpaceX is just days away from launching.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby NRao » 14 May 2019 02:09

A small space startup that's never launched a rocket keeps landing big contracts

Tim Ellis, Relativity's CEO who co-founded the company just over three years ago, said Relativity is attracting more attention because people are excited about its novel approach to manufacturing. Its rockets will be 3D-printed top to bottom.

"People are really starting to rally around that as the future of rocket technology," Ellis told CNN Business. "3D printing allows us to evolve extremely quickly."

Relativity says it will be able to reconfigure its 3D printers to change the design of its rockets and nimbly respond to satellite companies' needs.

What's the next internet-like investing opportunity? Some on Wall Street say it's spaceflight
It's an approach that has excited some high-profile investors.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 14 May 2019 21:33

Link

The U.S. Department of Defense has selected Leonardo’s BriteCloud active expendable decoy to carry out foreign comparative testing with the U.S. Air National Guard (ANG) under the remit of the Office of the Secretary of Defense, a program that could lead to a U.S. forces-wide adoption of the countermeasures system.

Foreign Comparative Test (FCT) is an avenue by which the DoD identifies and tests allied-developed technologies that are not necessarily being developed by U.S. industry, specifically systems that have a high technology readiness level (TRL) so that they can be rapidly adopted. ANG Lockheed Martin F-16 fighters will be used throughout this test campaign, which is due to begin in the coming months and is expected to last some two to three years. While the testing will be led by the service itself, Leonardo will be involved throughout. Leonardo said that BriteCloud will be tested in a variety of challenging scenarios to provide a high level of confidence in the performance of the system, demonstrating its ability to defeat radar-guided missile attacks.

BriteCloud is a self-contained radio-frequency countermeasure that separates from the aircraft it is deployed from, which adds to the survivability of the platform that is being targeted by the missile.
The “218” version will be used, which is compatible with the AN/ALE-47 countermeasure dispensers on the ANG’s F-16s.

“Under the Foreign Comparative Test program, the U.S. government looks to allies that have developed technology that has a high TRL in order to satisfy requirements quickly and economically,” Jon McCullagh, head of strategic campaigns for EW at Leonardo Electronics, told AIN. “BriteCloud, having already been approved for service by the Royal Air Force, is the only such system worldwide to be at such an advanced technology readiness level, which is one of the reasons why it has been selected for the program.”

...



Something like this is going to be an essential piece of equipment for IAF combat jets to be able to evade AIM-120 AMRAAM and SD-10 radar guided missiles fired from PAF jets in the future.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 16 May 2019 03:06

From AW&ST

Sweden may retain older Gripen C/D models well into the 2030s. Earlier plan was to replace them all with the 60 Gripen E/Fs.

Sweden is proposing strengthening its air force by retaining older model Gripen C/D fighters well into the 2030s.

Rather than replacing the JAS 39C/D model aircraft with the new Gripen E, currently under development, the two aircraft would operate alongside each other until the introduction of a new, next-generation fighter aircraft in the late 2030s, possibly co-developed with the UK.

The proposals are part of a future defense strategy published in a white paper on May 14 by the Swedish Defense Commission, an all-party committee studying the country’s future defense needs. The paper suggests the Swedish Air Force retain a strength of six fighter squadrons with the Gripen C/D as its backbone, and retain that type as the Gripen E is introduced. The number of squadrons could then rise, with four equipped with the Gripen E and three with the Gripen C/D.

As many as 60 Gripen C/Ds could be retained and operate alongside the 60 Gripen Es currently contracted with Saab, potentially giving Sweden a fast jet fleet of around 120 aircraft, up from the estimated 100 Gripen C/Ds flying now.

The C/D model will also be the first to be replaced by the next-generation aircraft, development of which will start to be funded between 2021-2025.

“The next-generation fighter aircraft will replace JAS 39C toward the end of the 2030s,” an English summary document of the white paper says.

The commission says bilateral and multilateral approaches should be studied for the development of the future combat aircraft, noting that “possible cooperation with the UK is being discussed.” Aerospace DAILY has previously reported on a “deepening dialogue” between Saab and BAE Systems on the UK’s Tempest future combat aircraft.

Development steps the commission suggests include studies, joint technology development and demonstrator activities “to secure access to critical material and technology for the coming fighter aircraft.”

The commission is also proposing the urgent introduction of a new training aircraft to replace the air force’s aging Saab SK60s, a type that has been in service for 50 years. Initial plans would see a turboprop aircraft used for initial or basic training, while tactical and advanced training would be carried out on the two-seat Gripen D despite suggestions that Stockholm become an operator of the T-X trainer that Saab has developed in conjunction with Boeing.

The use of the Gripen Ds will depend on the outcome of the proposals to keep the earlier-model Gripens in service, the document says. The commission says the acquisition of the new training aircraft should be made in the early 2020s, but “urgent decisions” ought to be made before 2021. The document also notes the air force is facing a shortfall of pilots in the coming years, and that efforts are needed to shorten flight training programs and allow pilots to re-enter the air force when required.

The commission also suggests steps should be taken to replace the air force’s fleet of Saab 340-based airborne early warning platforms, which use Saab’s Erieye radar. Replacement of the country’s C-130 Hercules, the oldest C-130s flying in Europe, is also being delayed again, with a replacement not envisioned until the end of the 2020s.

The proposals, which were handed to Defense Minister Peter Hultqvist, will now be studied for their feasibility and form part of a defense bill to be presented to the country’s legislature, the Riksdag, in 2020.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 16 May 2019 03:08

From AW&ST

Image

PHILADELPHIA—Boeing has completed initial wind-tunnel tests of a compound-helicopter version of the AH-64E Apache, showing potential for increased speed and range.

The aircraft has a tail-mounted variable-pitch propeller for propulsion and a larger wing to offload lift from the rotor and allow higher speed.

Lift and thrust compounding by adding a propulsor and wing have been identified as a way of expanding the Apache’s capability into the Future Vertical Lift (FVL) environment, Boeing propulsion technology engineer Ed Brouwers said.

Under FVL, the U.S. Army plans to replace its medium utility and armed reconnaissance fleets with advanced, high-speed rotorcraft beginning around 2030. But there are no formal plans to replace the AH-64 attack helicopter, which has a cruise speed of about 150 kt.

Performance goals for the compound Apache, powered by two 3,000-ship Improved Turbine Engines (ITE), are a 185-kt. maximum cruise speed and 460-nm range carrying a 5,900-lb. mission payload, both at 6,000-ft./95F high/hot conditions.

But Boeing is looking for increased capability within a set of design constraints mostly focused on minimizing the cost of upgrading the AH-64E to the new configuration, says Brouwers, speaking at the Vertical Flight Society’s Forum 75 convention here on May 15.

Starting with an ITE-powered AH-64E—the engine upgrade is already planned—the advanced Apache would retain the Apache’s composite main rotor blades (CRMB), cockpit, sensors, weapons and defensive aids. Aerodynamic improvements would be made to reduce drag and increase speed.

So far, Boeing has completed a series of wind-tunnel tests of the isolated rotor, rotor and wing, drag and propeller using powered and unpowered models in a range of scales from 16% to 30%. The next step will be a full-configuration powered model test, Brouwers says.

The isolated-rotor tests evaluated the performance of the CMRB rotor at high advance ratio (the ratio of forward speed to tip speed) to measure loads and controllability. In tests up to 225 kt., performance “greatly exceeded” that of the current rotor, he says.

But drag of the CMRB rotor at high speed was higher than desired, so Boeing determined the Apache needs both thrust and lift compounding, requiring a wing to offload lift from the rotor as well as the propulsor to offload thrust as speed increases.

Rotor and wing interaction tests evaluated a range of wing incidence angles, aspect ratio and area, and flap deflections to maximize lift-to-drag ratio while minimizing downforce from the rotor on the wing in hover. “We achieved the same lift sharing in different ways,” he says.

Drag tests by understanding the parasite drag of the baseline AH-64E. The first series of changes to the airframe resulted in a 24% reduction in drag. The largest reduction came from changing the arrangement of the external stores–a modification that could be applied to the existing fleet, he says.

Boeing then tested a more-aerodynamic “volume- and G-managed design” with retractable gear to reduce drag, additional fuel volume to increase range and other aerodynamic refinements. This resulted in 30% lower parasite drag, but is not the final design, Brouwers said.

After evaluating multiple configurations, Boeing picked a compound design for the Apache that is similar to that of the Lockheed AH-56 Cheyenne. A five-blade variable-pitch propeller is mounted on the tail, but the tail rotor is retained for anti-torque control in the hover and at low speed.

Brouwers says the 360 hr. of wind-tunnel tests, completed in January, resulted in “a significant increase in compound aircraft understanding” and produced a data set that will be used to support further work on advanced Apache configurations.

...


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 16 May 2019 03:36

The entire objective of the FVL effort is to develop capability with cruise speeds in the 250-300 Kt range (cruise being the operational word). Unless Boeing is pitching the transport helos be escorted by the light attack scout FVL variant how is this Apache expected to escort them?

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 16 May 2019 18:02

Kartik wrote:Link

The U.S. Department of Defense has selected Leonardo’s BriteCloud active expendable decoy to carry out foreign comparative testing with the U.S. Air National Guard (ANG) under the remit of the Office of the Secretary of Defense, a program that could lead to a U.S. forces-wide adoption of the countermeasures system.
.


The F-35 program looked at F&F solutions back in the day and stuck with the towed setup because it was believed that future threats would require cooperation between the onboard EW capability of the aircraft and the deployed countermeasures. There is simply more computational power onboard to help employ better techniques and to coordinate various CMs. Cognitive EW further bolsters this as the computational requirements there are quite draining. Leonardo actually developed an F-35 compliant form factor of this product but it was not taken up by any F-35 customer in the FOM phase of the program last year. Where this solution works best is on legacy aircraft which are not embarking on an extensive overhaul of their EW systems. This allows them to deploy these 'jamming in a can' solutions and become a lot more survivable.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 17 May 2019 00:52

IMO, the expendable towed decoy is an absolute must-have piece of equipment for all of the IAF's current and future assets. Haven't yet heard of any such indigenous solution or an Israeli solution that could be integrated. Even the Rafale doesn't have this counter-active AAM feature. Not sure about what other features its EW suite has to jam active seekers on inbound missiles.

brar_w
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 17 May 2019 02:36

An towed system is better when you have the organic EW system that is capable and can do a lot of the computational and ESM work to help develop the jamming solution. The Brite Cloud solution actually allows a lot of this to be incorporated on aircraft that don't necessarily have a highly capable organic EW capability. It isn't towed and is F&F. As I said, the former situation is really good as it allows you to develop solutions that are collaborative in nature especially when you have a limited systems that you can tow..so I guess both solutions are suitable depending on the host platform and intended mission.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby A Nandy » 18 May 2019 13:27

Why our manned program must be continued beyond LEO in the coming decades:

https://www.space.com/30074-trillion-do ... flyby.html

When an asteroid packed with about $5 trillion worth of platinum zoomed past Earth this month scientists were ready, capturing the space rock on radar as it sailed safely by our planet.

The asteroid 2011 UW158 missed Earth by about 1.5 million miles (2.4 million kilometers) — a little more than six times the distance between the planet and the moon — during its flyby on July 19. There was never a chance of a collision during the flyby, researchers said. But it was close enough for NASA scientists to create a video of the asteroid from radar observations.

The near-Earth asteroid is an intriguing candidate for mining, said representatives of the company Planetary Resources, which is hoping to begin these activities in the coming decades. (On July 16, Planetary Resources' Arkyd 3 Reflight spacecraft was deployed from the International Space Station to test software, control systems and avionics that could be used for asteroid hunting.) [Asteroid Mining: Planetary Resources Plan in Pictures]

Previous studies by Planetary Resources estimated that 2011 UW158 contains about $5.4 trillion worth of platinum, an element that is rare on Earth.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Haridas » 20 May 2019 06:00


brar_w
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 20 May 2019 06:23

The price was always expected to be $80 Million URF or lower by 2020 (buy year) and they were sticking to that reduction goal for the last 3-4 batches now so this should come as no surprise. I believe that a stable URF of $75 Million or so isn't too far fetched once they begin doing Multi-Year Procurement deals which is just a year or so down the pike. That's what cranking these out at 150 or more a year gets you in terms of EOS especially when you can allow suppliers to negotiate with vendors for 3-4 batches at a time which MYP usually allows them to do.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Mukesh.Kumar » 20 May 2019 15:09

Bad weather forces French carrier jets to land in Indonesia

Seven fighter jets from a French aircraft carrier made unscheduled landings in Indonesia on Saturday because of bad weather during training.

The Dassault Rafale jets touched down safely at Sultan Iskandar Muda air force base in Aceh, an Indonesian official told the AFP news agency.

They had been due to return to the Charles de Gaulle carrier out in the Indian Ocean, west of Sumatra.


Wonder how bad could the weather have been to force this? Could guru's enlighten on this?

Kartik
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 22 May 2019 02:17

brar_w wrote:An towed system is better when you have the organic EW system that is capable and can do a lot of the computational and ESM work to help develop the jamming solution. The Brite Cloud solution actually allows a lot of this to be incorporated on aircraft that don't necessarily have a highly capable organic EW capability. It isn't towed and is F&F. As I said, the former situation is really good as it allows you to develop solutions that are collaborative in nature especially when you have a limited systems that you can tow..so I guess both solutions are suitable depending on the host platform and intended mission.


Yes indeed. But IAF aircraft completely lack any decoy solution as of today and if the Brite Cloud is retrofitted onto legacy systems like the Su-30MKI, Mirage-2000 and MiG-29UPG and even the Tejas Mk1 and Mk1A, it offers a credible defence against the active guided missiles that the IAF has already encountered.

Looking at the video, the size of the Brite Cloud decoy is small enough to be able to fit in 10-12 Brite Cloud decoys for a Su-30MKI sized jet and 4-6 for a Tejas Mk1 sized light fighter. Not very different from a chaff or flare dispenser fitted on.



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