International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

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brar_w
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 23 Jun 2020 18:04

Still no pictures of F/A-18 E/F's or Typhoons dropping inert nukes :mrgreen:

F-35A Dropping Inert B61-12 Nuclear Bombs During DCA (Dual Capable Aircraft) Tests

The photos distributed to the DVIDS distribution service provide additional details about the dates when the tests were carried out: the first separation test with AF-1 flown by Jason Shulze was conducted on Jun. 27, 2019; sixth separation test with AF-1 (pilot unspecified) was carried out on Nov. 7, 2019; first separation test from AF-6 flown by Major Chris ‘Beast’ Taylor was conducted on Nov. 25, 2019. Separation test #6 with AF-1 was carried out with F-35 AF-01 flown by Major Rachael “Banshee” Winiecki on Feb. 6, 2020. A more recent test with AF-6 was carried out on Apr. 2, 2020 (no additional detail can be gathered about this test).

“the B61-12 represent the latest LEP (Life-Extention Program) upgrade to the B61 line of nuclear weapons that has already been extensively tested with the F-15E Strike Eagles of the 422nd Test and Evaluation Squadron, back in 2015.

The Life Extension Program or LEP, will replace the B61 -3, -4, -7, and -10 mods, with the -12 that, along with the B83, will become the only remaining gravity delivered nukes in the inventory.

The B61-12 gravity bomb ensures the current capability for the air-delivered leg of the U.S. strategic nuclear triad well into the future for both bombers and dual-capable aircraft supporting NATO,” said Paul Waugh, AFNWC’s Air-Delivered Capabilities director in a U.S. Air Force release dated Apr. 13 (more or less when the world learned about the first use of the famous MOAB in Afghanistan). The B61-12 will be compatible with the B-2A, B-21, F-15E, F-16C/D, F-16 MLU, F-35 and PA-200 aircraft.

With the integration of the B61-12, the “iconic nuclear fighter role, performed in the past by the F-15E and F-16, is being passed to the F-35A to play a future role in national security.” Other partner nations are slated to transfer the NATO nuclear role to the F-35A in the future.



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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 23 Jun 2020 21:02

Australia begins the search for its Next Gen. training solution to replace the Hawk which they would ideally like to fully replace by 2026 the currently scheduled retirement time frame. The T-7A enters its Operational Test and Evaluation in early-mid 2023 and early 2023 is also when Low Rate Initial Production will begin to provide aircraft for USAF's mid 2024 IOC.

Canberra kicks off search for new advanced jet trainer


Canberra has commenced the search for a new advanced jet trainer to replace BAE Systems Hawk 127s operated by the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF).

A request for information (RFI) for the Air 6002 Phase 1 requirement was issued on 1 June, says the Australian Department of Defence.“Defence is yet to fully define the requirements for Air 6002 Phase 1 Future Lead-in Fighter Training System,” it says.

“However, aircraft performance and aircraft mission systems that bridge between the pilot training system and fast jet conversion courses will be critical requirements. The Future Lead-in Fighter Training System will be expected to remain relevant to its role in training fast jet aircrew and supporting joint force training, to be adaptable to those needs as they evolve, to be affordable, and to be safe out to an indicative timeframe of 2050.”

Of major trainer manufacturers, BAE, Boeing and Leonardo all say they are interested in the requirment.

BAE is upbeat about the prospects for its long-running platform. “The Hawk is the world’s most successful and proven military aircraft trainer, built on more than 35 years of experience training pilots for the world’s leading air forces. For more than 20 years, we have worked in partnership with the Royal Australian Air Force to ensure it has the pilots it requires… and we believe Hawk is the proven solution to continue this partnership.”

Boeing plans to pitch its developmental T-7A Red Hawk, having briefed on the jet at the Avalaon Airshow in February 2019. “[The] T-7A Red Hawk is an all-new advanced pilot training system designed for the US Air Force training mission, with the flexibility to evolve as technologies, missions and training needs change. It includes trainer aircraft, ground-based training and support – designed together from the start.”

Leonardo says it will offer the M-346, which it claims is the ideal platform for training future pilots of the Lockheed Martin F-35. It notes that the M-346 is operated by Israel, Italy, Poland and Singapore, all of which are current or prospective operators of the Joint Strike Fighter.

“The M-346 training system is cost-effective and state-of-the-art, with the reliability of a fully developed programme, representing a competitive and no-risk solution compared with the alternatives,” says Leonardo.

Korea Aerospace Industries, which produces the T-50 advanced jet trainer, tells FlightGlobal that it is reviewing the RFI.

Cirium fleets data shows that the RAAF operates 33 Hawk 127s.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby SBajwa » 24 Jun 2020 02:58

ISRO does have a program called ADMIRE to reuse the first stage of various rockets. check below


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby NRao » 24 Jun 2020 07:17

For geeks, who want some details on manufacturing rockets. ULA CEO conducts tour.

54 minutes long.


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby NRao » 24 Jun 2020 07:58

Very interesting addendum. Guidance, autonomous updating of data, why Russian engines, Blue Origin engines, etc

15:00 minutes


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 24 Jun 2020 18:51

Translation: Units of the US Army in Japan, including the 3rd Wing and the 35th Fighting Wing belonging to Misawa Air Base, conducted "Elephant Walk".

 This is the first time that the US and Japan have jointly conducted the "Elephant Walk".

 In this "Elephant Walk," the Air Self-Defense Force F-35A, US Air Force F-16CM, MC-130J, US Navy EA-18, C-12, and P-8 aircraft work together on the runway. I marched while majesticly taxiing (sliding on the ground).

 Such efforts that symbolize a strong Japan-US alliance can be implemented only at the Misawa base, which is used jointly by the US and Japan.

LINK


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 26 Jun 2020 18:10

Some pretty cool footage of the CH-47 and M777 LWH operations -


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Prem » 27 Jun 2020 02:58

https://usadefensenews.com/2020/06/26/u ... guam-base/
The National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal 2021 has sought fighter jet training detachments for India, Japan, and Australia in Guam.
The NDAA 2021 was introduced in the US Senate on Thursday.The decision comes around 6 months after US Defense Secretary Mark Esper signed an MOU with Singapore Defense Minister Ng Eng Hen for the latter to set up a similar pilot training detachment in Guam.The bill emphasizes on the Pacific Deterrence Initiative of the US Military and to focus more resources on the Indo-Pacific region.Furthermore, the act proposes the procurement of 48 Long Range Anti-Ship Missiles (LRASMs), to be deployed in the Indo-Pacific region.AA also seeks acceleration in the effort to establish F-35A operating locations forward in the Indo-pacific region.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby NRao » 28 Jun 2020 12:42

And you thought you understood "stealth ". Plesse watch the vid in the following and watch how F-35Bs actually vanish into thin air.

https://mobile.twitter.com/HMSQNLZ/stat ... 9966443520

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 29 Jun 2020 22:22

ChanakyaM wrote:
idan wrote:American THAAD is still in Israel. In all likelihood we can see a THAAD in action in Ladakh and that will be a strong message to the dilly-dallying Russians.

A simple compare of THAAD and S400 shows the deficiencies of THAAD, so what additional help do we expect by trying to deploy THAAD?(if the amrikans give it to us).


“Simple look” is really not sufficient for a well educated comparison. These systems aren’t solving the same “problem” so any “deficiency” being attributed to either system needs to be well thought out.

What operational problem does THAAD solve? It solves the problem or saturated Ballistic missile attacks from safer havens where "TEL hunting" becomes challenging (think IRBM ranged missiles that can be launched from farther away from the target. Even some ICBM class capability is coming shortly to THAAD) and the discrimination problem associated with the more sophisticated ballistic missiles capable of employing decoys or other advanced countermeasures. This is the reason it has a MW class X-Band AESA (now upgraded to GaN for more range and sensitivity which makes it the largest and most powerful mobile GaN radar in the world) the size of a school bus instead of a more efficient S or L band system. This is also the reason that a typical battery operates with around 48 missiles loaded in launchers with additional on stand by and a radar that is constantly staring at an air/space and searching for just one type of target.

So if you were protecting a tactical defended area with a composite unit (call it a battalion though this isn’t used by its current operator ) with two “traditional” batteries and say three radars (2 with the "batteries" + 1 stand-alone) you now have nearly 100 missiles packed and linked up with the ability to remote launch ( launchers with missiles could be miles away) and daisy chained radar and launcher combinations to expand coverage. That's just at the current US deployed levels. THAAD can handle a 50% increase in magazine from what the US Army currently operates, without any system change or upgrade.

Same why the stand alone TPY-2 radar is used to provide better discrimination and OTH cuing to US Navy’s S band AEGIS radars. So comparisons with the S-400 aren’t justified as these systems aren’t solving the same problem and aren’t architectured for similar challenges. For the unique challenges THAAD has been designed to solve (TBM attacks on concentrated Military targets in an expeditionary environment) it stands apart in terms of current and planned capability. Likewise, as a long range air and missile defense system the S-400 too stands apart provided that it comes with the newer active seeker interceptor. They aren't even remotely designed to confront similar challenges though both fall under the general "Missile Defense" systems list.

Cain Marko wrote:
SSridhar wrote:The Americans wanted us to buy THAAD instead of S-400

True. But we didn't want an ABM, not when we have one of our own. What was needed was a SAM system with ultra long range. The s400 does that at multiple levels...400km, 200km, 120km and finally 40km. Basically it is a very powerful multi layered system with effective AIRBM capacity. Thaad, I'm not sure has this comprehensive capability. Totally different.


Can't compare the two systems when it comes to BMD capability. THAAD is 100% focused on the Anti MRBM and IRBM mission and has residual ICBM capability on the way (like 3-4 years away). It has a dedicated high power BMD radar that is looking up, for the very specific threat, all the time and has the capability to discriminate higher end RV's amidst advanced CMs (very powerful X band AESA radar, with the most optimal band for advanced discrimination). It also has dedicated Hit-to-kill long range interceptors that can create that 200 km defended area against the relevant threat type (MRBM and IRBM) which is very different from what dual-purpose interceptors are capable of (their TBM envelope is much smaller compared to long range shots based on a lofted profile against a slower target flying at sub 50K ft. altitudes). Plus it brings volume for counter-raid performance - The organic battery is capable of supporting up to 72 interceptors with 9 launchers as a baseline. A high number of launchers per battery, and a high number of missiles per launcher means that you can handle raids easier and better without having to take launchers out to reload them. I don't think anyone looking to compare BMD capability will have any sort of doubt as to which system is specifically tailored to this threat vs which has some residual capability to support it. THAAD is specifically designed to provide extended range protection (against up to 4,500 km ranged ballistic missiles) over a defended area measured in the hundreds of km. With the Increment 2 interceptor that should double if not increase more.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Cain Marko » 30 Jun 2020 06:15

^thanks for the confirmation Brar.. how do the drdo aad/pad compare vs thaad? Iirc drdos next challenge was longer ranged 5k class bm...

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 30 Jun 2020 06:35

Cain Marko wrote:^thanks for the confirmation Brar.. how do the drdo aad/pad compare vs thaad? Iirc drdos next challenge was longer ranged 5k class bm...


Comparisons needn't matter. BMD systems are designed around user requirements and specific threats. US has no ballistic missile threats coming from Canada or Mexico. It designs its theater systems for expeditionary use and as such breaks capability down into systems that all three services bring to the fight (USAF controls all the space and EW portion). So THAAD slots in between the very long range BMD capability that AEGIS provides from the sea (protecting land targets) and the short range coverage, against short and medium ranged missiles, that the PATRIOT provides.

THAAD has residual capability against ICBM (radar can see at distance, C2 can handle the tracks etc) and as an ASAT system as well (this was confirmed during Burnt Frost when senior US officials mentioned publicly that they could have also done it with THAAD).

THAAD was always meant to cover the high SRBM to IRBM threat but its operational capability demonstrations were designed to pace a threat which was MRBM capability at the time, but has grown to advanced IRBM (with decoys) capability since then. When they deployed to the Pacific this was important (Chinese MRBM's and IRBM's are more capable than Iran's). To keep pace, THAAD was tested against advanced MRBM targets, with and without decoys, and the envelope expanded progressively to validate the IRBM capability. As threats mature further I'm sure they'll open up additional IRBM capability. The system has it..its only a matter of developing those target missiles and demonstrating that credibly so you have confidence when it is deployed against that threat. Ballistic Missile capability is only as good as the cadence with which you test and demonstrate it and how much you invest in your threat systems (and how representative they are to your actual threats). THAAD has had 17 straight intercepts in testing and operational unit demonstrations IIRC. Majority of those targets have represented threats the US expected to encounter at the time (hence early target capability was heavily MRBM focused). In the next 3-5 years, expect more longer range and higher capability (CM's) targets being tested to fully demo the capability against the IRBM threat. This will then blend into the ICBM territory with the increment 2 interceptor which is a short term development.

Similarly, the US expects its air-bases and troop concentrations to come under saturated attacks on a consistent basis and as such the THAAD organic battery was desired to be 72 loaded missiles in its 9 launchers. This would provide a ripple fired Exo and Endo intercept strategy (dubbed look-shoot-look-shoot (one exo shot followed by one terminal endo shot at the same target)) for every long ranged weapon and you could continue to stay in the fight for longer without having to constantly resupply and have non operational launchers. Iran launched 15 ballistic missiles (IIRC) at 2 air-bases that they KNEW had no BMD capability. What would that calculation have looked like if they new this was defended? Current and future raid-scenarios have to be factored in when developing systems. And this will be user specific. Now they want to tip over into the ICBM envelope (at least the lower end ICBM ranged weapons) and provide a second layer to US homeland defense BMD capability. This follows the Gallium Nitride upgrade to the radar which increases range, sensitivity and the discrimination capability which was already best in class (along with SBX) given the band they chose to operate in (discrimination trumps raw range on the TPY-2).

US BMD program, at the theater level, is tiered. THAAD is the upper tier which handles threats between 50 km (altitude) and 150 km (altitude). The upper end of this limit will likely more than double with the increment 2 interceptor. The PATRIOT, the lower tier system, handles threats below 50 km altitude though next year, the THAAD organic battery will be capable of adding 2 x PAC-3 MSE launchers (24 total missiles) which would give it the ability to also do lower tier intercepts organically (it can do it now by providing targting for a PAC-3 MSE launched by a dedicated PATRIOT battery). This way, these sensors (TPY-2 operating in FB or Terminal modes handling upper tier threats, PATRIOT radar (and LTAMDS in the future) and TPS-59 handling lower tier threats) and shooters cover portions of the air and space allowing more optimal solutions given specific threat types with some envelope overlap which is now getting wider (THAAD is acquiring lower tier capability with MSE missile and launchers, while PATRIOT is expected to acquire upper tier capability via its next generation interceptor).

No two BMD needs are similarly architectured. Threats are different and so are needs and doctrine. This applies to the broader Air-Defense systems as well. Israel for example slices its systems differently between the Arrow and the David's Sling+PATRIOT. Even though the US MDA plays an advisory and SE role in most of their BMD programs. Their threats are different and at different ranges with different capabilities. As are raid sizes you envision. At this point, nearly 100% of US PATRIOT and THAAD development is being dictated by ballistic missile raid threats from China and Iran. This is reflected in their magazine sizes.

A normal PAC-3 or MSE load out is anywhere between 12 to 16 missiles per launcher. This when coupled with THAAD provides triple digit interceptors protecting troop concentrations and theater level deployments. Is that enough or is it an overkill? That is doctrine dependent. You can't win a war with missile defense or even defend against all missiles. Missile Defense then is a capability that you buy in order to deter and hold for long enough to destroy the enemies capability in other ways (degrade its capability to target you). Given the ability of the USAF and USN to create and maintain air-superiority, it is logical for the US threats to pepper them with ballistic missiles. It is cheaper than to try to take them on with air power. So BMD systems (either land or sea based) have evolved to counter that and these interceptor concentrations have to keep people alive long enough for the USAF/USN to degrade missile delivery and targeting capability utilizing their airpower.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 01 Jul 2020 06:42

US appears to confirm expanded F-15QA buy for Qatar


The United States appears to have confirmed an expanded procurement by Qatar of the Boeing F-15QA Advanced Eagle combat aircraft, with recent Department of Defense (DoD) articles and notifications referring to a larger number than officially contracted.

The Gulf state is currently contracted to receive 36 of the latest-generation multirole fighters, with a deal signed in December 2017. However, since at least late-May the DoD has issued no fewer than three official statements in which it has referred to a buy of 48 aircraft. The US State Department initially cleared Qatar to buy 72 aircraft, so this expanded procurement would be in line with current Congressional approvals.

On 23 May the DoD disclosed that the US Army Corps of Engineers had contracted Doha-based company BAH-ICM JV to build facilities for the Qatar Emiri Air Force’s (QEAF’s) new fleet. In the notification, the department said; “The Foreign Military Sales (FMS) purchase of forty-eight (48) F-15QA aircraft improves the State of Qatar's capability to meet current and future enemy air-to-air and air-to-ground threats”. Janes noted this discrepancy in the numbers at the time, but as it was the first such occurrence this suggested that it may have been in error.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 02 Jul 2020 01:12

South Korea to buy 20 TA-50 Block 2s from KAI for $562 million.

Surprisingly, it still doesn't have a targeting pod or BVRAAM integrated. And yet, thanks to the fact that KAI has marketed it well and it serves the basic fast jet needs of some nations, it has received export orders. The Tejas Mk1 itself is far superior in terms of combat capabilities to the FA-50, both in strike and air to air missions. Just look at the size of the radome on the FA-50 and one can realise that the diameter of the radar on it will be significantly smaller than on the Tejas. Which means smaller range for detection and tracking of aerial and ground targets. The Mk1A with the AESA radar will be even further ahead unless KAI works on a drastic upgrade of the FA-50.

The fact that the FA-50 (and all T-50, TA-50) variants have a second seat, it takes up a significant volume of space that other single seat light fighters would use for a fuel tank. As it is, the FA-50's limited capabilities hardly require a second WSO or pilot in the backseat. The most sensible option would be to modify the FA-50 to a single seater and use the freed up volume to add an integral fuel tank, but looks like they're exploring CFTs instead.

From AW&ST

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SEOUL, BEIJING—The South Korean defense ministry has ordered a second batch of Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI) TA-50s, reportedly totaling 20 aircraft, as lead-in fighter trainers.

Separately, KAI and the defense ministry are looking at improving a related attack version of the KAI T-50 family.

Announcing the order on June 29, KAI valued it at 688 billion won ($562 million). The ministry said it was worth 1 trillion won—a figure that the Edaily news service said included airframes, engines, simulators and maintenance equipment.

As is common when South Korea contracts for defense equipment, neither the ministry nor supplier mentioned the quantity to be supplied. The Maeil Business and Kyunghyang Shinmun newspapers said the number was 20.

The agreement takes domestic orders for KAI’s T-50 family to 164 aircraft, divided among the T-50, TA-50 and FA-50 versions. The company also has booked export orders for 64 aircraft of the type.

The ministry said the TA-50s would be of a Block 2 sub-variant. It received 22 TA-50s (of what is now presumably called the Block 1 sub-variant) in 2011-12.

In contrast to simpler jet trainers, lead-in fighter trainers offer more of the functions of a fighter for pilots to practice on. The T-50 family is powered by the General Electric F404 engine.

On May 21 the ministry’s Agency for Defense Development said it would conduct “pre-concept research” on upgrading the FA-50, which is designed for ground attack. Options to be considered and compared include increasing range by fitting conformal fuel tanks, integrating a targeting pod to improve ground-attack capability, and integrating beyond-visual-range air-to-air missiles.


KAI also said it is pursuing improved performance for the FA-50, including longer range and stronger armament “in sync with the requirements of the overseas potential clients.”

Since the company is in the midst of a challenging program to develop the KF-X, it may not immediately have engineering resources to spare for an FA-50 upgrade.

The T-50 is equipped only as a trainer. The TA-50, designed for training and attack, has an Elta EL/M-2032 fire-control radar, mission computer and a gun, and it can be armed with bombs and air-to-air and air-to-ground missiles. The FA-50 is a TA-50 with such additional equipment as a radar warning receiver and countermeasures dispensers.


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 02 Jul 2020 01:19

Nations will continue to be attracted towards training solutions being upgraded to serve limited combat duties like a light attack aircraft, or a point defense fighter. The "two birds with one stone" argument resonates well with bean counters and fleet planners. This is the same reason why the Master has an attack variant and why the M-346FA has already picked up a customer. Both companies seem to have done with international marketing and product support. Trainer like economics for light combat duties is a very good value proposition and there is a market out there even if only the combat side of the solution is adopted. Whether the reverse is true (whether the LCA MK1A as a higher end fighter can attract customers by offering a trainer variant) remains to be seen. If I were to guess, I'd venture that it would be the higher end variants, and their associated combat capability, that will be attractive for potential LCA export customers. Not the fact that you could squeeze other roles out of it with a sub-variant.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Armuan » 02 Jul 2020 12:15

~$28 million a pop including simulators and equipment. A decent capability for smaller air forces if you don't want to be in China's MIC orbit (~1,100 mile range, 3.7 tons stores). What other aircrafts are out there that offer similar performance? Thanks.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 02 Jul 2020 18:16

Armuan wrote:~$28 million a pop including simulators and equipment. A decent capability for smaller air forces if you don't want to be in China's MIC orbit (~1,100 mile range, 3.7 tons stores).


What does it do at 1,100 miles away? I wouldn't be surprised if the effective combat radius of the twin seater F/A-50 with a decent payload (bombs, IRIST etc) was no more than 250 miles or so. Not bad since it is still far cheaper than the Gripen C or an F-16 but then it is also less capable. A lot less capable in terms of mission or range/payload flexibility. But for those making the decision, an aircraft that can double up (either as is or as part of a mixed fleet) as a trainer helps make it worth it for some .

What other aircrafts are out there that offer similar performance? Thanks


Depends upon what you want to use it for. A trainer and a light attack aircraft? Then the M-346FA (and its Russian and Chinese cousins) deserves a look as well, especially given the upgrades to its targeting suite (Grifo-E AESA, targeting pod, SDR etc). But if you want a supersonic trainer that also doubles up as a supersonic point defense and strike aircraft then the F/A-50 is a more attractive option though in most range payload scenarios the supersonic envelope would be tiny.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 02 Jul 2020 18:49

GE awarded F-15EX engine contract ahead of potential competition


General Electric (GE) has been awarded USD101.3 million to launch engine production for the Boeing F-15EX Advanced Eagle combat aircraft, ahead of the US Air Force (USAF) potentially opening the requirement up to competition.

The firm-fixed-price contract announced on 30 June covers Lot 1 production of the F110-GE-129 engine through to 30 November 2022.

The USAF had always intended to sole-source GE for production of the F-15EX engine claiming that, with the F110-GE-129 already certified for installation, any competition could add up to three-years to the programme. However, following a protest from rival provider Pratt & Whitney, the service issued a sources sought notification on 15 May in which it asked for bids to build up 461 engines to power 144 aircraft (plus spares). Responses to that request were due to have been submitted in early June, with any request for proposals to follow after. Should the USAF decide it does require a second supplier, these alternate engines could potentially be introduced from Lot 2 onwards.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 02 Jul 2020 19:03

This is a major boost to distributed training capability using these very high fidelity simulators. This also gives them the opportunity to train alongside aircraft that they normally may not be because of classification or just the logistical complexities of getting together for extended training etc.

F-35 simulators can now team up with other fighter sims for virtual combat


U.S. Air Force F-35 pilots at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, will now be able to step into a simulator and train alongside virtual F-16s, F-15s and other aircraft, a Lockheed Martin executive said Wednesday.

Air Combat Command formally accepted Lockheed’s Distributed Mission Training system on June 22 after a final test on June 18. During that test, four F-35 simulators at Nellis carried out a virtual mission with pilots in F-22, F-16 and E-3 AWACs simulators at other bases, said Chauncey McIntosh, Lockheed’s vice president for F-35 training and logistics.

“We did originally intend to deliver this in the April time frame, but Nellis Air Force Base did shut down some operations due to the COVID crisis,” he told reporters in a July 1 briefing. “We worked very hard with both the [F-35 Joint Program Office] and the United States Air Force to ensure as soon as the facilities were re-stood up and open, that we were there to deliver this capability.” Although F-35 pilots in a simulator could previously train with up to three other F-35 sims at the same site, the DTS system allows for those pilots to fly digitally with a large number of varying types of aircraft, as long as the simulators can operate on the same network.

Lockheed previously connected F-35 simulators to other aircraft sims in its test lab, but the June 18 test was the first time F-35 simulators linked to a mass of other simulators for a virtual mission in a highly contested environment, Lockheed said in a news release. F-15s will also be able to connect into the DMT system.

The next step, McIntosh said, will be installing the DMT capability at Naval Air Station Lemoore this fall and to Marine Corps Naval Air Station Miramar in spring 2021. Both bases are in California.

However, some limitations will still exist, even as new DMT locations are spun up. The capability is “very scalable to other platforms,” McIntosh said, but currently only F-35, F-22, F-16, F-15 and E-3 simulators are supported by DMT. McIntosh also previously told Defense News that the U.S. Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps as well as the United Kingdom, which also plans to acquire the DMT system, won’t be able to train together because they use different networks.



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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby m_saini » 03 Jul 2020 13:05

South Korea completes development of indigenous AESA radar for KF-X Program

  1. Agency for Defense Development and Hanwha Systems have finished development of AESA radar for the KF-X Korean Fighter Program.
  2. First radar will be publicly unveiled on August 12th at an official event.
  3. This radar is capable of simultaneously detecting and tracking over 1,000 targets.
  4. This radar passed Critical Design Review (CDR) in September 26, 2019 and has been undergoing aerial testing since.
  5. US Congress refused technology transfer of AESA, which was among the "4 critical technology" (AESA radar, EO TGP / IRST / RF Jammer) that were promised by Lockheed Martin with the purchase of F-35A Lightning II.
  6. South Korea independently developed the radar and Israeli ELTA Systems assisted in aerial testing. The prototype radar was said to be very positively received by Israeli personnel.
  7. This radar will undergo further testing aboard prototype KF-X aircraft, which will be rolled out next year.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby basant » 03 Jul 2020 15:40

^^^
Tracking 1000 targets for a fighter? I must be dreaming.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Armuan » 08 Jul 2020 17:44

https://www.thomasnet.com/insights/rayt ... -contract/

Raytheon Technologies Inks $2.3 Billion Missile Defense Contract

"...has secured a $2.27 billion contract to manufacture seven gallium nitride (GaN)-based Army/Navy Transportation Surveillance and Control Model 2 radars (AN/TPY-2) as part of the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense system (THAAD)..."

"...is part of the U.S. foreign military sale to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia."

"Fourteen AN/TPY-2 radars have been produced, with half of them field-operated by US-THAAD systems. Of those, five operate in forward-based mode for the U.S., while two are part of foreign military sales."

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 08 Jul 2020 18:09

^^ These are 25,000+ Transmit/Receive module (9+ sq. meter array) X-band Module Gallium Nitride AESA radars and are going to be the largest GaN powered X band radars in the world until the SBX is upgraded in a couple of years. Looking at the radar OEM's and the market at large, no one else, and possibly not even all other military players combined currently have a set production capacity to produce this much military grade X-band GaN modules for missile defense, airborne radars etc. The Saudi's couldn't get the GaAs radars because by the time they finalized their contract Raytheon had already switched its TPY-2 production to GaN.

The contract to move this radar (and the associated family (SBX) ) over to GaN was awarded back in 2016 -

TEWKSBURY, Mass., Sept. 30, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Missile Defense Agency has awarded Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) a contract modification to develop a transition to production process to incorporate Gallium Nitride, or GaN, components into existing and future AN/TPY-2 radars. This initial effort will support the transition from Gallium Arsenide to GaN technology, which would further modernize the ballistic missile defense radar and drive down system obsolescence.

A critical element in the ballistic missile defense system, Raytheon's AN/TPY-2 continually searches the sky for ballistic missiles.
As demonstrated in other Raytheon-developed military radar applications, Gallium Nitride has the capability to enhance range, increase detection and discrimination performance and lower production costs.

Currently fielded AN/TPY-2 radars use Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) based transmit/receive modules to emit high power radiation. Raytheon and MDA are pursuing a retrofit approach to leverage Gallium Nitride elements.

"GaN components have significant, proven advantages when compared to the previous generation GaAs technology," said Raytheon's Dave Gulla, vice president of the Integrated Defense Systems Mission Systems and Sensors business area. "Through this effort, Raytheon will develop a clear modernization upgrade path for the AN/TPY-2 radar, enabling the system to better defend people and critical assets against ballistic missile threats at home and abroad." LINK


The US Army will get its first GaN AN/TPY-2 sometime in 2021 so it seems KSA will be operating more modern radars until the US Army upgrades all of its sets.

Compared to other Missile defense systems out there, THAAD has a very clear and distinct discrimination advantage and most of that is due to the X band radar. For pure range, efficiency and to save cost they could have gone in for an S band, or an L band solution. It would have been able to see longer, operate with less cooling and power and would have been much much cheaper to buy. But not even S-band would give them as good a discrimination as X band does.

Discrimination is the primary challenge when dealing with medium and intermediate ranged missiles, and particularly when these radars operate in forward based mode where they are the forward looking eyes for the US Navy's AEGIS which itself uses S-band radars and can use that better discriminating ability of a forward deployed sensor. The higher frequency BMD sensor allows them to better optimize there interceptors which means a larger magazine and a more optimal shot doctrine.

This is the reason why the SB-X will still continue to be in service, even after the "compromise" S-band Long Range Discrimination Radar is fielded in Alaska. While LRDR improves discrimination by leaps and bounds over the fixed UHF band EW radars it is in essence a compromise frequency chosen to get a two-faced LRD radar operational within a budget. Initial plans for the "optimal" LRDR called for 2 separate 2-stacks of TPY's (100,000+ T/R Modules) that favored discrimination above range and wouldn't have worked from Alaska (probably needed to be in Hawaii). That would have possibly allowed SBX retirement. But since the new LRDR is at S band, SBX will live on till its replacement (likely more forward deployed radars) is fielded in the 2030s. Discrimination is even more challenging when dealing with ICBMs.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 10 Jul 2020 12:01

MASSIVE F-35 notification just went out to US Congress for Japan to add more F-35's. 105 aircraft, mix of A's and B's, along with support, training, Performance Based Logistics and long term contractor and government support. I think this would put it among the top 3-5 FMS notifications ever to go to Congress in one lump sum.

Interestingly, the deal includes language for software development and testing and test instrumentation. This could be some sort of Japan specific weapons being integrated on the aircraft. Could be the UK-Japan hybrid Meteor, or this could pave the way for the integration of the LRASM on the F-35 as Japan has expressed interest in acquiring the JASSM/LRASM family. USAF and USN doesn't want that weapon on the F-35 though Finland, Japan and Australia probably would.

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to the Government of Japan of one hundred five (105) F-35 Joint Strike Fighter aircraft and related equipment for an estimated cost of $23.11 billion. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale today.

The Government of Japan has requested to buy sixty-three (63) F-35A Conventional Take­Off and Landing (CTOL) aircraft, forty-two (42) F-35B Short Take-Off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft, and one hundred ten (110) Pratt and Whitney F135 engines (includes 5 spares). Also included are Electronic Warfare Systems; Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence/Communications, Navigation and Identification; Autonomic Logistics Global Support System, Autonomic Logistics Information System; Flight Mission Trainer; Weapons Employment Capability, and other Subsystems, Features, and Capabilities; F-35 unique infrared flares; reprogramming center access and F-35 Performance Based Logistics; software development/integration; flight test instrumentation; aircraft ferry and tanker support; spare and repair parts; support equipment, tools and test equipment; technical data and publications; personnel training and training equipment; U.S. Government and contractor engineering, technical, and logistics support services; and other related elements of logistics support. The estimated total cost is $23.11 billion.

This proposed sale will support the foreign policy goals and national security objectives of the United States by improving the security of a major ally that is a force for political stability and economic progress in the Asia-Pacific region. It is vital to U.S. national interest to assist Japan in developing and maintaining a strong and effective self-defense capability.

The proposed sale of aircraft and support will augment Japan's operational aircraft inventory and enhance its air-to-air and air-to-ground self-defense capability. The Japan Air Self-Defense Force's F-4 aircraft are being decommissioned as F-35s are added to the inventory. Japan will have no difficulty absorbing these aircraft into its armed forces.

The proposed sale of this equipment and support will not alter the basic military balance in the region.

The prime contractors will be Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company, Fort Worth, Texas; and Pratt and Whitney Military Engines, East Hartford, Connecticut. There are no known offset agreements proposed in connection with this potential sale.

Implementation of this proposed sale will require multiple trips to Japan involving U.S. Government and contractor representatives for technical reviews/support, programs management, and training over a period of 25 years. U.S. contractor representatives will be required in Japan to conduct Contractor Engineering Technical Services (CETS) and Autonomic Logistics and Global Support (ALGS) for after-aircraft delivery.


https://dsca.mil/major-arms-sales/japan ... aircraft-0

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 10 Jul 2020 21:54

And on their home grown Next Gen Program -

Japan has created a timeline for the development and fielding of its locally made next-generation fighter jet, with serial production set to start at the beginning of the next decade.

The Japanese Ministry of Defense presented the draft development plan for the fighter program to a group of lawmakers from the ruling Liberal Democratic Party on Tuesday, which showed that full-scale production is due to begin in 2031.

The ministry added that the prime contractor for the program will be selected by early next year, although it could happen as soon as October 2020. This is to allow for the basic design for the airframe and engine to be launched before the end of the current Japanese fiscal year, which ends March 31, 2021.

The next step would be the production of the first fighter prototype, which is planned to begin in 2024, with flight tests earmarked to start in 2028 following finalization of the design and production plans.


https://www.defensenews.com/air/2020/07 ... t-program/

In terms of the schedule, they are aiming at matching Lockheed on the F-35A, where the first "production" example was delivered roughly 9 years from contract award (pre production was earlier but they weren't production standard) <edited out droppings>

Edited: brar_w, Posting good stuff about America and its allies are ok. Passing snide comments targeting Russian arms industry will be considered as trolling and need to be taken elsewhere not in this forum

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby MeshaVishwas » 11 Jul 2020 05:28

Very sweet news for Japan, ~150 Lightning bolts on an unsinkable aircraft carrier just off the coast of CCPland.
Maybe Japan specific items for the birds like their local missiles, on the horizon.
Although I understand that military contracts are not really comparable but feel like the Saudi Barbarians got a raw deal for the ~$30B Eagle spend(2010 money).

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 11 Jul 2020 10:07

MeshaVishwas wrote:Very sweet news for Japan, ~150 Lightning bolts on an unsinkable aircraft carrier just off the coast of CCPland.
Maybe Japan specific items for the birds like their local missiles, on the horizon.
Although I understand that military contracts are not really comparable but feel like the Saudi Barbarians got a raw deal for the ~$30B Eagle spend(2010 money).


Some of what Japan is getting in terms of new weapons will be integrated anyway. Meteor is being integrated right now and safe to assume that the hybrid Japanese variant will be as well. Joint Strike Missile as well..This will be the main anti-ship weapon for the Japanese F-35s - stealthy missile launched from a stealthy platform's internal bay will be a potent combination. Probably more to come. In fact, the specific language in the contract points to unique Japanese integration and test instrumentation. Quite a bit of that will be to integrate the F-35B into the Izumo which means that its logistical system, and other on deck integration needs to happen.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby neeraj » 12 Jul 2020 07:27

This Lecture By An F-22 Test Pilot On The Raptor's Flight Control System Is Bonkers

https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/3 ... is-bonkers

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Manish_P » 12 Jul 2020 12:14

^ Yes. Very interesting, and helped by the pilot being a very good communicator. Incidentally the video has been posted earlier... in fact just one page previous, on this very thread (by user NRao)

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby arvin » 13 Jul 2020 22:16

Good explanation of how IR tracking technology works on the AIM9 Sidewinder using lead sulphide(PbS) sensor.
PbS tech is outdated and current tech is based on indium antimonide(InSb). But still good read to understand the complexities.

https://medium.com/@OpenSeason/1946-ger ... 0b82926b40

Manpads also use something similar, only scan used is more advanced rosette scanning.
DRDO still does not have a Manpads program which is a serious gap that needs to be bridged.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 14 Jul 2020 03:46

The USAF awards its F-15EX contract to Boeing. All in, roughly $23 Billion IDIQ (for the total of 144 aircraft (if exercised)) contract with $1.2 billion obligated for the first batch and to be spent between 2020 and 2023 for developing the new baseline,and delivering the first batch and associated capability.

The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Missouri, has been awarded a $22,890,000,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (FA8634-20-D-2704). The first delivery order has been awarded as an undefinitized contract action with a total not-to-exceed value, including options, of $1,192,215,413. It is a cost-plus-fixed-fee, cost-plus-incentive-fee, fixed-price-incentive-fee, firm-fixed-price effort for the F-15EX system. This delivery order (FA8634-20-F-0022) provides for design, development, integration, manufacturing, test, verification, certification, delivery, sustainment and modification of F-15EX aircraft, as well as spares, support equipment, training materials, technical data and technical support. Work will be performed in St. Louis, Missouri; and at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, and is expected to be completed Dec. 31, 2023. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Fiscal 2020 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $248,224,746; and fiscal 2020 aircraft procurement funds in the amount of $53,000,000 are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, is the contracting activity. LINK

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby mody » 14 Jul 2020 13:58

US Airforce F-16C crashes during routine training. 5th Crash for US airforce since mid May. 2-F16s, 1-F15, 1-F22, 1-F35. Two pilots lost.

https://news.yahoo.com/us-air-force-f-16-033313006.html

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby mody » 14 Jul 2020 14:05


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 14 Jul 2020 18:54

mody wrote:US Airforce F-16C crashes during routine training. 5th Crash for US airforce since mid May. 2-F16s, 1-F15, 1-F22, 1-F35. Two pilots lost.

https://news.yahoo.com/us-air-force-f-16-033313006.html


This may be a year on the higher side but the other side of the argument is that the USAF regained readiness on most of its CAF last year with MCR's pushing into the 70% range for some, and into the 80+% range for other platforms. You fly more and you stress the entperprise more and that reveals cracks that you then need to plug. There have been years where, at those readiness levels and flying, the USAF has lost 5, 8 or even 10 F-16's in a given year (more when you add other platforms). But a combination of aging platforms, increased flying and provided some other C-19 related disruptions might show some uptick in data when they dig deeper into it (across the CAF and non combat aircraft fleets). Too early to tell.

mody wrote:More on the F-15EX purchase.

https://news.yahoo.com/much-money-boein ... 34143.html


Very interesting argument from the ACC. You can see how the F-15EX, a twin seater but one that will be operated by just one pilot, is a highly optimized DCA platform for the guard, and a multi-role strike aircraft for expeditionary duties. $100 or so million buys them a 20,000 hour platform which means it can do those DCA missions for decades while also contributing with medium to long range stand off attack. Not nearly as capable as the F-22A or F-35A but the Guard will operate its own F-35A's and doesn't need that capability for many F-15C and F-16 squadrons that are tasked with the homeland defense mission etc.

Plus, the USAF isn't exactly shy about mounting a 7000 lb hypersonic weapon on the aircraft either (we will see how that plans get past the bomber mafia) -

Image

Interestingly, here is an official USAF/Boeing photo of the F-15 EX (#0001) at Boeing St. Louis. Boeing likely switched some of Qatar's deliveries around to accommodate the first two test jets for the USAF. Likely internal company testing and integration to happen this year with deliveries sometime in 2021. Less than a year from contract award as Boeing had promised.

Image

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 15 Jul 2020 02:26

Turns out the $23 Billion IDIQ contract negotiated with Boeing is for up to 200 F-15 EX aircraft over 10 years out of which 144 is the current USAF minimum buy -

https://twitter.com/TheDEWLine/status/1 ... 3469779969

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 16 Jul 2020 02:34

More details here -

Boeing was awarded a 10-year indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity (ID/IQ) contract Monday for the F-15EX with a ceiling of almost $22.9 billion. It also includes 15 years of performance support.

While the Air Force has yet to determine the ultimate size of the buy, the minimum number of aircraft under the contract is 144 and the maximum is 200 — with a flyaway unit cost estimate of $87.7 million, an Air Force spokesman said in an email yesterday to clarify the terms.


https://breakingdefense.com/2020/07/boe ... ry-series/

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 16 Jul 2020 20:51

Turns out, the F-15EX shown by Boeing and the USAF in their respective press releases wasn't just a standard F-15QA with photo opp decals on it. It was indeed the first EX aircraft for the USAF which will be completed this year and delivered early next year for flight testing and certification.

First Two Test F-15EXs to be Delivered by Early 2021


The first two F-15EX aircraft are already well under construction and should be in the Air Force’s hands for testing at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. by early next year, Boeing F-15 Vice President and Program Manager Pratyush Kumar told reporters July 15.

We have been leaning-in to get the jets delivered much faster than the normal lead time of 39 months. And we will be in a position to deliver these jets by the first quarter of 2021,” Kumar said via teleconference. The first six aircraft will be used for developmental and operational test, and they will be convertible later for use as operational airframes.

The briefing came two days after USAF’s $1.2 billion award to Boeing for the first eight F-15EXs, which also set a not-to-exceed ceiling of $22.89 billion for up to 200 of the fighters. The fiscal year 2021 budget request includes 12 more aircraft, and up to 76 over the next five years, Kumar noted. The Air Force’s minimum quantity is 144 airplanes.

The jets are “a very enhanced and modern version” of the F-15, he said. The EX is based on the F-15QA being built for Qatar, the first of which flew in April. Boeing is also responding to a request for information from Israel to buy 25 new F-15EX jets and upgrade another 25 to the EX configuration. The work already in hand means that the F-15 production line will be “open for the next decade, and beyond,” Kumar said.

There are 400 suppliers in 42 states, with “55,000 people on the program,” which has been structured to get jets into the Air Force’s hands as fast as possible, Kumar said, given the urgency of the existing F-15C/D fleet’s structural exhaustion.

The heart of the airplane is a new core processor performing 87 million calculations per second, but there will be a common avionics software suite across the F-15 fleet, “maintaining interoperability.” The aircraft will have open mission systems architecture and permit new software updates more frequently, and with a broader array of suppliers.

The AESA radar—the APG-82—is the “largest” on a fighter, Kumar said, and the pilot will wear an advanced digital Joint Helmet Mounting Cuing System, or JHMCS.

The EX will have two seats, but the aircraft is “entirely operable from the front seat with a single pilot,” he said. Asked why the aircraft will be built with a functional rear cockpit if the Air Force isn’t planning to use it, Kumar said the “first objective was to get an aircraft as quickly as possible,” and changing the configuration would have added delays to its fielding, “so we didn’t touch it.” The Air Force may opt to use the rear cockpit for some kind of “AI [artificial intelligence] capability” or “manned/unmanned teaming” technology in the future, he said. “It’s certainly possible,” and Boeing has had “extensive” discussions with the Air Force about possible roles for adding a backseater in the EX.

Boeing says the airplane can carry a 22-foot long missile weighing up to 7,000 pounds on the center station, suggesting the jet can launch a hypersonic missile, but Kumar declined to discuss what kinds of weapons might be considered for it. The EX is a “fully multirole” aircraft capable of doing air-to-ground as well as air-to-air missions, he said, unlike the F-15C/D, which focuses exclusively on air superiority.

The EX “leverages the digital engineering” approach Boeing has taken with the T-7 advanced trainer, Kumar noted, and will employ Air Force acquisition chief Will Roper’s “Digital Century Series” ideas in digital twinning. This will speed updates and “you don’t have to do the full-up integration testing,” he said. “You can test that in a virtual environment and get that capability in a much more rapid fashion.” This also allows the use of weapons and systems from third parties using “containerized software” and Kubernetes approaches.

Digital applications on the factory floor, such as robotically pre-drilled holes, will reduce touch labor and “increase quality while decreasing cost.”

Digital methods will follow Roper’s dictates to “rapidly evolve new platforms,” and “increase supply base choices, … and keep industry in a pretty healthy competition,” he asserted. Using 3-D modeling has resulted in “a 70 percent reduction in touch labor on the shop floor, after the initial learning curve,” he added. Pushing some of that to suppliers can be risky—“and you have to watch that”—but is resulting in far less work on the shop floor, Kumar noted.

One feature Boeing was pushing as part of its “Advanced Eagle” campaign was the Advanced Missile and Bomb Ejector Rack (AMBER), which could sharply increase the loadout of the EX’s dogfight missiles, but Kumar said that’s not a feature of the EX program.

“So far, our U.S. Air Force customer seems to be happy with the 12 air-to-air stations” on the EX.

The Eagle Passive Active Warning Survivability System (EPAWSS), which is crucial to the F-15’s ability to get home from contested airspace missions, is “on track” and the Air Force is now testing it on six aircraft, Kumar said. The EPAWSS is included in the price of the F-15EX, he said, although it was a program underway before the EX was added to the Air Force’s budget.

Kumar said he’s confident the Air Force will be able to expedite F-15EX testing because so many of the technologies on it, particularly the fly-by-wire system, have already been tested by the Air Force on behalf of Saudi Arabia, whose F-15SAs employ that feature. The Saudi program “looked at 15,000 test points over five years,” he noted. There are no mold line changes, so the main change to be shaken out will be software, he added.

Japan is also looking at a modernization program for its F-15Js that would leverage technologies from the F-15EX, “converting them to F-15JSIs,” Kumar said. The modified Japanese aircraft would be retrofitted with advanced cockpit systems and radar” but not a new fly-by-wire system.


Image

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby chetak » 18 Jul 2020 00:10

Y I Patel wrote:I am reading Tanvi Madan’s “The Fateful Triangle”. Very interesting book overall, and I came across a startling revealation - USA blocked the sale of Viggen aircraft to India. This was from a memo of a conversation between US Secretary Cyrus Vance and Chinese FM Huang Hua, so this is as official as it gets.

There has been conversation about this on BRF, regarding why Jaguars were chosen. Maybe because they were what was available outside of Soviet offerings...


didn't the viggen have a largely ameriki engine thus allowing the amerikis to have a say in where it went.

an earlier avatar of the ITAR would have kicked in when the topic of foreign sales came up.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Rs_singh » 18 Jul 2020 00:24

Not largely. It was an America engine. PW if I remember.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Rakesh » 18 Jul 2020 01:36

The JA-37 Viggen was powered by a Volvo RM8 turbofan, which was a licensed produced version of the Pratt & Whitney JT8D.

The same is true for the JAS-39C/D Gripen which is powered by the Volvo RM12 turbofan, which is a licensed produced variant of the GE F404.

The JAS-39E/F Gripen is powered by the F414G turbofan, also from General Electric.


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