Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Anantha
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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Anantha » 06 May 2014 06:41

Hari Seldon wrote:
Anantha wrote:Currently the numbers are 1 rupee for congis 75 seats, 1 rupee for BJP 240 seats. In other words odds of BJP getting 240 seats are EQUAL to Congis getting 75 seats. It also means if Congis get 120 seats, BJP will get >300. Hurray


last line doesn't make sense. perhaps you meant >200, eh?


No. My statement is correct. The risk of either event Congis >120, or BJP>300 is high. I gave a conservative >300 number. For eg the probablity of congis getting 120 is same as BJP getting 330 seats. Both events cannot occur simultaneously. Probability theory Gurus can explain it a little bit better.

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Gus » 06 May 2014 06:54

Just read the TOI interview.

His comments about US relationship - should scare the state dept a lot, than straightforward hostility.

As said before by me - it is so immensely gratifying to finally have a leader who doesn't either run his mouth or be an MMS.

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby RamaY » 06 May 2014 07:20

Anantha wrote:
No. My statement is correct. The risk of either event Congis >120, or BJP>300 is high. I gave a conservative >300 number. For eg the probablity of congis getting 120 is same as BJP getting 330 seats. Both events cannot occur simultaneously. Probability theory Gurus can explain it a little bit better.


That calculation we figured out few weeks ago.

Cong+BJP =320 and this equation is held supreme by Satta. To check this point we need to check the Satta rates for cong = 80, 90, 100, 120 etc., and the corresponding BJP tally of 240, 230, 220, 200 and so on..

??

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Anantha » 06 May 2014 07:31

RamaY
You are right, except the total for Congi+ BJP is not 320 as the BJP is chewing on seats of other regional players. Satta will have rupee rates for all those points that you mentioned. I will try to find it out tomorrow.

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Dilbu » 06 May 2014 07:47

NaMo will lose onlee. :(( :(( :((


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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby krishnan » 06 May 2014 08:53

Subramanian Swamy ‏@Swamy39 17m

Robber Damad in Dubai. Baby Chor in Singapore. Pukka Chor in search of Uzbekistan to be MD of a recently purchased spinning mill.

Subramanian Swamy ‏@Swamy39 22m

Rigging attempts have largely failed. NDA will be between 260 and 320. Margins in 60 dicey so can't be sure. Modi as PM sure.

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Anantha » 06 May 2014 09:22

T-10 days: Patience boys. We have endured the $itch for the last 10 years, it is only 10 more days to get out of the dynasty period of Indian history
Doori-E-Manjil se na umeed na ho "Shaqeel"
Abhi aayi jaati hai manzil Abhi aayi jaati hai
by Shaqeel badayuni

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby KLP Dubey » 06 May 2014 09:34

krishnan wrote:
Subramanian Swamy ‏@Swamy39 17m

Robber Damad in Dubai. Baby Chor in Singapore. Pukka Chor in search of Uzbekistan to be MD of a recently purchased spinning mill.


Oho, so Donga Alludu has already left India ? Whereas Chorambaram is trying to get to Uzbekistan where he already has his hoes waiting. Who is Baby Chor ?

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby member_28108 » 06 May 2014 09:41

What is Donga Alludu ?

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Singha » 06 May 2014 09:42

baby chor in this dictionary could be the former telecom minister?

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby SaiK » 06 May 2014 09:43

:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:
Do you think AAP can replace Congress as an all-India "secular" alternative to Congress should the latter fail as miserably as you say it will?

After the elections, there will be hardly anything left of the Congress party to replace it.

:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home ... 704071.cms


and the dhoti sibber outsourced to massa here:
China has been very warm towards investment prospects in Gujarat. Unlike the US, it did not bring the 2002 riots in its dealings with Gujarat under you. Do you think you can build upon that to settle political differences?

It is possible to solve our problems with China and take the relationship with it to another level. If India and China want to work together towards improving our relationship and resolving our differences, it would be helpful to both the nations. The 21st century belongs to Asia. More than 60% of the world's population resides in Asia. It would thus be in the interest of the entire world that Asia develops and concentrates on improving the standard of living of its people.

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby a_bharat » 06 May 2014 09:54

prasannasimha wrote:What is Donga Alludu ?

Telugu for "thief son-in-law" -- Robber Damad

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby anmol » 06 May 2014 09:54

Thread should be renamed to "Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty & Kejriwal: Contrasting Ideas of India"

Lunch with the FT
by Amy Kazmin, ft.com
May 2nd 2014 2:02 AM

Half an hour before I am due to have lunch with Arvind Kejriwal, leader of India’s fledgling Aam Aadmi (literally “Common Man”) party, my appointment is cancelled. A day earlier, the tax collector turned social activist had been out campaigning in the parliamentary elections when the driver of an auto rickshaw slapped him across the face. It was just the latest physical blow landed on the 45-year-old Kejriwal, who refuses to have the heavily armed guards who shield many Indian politicians.

Instead of our rendezvous, Kejriwal, with media in tow, travelled to a distant corner of Delhi to visit his assailant, who offered a grovelling apology and was forgiven. It was the kind of headline-grabbing stunt at which Kejriwal excels, gaining him free TV airtime during India’s protracted general election, the world’s biggest, with more than 800m voters whose verdict will be revealed on May 16.

Such publicity coups are crucial for a campaign running on small donations. Kejriwal’s AAP is challenging deep-pocketed establishment rivals: Rahul Gandhi’s ruling Congress party and the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata party (BJP) of Narendra Modi, the expected beneficiary of strong public disillusionment with Congress.

A day later, I sip on a lemon water as I wait for Kejriwal in an elegant sitting room in Sunder Nagar, one of the capital’s most affluent neighbourhoods. Our host – a Kejriwal supporter – offered his home as the only place where the AAP leader and I could dine peacefully and without interruption. Still, it seems an incongruous place to meet a novice politician who projects himself as an Everyman, and who has ferociously attacked the culture of establishment privilege.

The decor is typical for India’s traditional power elite: sofas, antique wooden furniture, a faded Kashmiri carpet and objets d’art. Art books, newspapers and magazines are piled up. There is a table-top installation of stainless steel kitchen cutlery by contemporary artist Subodh Gupta.

I hear Kejriwal before I see him padding up the garden path behind our host. He is wearing an off-white work shirt with a cheap pen poking up from the pocket, brown trousers and well-worn sandals – typical attire for a bureaucrat or a middle-aged, mid-level office worker. He smiles and shakes my hand. “I’m sorry about yesterday,” he says.

A servant brings Kejriwal coconut water to drink. You must be really tired, I say. He is a charismatic public speaker, but now there is awkward silence. I persist: Do you find the campaigning exhausting? I ask.

He nods. “Physically,” he says, “and the challenges it poses sometimes; emotionally and psychologically.”

He goes on: “You come across so many people who are living in so much misery. They are illiterate, and grappling with their day-to-day issues. A large percentage of them don’t even know how to make their ends meet. Even for the middle class, it becomes increasingly difficult day by day to provide them good education and good medical facilities. On the other hand, you see that the politics of this country is controlled by a few corporate, political and bureaucratic interests. It’s not really a democracy.”

Kejriwal tells me about his visit to his attacker, who, he says, was paid (though by whom or for what reason, he cannot say) to hit him. “He is living in extreme poverty,” he says. “Anyone can give him a few thousand rupees and he’ll do anything for that. It’s not his fault. It’s our fault. It’s the fault of this country that we have such people who could be purchased for a few thousand rupees.” (World Bank figures estimate that 400m of the world’s 1.2bn extreme poor are in India.)

. . .

Critics, including middle-class former Kejriwal supporters, complain that the AAP leader has already thrown away his best chance to make a difference in ordinary lives. That came last December when his party, which promises to root out corruption and overhaul government, made a stunning debut in state-level elections in Delhi, a city of almost 17m.

With 28 of the local assembly’s 70 seats, AAP formed a minority government. Kejriwal became chief minister. His shock ascent electrified the capital, fuelling talk of AAP as a serious alternative for voters unhappy with both establishment national parties.

The excitement was shortlived. Kejriwal, unable to introduce legis­lation to create an agency to prosecute corruption in the state administration, resigned after just 49 days. It was a big setback to the party’s image and I ask whether he now regrets giving up so quickly.

“We were there to change the system,” he says, firmly. “We never said, ‘Those people are bad; we people are good; we will enter government and provide good governance.’ No one can do that. Anyone who enters the system ultimately will be sucked [in] by the system. To change the system, legislation is extremely important. If you don’t have the power to get any bill passed in the assembly, the government can’t survive.”

He goes on: “I could have continued and enjoyed the chair of chief minister, but I actually resigned. It’s a sacrifice. We assumed that people would celebrate the ethical politics involved. On the contrary, the opposition parties were able to create a huge amount of propaganda [saying] that we ran away from government.”

Despite being seen by many as a quitter, Kejriwal says he is confident about AAP’s parliamentary election prospects: “The number of people attending our rallies and roadshows has gone up many times.”

Our host reappears and shows us into the dining room, with its long table that could seat a dozen. Two places are set, each with a round metal platter bearing small portions of four Indian vegetarian dishes: green beans, cauliflower, aubergine and potato curry, and kadhi (a spicy chickpea flour and yoghurt gravy) along with a hot roti and rice.

Kejriwal, who is a vegetarian and diabetic, starts eating absently. I want to know how this almost diffident man from a small town in Haryana, a state adjacent to Delhi, ended up as a public figure. The son of an engineer and the eldest of three children, Kejriwal won a place at the prestigious Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, then worked at Tata Steel. Another competitive exam took him to the Indian Revenue Service in 1995. “I used to hate politics and politicians,” he admits.

So what happened to send him off the rails of his middle-class life?

Kejriwal tells me he became disillusioned while supervising tax collection in Delhi in his mid-twenties: “Once you are inside the system, you realise you are a very small peg, and there is very little you can do,” he says. Officials around him were taking bribes to release tax refunds. Accountants told him how much they had paid his peers for favours.

Many Indian officials succumb to bribe-taking, and even those who resist the temptation usually ignore the graft going on around them. Kejriwal was different: “I have no answer as to why it is that I hate corruption and why it is that someone else indulges in corruption,” he says. “It’s not easy to find out. You have to turn to philosophy and spirituality. The only thing you can say is that it’s not in my grain. So where does this grain come from?” He laughs.

He tells me that in the late 1990s, while still a tax official, he heard the then archbishop of Delhi, Alan Basil De Lastic, talking about graft. The Roman Catholic cleric mentioned “mutual corruption”, the awarding of lucrative contracts where both “bribe-giver and bribe-taker are happy and no one comes out and says that anything wrong took place”; and “extortionate corruption”, the practice of demanding bribes to issue documents such as birth certificates and passports.

“He was not very agitated about mutual corruption, but said extortionist corruption is making every single individual in this country corrupt. And when [the] entire population of a country – and the entire national psyche – becomes corrupt, that nation cannot progress.”


. . .

As he talks, I’m enjoying the food. The vegetables are cooked to perfection and subtly spiced, as only home-cooked Indian food can be. We are offered more rotis, rice and vegetables. Kejriwal takes another roti, but waves away the rest. Reluctant to appear greedy in the face of such abstemiousness, I take just a tiny second helping of the most austere of the dishes: sautéed green beans.

Kejriwal’s march towards politics began in 2000, when he helped establish a group to assist slum-dwellers resist harassment by the tax and electricity departments. He left his job to work on the initiative but soon realised that it was neither “scalable nor replicable”. He then joined a campaign to take advantage of a groundbreaking 2005 law that allowed citizens to access official documents previously shielded from public scrutiny.

By 2007, Kejriwal was active in the campaign to create a Jan Lokpal, literally “the people’s protector”, an independent anti-corruption ombudsman. The movement peaked in 2011, when tens of thousands of normally apolitical middle-class citizens – including business people and Bollywood stars – joined mass protests. Kejriwal, the angry urban Everyman, was one of the campaign’s stars. The protests were defused when Congress promised to create the agency, but activists were unhappy with the “toothless” legislation that finally emerged.

In late 2012, the Aam Aadmi party was born. “We were asking the same set of people who were corrupt to enact a law against themselves, which obviously they will never do,” Kejriwal says. “We started to realise that unless you change the politics of the country, things will never change. It was very clear you had to enter politics. It was not by choice; it was part of the journey, the next logical step.”

. . .

Servants enter with a plate of pieces of Alphonso mango. I ask my companion whether he can eat it, given his diabetes. “I’ll have a little,” he says. I still feel that I haven’t got to the heart of what drove Kejriwal, who has two school-age children and a wife who still works in the tax department, to embark on his impassioned quest.

Was it a childhood role model that inspired his sense of moral outrage? “In Hindu philosophy you say, ‘you inherit this all from your past life’, ” he says. He was a very religious boy, worshipping Hanuman, the monkey-faced Hindu deity.

[b]In college, he became an agnostic
. But as the anti-corruption movement gathered steam, Kejriwal rediscovered his faith. “This movement grew so big that it was beyond our imagination. I believe it’s not because of us. We are too small – too, too small – to be able to make any big difference. There is something extraordinary happening, something supernatural. I don’t believe in Hanuman-ji or something like that. But I do believe there is a supernatural power. If you walk on the path of truth, then all these powers somehow support you and things start happening. That is my belief.”
[/b]
Then he mentions an earthly role model: “Gandhi-ji. He is the person who has shown how powerful the principles of truth and non-violence are. He lived his life on these principles. Second is his belief in the people – that the people are always right. He is a person who believed completely in the people.”

Mahatma Gandhi is rather out of fashion in today’s impatient, materialistic India. But Kejriwal’s manifesto, Swaraj, evokes the independence leader’s romantic vision of a nation of “self-sufficient village republics.”

Kejriwal believes in radically decentralising political power and financial resources. “If you try to control India from Delhi, there will always be fissiparous tendencies,” he says, sipping a cup of chamomile tea. If power is devolved to local communities, he says, “maybe people will shout and scream in one meeting or two meetings, but when they know they have to run their own area, they will start behaving themselves. They will become responsible citizens.”

Critics have denounced Kejriwal as an anti-business populist who threatens to drag India backwards. He scoffs, calling the charges “propaganda” by his rivals. “It is only private business which can create wealth and employment in this country. Indians are born entrepreneurs. Yet the government has been acting as an obstacle in everyone’s business. It is so difficult to start and run a business in India unless you pay up money. All these laws and policies need to be simplified, but then the government’s job should be to ensure the laws are followed.”

He could almost be reading a policy briefing from India’s business organisations. But Kejriwal deviates from corporate views on one major issue: he is adamant that rural dwellers under threat of being displaced for large-scale infrastructure and industrial projects should have a say over the developments – and be better-off if they are relocated. “These displacements are totally inhuman,” he says.

Kejriwal has finished his tea and has a train to catch. Rivals flit about in helicopters and private jets but he uses Indian railways, the transport favoured by his hero Gandhi. Time for one last awkward question: if, as opinion polls predict, Modi’s BJP wins and the AAP secures just a few seats, can the nascent party survive?

“Modi is not coming to power,” he says firmly. I ask again. Initially rejecting the question as “hypothetical”, he finally says, “We will sit in opposition.” I ask whether he will remain committed to electoral politics. “Of course.” And what role does he envision for himself? “I don’t think about myself. Whatever role comes my way I am willing to take that up.”

Suddenly, Kejriwal is on his feet. Our host has reappeared, and thanks and handshakes are exchanged. Following a few steps behind them, I emerge on to the street to see Kejriwal in our host’s car, surrounded by excited security guards from nearby homes. As I watch the car pull away, I wonder whether Kejriwal is destined to help shape India’s future, or be a bright, shining flash in the pan.

Amy Kazmin is the FT’s south Asia correspondent

-------------------------------------------

A supporter’s residence

Sunder Nagar, Delhi

Aubergine and potato curry

Sautéed green beans

Spicy cauliflower with tomatoes

Kadhi with onion bhajis

Basmati rice

Rotis

Dahi (plain yoghurt)

Lemon drink x 1

Coconut water x 1

Alphonso mangoes

Fresh chamomile tea

Total FREE

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Singha » 06 May 2014 09:54

Former NDA minister Arun Shourie said that secularism is a prostituted word which is being used by parties for political gains

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Manish_Sharma » 06 May 2014 09:58

fanne wrote:My guess would be wrong, but the crowd does not look 2 lakhs from the photo above. Maybe it ahs been taken when the crowd has not fully assembled.


The photo is much much before NaMo landed.

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Singha » 06 May 2014 10:06

the laws of both molecular and planetary physics are being re-written...everyone is looking to stay out of jail somehow :rotfl:


NDTV

Thiruvananthapuram: An alliance between Mamata Banerjee and the Left may be unthinkable, but the CPI says - anything to keep Narendra Modi out.

CPI leader AB Bardhan said on Monday that he is not averse to partnering with the Chief Minister and her Trinamool Congress for political expediency.

"The whole idea will be to keep Modi out if it is possible. I don't give the BJP more than 165-170 seats and with all they can't go beyond 210, therefore BJP has to be kept out. And for that all options including Mamata will be discussed," Mr Bardhan told a private news channel. (India Votes 2014: Full Coverage)

Mamata Banerjee's aversion to the Left is legendary. After defeating the Left Front government in 2011, she has relentlessly blamed the Left for leaving Bengal struggling with poor infrastructure and massive debts.

As he suggested a tie-up with a bitter rival, Mr Bardhan said, "Why should Mamata become a central figure in the alliance? There are so many people whose policies are so different and they are anti-BJP and anti-Congress."

Mr Modi, the BJP's prime ministerial candidate, is widely predicted to lead his party to one of its biggest victories in the national election.

Though attempts at forging a coalition of non-Congress, non-BJP parties have not taken off, Left leaders have held out the possibility of post-poll tie-ups. CPI(M) General Secretary Prakash Karat talked about a "repeat of the 1996-like situation" and the Congress supporting a government of secular parties to keep the BJP out of power.

Congress vice president Rahul Gandhi, however, has ruled out supporting a Third Front. (Won't support Third Front, says Rahul Gandhi)

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby member_21074 » 06 May 2014 10:56

James B wrote:Picture from a drone of Amethi Rally before the beginning of the rally.

Image


Looks to be taken after arrival of Modi.
Check the helicopter in background (left side).

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Victor » 06 May 2014 10:57

Anantha wrote: has to be a drone camera.

Available in India for Rs 40k. Link. Military uses obvious and easily available to anyone. It is almost invisible because of its small size and silent as it runs on batteries. Was used in winter olympics to follow skiers down the mountain runs.

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby anmol » 06 May 2014 11:04

Image

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby James B » 06 May 2014 11:14

Sickular presstitutes getting pretty desperate

Image

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Singha » 06 May 2014 11:21

:rotfl:

best at what is the question and its not journalism for sure.

the sickular english new channels are nowhere in the top20 most watched channels in india. the non-english new channels WAY more viewership and reach and he is using them.

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby member_28352 » 06 May 2014 11:22

:rotfl: Best journalists :rotfl: Truly the ways of the mansabdars of the sikular sultanate are astounding. What sense of entitlement.

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Singha » 06 May 2014 11:24

no padma bhushans in the pipeline either. boo woo.

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby a_bharat » 06 May 2014 11:29

C'mon, I see Sagarika's tweet as a tongue-in-cheek (or wherever) comment; these journos may have sold themselves, but that doesn't mean they are devoid of humour. The days of condescension are gone. See how deferential Pronnoy Roy & Co have become in their interview with Amit Shah.
Last edited by a_bharat on 06 May 2014 11:30, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby chetak » 06 May 2014 11:30

James B wrote:Sickular presstitutes getting pretty desperate

Image


Somebody send this to mediacrooks please


no need......
looks like he already has it. :D
Last edited by chetak on 06 May 2014 11:46, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby member_21074 » 06 May 2014 11:32

Image

:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:
Last edited by member_21074 on 06 May 2014 11:33, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Rahul M » 06 May 2014 11:32

funny tidbit from kolkata. cong wanted RaGa to do a meeting at a park in north kolkata and approached KMC for permission. KMC refused saying park has undergone beautification recently and meeting would ruin it. a meeting at brigade grounds is the only available option. now, this park was a smallish thing and cong would have managed to fill it but brigade is a massive place that can hold 3-4 lakhs easily. now cong honchos are $hitting bricks about the meeting and how to fill it.

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby krishnan » 06 May 2014 11:33

mediacrooks would have seen it by now

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby James B » 06 May 2014 11:41

Just came across this wikileaks cable on Modi. Venkiah Naidu talking to US Amb. about Modi in 2008

He (Naidu) reiterated BJP objections to the revocation of Gujarat Chief Minister Narendra Modi's U.S. visa, noting that a majority of Indians feel that the U.S. position on this issue is unjustified. He claimed that Modi will hold a key position in the next BJP-led central government in New Delhi. For a senior leader like Naidu to speak of Modi with such enthusiasm and admiration suggests that Modi commands a great deal of clout and respect within the party.


Also some more nuggets from same cable

Naidu commented that incumbent BJP Madhya Pradesh Chief Minister Shivraj Singh Chauhan has quietly emerged as a popular mass leader because he is unassuming and accessible and has put in place some highly effective development programs that link subsidies to improvements in health, education, gender relations. He felt Chauhan should be ranked second after Gujarat's Narendra Modi as the country's most effective Chief Minister.


Naidu blamed the violence in Karnataka on a backlash to the activities of some evangelical churches, particularly the New Life church. He observed that some of these churches distribute literature that is highly objectionable to the Hindu community. As examples, he noted, one of New Life church's publications horribly denigrates mythological Hindu deities, calling them children of prostitutes and referring to them as promiscuous philanders.


Link to the cable - https://search.wikileaks.org/plusd/cabl ... 681_a.html

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby member_28352 » 06 May 2014 11:51

Post elections we need an "Indigenous Religions Protection and Promotion Act". Activities of the kind engaged in by the New Life EJ's would be proscribed under this act and tough sentences should be given out. There should be no scope for violence. Violence is counter productive and only creates an image of a violent Yindoo. The preferred approach should be what was done to Doniger's book.

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Hari Seldon » 06 May 2014 11:53

Dynasty's humility hits new highs.

Did Congress ask Lalu Prasad to stay away from Sonia Gandhi's rally?

:lol:

Hope laloo also responds by trying to sabotage the event with plausible deniability. onlee...

RJD president Lalu Prasad remained absent from Congress president Sonia Gandhi's rally for the second time on Monday, lending credence to reports that the Congress had requested him to stay away from its top leaders during the poll campaign.
Besides the Muzaffarpur rally, the RJD president was also not present at Sonia's previous rally in the Sasaram (reserved) constituency. Lok Sabha Speaker Meira Kumar is the Congress MP from Sasaram. Even though Lalu went to Sasaram later to campaign for Meira, he had refrained from joining Sonia at her rally.

Lalu had also not attended Rahul Gandhi's two rallies at Aurangabad and Kishanganj. Nikhil Kumar and Maulana Asrarul Haque are the Congress candidates from these two Lok Sabha seats. The Congress had not invited Lalu to these rallies, sources in the RJD said.


Methinks this high praise for laloo is only so that dynasty can retain its use of the "yeddiyurappa" card against the lotus in its social circles.
Last edited by Hari Seldon on 06 May 2014 11:54, edited 1 time in total.

ashish raval
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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby ashish raval » 06 May 2014 11:54

anmol wrote:Image


May be he can also call his chacha bhatija tau in the name of undivided family now. Nonsense, his mother lives with youngest brother of modi and not in old age home okay !!!

Yagnasri
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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Yagnasri » 06 May 2014 11:55

Even Rajdeep is deferential now a days. Losing TRPs and advertisements and foreign 'investments" like ones UndyTV gets at regular intervals is going to be serious problem. MHA under NM should stop gora investments in Indian Media as one of the first measures.

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Singha » 06 May 2014 11:57

EJs, paid media, 1000s of dubious NGOs , dubai based "entrepreneurs" financing shady activities here...a huge cleanup is needed.

and you all know who would be best guy to head this new ministry for promotion of virtue and cleanup of vice

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Sanku » 06 May 2014 12:06

James B wrote:Just came across this wikileaks cable on Modi. Venkiah Naidu talking to US Amb. about Modi in 2008


Thats clearly nonsense, we know that Venkaiah was a Low-purush Bhakt and a key member of D420 in 2008 which together were working with congress to destroy BJP and were holding down the cadres in chains and publishing stories about NaMo by meeting Sonia G over tea personally.

Such information can not be true.

Hari Seldon
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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Hari Seldon » 06 May 2014 12:10

Wall 2 wall modi coverage in ToI's lucknow edition

Image

krishnan
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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby krishnan » 06 May 2014 12:11

same with ToI chennai edition

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby Singha » 06 May 2014 12:17

same for BLR print edition.

looks like the opening barrage of Op Bagration on the moscow front.

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Re: Narendra Modi vs the Dynasty: Contrasting Ideas of India

Postby VikramS » 06 May 2014 12:32

EC is doing press conference today?


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