Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Philip » 05 Jan 2019 16:07

http://www.atimes.com/article/us-china- ... ct-at-sea/

Where India quietly watches China at sea
India maintains one of its newest and best-equipped military bases on the remote and restricted Andaman Islands, from where it surveils and looks to counter China in nearby waters
By Bertil Lintner New Delhi, December 10, 2018 3:03 PM (UTC+8)

An aerial view of India's Andaman islands. Photo: Facebook

India’s Andaman Islands are where stone-age warfare meets 21st century weapons technology. On November 16, John Allen Chau, an American Christian missionary, was killed in a hail of arrows fired by aboriginal Sentinelese tribesmen as he tried to land on North Sentinel island to spread his faith.

The island, one of the remotest and most isolated islands in the Andaman archipelago, is a no-go territory even for Indian administrators, but was suddenly – if not fleetingly – in the global media spotlight due to the US proselytizer’s demise.

But there is a bigger hidden story in the Andamans, one with a modern geo-strategic twist.

On that same chain of remote islands, situated between Southeast Asia and the Indian Subcontinent, India quietly maintains one of its newest and best-equipped military bases.

From there, it monitors among other things the movements of Chinese submarines patrolling the entrance to the Malacca Strait shipping chokepoint while also eavesdropping on their radio traffic, according to sources familiar with the situation.

The Andamans, along with the nearby Nicobar Islands, form an Indian union territory run from New Delhi. It is home to what is appropriately called the Andaman and Nicobar Command, the Indian military’s first and only tri-service command.
India-Andaman Islands-Map
The Andaman and Nicobar Islands in regional relief. Map: Facebook

Headquartered at Port Blair, the main town on the islands, the command was established in 2001 to safeguard India’s strategic interests in the waters east of the Subcontinent and coordinates the activities of the navy, army and air force as well as the coast guards in the eastern Indian Ocean.

The main bases are on the larger Andamans, while there is a naval air station on the Nicobars not far from the northern tip of the Indonesian island of Sumatra.

Now, as China expands its naval presence in the Indian Ocean, the Andamans have become a new maritime frontline in the increasingly pitched geopolitical rivalry between the two Asian giants.

On December 30, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is scheduled to visit the Andamans, officially to mark the 75th anniversary of the hoisting of the Indian tricolor flag and the declaration of Azad Hind, or Free India, in Port Blair.

Free India was a provisional government established in 1943 in then occupied Singapore and supported by Empire Japan, Nazi Germany and Italy’s Social Republic – all Axis allies – during World War II.

The Andamans and Nicobars were occupied by the Japanese during the war, the only Indian territory to come under Tokyo’s control. Japan’s ally at that time was Subhas Chandra Bose, the leader of the Indian National Army, which fought alongside the Japanese Army in Southeast Asia and on the fringes of South Asia.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (L) and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi at the India-Japan annual summit on September 14, 2017. Photo: AFP/Prakash Singh

Modi will hoist the historical flag at exactly the same place in Port Blair where Bose performed the same ceremony on December 30, 1943.

Today, Japanese and Indian nationalists are allies once again, as Modi has found a strategic soul mate in Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. Japanese naval vessels may soon be seen in Port Blair as well, as the two countries’ navies build a relationship to counter China’s moves in the Indian Ocean.

Talks are already underway between India and Japan to upgrade the laggard infrastructure on the strategically situated islands, in a project that represents a counter to China’s infrastructure building initiative, the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI).

Yet the idea of positioning a new Indian military command on the Andamans predates the BRI. It was first hatched in 1995 during a closed-door meeting in Washington between India’s then prime minister P V Narasimha Rao and then US president Bill Clinton, as it was already clear then that China was keen to establish a presence in the Indian Ocean.

The plan was finalized when Clinton visited India in 2000, and since then US naval ships have docked at Port Blair, ostensibly to assist in training rescue teams. But it is hardly a secret among military observers that the larger reason is to strengthen an informal alliance of powers that are concerned about China’s rising maritime ambitions.
India-Andaman Islands-Nicobar Islands-Navy
Indian naval vessels in the Andaman islands. Photo: Wikimedia

Speaking at a roundtable conference organized by the New Delhi-based think tank the National Maritime Foundation, US Navy chief Admiral Gary Roughead said that American leaders at the highest level had declared Washington and New Delhi would be strategic partners throughout the 21st century: “I’m here to say that the United States Navy in particular is a committed friend to India for the long term.”

In April 2016, India agreed to open its naval bases to the US in exchange for access to weapons technology to help narrow its gap with China. That month officials also said that Chinese submarines had been sighted in the area on an average of four times every three months. Since then, India has received US assistance in tracking China’s submarines.

But with Donald Trump in the White House, America’s commitment to Asia – and by extension India – may not be as firm as previously. That’s caused New Delhi to look increasingly to Tokyo for assistance in reasserting its position in its traditional sphere of influence.

During an October visit to Tokyo, Modi and Abe concluded a range of agreements to strengthen military cooperation, including an “Acquisition and Cross-Servicing Agreement,” or ACSA, which will grant the two sides’ armed forces reciprocal access to each other’s military bases and facilities.

It is obvious to most why China has moved into the Indian Ocean region and no one questions the legitimacy of its interests: most of China’s foreign trade as well as its crucial oil imports pass through the waters. But it is a new geopolitical development that other powers in the region are watching with increased concern.
India-Andaman Islands-Naval Exercise-2010
Indian Navy Commandos in a water para-jump during an exercise off Port Blair. Photo: Facebook/Indian Navy

China’s military base in Djibouti, its first overseas military facility, has sparked speculation that the Chinese navy is aiming for strategic access to other ports in Beijing-friendly nations in the region such as Kyaukpyu in Myanmar, Gwadar in Pakistan and Hambantota in Sri Lanka.

Today, India’s Andaman and Nicobar Command consists of a joint naval and air force base, two logistics support bases, two naval stations and an air base. Those are rapidly becoming some of India’s most important military outposts, security analysts say.

More transport planes were brought in after the 2004 tsunami disaster, with the Indian Air Force eventually stationing a Sukhoi SU-30 squadron on the Andamans, converting the facility into a fighter aircraft base. Indian military and policy makers now frequently refer to the islands as a “stationary aircraft carrier.”

The Indian Navy also maintains a major Naval Special Forces, known as MARCOS, detachment there, in large part to guard against China’s maneuvers in the Indian Ocean region.

Modi’s upcoming visit there is thus not only a symbolic gesture to honor an old freedom fighter and his budding friendship with Japan, but will also mark more officially the beginning of a new strategic era where Japan and India are once again close partners.

The isolated Sentinelese tribe may be utterly unaware of what is going on so near to their secluded home island. But to the rest of the world, it is obvious that a new Cold War is emerging on the Indian Ocean’s horizon and the Andaman islands are emerging as important outposts in that contest.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Rakesh » 06 Jan 2019 01:50

Rakesh wrote:When pictures like these come (and they come VERY rarely), enjoy them in all their glory!!! The missiles shown below are the P-15 Termit ---> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P-15_Termit

Some more pictures (earlier set of pictures in previous page of this thread) of the P-15 Termit coastal missile batteries of the Indian Navy...

https://twitter.com/strategic_front/sta ... 4153452544 ---> P-15 Termit (SS-N-2 Styx) of Indian Navy.

Image

Image

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Austin » 06 Jan 2019 11:43

I wonder if they still use it in 2018 , this is an old and obsolete missile can be used as target missile though.

The Styx were greatly indeginised including many electronics system and radars were Indian one , Rakesh if you remeber we discussed in late 90's Project Orel at BRF

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Prithwiraj » 06 Jan 2019 12:57

The orange jacket has marking of Adani which means it was Adani port and image date stamp says 2016.. are they being loaded or decomissioned? i guess those coastal batteries are for Gujrat coast

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby ramana » 07 Jan 2019 10:13

https://twitter.com/IndianDefenceRA/sta ... 88640?s=19

INS Kohasa new airstation.for Andaman and Nicobar.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Austin » 07 Jan 2019 10:16

PICTURES: Aircraft carrier Vikranta: inside the largest and most ambitious military shipbuilding project in India"

https://bmpd.livejournal.com/3485558.html

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Singha » 07 Jan 2019 10:19

a new pearl harbour/guam needs to come up on car nicobar island.

fortunately no sentinel type uncontacted tribe lives there. 21 villages and 4500 inhabitants are there and most will benefit from the service industry that would support a major base like shops and supplies.

maybe instead of impacting the island forests, dump more sand and rocks and enlarge the island. NYC, singapore, mumbai, hong kong, osaka kansai have all expanded in that way.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Rakesh » 09 Jan 2019 00:51

https://twitter.com/SJha1618/status/1082626750578741249 ---> Given Mazagon Dockyard Limited's idling capacity, one additional P-15B & one more P-17A can probably be built there by the second half of the 2020s. I think New Delhi should seriously look at this. GRSE, Kolkata is also in the same boat.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby John » 09 Jan 2019 02:29

Rakesh wrote:https://twitter.com/SJha1618/status/1082626750578741249 ---> Given Mazagon Dockyard Limited's idling capacity, one additional P-15B & one more P-17A can probably be built there by the second half of the 2020s. I think New Delhi should seriously look at this. GRSE, Kolkata is also in the same boat.

I would go for more P-15b since they are already being fitted it would be easier to incorporate any enhancements from trials to new one being constructed.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Singha » 09 Jan 2019 07:36

We need to ramp up corvette hull production too a p28 sized ship with diesel power

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Philip » 09 Jan 2019 09:43

Tnere is a media item the CSL will build 8 corvettes, but the report saying that it may be P- 28s appears in correct given the total cost of them under $1B.These must be the inshore ASW corvettes whose conatruction mah be split between GRSE and CSL.First within 4 years and 2 each year after that.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby John » 09 Jan 2019 19:00

Are you referring to this?

http://www.newindianexpress.com/cities/ ... 21517.html

As link states these are ASW corvettes intended to built cheaply in larger nos we discussed them a couple pages back. More P-28 appear to be unlikely as stated by experts these are vessels armed like light corvette with endurance like a light frigate and priced like one.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby chola » 09 Jan 2019 20:16

chola wrote:India to acquire US-2 amphibious aircraft from Japan
http://www.navyrecognition.com/index.ph ... japan.html
Maritime Defense Industry
ARTICLE CATEGORY
POSTED ON WEDNESDAY, 09 JANUARY 2019 11:45


What’s a high speed railway gun? Dorky misinterpretation of rail gun? Or actually a gun being pulled around on HSR (we don’t even have any yet but I know we are working with the Japs on this.)

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Gagan » 09 Jan 2019 22:11

An ElectroMagnetic type Gun?

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Philip » 09 Jan 2019 23:50

Read lreports about latest US tests lsst year with near hyper- velocity rounds fired from std. naval guns, requiring no huge power banks required for rail guns. Modified projectiles. Far cheaper than a rail gin, plus makes any warship that has a legacy main gun which can fire rounds of the same calibre, hugely increase their lethality.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby nachiket » 10 Jan 2019 04:53

chola wrote:What’s a high speed railway gun? Dorky misinterpretation of rail gun? Or actually a gun being pulled around on HSR (we don’t even have any yet but I know we are working with the Japs on this.)

The new Mumbai-Ahmedabad HSR being built with Japanese help is going to be integrated with the 155mm Dhanush howitzer with two guns mounted on the first and last coaches for self defense against stone throwers and cattle and trucks wandering onto tracks.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby PratikDas » 10 Jan 2019 05:08

nachiket wrote:The new Mumbai-Ahmedabad HSR being built with Japanese help is going to be integrated with the 155mm Dhanush howitzer with two guns mounted on the first and last coaches for self defense against stone throwers and cattle and trucks wandering onto tracks.

:rotfl:

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Chinmay » 10 Jan 2019 09:45

nachiket wrote:The new Mumbai-Ahmedabad HSR being built with Japanese help is going to be integrated with the 155mm Dhanush howitzer with two guns mounted on the first and last coaches for self defense against stone throwers and cattle and trucks wandering onto tracks.


:lol: :lol: :lol:

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby srin » 10 Jan 2019 10:12

nachiket wrote:
chola wrote:What’s a high speed railway gun? Dorky misinterpretation of rail gun? Or actually a gun being pulled around on HSR (we don’t even have any yet but I know we are working with the Japs on this.)

The new Mumbai-Ahmedabad HSR being built with Japanese help is going to be integrated with the 155mm Dhanush howitzer with two guns mounted on the first and last coaches for self defense against stone throwers and cattle and trucks wandering onto tracks.


The Mumbai-Ahmedabad HSR is a bullet train. So, they'll use INSAS, not the Dhanush. Duh.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Aditya_V » 10 Jan 2019 11:04

John wrote:Are you referring to this?

http://www.newindianexpress.com/cities/ ... 21517.html

As link states these are ASW corvettes intended to built cheaply in larger nos we discussed them a couple pages back. More P-28 appear to be unlikely as stated by experts these are vessels armed like light corvette with endurance like a light frigate and priced like one.


P-28 are blue water water Corvettes with specialized ASW equipment and with a lot of effort taken to deaden sound vibrations, they are most probably meant to travel along with CBG's for protection.

These corvettes are probably for more general use.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby ks_sachin » 10 Jan 2019 12:46

nachiket wrote:
chola wrote:What’s a high speed railway gun? Dorky misinterpretation of rail gun? Or actually a gun being pulled around on HSR (we don’t even have any yet but I know we are working with the Japs on this.)

The new Mumbai-Ahmedabad HSR being built with Japanese help is going to be integrated with the 155mm Dhanush howitzer with two guns mounted on the first and last coaches for self defense against stone throwers and cattle and trucks wandering onto tracks.

I am sorry but it is the kashtan CIWS with the short range Patharastra anti stone mizzile.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby chola » 10 Jan 2019 13:24

nachiket wrote:
chola wrote:What’s a high speed railway gun? Dorky misinterpretation of rail gun? Or actually a gun being pulled around on HSR (we don’t even have any yet but I know we are working with the Japs on this.)

The new Mumbai-Ahmedabad HSR being built with Japanese help is going to be integrated with the 155mm Dhanush howitzer with two guns mounted on the first and last coaches for self defense against stone throwers and cattle and trucks wandering onto tracks.


Stone throwers and trucks, yeah. Not the third unless you want riots.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Austin » 10 Jan 2019 17:18

INS Kochi - The Stealth Destroyer | Patriot With Major Gaurav Arya


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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby John » 10 Jan 2019 18:11

Aditya_V wrote:
John wrote:Are you referring to this?

http://www.newindianexpress.com/cities/ ... 21517.html

As link states these are ASW corvettes intended to built cheaply in larger nos we discussed them a couple pages back. More P-28 appear to be unlikely as stated by experts these are vessels armed like light corvette with endurance like a light frigate and priced like one.


P-28 are blue water water Corvettes with specialized ASW equipment and with a lot of effort taken to deaden sound vibrations, they are most probably meant to travel along with CBG's for protection.

These corvettes are probably for more general use.


Yes P-28 are blue water ASW surface combatants where as these 8 will be inshore ASW vessels. But that said P-28s won't be able to keep pace with the fleet they have top speed of about 22-23 knots and I believe the new one should be little faster with weight reduction.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Singha » 10 Jan 2019 19:01

we need to invest whatever is needed to make life in IOR impossible for enemy SSNs.

japan with its long ASW focus can perhaps be a good source of tech for ASW frigates and corvettes if we lack something locally. they have a large troop of ASW ships.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Aditya_V » 10 Jan 2019 22:38

Per Wiki P-28 top speed is 25knots

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Singha » 10 Jan 2019 22:46

I dont think ASW ships can hunt for ships at high speeds or keeping pace with the fleet.
they will need to go slow and idle along on electric motors to get maximum detection.

LRMP a/c will usually be tasked to drop sononuoys too if a fleet is moving fast and n-subs(for those who have them) sent to search the area.

have the towed array sonars we ordered from atlas elektronik been fitted? we sorely we need them.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby John » 10 Jan 2019 23:42

Aditya_V wrote:Per Wiki P-28 top speed is 25knots

It's wiki it's based on initial specs, There was article that higher displacement caused lower top speed for first two vessels hence they moved to composite mast for latter two. I believe Kitan can get close to 24 knots.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby kit » 11 Jan 2019 00:07

Singha wrote:we need to invest whatever is needed to make life in IOR impossible for enemy SSNs.

japan with its long ASW focus can perhaps be a good source of tech for ASW frigates and corvettes if we lack something locally. they have a large troop of ASW ships.


Mine strategic choke points and strategic areas with antisubmarine nets with detonation mines and acoustically activated mines ..so that we are ready to bottle them in and finish them off with our own "gigantic aircraft carrier" India from its peninsula can bring in overwhelming firepower to any target in IOA.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Rakesh » 11 Jan 2019 06:27

chola wrote:
chola wrote:India to acquire US-2 amphibious aircraft from Japan
http://www.navyrecognition.com/index.ph ... japan.html
Maritime Defense Industry
ARTICLE CATEGORY
POSTED ON WEDNESDAY, 09 JANUARY 2019 11:45


Rafale controversy stops Japan from pushing sale of amphibious aircraft for Indian Navy
https://theprint.in/security/rafale-con ... vy/175002/
09 JANUARY 2019

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby chola » 11 Jan 2019 18:13

Rakesh wrote:
chola wrote:


Rafale controversy stops Japan from pushing sale of amphibious aircraft for Indian Navy
https://theprint.in/security/rafale-con ... vy/175002/
09 JANUARY 2019


Completely contrary news on the very same day. LOL.

Nothing goes unstuck once caught in the wheels of our procurement raj.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Singha » 11 Jan 2019 19:48

the chances of accidents with captor mines, seabed moored mines in peacetime and against blue forces is too high. nobody just drops them off and radio activates later unless war is imminent. we cannot mine international waters like ASEAN straits outside our territory even in a war. imagine 100s of evil floating spherical mines in the malacca among dozens of heavy merchant vessels...the world will not tolerate it.

IOR is open ocean really with less chokepoints except in the rims

SOSUS I agree, even a mouse farts in antarctica we need to know of it.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Rakesh » 12 Jan 2019 23:44

Two high-speed interceptor boats inducted into Navy
https://indianexpress.com/article/india ... y-5534128/

The Indian Navy Friday inducted two Fast Interceptor Craft (FIC) into its fleet at Nagapattinam in an effort to beef up coastal security. The high-speed vessels, capable of operating in shallow waters, were acquired for Sagar Prahari Bal, a unit of the Navy created post-26/11 Mumbai terror attacks as part of the coastal security construct, said a defence press release here. Over the years, the boats, which have established their efficacy in coastal security and force protection measures, the release said. Also, the boats can carry a variety of armament from heavy machine guns to grenade launchers with the upper deck canopies bullet-proof, it said. The vessels were inducted in the presence of naval detachment Nagapattinam officer-in-charge Lieutenant Commodore Harihar and naval officer-in-charge to flag officer commanding (Tamil Nadu and Puducherry) Commodore Vidyanshu Srivastava, it added.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Rakesh » 13 Jan 2019 00:02

Naval Chief to commission INS Kohassa in north Andaman on January 24
http://www.newindianexpress.com/nation/ ... 21901.html

Adding strength to India’s Act East Policy, Indian Navy is to commission a new Naval Air Base in the Andaman Group of Islands. Chief of Naval Staff Admiral Sunil Lanba will commission the new Base christened as the INS Kohassa on January 24 in Shibpur area of North Andaman of the Andaman & Nicobar group of islands. At present, the airbase will be able to handle Helicopter and Dornier Aircraft. With commissioning the base will become self-contained with fuel storage, repair facility, manpower under a commanding officer. The Navy plans to extend the base into a bigger air base in future. The Navy Spokesperson, Captain DK Sharma said, “The base is in consonance with the government’s act east policy.

This will provide flexibility to the Indian aircraft and ships in case of any emergency.” Andaman is about 1400 kilometers away from the country’s mainland. Keeping the strategic location in Mind, India has already institutionalised patrolling of strategic waterways passing through the high seas near Malacca Strait and Six Degrees Channel. India’s only tri-services command, Andaman & Nicobar Command, is located here along with three other air bases at Port Blair, Great Nicobar and Campbell Bay. The Indian Ocean Region is vital to world trade and economic prosperity of many nations as more than 75% of the world’s maritime trade and 50% of global oil consumption passes through the IOR.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Rakesh » 13 Jan 2019 00:13

India adds more teeth in Andamans, Indian Navy to get new airbase INS Kohassa
http://zeenews.india.com/india/india-ad ... 68363.html

Image

The Andaman & Nicobar Islands will get a new airbase at the archipelago in the Indian Naval Air Station (INAS) Kohassa near Diglipur. "The base has been readied for operations of helicopters and small transport aircraft and gives an optional landing & operating base to military pilots while operating in the island territories, which are stretched over around 1,000 kilometre from top to bottom," news agency ANI reported quoting a Navy official. The facility was earlier known as INS Shivpur and has been renamed as INS Kohassa after the extension of facilities at the base, he said. The new base would be in addition to the Port Blair, Car Nicobar and Navy's INS Baaz facility at the greater Nicobar Islands and is scheduled to be inaugurated by the Andaman and Nicobar Command Chief Vice Admiral Bimal Verma on January 24.

India has been steadily upgrading its military capabilities in the Andaman and Nicobar territories for the last many years. Due to the strategic location of the island territories near the mouth of the Malacca Straits from where over 70 per cent of the merchant ships operate, they are very important in the Navy`s game-plan to keep control over the activities in the Indian Ocean region. India's only tri-services operational command also exists in the Andamans where the members of the three services operate under one Navy officer. Earlier, the command was headed by officers from three services on a rotational basis but for around the last three years, it has been held by a Navy officer only. India wants to develop a model similar to the Andaman ones to create Theatre Commands and a number of efforts are being made in this direction. The Andamans have a large presence of the Navy, Coast Guard, Air Force and the Army who practice amphibious warfare.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Rakesh » 13 Jan 2019 00:14

First Helicopter Cross-Decking Between U.S. and Indian Navies
https://news.usni.org/2019/01/07/40119

An Indian Navy UH-3H helicopter is secured to the deck of USS Anchorage (LPD-23) in the foreground during a cooperative deployment in the Indian Ocean with Indian Navy guided-missile destroyer INS Rajput (D51) in the background.

Image

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Rakesh » 13 Jan 2019 01:07

Enjoy these pictures of the soon to be INS Karanj - the third Kalvari (Scorpene) Class boat.

Both INS Karanj and the second vessel (INS Khanderi) are expected to be commissioned in 2019.

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Rakesh
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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Rakesh » 13 Jan 2019 01:11

Indian Navy tests indigenous air-droppable containers for logistics support
https://sputniknews.com/military/201901 ... -suppoprt/

he containers, domestically developed by the country’s defence research body, could drastically improve ships' deployment duration on missions. In what may provide a major boost to India's operational logistic capability in the Indian Ocean Region, the Indian Navy has conducted successful trials of the Sahayak air droppable containers. The containers were successfully dropped at the intended location from IL-38 aircraft off Goa in the Arabian Sea during the trials, according to the navy. "Sahayak Containers will enhance operational logistics capability of Indian Navy and will provide the wherewithal to supply spares and stores to ships which are deployed more than 2,000 km from the coast," a statement issued by the Indian Navy reads.

The cylindrical containers have been indigenously developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), India's state-owned military research body. On Tuesday, the Indian Navy dropped a test payload of 50 kg in the container, which descended to the sea with the help of a parachute. "With the success of these trials, series production of Sahayak containers and parachutes would be undertaken," the Indian Navy added. The Indian Navy has been enhancing its operational and logistic strength in the Indian Ocean Region by signing pacts with several friendly nations. Since 2016, India has signed logistics pacts with the US, Singapore, France, while similar pacts are expected to soon be signed with Russia and Japan.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Rakesh » 13 Jan 2019 01:13

Indian Navy's Sahayak Air Droppable Containers Enhance Operational Logistics Capability
https://www.indiannavy.nic.in/content/i ... capability

Successful trials of the Sahayak Air Droppable Containers was undertaken from IL-38 aircraft off Goa in the Arabian Sea on 08 January 2019. Sahayak Containers will enhance operational logistics capability of Indian Navy and will provide the wherewithal to supply spares and stores to ships which are deployed more than 2,000 km from coast. This will reduce the requirement of ships to close coast for collecting spares and stores, thereby increasing the deployment duration. These cylindrical containers are indigenously developed by Naval Science & Technological Laboratory and Aeronautical Development Establishment of DRDO. A test payload of 50 kg was dropped in the container, which descended to the sea with the help of a parachute. With the success of these trials, series production of Sahayak containers and parachutes would be undertaken.

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Re: Indian Navy News & Discussion - 03 July 2018

Postby Rakesh » 13 Jan 2019 01:27

https://twitter.com/indiannavy/status/1 ... 4267199489 ---> Bridges of Friendship - Admiral Sunil Lanba, CNS receives Admiral Christophe Prazuck, Chief of the Naval Staff, French Navy at South Block. The visiting Chief of Marine Nationale was accorded a ceremonial reception at South Block.

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