International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

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brar_w
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 13 Oct 2020 01:55

XB-1 Demonstrator Rollout Adds Credibility To Boom Supersonic Airliner


Little wonder that Boom Supersonic founder Blake Scholl describes the Oct. 7 rollout of the company’s sleek XB-1 demonstrator as “a little surreal.” Since creating Boom in 2014 to bring back supersonic civil flight, Scholl’s ambitious plan has been derided as crazy by some and unrealistic by others.

Now, with a completed aircraft set to begin ground tests in the coming weeks and design work transitioning to the follow-on Overture airliner, Boom’s vision is gaining ground and—just as important—credibility.

Although the 71-ft.-long, delta-wing XB-1 trijet looks to have more in common with a high-speed fighter than an airliner, the completed demonstrator has already proven to Boom’s backers that it has the design and manufacturing capability to produce the first privately developed air-breathing civil supersonic aircraft.

But the next real test will be in taking flight. Comparing the XB-1 to the pioneering role played by the Falcon 1 launch vehicle for SpaceX, Scholl says the major challenge will be proving the baseline aerodynamics of Boom’s ogive delta wing and engine inlet design across the low-speed, transonic and high-speed envelopes. Flight tests will begin in Mojave, California, later in 2021 following initial ground tests at Centennial Airport near Denver.

Internally nicknamed “Baby Boom,” the XB-1 will be put through an initial battery of 36 major ground tests ranging from hydraulic system checks and engine runs to failure modes and ground vibration tests. “We’ll do taxi tests here in Colorado, and then we take the vertical tail off, put it on a truck and take it down to Mojave. Then we put the throttle forward and go fly, and that’ll probably be later next year.”

Acknowledging his earlier overoptimistic schedule and “many setbacks and roadblocks” along the way, first flight is provisionally slated for “something like the third quarter,” Scholl says. “I don’t want to promise anything too specific, and then we’ll be supersonic by the end of next year.”

A major source of skepticism about Boom during the last six years has centered on the lack of a definitive plan for how to power its supersonic airliner. Three GE Aviation J85s will power the XB-1. But until recently, nothing was known about the engine choices for the Overture. With the recent disclosure that Rolls-Royce has been in talks with Boom for five years and is now the chosen propulsion partner for the airliner, more details are beginning to emerge.

“A few months ago, Rolls had three different engine concepts for the aircraft, and by November we’ll be selecting one,” Scholl says. “We think we know what the winner is already, actually. But we’re kind of dotting the ‘i’s and crossing the ‘t’s and making sure that we’ve got that right.” Few specifics are known, but Scholl says all the options are medium-bypass midthrust derivatives of existing cores. “The options are a completely off-the-shelf core, an upgraded core or a photo-scaled core,” he adds. All will be adapted with a new low-pressure system, distortion-tolerant fan and exhaust.

With engine plans firming up and the XB-1 ready for testing, Boom’s schedule for the Overture is also coming into sharper focus. Based on lessons learned from the demonstrator, final configuration freeze is targeted for the end of 2021. The program will be officially launched in 2022, coinciding with groundbreaking for the as-yet-unnamed production site. “In 2023, we’ll start building the first parts and tools, and then rollout of Overture is in 2025. First flight is 2026,” Scholl says.

“Then the question becomes, how long does flight test and certification take? The [Airbus] A350 did it in 18 months. I suspect that would be pretty sporty for us, given the airplane and that we’re in the post-737 MAX era,” he adds. At the rollout, entry into service was given as 2029, but Scholl says: “Our commitment is to carry passengers by the end of the decade—and there’s some margin in there.”

Boom also plans to whittle down its list of 15 potential U.S. assembly sites to around five finalists by year-end. “If you look at the schedule, we better know where we’re going to be by the middle of next year,” Scholl says. He adds that the final arrangement could include an option for an inland final assembly facility and a coastal site for supersonic flight test and delivery.


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby kit » 18 Oct 2020 20:10

https://www.flightglobal.com/defence/team-tempest-partners-detail-fcas-progress/140650.article

Speaking on 15 October, Michael Christie, director of FCAS at BAE Systems Air, singled out the gaming industry’s use of virtual and augmented reality technology and the Williams Formula 1 team’s experience with rapid engineering as examples of the consortium working to “bring in the innovative, different kinds of partners to ensure that we develop pace in this programme.

An FCAS platform’s integrated sensor-to-effects system would also be required to manage the power requirements for laser or electromagnetic weapons, which are among future concepts being eyed by MBDA.

R-R’s director of future programmes Phil Townley says the company is drawing on its past collaboration with BAE on the Taranis unmanned combat air vehicle demonstrator to design an FCAS integrated propulsion and power system. Innovations being studied include the increased use of additive manufacturing technology, to enable engines to operate at increased temperatures versus previous products. The company says this would reduce specific fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions, offering extended-range performance or longer component life.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 18 Oct 2020 20:44

The sheer complexity of designing, building and producing a very advanced system like FCAS is envisioned requires a level of sustained investment and a fairly larger overall bill (probably in the $60-$80 Billion) that neither UK (BAE, RR), SAAB, or Leonardo have a great track record off recently. Having said that, there is some pretty good design capability between these partners so something interesting can come out of it if they have political support and steady funding. But besides being British, Italian and Swedish (which may well be enough of a reason to pursue it for them), I don't see how this is going to be a half a generation leap over a late block 5 or block 6 F-35 which should be rolling off the production line around the time this enters rate production.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 22 Oct 2020 18:28

Australia’s First Loyal Wingman Completes Low-Speed Taxi Testing



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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 22 Oct 2020 19:08

Pratt & Whitney Awarded Contract for F135 Engine Modernization Study


Pratt & Whitney, a division of Raytheon Technologies Corp., has been awarded a $1.5M contract to conduct an F135 modernization study and operational assessment by the F-35 Joint Program Office to determine specific propulsion system growth requirements for Block 4.2 F-35 aircraft and beyond, the company said in an Oct. 20 release. The study is expected to conclude in March 2021.

“This award is a significant milestone for the program and the warfighter, as we look to ensure the F135 propulsion system continues to provide the foundation for all air vehicle capability requirements over the full lifecycle of the F-35,” said Matthew Bromberg, president, Pratt & Whitney Military Engines. “As we look to the future, growth in aircraft capability must be met with matched propulsion modernization. Fortunately, the F135 has ample design margin to support agile and affordable upgrades that will enable all F-35 operators to keep pace with evolving threat environments.”

Under this award, Pratt & Whitney will assess F135 engine enhancements required to support future F-35 weapon system capability requirements across all F-35 variants beginning with Block 4.2 aircraft. The scope of the assessment focuses on enhancements addressing improvements to up and away thrust, powered lift thrust, power and thermal management capacity, and fuel burn reduction.

Designed with the knowledge that operational environments will evolve and threats will advance, the F135 is postured to meet future F-35 capability requirements. Its modular design and advanced digital architecture allow for the agile development and spiral insertion of both hardware and software upgrades. As part of the study, Pratt & Whitney’s GATORWORKS organization will complete the conceptual design and analysis of multiple F135 Engine Enhancement Package (EEP) growth options with phased insertion plans.

Leveraging significant U.S. Government and Pratt & Whitney investment in next generation adaptive propulsion technologies, Pratt & Whitney’s EEP approach offers low risk, variant-common upgrade options for the F135 that provide increased performance aligned with the program’s continuous capability development and delivery strategy and serve as a critical enabler for future capability growth of the F-35 weapon system.

The combat-proven F135 is the most advanced operational fighter engine in the world, delivering 26% more thrust, 116% more powered lift, and more than a 300% increase in power and thermal management over 4th generation fighter engines – all with a demonstrated mission capability rate of greater than 94%.

“Built upon decades of combat propulsion experience, the F135 provides the warfighter with a critical technological advantage over adversaries at an unparalleled value to the taxpayer,” said Bromberg. “With more than 40,000 pounds of thrust, unmatched low-observable signature, world-class thermal management, and innovative engine control system, the F135 is a critical enabler of the F-35 weapons system and of operations conducted in advanced threat environments – a core element of the National Defense Strategy.”

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Philip » 27 Oct 2020 03:56

Vietnam is supposedly going to convert some of its large stock of mothballed MIG-21s into drones,as target drones or even as UCAVs.The task of converting these non- FBW aircraft into unmanned birds is going to be difficult and expensive for the Vietnamese,but could be v.useful assets once the conversion succeeds. Have said for long something that we with our hundreds of Fishbeds in retirement could emulate.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 28 Oct 2020 04:59

brar_w wrote:These sort of internal R&D projects and their continuous evaluation, testing and validation (internal and by customer) are pivotal steps in achieving next generation aero systems, be it for manned, unmanned, or optionally manned platforms across a whole host of missions and use cases.

Northrop Grumman / Scaled Composites have been flying their N401XP for at least 3 years now (that we know of). Hard to see it not being a test bed for a whole host of technologies they are pitching for the next gen. fighter, or the MQ-Next which replaces the MQ-9 family starting 2030.

Given that there is now details around the operationalization of the RQ-180, one has to wonder what other technologies require a completely new test bed (I guess there is something to be said about testing this on a "known" and revealable platform as opposed to something that likely can only be used at night and over very few test ranges or open ocean).

Stealthy 'Son Of Ares' Mystery Jet Appears With Odd Markings And NASA F-15 Escort


More Intrigue -

Stealthy Son Of Ares Test Jet Now Flying With Possible Laser System Modifications


Image

Image

Image

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 28 Oct 2020 19:52

The part in bold is kind of important as 5th generation transitions to 6th generations in the coming years. We are about to reach a point where 5th gen fighter specific weapons (AIM-260 and SIAW are good examples of them) are going to begin to show up in the coming years and they may not necessarily be solutions that are optimal for previous gen platforms and their needs.

Wilsbach to Allies: Learn from USAF’s Mistakes, Fly Your F-35 Like an F-35


Pacific Air Forces commander Gen. Kenneth S. Wilsbach has some advice for users of the F-35 in his region: Don’t use it like the aircraft you’re used to, but take advantage of its full potential.

Speaking at an AFA Mitchell Institute virtual event Oct. 27, Wilsbach said the U.S. Air Force operated the F-22 like the F-15C for “about five years,” failing to fully exploit its fifth-generation stealth and sensor fusion capabilities.

“It took us a while to learn” what the jet could really do, he said, and now, “the tactics are completely different.” He advises the F-35 partners to use the aircraft “like an F-35,” and not like some of the high-performance fourth-generation aircraft they have been operating.


“Take advantage of the lessons learned that we’ve had,” he said. “Skip right to that … and cycle through those lessons learned that much faster. Take full advantage of the platform.”

The advice “resonates with those operators,” he said. The U.S. has F-35 exchange pilots with Australia, Japan, and Korea, and “they all learn to fly it at Luke” Air Force Base, Ariz., so the foundation exists for a good partnership on the F-35 and other interoperable systems, he asserted.

Because of the range distances involved in the Pacific, Wilsbach said the command needs lots of tankers, long-range future fighter aircraft, and long-range missiles, particularly hypersonics.

“Covering those vast distances at the fastest speeds possible,” is essential, he said. “I’ve been talking about hypersonics awhile.” Given their high mach speed, an enemy has “so little time to react” that “even if they do … their defensive systems have a hard time hitting a target that’s going that fast.”

Stealth will also continue to be essential “to get inside of [an adversary’s] network and sensors undetected, so that they don’t know that they’re there, or when they do figure it out, it’s too late.”

China has pushed ahead of Russia militarily, Wilsbach said, so the Air Force should use Chinese capabilities as “the pacing threat.” If USAF can deal with anything China can do, it will then be able to “by default … compete with” Russia, North Korea, Iran, or other adversaries.

Despite the close-call intercepts USAF has experienced with Russia in the Arctic and other places in recent months, Wilsbach said he’s not having similar problems in PACAF.

There’s “quite a bit” of intercepting going on, he said, but “for the most part, those intercepts are safe, both for the Chinese and the Russians.” He added, “Ours are always professional and safe.”

As to the pace of intercepts, Wilsbach reported they occur “not every day, but many times a week. As we fly near China or when we do fly near Russia, we do get intercepted.”

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 28 Oct 2020 23:10

darshhan wrote:
tsarkar wrote:CIWS have turrets with super fast electric drives for 360 degree coverage in azimuth and 89 degrees in elevation

https://www.wired.com/2007/10/robot-cannon-ki/


Let me paint a scenario. A swarm of harop equivalent drones, let us say 20 nos. is attacking a target. Let us assume the drone speed is 250-300 kmph. CIWS range is assumed to be anywhere from 3-5 kms. Each drone has a warhead of 20 kgs. Just before entering this range the swarming drones spread out to attack the target from different trajectories. Some will even flank the target totally to come in from opposite side. Some will come in high. Some will come in low. Now can a single CIWS successfully engage all these drones at once considering the fact that all these drones will be attacking simultaneously and CIWS has less than one minute to neutralize all the drones once they enter within its range. 300 kmph speed means that drones are covering 5 kms per minute.

Yes CIWS can rotate to provide 360 degree protection, but can it do it wrt multiple drones all at once.


What you describe is basically what the USAF's Golden Horde demonstration is attempting to validate via development and experimentation i.e. a "playbook" approach to munition to munition organic communication and organic command and control with a few of these munitions' acting as play makers. Instead of harop's, imaging a small swarm of 2-3 dozen SDB's coordinating this way choosing attack vectors, and prioritizing targets based on air-defense effectiveness.

More here - https://www.airforcemag.com/air-force-w ... s%20needed.

A flight test is coming later this year, despite revamping certain parts of the program, Collins confirmed.

“We took a step back to assess what we’ve gained from it, from [Raytheon Technologies’ Miniature Air-Launched Decoy], from everything else we were doing, and then really tried to identify what was going to be the bigger, broader enduring capabilities for our weapon system,” he said. “We did identify that to continue forward with the Small Diameter Bomb test would give us good insight into the Air Force’s foray into a collaborative weapon with those SDB Is. And, frankly, a lot of the modifications have already been made to those SDB Is, so we’re very close to being ready to utilize those.”

AFRL may drop the collaborative version of MALD from Golden Horde altogether. MALD can confuse or jam enemy air defenses to allow friendly aircraft to slip into a protected area.

“We’re still assessing that right now. It’s still in question whether we see that as existing in the long haul,” Collins said. “We’re going to continue with SDB I, and then pivot to both virtual and surrogate platforms as well, and continue a very rapid, regular assessment and evaluation of how to put that [software] onto existing weapons.”

AFRL was working with Scientific Applications and Research Associates, Inc. to integrate SDB I into a swarm network, and with Georgia Tech Applied Research Corp. to do the same with MALD.

Right now, the Air Force has to retool existing munitions to work together. In the future, weapon systems should come ready to plug into a collaborative swarm, he said. He envisions that hypersonic weapons and others like the Stand-In Attack Weapon, a variant of a Northrop Grumman missile used to destroy enemy air defenses, will be part of the operational swarm.


And - https://afresearchlab.com/technology/va ... lden-horde

Networked collaborative weapons share data, interact, develop and execute coordinated actions or behaviors. They use shared data to improve information across an entire group of weapons – sometimes called a swarm – thereby improving the effectiveness of the entire swarm. When each weapon shares measurements of a target’s location, combining this information reduces errors since it creates a more accurate target location for all to reference. Ultimately, this supports the use of lower-cost sub-systems in place of more expensive systems without sacrificing capability.

Golden Horde uses a collaborative autonomy approach referred to as “play calling.” A “play” is an established collaborative behavior enabled (or disabled) when certain predefined conditions are met by the swarm. Golden Horde uses a collection of plays called a Playbook. Loaded prior to the mission, the Playbook provides a choice of plays from which the weapons can choose.

Golden Horde does not use artificial intelligence or machine learning to make determinations independently regarding which targets to strike. The system only selects from set plays and cannot violate defined Rules of Engagement.


The SDB-I is a good platfrom for this because a couple of sub-systems have already been fielded operationally for this like a HOJ seeker variant. You mix them up in a swarm and you have different capabilities collectively informing the swarm decisions and collaborative behavior (or "plays"). Also, a bomber may be able to carry multiple waves (few dozen SDB's each per wave) of these weapons.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 29 Oct 2020 23:05

U.S. Seeks to Sell Up to 50 F-35s to UAE for $10.4 Billion


The State Department notified Congress Thursday that it backs the proposed sale of as many as 50 F-35A fighter jets to the United Arab Emirates for $10.4 billion, according to four people familiar with the matter.

It’s the latest step in the Gulf nation’s efforts to secure the stealthy Lockheed Martin Corp. fighters, the most advanced U.S.-built aircraft, after it agreed to recognize Israel in an accord brokered by the Trump administration.

Under American law, Israel is guaranteed weapons needed to maintain its “qualitative military edge” over Arab nations. U.S. officials have said they can provide that assurance regardless of F-35 sales without specifying publicly what they would offer Israel.

Israel has committed to buy at least 50 F-35s and in 2017 declared the first of the planes operational.

Representative Eliot Engel, the outgoing head of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, said in a statement that congressional approval was no sure thing. The New York Democrat has tangled with the Trump administration in the past over weapons sales to UAE and Saudi Arabia.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 30 Oct 2020 18:20

USAF contracting Lockheed to allow for up to 32 JASSM-ER (and XRs) missiles to be launched from a single C-17 -

AFRL Moves To Equip Cargo Planes With Bombs In a Box

WASHINGTON: With its latest contract to Lockheed Martin, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has taken another step in its effort to rapidly develop a capability to drop bombs and launch cruise missiles to augment the shrinking fleet of long-range bombers.

The Other Transaction Authority (OTA) contract, announced yesterday and worth $25 million over 18 months, represents the fourth phase of AFRL’s Palletized Munitions Experimentation Campaign, and builds on a series of previous experiments with palletized munitions using both an MC-130J and a C-17.

Lockheed Martin’s roll-on/roll-off pallet can carry up to 32 AGM-158B JASSM-ER (Joint-Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile-Extended Range) missiles on a C-17, Scott Calloway, program director at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control, told reporters today.

The effort is managed by AFRL’s Strategic Development Planning and Experimentation (SPDE, pronounced ‘speedy’) Office. SPDE sees the experimental program as an option for bringing “more mass to the fight” and for the service to shore up its long-range fires capability.

“This new contract that we were just awarded puts us on track for a system-level demonstration of that palletized JASSM deployment system from a cargo aircraft next year,” Calloway said.

“We’re working with the Air Force now to come up with that optimal payload, optimal load out,” he said. “But it’s largely a function of the deployment airdrop system, the missile being loaded onto the system, and the range of the aircraft is flying. Obviously, if a smaller munitions come online, I would expect that load out to increase without the need to design a new palletize munition system.”

Lockheed Martin also has one eye on future Advanced Battle Management System (ABMS) demos for testing its “box of cruise missiles,” Calloway said

“It’s not part of our baseline plan, but while we’re going through our test program next year we’ll definitely be looking for opportunities to synergize with ABMS,” he said.

The palletized munition system was used in the second ABMS “On-Ramp” demonstration Sept. 3. Targeting information was transferred “to an Air Force Special Operations Command aircraft via existing Beyond Line of Sight communications systems and cue the simulated release of a mock ‘palletized’ Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile (JASSM),” according to an AFRL press release.

“Lockheed Martin, R4 Integration, and Naval Surface Warfare Center-Dahlgren were involved in the development effort for the first-of-its-kind demonstration. In a related event, the 412th Test Wing, in coordination with Air Mobility Command, conducted a C-17 palletized munitions airdrop demonstration using simulated munitions,” the Sept. 30 release added.

ABMS is the Air Force’s technology development effort designed to support the creation of a Joint All-Domain Command and Control (JADC2) network to enable military commanders to run future information-centric warfare across the air, land, sea, space and cyberspace domains.

Breaking D readers may remember that back in May, then-Maj. Gen. Clint Hinote said the Air Force wants to equip cargo planes with semi-autonomous stand-off weapons for long-range fires for All-Domain Operations. At the time, Hinote was deputy director of the Air Force Warfighting Integration Capability (AFWIC) office; in June he gained a star and now is deputy chief of staff for Strategy, Integration and Requirements at Air Force headquarters.

Hinote explained that in order for the concept of cargo planes carrying munitions to actually work, there would need to be a JADC2 network to figure out the availability of the aircraft for this secondary mission and sort out which missions would get priorities where and when.

AFRL further has been exploring new types of stand-off munitions that might make sense for deployment on cargo aircraft. The AFRL’s Jan. 28 experiment with the MC-130J at Dugway Proving Ground included drops of simulated Cargo Launch Expendable Air Vehicles with Extended Range (CLEAVERs), which AFRL has designed as potential “long-range, high precision weapons to destroy moving and non-moving targets.”

“The CLEAVER work started out as an Air Force program, where they were conducting some internal development of systems to be deployed by transport aircraft,” Calloway said. “That turned into this Pallitized Munitions concept. And we’ve been working with the Air Force on a series of usability, and analysis, and risk reduction efforts that have led to this most recent contract award.”



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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby NRao » 03 Nov 2020 23:46

Nov 3, 2020 :: First operational capacity of the Talios pod on Rafale F3-R

Image

Image

Talios ( TArgeting Long-range Identification Optronic System - optronic long-range identification and targeting system) is a multifunction optronic pod manufactured by the French equipment manufacturer Thales. It is a new generation laser designation pod (PDL-NG) which is an evolution of the Damocles nacelle currently in service in theaters of operations. Talios makes it possible to detect and identify targets on the ground, but also to deliver weapons with great precision.

This new pod will gradually equip all the Rafale squadrons of the French Air and Space Force and will be deployed in theaters of operations. Talios is perfectly suited to current commitments for the benefit of the Chammal operations in the Levant and Barkhane in the Sahelo-Saharan strip. It is particularly suitable for fire support (CAS: Close Air Support ) or armed reconnaissance (SCAR: Strike Coordination and Reconnaissance ) missions .

The Talios pod is characterized by a much higher image quality from its new infrared (IR) and near IR sensors, allowing the aircraft to remain at a safe distance. The resolution and the additional tactical overlays allow a better interpretation of the image and facilitate the use (search, identification, pursuit and designation of targets) and the decision-making process.

Its main missions will be intelligence gathering, research, identification, monitoring and designation of targets on the ground for the benefit of the Rafale armaments. To do this, it also benefits from the precision of its geolocation, a modern and enhanced human-system interface and then an integrated Rover capability, allowing the exchange of images with troops on the ground. It also has integrated maintenance capabilities that will facilitate its support.

Talios will form, with the Damocles nacelle, the framework of the targeting nacelles of the Mirage 2000 D and Rafale (Air and Marine), and has significant potential for development.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Rakesh » 04 Nov 2020 00:00

brar, going forward, can we post all military aviation news - from the US - in the US military, technology, arms, tactics thread?

viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7088?


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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 04 Nov 2020 06:19

Rakesh wrote:brar, going forward, can we post all military aviation news - from the US - in the US military, technology, arms, tactics thread?

viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7088?


Will do.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Rakesh » 04 Nov 2020 21:36

Thank You. Greatly appreciated.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 11 Nov 2020 02:51

Three very large US State Department FMS case notifications for UAE just posted. The 30-day notification period will be within the Trump administration so this is clearly a strategy for UAE to get a large chunk of the deal pushed through the WH and Congress even if they only end up exercising some bits out of it (though they can take up the whole thing as well). Total cost of approved weapons, aircraft and PBL/support package is in the $23 Billion range.

Highlights :

Aircraft & Support

- 50 x F-35A's (The aircraft appear to be Blk 4 stanadard since the Operational Data Integrated Network (ODIN) is included which is a Blk 4 ALIS replacement)
- 54 x F-135 Engines (4 spare)
- Standard F-35 Mission Systems
- F-35 Performance Based Logistics
- 18 MQ-9B Drones
- MQ-9 Sensor Package includes MST sensor, SAR radar with GMTI and all the ground support and PNT required for ops

Weapons

- 802 x AIM-120 C8 Missiles
- 2,004 x MK82 500 lb munitions with 2,000 JDAM tail kits
- 1,000 x MK84 2,000 lb munitions with 1,000 JDAM tail kits
- 1,002 x MK-83 1,000 lb munitions
- 2,500 x Small Diameter Bomb I
- 650 x AGM-154C JSOW
- 50 x AGM-154E JSOW-ER (this is the first export order for the powered JSOW ER)
- 150 x AGM-88E AARGM Missiles (this appears to be to provide SEAD/DEAD capability to their F-16's). Also the first Non NATO / Non 5Eyes AARGM export request
- 515 x AGM-114R Hellfire Missiles

Full details of what was requested for Congressional approval -

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – F-35 JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – MQ-9B REMOTELY PILOTED AIRCRAFT

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – MUNITIONS, SUSTAINMENT AND SUPPORT

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 12 Nov 2020 05:55

Israel Air Force's Flight Testing Center Receives First Experimental "Adir"

November 11th, 2020, marks the start of a new era in the IAF Flight Testing Center (FTC) Squadron - for the first time in 14 years, a first of its kind fighter jet equipped with advanced experimenting capabilities will land at the squadron. The arriving "Adir" (F-35I), designated for flight experiments, will greatly enrich the IAF's independence in improving its division of fifth generation aircraft. What makes the jet so unique and how will IAF pilots stretch the limits and capabilities of one of the most advanced aircraft in the world?


"With the new addition of the 'Adir' to the lines of experimental aircraft in the Israeli Air Force's FTC Squadron, we are witnessing a historic event, the magnitude of which cannot be underestimated - a meaningful corner stone in the IAF's inauguration and development of the F-35 division", said Brig. Gen. Oded Cohen, Commander of Tel-Nof AFB. "To the FTC Squadron personnel - the absorption of the 'Adir' poses new challenges. I have no doubt that by virtue of your skill and professional spirit you will know, as you have proven in the past, how to challenge the limits of the 'Adir's' capabilities, and lead the IAF through toward new horizons".

Blue and White Munitions

One of the extraordinary aspects of the IAF is its use of Israeli operating systems and munitions on its various flight platforms. In the majority of the acquisitions made in cooperation with the United States, the IAF is given the opportunity to install its own electronic warfare, communications and weapons systems - all to accommodate the platforms to the relevant operational needs and requirements. For the F-35I, the situation is more complicated: "In the 'Adir' program, the IAF doesn't have access to everything, and cannot fully intervene", described Lt. Col. Y, Commander of the FTC Squadron.


"The 'Adir' division is set to play a central role in the IAF's future operational activity", Lt. Col. Y. continued. "Therefore, we understand the need to test it and adapt its weapons systems to the operational reality in the field. The experimental F-35I will act as the main building block for acquiring new flight capabilities, and allow for independent installation of munitions".


"New weapons affect the aircraft in different ways. We run an entire series of tests to certify a capability, such as load testing, fluttering, and release fluency," he added. "In load testing, we examine the durability of the weapon and aircraft while performing complex maneuvers. In flutter testing, we check for aerodynamic phenomenon that may endanger the jet. While testing release fluency, we scan for issues in the release process of munitions - a significant test for the 'Adir' since its payload is released from an internal hold in the jet's body. After the testing process is completed, we are able to determine the guidelines for operating with the new capability".

Providing Data


What grants the squadron personnel the ability to examine, receive data and dissect it to draw conclusions that will benefit the IAF? In addition to the flight and technical departments, the FTC Squadron has a systems department. The squadron's aircraft are equipped with systems that collect the data that is later used to examine the test outcomes. The systems department focuses on collecting and dissecting the data from the aircraft systems, including delivering the information in real-time to the squadron on the ground, where the test is closely monitored.


"The purpose of the systems is to provide data that the aircraft cannot display on its own, thus allowing for an effective de-brief and learning experience", said Maj. Manny, Commander of the Systems Department. Most of the systems are installed during the production of the jet, and the Systems Department can add additional ones according to the kind of test. "While planning for the acquisition of the experimental F-35I, the IAF began to establish the kind of testing that would be held. Accordingly, appropriate systems were assimilated during production".


In the near future, concurrent with the integration of the aircraft, American teams from "Lockheed Martin" will arrive at the squadron to deliver system instructions to its personnel. "The 'Adir' speaks a different language, one that we must connect with and learn to understand", mentioned Maj. Manny and Lt. Col. Y added: "The IAF knows how to operate the "Adir", but does not yet know how to operate an experimental model. We need to receive the relevant knowledge in order to operate the aircraft and fly it prior to the testing process".

A New Home


Since the IAF's decision to integrate "Adir" aircraft, the squadron and Tel Nof AFB has changed quite dramatically. "The changes relate to several aspects", explains Maj. A, the squadron's Technical Officer who recently completed his role. "The first is infrastructure. There were two options as to where the aircraft will be held and maintained - the FTC Squadron and Nevatim AFB. When our squadron was chosen, our personnel began building the suitable infrastructure. The squadron's flight line underwent a substantial overhaul and was converted to accommodate 5th generation aircraft".


Without the necessary work force, the squadron cannot maintain and operate the aircraft to the best of its ability. "The entire squadron strengthened considerably", continued Maj. A. "There's need for professionals - F-35-certified pilots, test engineers, equipment specialists, and technicians". Lt. Col. Y. added: "In the past year, two operational F-35I pilots joined the Flight Testing Center and are currently training to become test pilots".


The FTC's flight line operates all of the IAF's fighter jets and the technical department must maintain them regularly and thoroughly. "The 5th generation aircraft is differs from the rest of the FTC's aircraft", emphasized Maj. A. "Consequently, all of the 'Adir' technical staff underwent a series of designated F-35I training in order to maximize their independence prior to the jet's arrival. The 'Adir' integration adds a layer of complexity to the department's routine since F-35I maintenance is different as well. The arrival of the aircraft constitutes a significant milestone for both the squadron and the technical department".

Custom-Made Fighter Jet


Why exactly is this experimental F-35I model the first of its kind in the world? "To date, the only experimental F-35 models manufactured were aeromechanical testing aircraft of limited operational ability or testing models meant to examine specific systems. The arriving 'Adir' model has advanced aeromechanical testing capabilities and full operational capabilities. Similar to other equipped testing aircraft in the FTC, we could, if necessary, convert the model to an operational one".


"The test 'Adir' model is the first-ever to be manufactured in the United States, per our request. Now, they will likely produce additional aircraft based on the current model for themselves", detailed Lt. Col. Y. "As soon as we're fully prepared, we will be able to advance the 'Adir' Division and its capabilities".


Adding some color to that "boring stealth" scheme of prior Adirs..

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Rakesh
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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Rakesh » 14 Nov 2020 23:09

https://twitter.com/GarethJennings3/sta ... 78465?s=20 ---> UK bemoans lack of F-35 transparency, requests regular programme updates.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby MeshaVishwas » 15 Nov 2020 19:52

Jaguar rad alt calibration run. Oman
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https://twitter.com/CcibChris/status/98 ... 52706?s=20

Just a low flying Jaguar :mrgreen:

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Manish_P » 15 Nov 2020 20:41

That's pretty standard flight ceiling for the big cat. Jag pilots drivers are known to say that any higher than that and they get altitude sickness :mrgreen:

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Lisa » 15 Nov 2020 23:47

Nice image to explain density

https://twitter.com/clark_aviation/stat ... 2069621762

(P.S. Sorry do not know how to display an image)

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Manish_P » 16 Nov 2020 13:35

^ God, and i thought Mumbai traffic was bad!

I am taking the liberty of posting the image you have referred to in your post above, hoping that you will not mind..

Image

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 17 Nov 2020 06:08

It is official: Greece is requesting the purchase of 18-24 American F-35 fighters from the USA


Following the decision of Kyriakos Mitsotakis to supply 18 twin-engine French Rafale fighter jets (six new and 12 slightly used), the Greek government officially addressed Washington asking for the immediate purchase of the famous American F-35 fighter jets .

The official Letter of Request (LOR) letter from the Department of Defense was sent to the US Government on November 6.

"The decision to enter (Greece) in the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program will be based on a variety of factors such as the fighter delivery program, the repayment plan, the configuration of the aircraft and a possible combination to obtain a total of 18- 24 jets (new or used by the US Air Force, if available) "is mentioned in the Letter of Expression of Interest of the Greek Ministry of National Defense dated November 6.

"Your immediate response will be appreciated," reads the letter from the Ministry of National Defense, signed by the Director General of Armaments and Investments, Theodoros Lagios ."Due to internal fiscal arrangements and other applicable rules within the EU budget and deficit framework, it is crucial that the first F-35s are delivered in 2021. For our part, we will do everything possible to implement this ambitious program ".

The Director General of Defense Equipments and Investments, as the person in charge of the Ministry of National Defense for the promotion of issues related to defense equipment, invites the competent American officials to visit Greece as soon as possible so that the discussions on the 18 to 24 F-35 fighter jets. "We would like you to address this request with the highest possible sense of urgency, because we have a window of opportunity for the possible supply of F-35s in the very near future," the Greek Ministry of National Defense also stressed.

Already, as reported in the official LOR for the purchase of 18-24 American F-35 fighter jets, the Greek government has received data on the availability and prices of fighter jets available in the United States for sale in Greece.

With the immediate acquisition of a squadron of 18-24 fifth-generation F-35 fighters, along with the purchase of 18 French Rafale fighter jets , the Greek government is seeking to offset the balance of power with Turkey. As the Russian S-400 anti-aircraft system procured by the Turks can create problems in the daily activity of the Air Force, Athens is moving fast in the acquisition of F-35 stealth aircraft, in combination with the purchase of twin-engine French fighter jets.

The French Rafale fighter jets are expected to start delivering to the Air Force from the beginning of 2021 at a rate of one every month so that by the end of the first half of next year the first six - slightly used Rafale - have joined the Air Force arsenal .

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby NRao » 17 Nov 2020 22:07

@embraer

#NEWS | #Embraer and Hungarian Government signs contract for acquisition of two multi-mission #KC390 #Millennium Airlifters. Read more: https://embr.cc/vymW #WeAreEmbraer #EmbraerStories

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Prithwiraj » 17 Nov 2020 22:56

brar_w wrote:It is official: Greece is requesting the purchase of 18-24 American F-35 fighters from the USA


Following the decision of Kyriakos Mitsotakis to supply 18 twin-engine French Rafale fighter jets (six new and 12 slightly used), the Greek government officially addressed Washington asking for the immediate purchase of the famous American F-35 fighter jets .

The official Letter of Request (LOR) letter from the Department of Defense was sent to the US Government on November 6.

"The decision to enter (Greece) in the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program will be based on a variety of factors such as the fighter delivery program, the repayment plan, the configuration of the aircraft and a possible combination to obtain a total of 18- 24 jets (new or used by the US Air Force, if available) "is mentioned in the Letter of Expression of Interest of the Greek Ministry of National Defense dated November 6.

"Your immediate response will be appreciated," reads the letter from the Ministry of National Defense, signed by the Director General of Armaments and Investments, Theodoros Lagios ."Due to internal fiscal arrangements and other applicable rules within the EU budget and deficit framework, it is crucial that the first F-35s are delivered in 2021. For our part, we will do everything possible to implement this ambitious program ".

The Director General of Defense Equipments and Investments, as the person in charge of the Ministry of National Defense for the promotion of issues related to defense equipment, invites the competent American officials to visit Greece as soon as possible so that the discussions on the 18 to 24 F-35 fighter jets. "We would like you to address this request with the highest possible sense of urgency, because we have a window of opportunity for the possible supply of F-35s in the very near future," the Greek Ministry of National Defense also stressed.

Already, as reported in the official LOR for the purchase of 18-24 American F-35 fighter jets, the Greek government has received data on the availability and prices of fighter jets available in the United States for sale in Greece.

With the immediate acquisition of a squadron of 18-24 fifth-generation F-35 fighters, along with the purchase of 18 French Rafale fighter jets , the Greek government is seeking to offset the balance of power with Turkey. As the Russian S-400 anti-aircraft system procured by the Turks can create problems in the daily activity of the Air Force, Athens is moving fast in the acquisition of F-35 stealth aircraft, in combination with the purchase of twin-engine French fighter jets.

The French Rafale fighter jets are expected to start delivering to the Air Force from the beginning of 2021 at a rate of one every month so that by the end of the first half of next year the first six - slightly used Rafale - have joined the Air Force arsenal .

who is funding the Helenic forces? few years back they were on the verge of default and almost sold off their submarines fleet and rest of the defense hardware. How can things turn so quickly? Or is it being funded by Americans and French somehow to fend off Erdogen (The name itself sounds like a villain from Lord of the Rings)

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 17 Nov 2020 23:08

Prithwiraj wrote:who is funding the Helenic forces? few years back they were on the verge of default and almost sold off their submarines fleet and rest of the defense hardware. How can things turn so quickly? Or is it being funded by Americans and French somehow to fend off Erdogen (The name itself sounds like a villain from Lord of the Rings)


Turkish adventurism is no doubt playing a role in this. The Rafale deal involves majority used aircraft which are cheaper than new builds (€1.7 billion for 18 aircraft). On the F-35 front, the LOR isn't specific (but the FMS notification that follows will be) but it could lead to (a likely scenario) an initial purchase of 6 ex Turkish F-35A's (that are currently being absorbed into the USAF) and spreading out additional aircraft till after the Rafale deal concludes. They've also just increased their defense budget and if they want to raise capital externally I'm sure quite a few nations would be willing to provide a favorable loan just to mess with Erdogan.

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Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Rakesh » 22 Nov 2020 00:20

Similar missiles I believe were ordered last year, post Balakot. Someone please correct me if I am wrong.

https://twitter.com/mahmouedgamal44/sta ... 24416?s=20 --> During Nile Eagles-1 Exercise, Egyptian Air Force MIG-29M/M2 jets appeared for the 1st time armed with RVVSD/R-77-1 air-to-air missiles which have an improved firing range of up to 110km instead of 80km to the old version.

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