Magazine and Media Watch/Review

The Military Issues & History Forum is a venue to discuss issues relating to the military aspects of the Indian Armed Forces, whether the past, present or future. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
Harry
BRFite
Posts: 365
Joined: 20 Jun 2000 11:31
Contact:

Postby Harry » 14 May 2006 09:14

ATM mag from the Czech republic has an extensive article on INS Delhi,

Image

Photos from ACIG.

Rahul M
Forum Moderator
Posts: 16834
Joined: 17 Aug 2005 21:09
Location: Skies over BRFATA
Contact:

Postby Rahul M » 15 May 2006 02:50

Photos from ACIG


as far as I can see with my limited # of eyes there is only ONE photo. :shock:
anyway ,details anybody??

Jagan
Webmaster BR
Posts: 3032
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Earth @ Google.com
Contact:

Postby Jagan » 18 May 2006 22:14

http://www.afji.com/2006/05/1670484

The Indian voice
Forums offer insights into a developing strategic partner
By Christopher Griffin

[quote]The most interesting part of the site is the Bharat Rakshak Forum (BRF) (http://forums.bharat-rakshak.com), which contains bulletin boards on almost every security topic, from India’s “Cold Startâ€

A Sharma
BRFite
Posts: 1141
Joined: 20 May 2003 11:31

Postby A Sharma » 23 May 2006 19:14


shiv
BRF Oldie
Posts: 34982
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Pindliyon ka Gooda

Postby shiv » 03 Jun 2006 15:16

Ved
BRFite


Joined: 08 Jul 1999
Posts: 211


PostPosted: 03 Jun 2006 Post subject: Surya Kirans on NDTV Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Did you guys in India see the show on 24x7 yesterday (2030h, IST), about the Surya Kirans (by Vishnu). Frankly, not as good as I had hoped. With a side-by-side seater, I expected many great airborne shots, maybe even a whole sequence. And why waste time on the Red Arrows - if at all, they could have included the Blue Angels and FAF Escadrille (or whatever) just to add balance.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
uddu
BRFite


Joined: 15 Aug 2004
Posts: 371


PostPosted: 03 Jun 2006 Post subject: Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
It was an excellent one. Congrats Vishnu.

The Red arrows was shown only for a very few minutes. The Red arrows was included because they had visited Goa one or two weeks back.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Mayurica
BRFite -Trainee


Joined: 06 Feb 2006
Posts: 13


PostPosted: 03 Jun 2006 Post subject: Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
When does it repeat?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
uddu
BRFite


Joined: 15 Aug 2004
Posts: 371


PostPosted: 03 Jun 2006 Post subject: Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Surya Kirans celebrate 10th anniversary
Link

The jets are now referred to as the 52 Squadron, 'The Sharks'.

Mayurica, you can login to watch the video if you are a member:
http://www.ndtv.com/ndtvvideo/default.asp?id=3357
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

kanoji_angre
BRFite -Trainee
Posts: 3
Joined: 05 May 2006 01:44

Postby kanoji_angre » 21 Jun 2006 13:44

A managed media [/url]http://www.indiatogether.org/2006/may/rgh-obits.htm[url]

A nice article by Ramachandra Guha about the indian media.[/url]

Austin
BRF Oldie
Posts: 23385
Joined: 23 Jul 2000 11:31

Postby Austin » 21 Jun 2006 18:26

Harry wrote:ATM mag from the Czech republic has an extensive article on INS Delhi,


Can you post the contents of the Delhi Article , if not the entire stuff then something interesting

Samir
Webmaster BR
Posts: 90
Joined: 08 Jul 2000 11:31

Postby Samir » 30 Jul 2006 22:53

Indian Express does a two-page spread on the 1965 war book:

http://www.indianexpress.com/sunday/story/9548.html

Harry
BRFite
Posts: 365
Joined: 20 Jun 2000 11:31
Contact:

Postby Harry » 30 Jul 2006 23:54

Samir wrote:Indian Express does a two-page spread on the 1965 war book:

http://www.indianexpress.com/sunday/story/9548.html


Could'nt those idiots read the details and final tables properly? There were 16 air-to-air kills by both sides, although Cooke's second kill is not mentioned in the tables, plus Sikands Gnat and Kacker's Hunter are also attributed as kills, which need to be fixed. Pakistan claims 36 air-to-air kills alone, but the official history's figure of 24 lost, includes AAA losses.

Rajit Ojha
BRFite -Trainee
Posts: 20
Joined: 31 Jul 2004 13:23

Brahmos on Headlines today

Postby Rajit Ojha » 31 Jul 2006 19:44

Headlines Today feature on Brahmos at 2130 and 2330, Monday, Jul 31 2006

MN Kumar
BRFite
Posts: 393
Joined: 27 Jan 2002 12:31

Postby MN Kumar » 08 Oct 2006 23:51

A special program "Defence Watch" on the 75th year of the IAF was telecast in DDNews today at 10.30 PM IST. Good news is that we had an Analyst from BR participating in the Panel discussion. That was our own loot bag guru Mr.Kapil Chandni.

Did anyone else watch the show? Kapil any repeat telecast of the show?

Anabhaya
BRFite
Posts: 271
Joined: 20 Sep 2005 12:36

Postby Anabhaya » 28 Oct 2006 12:42

Without access to all the facts and inside story, the one true surprise, which has received scant attention in the press even from defence commentators, is the exclusion from consideration of the Russian Klab missiles. These longer-range missiles, originally designed for submarine based operations, also have supersonic capability enabling them to engage sea-skimming missiles such as the Exocet. The Klab missiles are in fact coming to India along with several Kilo-class Russian submarines bought by India. Modified versions have also been fitted on to the reconditioned Russian aircraft carrier Gorshkov and on several stealth technology frigates being built in Russia for the Indian Navy. The modified frigate-mounted versions of the Klab are also vertically mounted systems like the Barak (and unlike the Trishul), making it easier to mount and operate on existing vessels. The booklet Indefensible Dealings had therefore asked: Whether there had been a comparative evaluation of the two systems or had subjective pro-Israeli biases or undue pressures been brought to bear in favour of the Israeli systems? And the question is relevant even today.



People's Democracy

What Klab are they talking about? :roll:

Abhi K Rao
BRFite -Trainee
Posts: 41
Joined: 20 Jul 2006 02:36
Location: Planet Earth

Postby Abhi K Rao » 18 Nov 2006 09:59

"The major weakness of BRF is that, unlike their American counterparts, serving Indian soldiers do not post. As one author notes: "You know what is really advanced about the USAF? Their pilots can go on a [bulletin board], right after they have completed an exercise, and talk about it, and post photos. Wow, if one of our pilots tried that, the IAF would expel his kid from Air Force School, make his wife dance at the AFWWA dinner, and add 5000 to his serial number." I am not sure what the latter half of that quote means, but I will not hold my breath while I wait for Indian military participation in online forums."

http://www.afji.com/2006/05/1670484

Vipul
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3727
Joined: 15 Jan 2005 03:30

Postby Vipul » 30 Dec 2006 21:09


JCage
BRFite
Posts: 1562
Joined: 09 Oct 2000 11:31

Postby JCage » 31 Dec 2006 07:13

Rajesh Ramachandran, the dude who ran that hilarious BS Outlook story about DRDO gets caught out..

http://warfornews.blogspot.com/2006/03/ ... le_17.html

Austin
BRF Oldie
Posts: 23385
Joined: 23 Jul 2000 11:31

Postby Austin » 31 Dec 2006 10:32

Did a write up on the recent ABM test , Comments and Suggestions welcome :)

Success Ahoy

Vick
BRFite
Posts: 753
Joined: 14 Oct 1999 11:31

Postby Vick » 31 Dec 2006 10:49

I think what you want to say is "rogue elements" not "rouge elements". Unless you mean people in the Pakistan Army that wear rouge?... for their dates with their goats? :)

Austin
BRF Oldie
Posts: 23385
Joined: 23 Jul 2000 11:31

Postby Austin » 31 Dec 2006 10:57

Thanks , Correction done :)

svinayak
BRF Oldie
Posts: 14223
Joined: 09 Feb 1999 12:31

Postby svinayak » 31 Dec 2006 12:05

Image

Nalla Baalu
BRFite
Posts: 119
Joined: 24 Aug 2006 07:16
Location: Yerramandi, Dhoolpeta

Postby Nalla Baalu » 01 Jan 2007 04:01

Outlook Photoessay

Clueless morons!

Nalla Baalu
BRFite
Posts: 119
Joined: 24 Aug 2006 07:16
Location: Yerramandi, Dhoolpeta

Postby Nalla Baalu » 01 Jan 2007 07:58

Austin saar!

Is the following excerpt (from your blog) from a public source? If yes, can you recall which components were positioned so far from each other?
In this trial, various data transmission and control centres were spread over a distance of 1,000 km.

Austin
BRF Oldie
Posts: 23385
Joined: 23 Jul 2000 11:31

Postby Austin » 01 Jan 2007 10:13

Hi Nalla Baalu , the excerpt is taken from The Hindu report , It dosent clearly mentions any specific components , But it generically mentions Control Center ( Shadow center perhaps ? ) and redudancy in data links/communication to the ABM system as a whole.

Since the test was done in complete weapon system configuration I would like to think they would have checked/tested the redudancy aspect of ABM system as a whole spread over multiple location

JCage
BRFite
Posts: 1562
Joined: 09 Oct 2000 11:31

Postby JCage » 14 Jan 2007 08:44

The UPA Govt has been a disaster.

http://www.indiareacts.com/archivedebat ... tg=Defence

His master's voice
Shyam Saran follows the PM in attacking nuclear scientists.

11 January 2007: On one hand, the prime minister bemoans our backwardness in the sciences, promising higher compensations for scientists and boosts in research facilities. On the other hand, he does not flinch from demoralizing them, especially the nuclear scientists, because they oppose him in the Indo-US nuclear deal. In Parliament, he pointed fingers at the nuclear scientific establishment for falling back on power generation targets without giving them credit for keeping alive both a strategic and civilian atomic programme under crippling world technology denial regimes.

Because the PM forgets he is the head of the government, and must weigh his words and opinions carefully, others take license from his position. Yesterday, at an IDSA seminar, according to the papers, the PM's special envoy on the nuclear deal, Shyam Saran, ran down the scientists. Saying that India would not accept any reference to a test moratorium in the 123 agreement being negotiated with the United States, he added, somewhat superfluously, that the last word lay with the political establishment here, and not the scientists.

The buck ultimately stops with the prime minister. Shyam Saran is not being exactly educative telling is what is obvious. But why the sideswipe at the scientists? Because they stood up to the government and pointed to its blundering nuke deal negotiations? Shyam Saran reveals himself. So does the PM. Even having served the government most of their lives, neither can separate policy criticism from the personal.

In strategic research, scientists have played an extra-scientific leading role all over the world. They have been demons and also served as conscience keepers. European scientists although they had stumbled upon fission in the Thirties did not publish their results in some cases because of the potential of misuse by fascist governments. One plausible reason that Hitler's Third Reich could not make atomic weapons before the US was because the German atomic project chief, the quantum physicist, Werner Heisenberg, had a role in misguiding the research. And Niels Bohr, on the advise of Manhattan Project's scientific director, J.Robert Oppenheimer, spoke with the then US president, Franklin D.Roosevelt, about sharing the atomic bomb technology with the Soviet Union. Roosevelt accepted the great physicist's argument. But Churchill said no. Anyhow, the Soviets caught up sooner than later.

Since then, some of the strongest opponents of atomic weapons and the doughtiest supporters of deterrence and non-proliferation have been nuclear scientists, weapons' designers, and so on. Their role in the polemics of the devastating weapons they create and refine cannot be wished away. Why should the political establishment alone have a view on it and cheerleaders of that view among strategists? Why not others? Why not nuclear scientists?

We have said this before, and we repeat. If we had not tested in 1974 and 1998, shown our capability with weaponization, and succeeded with nuclear IRBMs, the United States and other powers would not have given us today's special attention. It is true our economic miracle has increased the draw. But why does in comparison to India Japan, a bigger economic powerhouse, and Germany, a leader, pale? Look jaded? Appear tired? More to the point, how would we have got US acceptance of our nuclear weapons' status if we weren't a nuclear weapons' power thanks to our scientists? And why would the US give us that status if it didn't see India as a strategic balancer in Asia? We haven't sought this role. We may not even want it, especially if it entails congruency with US foreign policy. But without our credible deterrent, would we even have come on the radar?

Now consider why the US is the world technology leader, which gives it the heft to be a hyperpower. It is its sciences that power the US, keep it ahead of Europe by at least two generations or more and ahead of us by three generations or perhaps four. From its sciences, its R and D, flow its technologies that power the world. Four reactors sold to China at a cost exceeding $2 billion each nudge down its trade deficit with the Chinese. The US hopes to sell at least eight reactors to India with the nuke deal. See the high tech cost we pay to the US because we have neglected our sciences, scorned our scientists, and run them down in public. How does the PM hope to shore up the morale of scientists by insulting them?

This is not alone the case of nuclear scientists. Following the Barak scandal, the DRDO was targeted wholesale. There are obvious problems with DRDO as there are bound to be problems with all monopolies working under a blanket of secrecy. It is perhaps true that DRDO spread itself too thin. As we have published before, it should have concentrated on select areas, missiles for example, and withdrawn from other sectors. In fact, our solution for optimizing defence research is to part privatize it or join it with science universities or create internal competition, which the Russians have successfully modeled. But DRDO was so heavily shelled that Western weapons' manufacturers were suspected behind it.

When did the attacks cease? When DRDO stunned with a successful missile interception test. Naturally, it is a beginning. Missile defence is a hazardous enterprise. The US, for example, is painfully overcoming failures. But it needed such DRDO success to still the critics. Objective criticism is valid and welcome. But the attack on DRDO was motivated.
Yesterday, the ISRO proved itself all over again by putting four satellites into orbit. We probably still haven't fully understood the enormity of this success. But big powers like the US which are intimate with the consequences of such strategic high leaps would get a complete measure of where we are headed space-wise and missile-wise. Bumptious bureaucrats like Shyam Saran would scorn its significance unless it is accidentally revealed in the course of diplomacy. The same is unfortunately true of Manmohan Singh.


This is not to suggest that scientists ought to have a veto on strategic policy. The political establishment is the ultimate arbiter of it. But the establishment must accept and appreciate that in strategic negotiations, strategic R and D is the driver. The technical side of negotiations must always feature scientists. When scientists foresee an erosion of or compromise with national interest, they will speak out. In the nuke deal negotiations, it verily looked that DAE objections were being passed over or suppressed. Retired scientists were probably forced into the role of opposing the deal. This must not happen again. And the PM is lowering himself, and disserving his office, by targeting strategic scientists without a care for past services rendered. In his lead, others follow. The Congress party has no tradition of this.

Jagan
Webmaster BR
Posts: 3032
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Earth @ Google.com
Contact:

Postby Jagan » 31 Mar 2007 04:52

The recent Air Forces Monthly (April 2007) Issue has

1. A photo of a BAE Hawk in IAF Colors (Serial A3483)

2. Photographs of the IJT Crash - credited to Alan Warnes and Sanjay Simha. One of the phtoos - probably by Warnes shows the aircraft at a point when its port wing hit the runway and broke - the nosewheel is turned thru 90 degrees, signifying it was skidding sideways at that time, and the canopy was quite clearly wide open. This was before the aircraft continued its skid off the runway and the dust cloud that we clearly saw in the other pictures. The same photo also appears on the cover

3. four to five pages of Aero India show report.

4. Picture of crashed Dhruv J4042

negi
BRF Oldie
Posts: 13099
Joined: 27 Jul 2006 17:51
Location: Ban se dar nahin lagta , chootiyon se lagta hai .

Postby negi » 09 Apr 2007 15:28

The latest issue of the 'The Week' (15th April) has an article on problems in indiginisation due to lack of coordination between the Armed Forces and DRDO.

Bolasani
BRFite -Trainee
Posts: 50
Joined: 22 Sep 2005 10:43
Location: Hyderabad
Contact:

Week article on DRDO

Postby Bolasani » 10 Apr 2007 10:07

X-post from LCA thread

Article on DRDO in 'The Week'
Image Image Image

krishnan
BRF Oldie
Posts: 7342
Joined: 07 Oct 2005 12:58
Location: 13° 04' N , 80° 17' E

Postby krishnan » 10 Apr 2007 11:25

Thanks Bola

A Sharma
BRFite
Posts: 1141
Joined: 20 May 2003 11:31

Postby A Sharma » 10 Apr 2007 18:36

The same article is now available online
Look who's talking

Philip
BRF Oldie
Posts: 20155
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: India

Postby Philip » 11 Apr 2007 11:58

Has anyone seen the article in the Week Apr.6th. on the misserable plight of one of the country's most decorated and famous heroes,Naik Subedar Major Bana Singh? The name Bana Singh and Siachen are synonomous in the history of the Indian Army.He was awarded the PVC forcapturing along with his colleagues Pak's Qaid Post at an alt. of 6,500m!

20 yrs. later "Singh is a forgotten hero",says the Week.In retirement,the GOI turned down his requests for a petrol pump and a liquor shop licence.To sustain his 6 member family he has taken to farming in his village,Kadyal.says Bana Singh,"This is how the govt. treats a soldier who sacrificed everything for it".He also says,upset with the civvies in South Block,"I would like them to serve in Siachen alongside the troops for some time.Then they would realise what it takes to defend Siachen".

Shameful and outrageous.Words fail me as to the unfogivable attitude of the GOI.Is there anything that we at BR can do for bana Singh?

RayC
BRF Oldie
Posts: 4333
Joined: 16 Jan 2004 12:31

Postby RayC » 22 Apr 2007 10:16

Here is an interesting article from Salman Rushdie.

Just happen to see it and thought it was thought provoking.


http://www.english.ccsu.edu/hegglund/20 ... empire.htm

Rakesh
Forum Moderator
Posts: 7874
Joined: 15 Jan 2004 12:31
Location: Planet Earth
Contact:

Postby Rakesh » 22 Apr 2007 18:53

Philip wrote:Has anyone seen the article in the Week Apr.6th. on the misserable plight of one of the country's most decorated and famous heroes,Naik Subedar Major Bana Singh? The name Bana Singh and Siachen are synonomous in the history of the Indian Army.He was awarded the PVC forcapturing along with his colleagues Pak's Qaid Post at an alt. of 6,500m!

20 yrs. later "Singh is a forgotten hero",says the Week.In retirement,the GOI turned down his requests for a petrol pump and a liquor shop licence.To sustain his 6 member family he has taken to farming in his village,Kadyal.says Bana Singh,"This is how the govt. treats a soldier who sacrificed everything for it".He also says,upset with the civvies in South Block,"I would like them to serve in Siachen alongside the troops for some time.Then they would realise what it takes to defend Siachen".

Shameful and outrageous.Words fail me as to the unfogivable attitude of the GOI.Is there anything that we at BR can do for bana Singh?


I can't imagine that they are treating Bana Singh, PVC in this manner. Really shameful. Let me speak to the admin team and find out if BR can do anything. Thanks.

Aditya G
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3399
Joined: 19 Feb 2002 12:31
Contact:

Postby Aditya G » 22 Apr 2007 21:03

Due respect for NS major Singh, but on what grounds he wants the govt to give him a petrol pump and liquor license? Sure, he is a living legend - but does that give him a right?

Unless ofcourse this is part of GoI's standard package for non-posthumous PVC winners - if it is not then this is just a rant. Thousands of other brave soldiers have gone without medals and managed with what the govt gives even if considered too less.

Rakesh wrote:
Philip wrote:Has anyone seen the article in the Week Apr.6th. on the misserable plight of one of the country's most decorated and famous heroes,Naik Subedar Major Bana Singh? The name Bana Singh and Siachen are synonomous in the history of the Indian Army.He was awarded the PVC forcapturing along with his colleagues Pak's Qaid Post at an alt. of 6,500m!

20 yrs. later "Singh is a forgotten hero",says the Week.In retirement,the GOI turned down his requests for a petrol pump and a liquor shop licence.To sustain his 6 member family he has taken to farming in his village,Kadyal.says Bana Singh,"This is how the govt. treats a soldier who sacrificed everything for it".He also says,upset with the civvies in South Block,"I would like them to serve in Siachen alongside the troops for some time.Then they would realise what it takes to defend Siachen".

Shameful and outrageous.Words fail me as to the unfogivable attitude of the GOI.Is there anything that we at BR can do for bana Singh?


I can't imagine that they are treating Bana Singh, PVC in this manner. Really shameful. Let me speak to the admin team and find out if BR can do anything. Thanks.

Jagan
Webmaster BR
Posts: 3032
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Earth @ Google.com
Contact:

Postby Jagan » 22 Apr 2007 21:20

First time I am hearing about Naik Subedar Major :D

Regarding the petrol pump and land eligibility, it depends. Many states have passed some rules ensuring 'rewards' and 'benefits' to soldiers who are killed in action and as well as to those who get gallantry awards.

The petroleum companies themselves have rules that promise special treatment to ex servicemen, with the kin of the killed in action getting the highest priority , wounded next, normal retired next etc.

I dont remember if the gallantry awardees rank above or below the killed and disabled in action but the set of rules do promise some benefits to the decorated soldiers, both at the state govt level and at the petroleum company level. As long as Bana Singh is not asking to jump the line within the ex-servicemen quota, he is well within his rights to complain if his application has been delyaed or is being sat upon.

ParGha
BRFite
Posts: 881
Joined: 20 Jul 2006 06:01

Postby ParGha » 23 Apr 2007 05:17

Jagan wrote:First time I am hearing about Naik Subedar Major :D

Regarding the petrol pump and land eligibility, it depends. Many states have passed some rules ensuring 'rewards' and 'benefits' to soldiers who are killed in action and as well as to those who get gallantry awards.

The petroleum companies themselves have rules that promise special treatment to ex servicemen, with the kin of the killed in action getting the highest priority , wounded next, normal retired next etc.

I dont remember if the gallantry awardees rank above or below the killed and disabled in action but the set of rules do promise some benefits to the decorated soldiers, both at the state govt level and at the petroleum company level. As long as Bana Singh is not asking to jump the line within the ex-servicemen quota, he is well within his rights to complain if his application has been delyaed or is being sat upon.


Could it be that this is usually a State Government's function, and his particular state - Jammu and Kashmir - is playing some local politics that we cannot grasp? Different states play different politics with regard to armed forces (especially Army). Captain Singh himself juxtaposed Punjab government's generous offer with J&K's. Obviously Punjab government stands to gain a lot of soldiers' goodwill - who make up a significant portion of the politicians' constituency. While most other state governments stand to get fewer points... might it be that J&K actually sees negative points in this? If so, it may be an alarming trend indeed!

Philip
BRF Oldie
Posts: 20155
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: India

Postby Philip » 23 Apr 2007 15:56

The worst nightmare for any serviceman is that of retirement.He can face any foe,fight on any front,endure and survive the most extreme forces of nature,yet he is unable to fight successfully the indifference and forgetfullness of the babudom of India-the rusty and rotten "iron frame" of India,that devours all hope.Time and time again do we hear of stories of forgotten heroes of India,neglected in the evening of their life,remembered at their deathbed.

The latest joke in my opinion is the backpay for our greatest hero,FM Sam Manekshaw.That great worthy soldier is ill and in hospital.There is little chance of him ever enjoying in full the money that he is going to receive.Why was it not given to him at least a few years earlier when he was younger and could've enjoyed it? Well I supopose a warrior's family can enjoy it,but for the man who earned it,it's salt in the wound.

This reminds me of the story about the late Sri Lankan PM,Sir John Kotalwela.He refused President Jayawardene's desire to have his portrait put up in his club thus(JR was seeking membership of the Orient Club,where Sir John was the president and wanted along with his membership his portrait to adorn the club's walls where the portrait's of the most famous of the land looked down upon its members);"for one,he isn't a member and secondly he isn't dead"! When Sir John was on his deathbed,Jayawardene who had forgotten for years about this very popular ex-PM ,veteran soldier and ace cuckolder,suddenly decided to promote him to the rank of a general for cheap political gain.According to insider reports,Sir John was drifting into a coma as the news was shouted into his ear by the president's emissary,louder and louder each time (Sir John,you are now a general!),but there was no response.Finally after one final shriek Sir John stirred,turned and famously belched into the emissary's face!

karan_mc
BRFite
Posts: 690
Joined: 02 Dec 2006 20:53

Postby karan_mc » 12 May 2007 20:14

sushmita sen to visit INS Virat for the programme Jai jawan (NDTV), day for the telecast as not been mentioned yet

gopal.suri
BRFite
Posts: 191
Joined: 26 May 2007 17:22

Postby gopal.suri » 02 Jul 2007 14:02

The Kaoboys of R&AW- Down memory lane

Jul 2nd, 2007 by FIDSNS | 0

A new book “The Kaoboys of R&AW - Down Memory Laneâ€

Surya
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5034
Joined: 05 Mar 2001 12:31

Postby Surya » 23 Jul 2007 01:40

Just watched a superb French-algerian-morrocan war film - Indigenes ie Days of Glory
A superb balance of realistic action, emotions and raises very interesting questions of the men who died for various colonial powers (this movie is about France)

Should have won the oscars which went to a pretty good German movie.

Definitely one for the collections

Rudranathh
BRFite
Posts: 227
Joined: 17 Nov 2007 20:06

Postby Rudranathh » 13 Jan 2008 16:43

Difficulties in disseminating defence information(Article)

Jan 13,2008

By I. Ramamohan Rao

New Delhi, Jan 13 (ANI): The Central Information Commission has asked the Defence Ministry to have proper information policy concerning disclosure of vital information, " especially in events connected with the engagement of our Armed Forces with the forces of other countries in theatres of war".

The observation of the CIC was made in response to an application from a correspondent of a national weekly who appealed against the Naval Headquarters decision not to disclose the results of an inquiry instituted into the causes of the sinking of the Naval Ship INS Khukri during the India-Pakistan War in December 1971.

Eighteen officers and 175 sailors manned the Khukri, which was commanded by Captain Mulla. Captain Mulla who went down with the frigate, was awarded the Mahavir Chakra posthumously.

The Naval Headquarters has refused to give the details of the inquiry based on the debriefing of survivors, as the recommendations are still on the basis of naval strategy, and it would "compromise security, owing to the possibility of it becoming available to state and on state actors, which may be inimical to country's security interests"

I have had the opportunity of serving for over two decades with the Armed Forces as a Public Relations Officer, since the late fifties. The Army was a closed book those days and 'civilians' had little or no excess to the cantonments where they were stationed. The practice had its origins when the Indian Army was a part of the colonial government and took its orders from the Commander-in-Chief.

Much water has flown down the Brahmaputra and the Indus since those days. The country has fought three wars with Pakistan and one with China. I was associated as a communicator in all the wars. Each war added to the experience of the Government in handling information concerning operations.

The Defence Ministry drew up operational publicity guidelines for the dissemination of information during wars in the late sixties. Journalists were also trained to be 'war correspondents' and a detailed procedure was laid down to facilitate their reporting. The prevailing practice concerning the release of information is as liberal as that followed by many 'democratic nations'.

Generally, during a war, information needs to be released as to the progress of the operations, giving details on whether the armed forces are winning or losing, the casualties suffered by them, and the damage inflicted by them on the adversary.

Correct information is required to be given out to maintain the morale of the country, the Armed Forces themselves and to affect the morale of the enemy. The impact is meant to be felt both within the country and the world over. Even information of an adverse nature cannot be concealed to ensure the Government's credibility.

In recent years, the communication scene has undergone a dramatic change. For example during the Kargil operations in 1999 the media covered many battles almost 'live' and pictures were sent from theatres of war to television channels by satellite transmission. As of now, it would be difficult to keep the progress of operations 'under cover'.

The country also has been a victim of proxy wars since the late eighties. The terrorist always tries to use the media as an ally to create the needed impact, and disseminate false information. They also make an effort to project that the people of the area are against the Government and gain their sympathy to causes promoted by the terrorist.

The main lesson learnt during the counter-insurgency operations in Jammu and Kashmir as also in the north-east has been that it is always an advantage to give facts before the adversary can, and to give access to the media to directly interact with the people.

The dilemma for the Armed Forces has always been on how much information to release. They have to keep in mind the fact that our adversaries are keen to collect information about the Indian Armed Forces to plan their operations. The adversary wants to know the attitudes of the troops and the officers to the current conflict, conditions under which they operate, the preparedness and the relations between the people around towards the soldiers.

Such information is very important for the planning and conduct of psychological operations in aid of actual warfare.

The Indian Army had faced problems in motivating troops during the IPKF operations in Sri Lanka in the late 1980s. Initially, the Indian troops were airlifted ostensibly to assist the Tamils in getting a fair deal, but later, they had to fight the LTTE itself.

The American Armed forces were one of the most 'open ' as far as the media was concerned. The attitude changed after the Vietnam War experience, when gory pictures were seen in the living rooms back home in the United States.

During the Gulf War in the early nineties, only a limited number of media representatives were allowed to cover the operations on the frontline, and most of the reporting, was done through the briefing of correspondents at formation headquarters.

During the Iraq operations, the Allied Armed Forces have coined a new term 'embedded journalists'. To have access to the scene of operations, the journalists agree to be 'embedded' but the experience has been that the media has a compulsion to report the truth, sooner than later.

India does not have a policy regarding the "declassifying" of information of a sensitive nature after the lapse of a certain number of years.

In contrast, in the United States, records relating to the Johnson years (1964-69) have now become open to scholars. Also, in the United Kingdom, the records relating to the period relating to the pre-partition years are open. In India, documents relating to that period are still 'classified'.

The recent publication "Information and Security - Where Truth Lies" by Lt..Col. Anil Bhat (Manas Publications, Delhi, Pages 206) is a comprehensive work on the subject. Anil Bhat has had varied experience, having served both in the north-east and in New Delhi as the Public Relations Officer for the Army.

Bhat has also had the advantage of having studied in the Institute of Defence Studies and Analysis. The book also contains details of the organizations under the Government of India for charged with the task of dissemination of information.

One gets the feeling after going through Anil's book that those seeking information on security matters will always have an uphill task ahead of them.

I. Ramamohan Rao, Former Principal Information Officer, Government of India

wesley
BRFite -Trainee
Posts: 19
Joined: 23 Feb 2008 19:40

Air Forces Monthly Article on TVC Technology

Postby wesley » 21 Mar 2008 09:29

In case anyone missed it, the March issue of the British publication Air Forces Monthly carried an extensive article weighing the pro's and con's of thrust vector control, and exploring why so few Western nations have invested resources into the technology.

Significantly, however, the article also sited a 2002 Boeing report prepared for the US Air Force, that concluded that in the hands of a properly trained pilot, India's Su-30MKI fighter:

. . . could expect to defeat the F-15C "every time". Not most engagements, not even the majority of engagements - all of the engagements.


The article goes on to describe the mechanics of this "assured kill strategy" in detail. For anyone who hasn't seen it, it's definitely worth a read.


Return to “Military Issues & History Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot], kvraghav and 29 guests