Indian ASAT Test

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby Singha » 06 Apr 2019 17:45

Amazing talk. loved the test images of the divert thruster and the missile assembly, the optical telescopy of the explosion and the IIR seeker snaps until the last moment. unlike shady cheen tests, this one leaves 0% doubt on the tech and outcome.

another resounding slap to the "world order"

in the Q&A part, which starts around 19 mins mark, a lal topi lady of unknown antecedents jumped in to demand have you taken permission from the EC for this talk ? he ignored that question :rotfl:

this is a must watch video. surprise quiz will be tomorrow morning and all who cannot score 80% will be banned for 2 weeks by imperial firman.

so get to it :twisted:

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby nam » 06 Apr 2019 17:50

The reporters were absolutely useless. The only sensible question asked was by the DD reporter!
Most of the question was around, they said this, they said that, what do you have to say?

There was even a question on number of woman scientist!

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby Singha » 06 Apr 2019 17:59

science reporting in india is not filled with talent, seeing as how SJW/leftist cabal run the show and recruit and train their own padawans.

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby arun » 06 Apr 2019 18:22

Kakarat wrote:https://twitter.com/kakarat2001/status/1114478518346207232
The final seeker image of #MicrosatR sent by kill vehicle of PDV MkII seconds before hit

Image


Good Find 8) .

So if satellite was travelling at 7.5 mt.sec and closing speed was 10 mt.sec then ASAT missile was travelling at 2.5 mt.sec.

ASAT lengths is 19 mts of which kill vehicle is 6 mts. Weight 90 Tonnes. That bit was garbled. Any one correcting?

Are divert motors used in the kill vehicle a building block for Ballistic Missile MIRV/MARV and/or BMD countering/evading option for our ballistic missiles?

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby Zynda » 06 Apr 2019 18:26

Here is the video put out by DRDO about ASAT test. Credits goes to Shiv Aroor of Livefist for sharing the same.



So Microsat-R was indeed launched to serve as a target for ASAT. Probably gems are contained in the video that others could recognize.

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby Austin » 06 Apr 2019 18:28

@livefist
Follow Follow @livefist
More
The @DRDO_India has just officially denied a @Diplomat_APAC 'scoop' which said India's March 27 A-SAT test was preceded by a failed attempt in February. The DRDO categorically says the Feb launch was a BMD test against an electronic target.

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby nam » 06 Apr 2019 19:20

Some good images in the video.

At 1:44, is that a composite motor?

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby ldev » 06 Apr 2019 20:18

Kakarat wrote:https://twitter.com/ShivAroor/status/1114464806323593216

Video
The @DRDO_India chief’s briefing on India’s #MissionShakti anti-satellite test is live here:


https://www.pscp.tv/ANI_news/1OwGWkaAWmpGQ


At 14:50 he says that this interceptor has the capability to intercept at an altitude of more than 1000 km!!

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby Dileep » 06 Apr 2019 21:17

Amber Ji, was waiting for you to comment. Would you be able to comment on the following notions I figure?

1. The new perigee of any piece cannot be lower than the impact point (because the object returns there.. DUH!
2. If debris is thrown all around (from an almost circular orbit), most of them will end up with a lower perigee than the current orbit. Only a small percentage will end up with a perigee between the current orbit and the impact point altitude.
3. The HTK kinetic impact is no different from an 'explosion'. It is all energy release.
4. The direction of impact doesn't matter much when both objects disintegrate into pieces much smaller than the original ones.

TIA

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby Rahul M » 06 Apr 2019 21:28

Prem Kumar wrote:Even discounting the racism (which certainly exists), U.S is reacting to a change in the equilibrium. MMS was happy with maintaining the equilibrium a.k.a. self-castration. Modi has disrupted it, be it surgical strikes or ASAT.

U.S is going through its 5 stages of grief before they accept the new normal. They will bat for Rahul because it will mean a return to the old equilibrium.

I have a different take on this, if you note, virtually every US govt. entity has a different stand than NASA.
the reason might be 2 fold,
1) as a primarily civilian 'sciencey' organisation NASA administrator has to be seen to oppose 'militarisation of space' to his own employees who, like most romantic millenials might believe deeply in such things. the so called boycott of ISRO (which had nothing to do with the test) would be part of such a move,

2) there is very likely a larger inter departmental war in which NASA is losing out on funding to the more militarised arms of US govt during trump reign. fearmongering about space debris especially when the target is a brown-skinned nation would look like an attractive option to get some attention and may be funds.

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby nam » 06 Apr 2019 21:31

Next step need something like at 3:13 in this video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpX0EwO5SkE

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby Singha » 06 Apr 2019 21:38

Inside the factory the htk vehicle with heat shield removed has been shown with the iir sensor in front

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby prasannasimha » 06 Apr 2019 21:41


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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby disha » 06 Apr 2019 21:44

prasannasimha wrote:https://youtu.be/KRs79t6z7fc
Full DRDO video


Initial part of video showing quick reaction divergent thrusters test answers one of Indranil's question.

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby Amber G. » 06 Apr 2019 21:59

Indranil wrote:Amber G,

Thank you for writing such great posts every now and then. You asked if there is more interest, you will write more. Let me register my interest. Please keep these coming.

Physics and math are so beautiful if taught properly. It is a pity how science is taught in schools. To this day, most of my friends think Newton “discovered” gravity because an apple fell on his head!!!

Please keep these illuminating posts coming. I absolutely love to read them. For example, there was one line in your posts: All these objects will come back to the point of impact if there was no decay. It is obvious, but only after I read it.


Thanks. I enjoy your posts too.

Another comment I wanted to make was about a few peoples (including one or two here in brf) writing something along the line:

>>> - Since sat's orbit was "well known" it was "no big deal" to hit it. They said something to the effect: "Just wait at right place (along the sat's orbit) and let the sat come and hit you"


Of course, the orbit is not like a train track where one can just "wait". One is literally in a free fall and just can't flap one's wings and hover.
It is not anything like
a goalkeeper blocking a football shot into the box, the goalie just ensure the ball hits him.

It's sort of irrelevant who is moving slower or faster)- it's the relative speed which matters here.

In fact, if one misses it by 1 millisecond, at those speeds, one will miss the target by some 10 meters.
Just think about that.

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby Amber G. » 06 Apr 2019 22:01


Thanks. Interesting article.

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby Amber G. » 06 Apr 2019 22:47

Syam - Let me put my perspective, hope it helps.

syam wrote:
Amber G. wrote:To add - Any explosive added really does not matter as KE per mass from KE is quite larger than, say compared to TNT or other explosives.

Sir, our ASAT missile is more like Brahmos without the warhead. Collision is not explosion in most cases. It leaves wreckage, not blast.


The energy released by a ASAT missile at, say 10 km/sec, is about 45,000 joules per gram. This is about 10-15 times TNT of the same mass. In other words having a warhead with explosives in ASAT will not matter as much as a regular Brahmos hitting an ordinary target where you need explosives.

Also there is, really *no* difference between a "blast" or a "wreckage" as far as physics is concerned. A TNT "blast" is nothing more (or less) than high-velocity particles of TNT, air-molecules colliding with the target. :). (In other words, in an ordinary car collision, energy spent is MUCH less than a explosive so the "wreckage" does not look as bad as a "blast" but at ASAT speed the "wreckage" will look about 10,000 times "worse" and as bad as a "blast". :)

Coming to the new orbits and stuff. I think we are underestimating gravity here. Orbits are not roads where things travel. It's like you attach a string to an object and throw it out. Once it runs out of the steam it swings back into place. Of course the momentum will be preserved. That's why the object swings to other side.

Our satellite is like that object with gravity itself acting as the string. It 'swings' around earth. That's why we see max speed at perigee. What happened here is, the satellite was hit when it is 'swinging'. It won't create new orbit. It might increase the 'swinging' hight.

Any way that's what I understood by going through space science #101. Please correct me if I am wrong.


Actually, by understanding gravity we can precisely calculate orbits. One does require math though. (I have taught that stuff as my day job so I can speak about this rather confidently). So permit me to put orbit-science 101 here.

One way to actually calculate speed at perigee (or any other point of the orbit) is just to use the following formulas and the following basic understandings -

1- All orbits are elliptical. The semi-major axis (let us call it a) sort of defines how big (high) or small the orbit is. Measure the distance from center of the earth. This elliptical orbit has the *same* time period and total energy as the equivalent circular orbit of radius a. (It is easy to calculate energy/time-period for circular orbit)

2 - The speed (v ) at any point in orbit at a distance r is given by (simple conservation of energy calculation):
v^2 = k (2/r - 1/a)

(k here is gravitational parameter, for earth it is about 4*10^14 if you use metic units (like meter and second etc)



(This is why you see speed at perigee (when r is smaller) is higher etc)

I hope this is helpful.

***
In ideal conditions the orbit will remain fixed. In real world due to perturbations like air drag (yes, even at 300 km this is there), non-spherical shape of the earth, effects due to Moon and other planets, and may be even further collisions with other space debris the orbits change. The math becomes quite complex and one depends on computer simulations and statistical analysis to study orbit decay.

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby ramana » 06 Apr 2019 22:57

Disha

You are looking at global/strategic factors in NASA statement while there is a local/tactical component.

NASA was saying ISS in ~400 km orbit could be affected by debris of Microsat R in lower orbit. DRDO said they chose the test orbit carefully to ensure debris will fall back in 45 days.

So what are they really complaing about?

Mamla aur kuch hain.

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby Amber G. » 06 Apr 2019 22:58

arun wrote:

So if satellite was travelling at 7.5 mt.sec and closing speed was 10 mt.sec then ASAT missile was travelling at 2.5 mt.sec.

?

May be I am missing something but..
1 - The speeds are of the order of 10 Km/sec .. not mt.sec..
2 - The velocities are vectors, so one can not just "add" or "subtract" scaler values. (Of course, one does not have to guess, all the speeds are accurately known)

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby srin » 06 Apr 2019 23:15

Did Dr. Reddy say that IIR seeker detected and tracked the satellite from 200km away ? :eek:

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby Amber G. » 06 Apr 2019 23:45

From the following article:
All You Need To Know About The PDV MK-II: India’s Satellite Killer By Indranil Roy

About debris:
The test parameters were chosen with extreme caution to minimize the hazard of debris after the impact. Although the missile can take out a satellite at 1000 km, the satellite was purposely injected into a circular orbit very close to the outer atmosphere. This decreased the time for reentry of the particles into the atmosphere. It is currently estimated that Microsat-R disintegrated into about 270 chunks, with a cross section of 10 cm2 or above. All of these are predicted to re-enter the earth’s atmosphere in less than 45 days.



This signals another aspect of the test: the KKV most probably impacted the satellite on its way down. Most of the debris from such an impact are boosted to a lower atmosphere interesting orbits. Therefore, this test is akin to Operation Burnt Frost, conducted by the United States to shoot-down a defunct satellite at nearly the same altitude as the Mission Shakti test. That satellite was about 3 times larger than Microsat-R and contained a significantly higher volume of unused fuel. The satellite disintegrated into over 360 pieces most of which entered lower atmosphere-intersecting orbits within a couple of months. However, one of the projectiles was reportedly boosted to a 3000 km orbit and is yet to re-enter the atmosphere. In contrast, the Chinese chose to shoot down a weather satellite at an altitude of 865 km. The result was a large debris field, a significant part of which is still circling the earth, unlikely to decay anytime in the next couple of decades.

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby Amber G. » 07 Apr 2019 00:02

Dileep wrote:Amber Ji, was waiting for you to comment. Would you be able to comment on the following notions I figure?

1. The new perigee of any piece cannot be lower than the impact point (because the object returns there.. DUH!
2. If debris is thrown all around (from an almost circular orbit), most of them will end up with a lower perigee than the current orbit. Only a small percentage will end up with a perigee between the current orbit and the impact point altitude.
3. The HTK kinetic impact is no different from an 'explosion'. It is all energy release.
4. The direction of impact doesn't matter much when both objects disintegrate into pieces much smaller than the original ones.

TIA

Hi Dileep, let me take a stab and few comments:
1-2 Yes, the perigee (by it's definition) of the elliptical orbit almost always will be "lower" than the impact point but I think the part we should think about is not perigee/apogee but rather the whole orbit in general. (After all a debris need not be at perigee to hit something)

For me, thinking about semi-major axis - which actually equals to average between perigee and apogee) - tells me how "high" (on average) the debris go, the time-period and energy of the orbit etc. Yes, of course, perigee is important as this is where most decay occurs but one has to think about the whole picture - eg how much time is spent at what altitude - to study debris decay.

Of course, probability of hitting, say a space-station, is already *very* low but even a small percentage is *not* zero so people can talk about debris going "higher".

3 - Agree.
4 - In my view direction of impact does matter as the total energy lost will depend on it. (Actually since KE is proportional to square of velocity the design - all other things being equal - which they are not - - should aim for a "head-on" collision and this can impact the damage done by a factor of few)

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby syam » 07 Apr 2019 00:12

Amber G. wrote:Syam - Let me put my perspective, hope it helps.

It helped big time, amber ji. Thanks for the detailed explanation. I know next to nothing about space science few days back. Kinda slogging it to understand wth going on.
The energy released by a ASAT missile at, say 10 km/sec, is about 45,000 joules per gram.

In other words, in an ordinary car collision, energy spent is MUCH less than a explosive so the "wreckage" does not look as bad as a "blast" but at ASAT speed the "wreckage" will look about 10,000 times "worse" and as bad as a "blast".

:oops: My bad. I was going with basic equation.
Kinetic = some 1k yield
Kinetic + bomb = 1k +++ yield.

Since collisions are very common in lower earth orbits, I thought first eq is pretty normal, not big deal. I am still of that opinion. Debris were very few in number after our test. If big blast happened, things would have looked little colorful in sky, right?
~~ orbit-science #101

I hope this is helpful.

I first read Newton canon ball, adapted it for my 'swing' example. Guess it missed the target big time. Thanks for the equations, sir.
The math becomes quite complex and one depends on computer simulations and statistical analysis to study orbit decay.

DRDO chief explained it. If something gone wrong, things would have gone wrong in last 10 days. Everything is ok so far. That's enough for me. If nasa is still worried, they should try steering wheel and brakes for their iss to dodge the debris. :)

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby SriKumar » 07 Apr 2019 01:05

The DRDO video is something. Its has experimental data i.e. in the 2 sets of impact imageries. Around 3:50 onwards there is (IR?) video of the seeker aiming for the satellite.

Relative velocity is mentioned as 10.45 km/sec (on the right side display). It shows the action in the last second of impact (range goes from 12.x km to 0.4x km- this should take about 1 second, the video was slowed down for us mortals :shock: ). One can see several corrections to KKV course (evident by the movements of the blue 'lock-on box' in the video) in that 1 second (more than 6-8 course corrections). That video will make our red friends think a bit harder. It was released especially for eleven saab's viewing pleasure.

On a different note, Mircrosat R was launched Southwards (and a little eastwards) just as all PSLVs are launched from SHAR. Its orbit was mostly north to south. DRDO video shows this launch track. However, later in the DRDO video (And the AGI video simulation of impact that 'singha' posted a few days ago) the Microsat is shown going from south to north. Looks like it was made to reverse/change direction but the question is how. It would require a tremendous amount of energy to completely reverse direction and keep orbital velocity. Maybe the 740 kg weight of the satellite was mostly fuel? But still....it is not clear to me how the orbit was reversed, and how it got the energy to do that (well after rocket's launch)....unless the PSLV final stages executed some extra/unusual maneuvers after it went way south over Indian ocean.

AmberG-
the ASAT-Microsat impact discussion above reminds me of the question you had posted a couple of years ago on the ISRO thread about the direction of an orbiting satellite which is 'impacted' tangential to and normal to its orbit :)
Last edited by SriKumar on 07 Apr 2019 01:48, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby souravB » 07 Apr 2019 01:45

I wouldn't be surprised if Khan wants to partner up with India for it's next gen of BMD under the guise of DTTI. They already do it with Israel for their Arrow-3/SM3 GBMD. As they will move towards ICBMs &/or HGV for the next phase, they would require to have as many partners as possible. And quite frankly Only India has some meaningful experience to partner up.

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby UlanBatori » 07 Apr 2019 02:03

ramana wrote:I don't get what the bokwas whine is all about using BMD for ASAT?
Which moron will start from scratch when you have a working BMD system? I am sure US also has done that. The mention of SM-3 and GMD with HTK confirms that.


That was the most interesting part I have read in this whole tamasha.

Hitting a satellite in orbit is same as tossing a ball up as a bird is flying fast, as I mentioned (and iirc some pompous entity of course twisted into something else :rotfl: ). Because of the extreme speed of the satellite in orbit (~ 7.5 km/s) the "H2K" (a.k.a. "Smart Rock / Brilliant Pebble") killer vehicle does not have to be going fast w.r.t. the ground: it can be reaching the top of its rise and beginning to come slowly straight down (no one does that, sure) and so traveling at 1 cm per second w.r.t. Earth, as long as it is in the right place at the right instant to be in front of the satellite. So it is very different from the case of, say, an ATGM. Also the target will have a tough time maneuvering "out of the way" in time, and even if it does, it will now be in a very different orbit and face rapid decline - like a car dodging a large pakistani beeing in the middle of a mountain pass road. Meanwhile the killer can move a bit in any direction (not cover much distance) because it is at very low kinetic energy, not much thrust needed to change orbit plane.

Also note that this is why there is such paranoia about even small pieces of debris floating gently in the path of satellites: It is finis for the satellite.

Sounds like the Indian ASAT apparently **did not** use any such tactics. The demonstration was at a relative velocity of 10.45km per second meaning at least about 3km/s speed higher than the necessary orbital speed.

WHY?

So the demo was that kill can be done at much higher altitude/ very different orbital plane, showing a lot of freedom between the launch site and the orbital plane of the kill as well as orbit height. IOW, the same vehicle/same launch point can hit satellites in much higher orbits. Also, that there is very fast sensor/computer/thruster coordination on board, so even avoidance maneuvers are not going to be very successful. Think who that message is meant for. It is *Not * for killing satellites.

Now for the BMD reference. How many official GOI references have u seen to this "BMD" after the first 2 Sriharikota tests? I have not seen any, maybe because I can't read sophisticated things like PeeAref MilForum threads. Note that it says "cost was low because... existing BMD INFRASTRUCTURE". IOW, BMD exists not just as a "tech demo" but as an "infrastructure". NOW think why the ASAT was done when it was done, and why it merited a special Address By PMji. It was a clear message to Pakis that there is an existing BMD infrastructure.

ramana, the vehicle's genesis and this reference tie in with what I mentioned. Message of 10.45kmps was for Eleven, maybe, but the rest was for someone else. There should be a Truth and Accountability Investigation of Karachi Stock Exchange to see the variation in price of Rolaids. VERY happy to see this: it is confirmation/validation of many things only hoped-for for decades.

Remember Dimran shivering: "Modi threatened to use missiles". NOW think about the significance.
Last edited by UlanBatori on 07 Apr 2019 04:29, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby Indranil » 07 Apr 2019 02:42

I am going to plug my article in here. But I Am not feeling any shame in this. I had written this with no insider knowledge. Saurav Jha did provide some quality inputs about the KKV. Every point we made has turned out to be correct. Feeling proud.

All You Need To Know About The PDV MK-II: India’s Satellite Killer

However, India had only tested targets simulating re-entry vehicles of medium range ballistic missiles, that is targets which were moving at a speed of about 2 km/s. Hence the system had to be upgraded to track targets which were moving much faster, at speeds of around 7 km/s.
...

Based on the above analysis, the following characteristics of the missile emerge. It is a three stage missile with a diameter of 1.4 m and a length of nearly 13.2 m. The first two stages cumulatively weigh around 17.2 tonnes (t) carrying 16.7 t of fuel. The PDV-derived third stage which includes the KKV weighs around 1.8 t, bringing the overall weight of the missile to around 18.5 t (slight error here 17.2 +1.8 = 19.0 tons). Such a missile should be able to take out targets up to an altitude of 1000 km.
---
Before the missile is launched, the fire control system estimates an approximate impact point based on the projected flight path of the target and the flight characteristics of the missile. This estimated flight path is uploaded onto the flight computer which is also housed in the third stage of the missile before the launch. After launch, the flight computer guided by a highly accurate ring laser gyroscope based inertial navigational system (RLG-INS) provides control commands to the thrust vectoring systems of the first and second stage to guide the rocket along this pre-calculated path.
---
The booster stages separate after burn up. The heat shield also separates once the missile has cleared the atmosphere. Once the kill vehicle is in the vicinity of the impact point, it switches on its Imaging Infrared (IIR) seeker.
---
Once the target is locked, the kill vehicle homes onto its target for a hit-to-kill (HTK) interception. The accuracy needed to achieve such a kill is, let us say, non-trivial. The two projectiles approach each other at nearly 10 km/s, whereas the accuracy of the hit is measured in centimeters. To achieve such accuracy, four divert thrusters placed at 90 degrees to each other are used. These thrusters create short and precise rocket pulses to modify the attitude of the KKV or create a translation if needed. In addition to these four main-thrusters, 8 more ports are visible along the base of the third stage. It is unclear whether these ports are part of a longitudinal motor placed at the base of the third stage (the guess has been confirmed. Should give SJha his due credit here).
---
The test parameters were chosen with extreme caution to minimize the hazard of debris after the impact. Although the missile can take out a satellite at 1000 km, the satellite was purposely injected into a circular orbit very close to the outer atmosphere. This decreased the time for reentry of the particles into the atmosphere. It is currently estimated that Microsat-R disintegrated into about 270 chunks, with a cross section of 10 cm2 or above. All of these are predicted to re-enter the earth’s atmosphere in less than 45 days.
---
It is very unlikely that India will conduct another ASAT test in the near future, especially against a real satellite. There is simply no need: India has already demonstrated its capability which is verifiable by all the majors power in the world. If any further refinements are required, the tests are likely to be against electronic targets, may be at higher orbits.
---
The RLG-INS of the PDV Mk-II is the most advanced of any Indian missile designed till date. This is likely to be adapted to long range ballistic missile to increase their accuracy as well.

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby SaiK » 07 Apr 2019 03:27

Satellite-killer not a one-off, India working on star wars armoury

India is now also working to develop other counterspace capa ..

Read more at:
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/arti ... aign=cppst

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/ind ... 758674.cms

NEW DELHI: After successfully testing an anti-satellite (ASat) missile last month, India is now also working to develop other counterspace capabilities like directed energy weapons (DEWs) and co-orbital killers as well as the ability to protect its own satellites from electronic or physical attacks.

“We are working on a number of technologies like DEWs, lasers, electromagnetic pulse (EMP) and co-orbital weapons etc. I can’t divulge the details, but we are taking them forward,” said DRDO chief G Satheesh Reddy on Saturday. The A-Sat missile that destroyed the Microsat-R satellite, at an altitude of 283-km in the low-earth orbit (LEO) on March 27, was a “directascent, kinetic kill” weapon. It’s “feasible” to target multiple satellites with multiple launches of the three-stage interceptor missile, which can go up to 1,000 km into space," said the DRDO chief.


A coorbital weapon, in turn, is basically a satellite equipped with some explosive, weapon or DEW device, which is first put into orbit and then later manoeuvred to target the enemy satellite. Apart from these kinetic kill weapons, other ASAT weapons like lasers jammers, EMP and high-powered microwaves are being rapidly developed by China, which first tested an A-Sat missile against a LEO weather satellite in January 2007.

Trying to play catch-up, sources say India’s long-term aim is to develop A-Sat weapons against satellites in both LEO and GEO-synchronous orbits as a credible deterrence against emerging threats to its growing spacebased assets. “Conversely, EMP hardening of our satellites and sensors, apart from other measures, can be done to protect them from our adversaries,” said a source.


"There is a plan to launch mini-satellites on demand for the armed forces if the main satellites are targeted,” said a source. DRDO for long has also been running programmes on a wide variety of DEWs like high-energy lasers and highpowered microwaves capable of destroying aerial and ground-based targets, but whether they can be successfully developed into A-Sat weapons remains to be seen.

DRDO chief G Satheesh Reddy, on his part, said it was for the government to decide on the issue of weaponisation of A-Sat systems or the creation of a fullfledged Aerospace Military Command. “Space has gained importance in the military domain. The best way to ensure security is to have deterrence,” he said. The DRDO chief made it clear that there was no move to conduct additional tests of the new A-Sat missile as of now.


“Though we tested the interceptor missile for an altitude below 300 km as a responsible nation after multiple simulations, it has the technical capability to go beyond 1,000 km. That will cover most of the orbiting satellites in LEO. For the same purpose, we don’t need more tests,” he said. The target satellite was hit with an accuracy of less than 10 cm, on par with “the best reported performances” of such A-Sat missiles worldwide. “So, it meets all our objectives. The successful demonstration of ‘Mission Shakti’ has placed India in the elite club of three countries (US, Russia and China) possessing the A-Sat capability,” Reddy added.

---


India’s NSA Ajit Doval & the @DRDO_India chief Satheesh Reddy met with members of the strategic community & technocrats to discuss the A-SAT program this week. The DRDO has just put out these pictures:
https://twitter.com/livefist/status/1114541980888043520

Image
Image
Image

sanjaykumar
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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby sanjaykumar » 07 Apr 2019 04:20

I think we can close shop at BRF now. These dudes are way ahead of us.

SaiK
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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby SaiK » 07 Apr 2019 04:26


UlanBatori
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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby UlanBatori » 07 Apr 2019 04:38

I added this link to Smart Rocks/Brilliant Pebbles. in my post above.
Proposing Concepts is one thing: making them work first-crack is something else entirely. No end of kudos to the Indian team.
BTW, re: the Amazing Inside Claim that the first attempt missed, this is second attempt, use da leettil gray cells a bit: The kill vehicle was going at AT LEAST 3, probably 10, km/s. Such a thing goes into Earth orbit: its not like taking a container full of Pakis into the Afghan dejert. The event would be catalogued by at least 6 nations plus a host of amateur astronomers and not be something you can hide.

But for the PM to go on live TV after keeping population waiting 45 minutes, the reason is very clearly not "Message to China". It has to do with damping Paki enthusiasm and driving up Rolaids prices. Their Feared TFTA First Strike just became phut once the word "infrastructure" was thrown in casually.

The term "Retaliatory Counter-Strike of Total Pakihilation - Tandava Nrtta" comes to mind instead. No need for anything that extreme. 6 mijjiles that take out the main PAF and "strategic" installations would be faaaar more fun to watch the aftermath as the repressed populations that beat the 2 PAF pilots to death, come in with the portable sawmills and lampposts.

SaiK
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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby SaiK » 07 Apr 2019 04:48

From the above two target acquisition pics is enough for NASA folks to understand and feel safe! [/The ASAT was on head-on on the orbital plane.. and in fact the probability of kill is near 1 this way. Else, it would be near Zero and highest miss possibility]

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby Vips » 07 Apr 2019 05:37

Satellite-killer not a one-off, India working on star wars armoury.

After successfully testing an anti-satellite (ASat) missile last month, India is now also working to develop other counterspace capabilities like directed energy weapons (DEWs) and co-orbital killers as well as the ability to protect its own satellites from electronic or physical attacks.

“We are working on a number of technologies like DEWs, lasers, electromagnetic pulse (EMP) and co-orbital weapons etc. I can’t divulge
the details, but we are taking them forward
,” said DRDO chief G Satheesh Reddy on Saturday.

The A-Sat missile that destroyed the Microsat-R satellite, at an altitude of 283-km in the low-earth orbit (LEO) on March 27, was a “directascent, kinetic kill” weapon. It’s “feasible” to target multiple satellites with multiple launches of the three-stage interceptor missile, which can go up to 1,000 km into space," said the DRDO chief.

A coorbital weapon, in turn, is basically a satellite equipped with some explosive, weapon or DEW device, which is first put into orbit and then later manoeuvred to target the enemy satellite. Apart from these kinetic kill weapons, other ASAT weapons like lasers jammers, EMP and high-powered microwaves are being rapidly developed by China, which first tested an A-Sat missile against a LEO weather satellite in January 2007.

Trying to play catch-up, sources say India’s long-term aim is to develop A-Sat weapons against satellites in both LEO and GEO-synchronous orbits as a credible deterrence against emerging threats to its growing spacebased assets. “Conversely, EMP hardening of our satellites and sensors, apart from other measures, can be done to protect them from our adversaries,” said a source.

"There is a plan to launch mini-satellites on demand for the armed forces if the main satellites are targeted,” said a source. DRDO for long has also been running programmes on a wide variety of DEWs like high-energy lasers and highpowered microwaves capable of destroying aerial and ground-based targets, but whether they can be successfully developed into A-Sat weapons remains to be seen.

DRDO chief G Satheesh Reddy, on his part, said it was for the government to decide on the issue of weaponisation of A-Sat systems or the creation of a fullfledged Aerospace Military Command. “Space has gained importance in the military domain.

The best way to ensure security is to have deterrence,” he said. The DRDO chief made it clear that there was no move to conduct additional tests of the new A-Sat missile as of now.

“Though we tested the interceptor missile for an altitude below 300 km as a responsible nation after multiple simulations, it has the technical capability to go beyond 1,000 km. That will cover most of the orbiting satellites in LEO. For the same purpose, we don’t need more tests,” he said. The target satellite was hit with an accuracy of less than 10 cm, on par with “the best reported performances” of such A-Sat missiles worldwide. “So, it meets all our objectives.

The successful demonstration of ‘Mission Shakti’ has placed India in the elite club of three countries (US, Russia and China) possessing the A-Sat capability,” Reddy added.

This is huge. All the BRF jingo's wish list of DEW, lasers etc is being worked on actively. Is to too much to wish for a MIRV test?
Namo Namo Modi/Doval.

arun
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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby arun » 07 Apr 2019 07:31

Amber G. wrote:
arun wrote:

So if satellite was travelling at 7.5 mt.sec and closing speed was 10 mt.sec then ASAT missile was travelling at 2.5 mt.sec.

?

May be I am missing something but..
1 - The speeds are of the order of 10 Km/sec .. not mt.sec..
2 - The velocities are vectors, so one can not just "add" or "subtract" scaler values. (Of course, one does not have to guess, all the speeds are accurately known)


1.You are right, my bad, Km Sec it is.

2.OK. So would I be correct in understanding that no conclusion can be drawn regards the speed of the ASAT Interceptor :?:

:wink: If any missing something is happening, it is more likely from my end ........

arun
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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby arun » 07 Apr 2019 07:41

SaiK wrote:loads of pics here

https://twitter.com/strategic_front/sta ... 9264355328

..........{Rest Snipped}..........



Appear to be stills captured from the ASAT Test video released by DRDO yesterday.

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby sudeepj » 07 Apr 2019 07:47

As fun as it is for the jingo side of me, I wish the DRDO had not done such a detailed press conference. Showing the last minute kkv maneuvering, using technical descriptor words that can leak information about the guidance algorithms makes me feel uneasy.

Karan M
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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby Karan M » 07 Apr 2019 07:51

Yes, I agree. The problem with DRDO is that lack of GOI support during the UPA era, when UPA used pliable journos like Coupta to target DRDO and push for imports, made it start giving out overtly detailed information in an effort to establish its credibility.

VikramA
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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby VikramA » 07 Apr 2019 08:07

technically proficient civilians like space enthusiasts are already getting way too much info from the drdo video like:
"It also lists an azimuth, elevation and range: az 168.981 deg, elev 41.758 deg, range 414.485 km. This would place the IR camera on the coast near 21.345 N, 86.912 E, give or take a few hundred meters, near Deulabad."

I can only imagine what a foreign nation military intelligence will get.

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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby Singha » 07 Apr 2019 08:41

I am sure info is screened
These are not observatories but trailers like swordfish

Its a stone in the pond to see how china responds
More it proliferates or tries to prop up its fading munna more it will get into trouble

UlanBatori
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Re: Indian ASAT Test

Postby UlanBatori » 07 Apr 2019 08:42

Arun, if you look at the video, you see the Satellite (Passive Attractor Of Killer Indians or PAKI) is coming in its orbit, at a speed relative to Earth of about 7.5km/s (that should work out to be nearly 18000 miles per hour - you can work the conversion yourself). The Killer Indian ASAT mijjile takes off and accelerates and approaches the PAKI, and actually goes towards it. At the time of impact, the relative speed apparently is 10.45km/s (I heard that somewhere). Since the KI is still rising as well as going towards the PAKI, I guess this means the KI has a speed of something like 5km/s itself.

An impact with relative velocity of 10.45 km/s is far worse than being close to an ATGM explosion. If you look at the KI, it looks like a bullet with two big ears. So for the PAKI this would have been like running into a wall at 10km/se. Pulverized worse than an F-16 that gets an R-73 mijjile up its (never mind).
I am sure DRDO/ISRO cooperation was good enough to have a solid back-up plan. It might be something like this based on SOP in the US Defense Acquisition System:
When the Paki sees the KI approaching, and death is certain, it triggers a soosai vest and blows itself up. This was how the Sergeant York anti-aircraft gun was tested in demonstration. They used a helicopter to test it (moves slower than an airplane..). Then they got the helicopter to hover. Then they made damn sure by putting an explosive charge on the helicopter, and triggering it a second after the gun "fired". Very spectacular, the Mantris/ Netas went back to COTUS and voted a few $B for the budget to make this.


AFAIK, the Indian ASAT test worked perfect, first time. Nagararajamani Khan BuddharakhitaTero Appukkuttan Makal Parukutti Singh Gangopahdyay probably got 100/100 in SSLC math so she made no mistake in her calculations and had the trajectories calculated down to 2 millimeters Circular Error Probability,


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