Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Kuttan » 13 Apr 2002 21:56

maps depicting the landmass of Antarctica pre-ice age
Recently I saw a National Geographic map of Antarctica with depictions of the ice cap thickness. This was specifically in the context of a big buried lake (Lake Vostock?) under the Russian scientific stations. It turns out that over most of Antarctica, the rock/ soil strata are about 800 feet below sea level - capped by this huge 2km-thick layer of ice. So if Antarctica were moved away from the polar reqion of Earth, it would be called Untertica.

Before the last Ice Age, a large part of Antarctica may still have been covered in ice ... but one has to be cautious in interpreting claims made in these books. Over the past two decades I have come to the conclusion that most book-writers share some of Shri Pankaj Mishra's attitude towards writing:

"..I write what I feel like writing .. sometimes fiction... sometimes non-fiction".

This must be related to the strong support of the liquor industry by book-authors.

The fact that the garbage is clamped between two fine hard pieces of cardboard covered with imitation leather or vinyl, does not improve the fact that the contents are still garbage.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Sundareswara » 14 Apr 2002 07:27

Yes, even sugar must be taken with a pinch of salt. One can't be selective with this rule, either.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Kuttan » 14 Apr 2002 10:05

Sundareswara:

Re: Western "historians" - See the recent article in Scientific American about the origin of zero in mathematics. They have traced its appearance in Arabia, to Arab traders who learned it in India. But oh, now comes the standard item - they HAD to create some means by which it CAME to India. So, the article says:

"It must have originated in the Sumerian civilization.. and been taken to India by the GREEKS, although no trace of it has ever appeared in Greek writings "

So they are perfectly willing to create a theory with a huge hole like that, rather than accept the obvious conclusion that the concept came from India to the West.

Most of these sillies are Mullah-like in their belief that any civilization HAD to have originated in the West (or maybe China) .. but NEVER in India. To even consider admitting otherwise would be to admit that their prejudices of the Middle Eastern origin of any Divine revelations might have to be reconsidered.. and scientists though they claim to be, they can never countenance that.

This is just so typical of Western "thinking", which we see emanating from between the ears of the Stephen Cohens, the Colin Powells, the Friedmans and all those other "experts".

This is the "salt" which must be taken with any of the "sugary" writing that one finds falsely advertised as unbiased scientific writing.

The other thing that I have learned is that one starts writing books when one gets tired of getting one's scientific papers rejected. With a book, one can be much freer with one's prejudices, and much looser about the need to justify statements.

Historians are people who prefer to live in the past. What distinguishes them from apes is that they wear pants and lie a lot more.

Cheers

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby James Bund » 14 Apr 2002 22:30

"It must have originated in the Sumerian civilization.. and been taken to India by the GREEKS, although no trace of it has ever appeared in Greek writings "

A statement of breathtaking disingenuousness.

Pease, please, write a missive to Sc Am, I have not even read the article and am tied up with a lot

I am quite disappointed that this Paki-type "double-think" garbage is tolerated even by Sc. Am.

Thank you for pointing it out.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Rudra » 14 Apr 2002 22:52

Sumeria is much nearer to Arabia than India. and
I believe the Greeks were nowhere in the vicinity
of a civilization when the ol' sumerians were
around.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Calvin » 14 Apr 2002 23:59

Folks: The scientific refutation of the Piri Reis maps on the basis of scientific evidence is far reaching and well documented. Let us not give Hancock more credibility than he, or fellows like Daniken deserve.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby JE Menon » 15 Apr 2002 02:45

The matter is simple. A sunken settlement has been found of south-eastern India. Carbon date the bugger. End of story. WTF has anything else got to do with it? Anyhow you look at it, it's a net gain for India.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Umrao » 15 Apr 2002 02:57

my only worry is that GOI will give this SL like the way we gave away 'Kachhativu Isl' !!!

GEM>> you are right some cities and dates have to be carbon dated, before we fix the age!!

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Kuttan » 15 Apr 2002 05:12

The trouble with carbon dating here is that only the stone structures may be from the era when the structures were built - the pots, pans etc. may be from expended missiles used in domestic "negotiations" by the successors of the person who tossed her anklet. And carbon-dating stone which has been thoroughly washed with salt water and sewage for 10,000 years is not much use, is it?

The implication from all this appears to be that Tamil Nadu is gradually going under the sea. I agree that many parts of Chennai would greatly benefit from a few thousand years of washing.

I can see it now - in 12000AD, marine archaeologists regarding the sunken ruins of Narmada Hostel, 100 km offshore, and pondering on the simians who lived there in the 1970s, and the weird inscriptions on the desks in the Physics Lecture Theatre. Now THERE's a good candidate for carbon dating.

Whom do I contact to buy some future beach-front property in Madurai or Thiruchiraippalli?

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Kaushal » 15 Apr 2002 13:49

And carbon-dating stone which has been thoroughly washed with salt water and sewage for 10,000 years is not much use, is it?

http://www.c14dating.com/int.html

"Today, there are over 130 radiocarbon dating laboratories around the world producing radiocarbon assays for the scientific community. The C14 technique has been and continues to be applied and used in many, many different fields including hydrology, atmospheric science, oceanography, geology, palaeoclimatology, archaeology and biomedicine.

The 14C Method
There are three principal isotopes of carbon which occur naturally - C12, C13 (both stable) and C14 (unstable or radioactive). These isotopes are present in the following amounts C12 - 98.89%, C13 - 1.11% and C14 - 0.00000000010%. Thus, one carbon 14 atom exists in nature for every 1,000,000,000,000 C12 atoms in living material. The radiocarbon method is based on the rate of decay of the radioactive or unstable carbon isotope 14 (14C), which is formed in the upper atmosphere through the effect of cosmic ray neutrons upon nitrogen 14. The reaction is:

14N + n => 14C + p
(Where n is a neutron and p is a proton).
The 14C formed is rapidly oxidised to 14CO2 and enters the earth's plant and animal lifeways through photosynthesis and the food chain. The rapidity of the dispersal of C14 into the atmosphere has been demonstrated by measurements of radioactive carbon produced from thermonuclear bomb testing. 14C also enters the Earth's oceans in an atmospheric exchange and as dissolved carbonate (the entire 14C inventory is termed the carbon exchange reservoir (Aitken, 1990)). Plants and animals which utilise carbon in biological foodchains take up 14C during their lifetimes. They exist in equilibrium with the C14 concentration of the atmosphere, that is, the numbers of C14 atoms and non-radioactive carbon atoms stays approximately the same over time. As soon as a plant or animal dies, they cease the metabolic function of carbon uptake; there is no replenishment of radioactive carbon, only decay. There is a useful diagrammatic representation of this process given here...[/b]

Effect of oceans on C-14 dating can be estimated,see for instance

http://www.anthropology.hawaii.edu/faculty/graves/graves210/210wk8.htm

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Calvin » 15 Apr 2002 18:45

Kaushal: The point re: carbon dating *stone* still stands. The question is whether there are any recoverable organic matter that is interred within these ruins. If there are, C-14 dating is certainly a viable option. Even if not, there are other elemental fingerprints that may be applicable.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby JE Menon » 15 Apr 2002 19:56

Guys, a ruin the size of Manhattan (or so they say) should at least have a few bones or some organic stuff leftover - remember reading something about some ancient bones being discovered off Turkey (maybe they were in some container can't recall).

Moreover, NIOT is talking far less than the 9000 yrs which Hancock is in favour of. So question: if there is no organic matter or some other identifying element, it would be impossible to date the stuff just based on the stones?

BTW, I watched the BBC programme. They totally trashed Hancock and others' theories. Hell, they even linked it to the Nazis and what not. Mind you, give the Brits half a chance they'll link your afternoon nap to the Nazis. Remember the "Commando" comics anyone?

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Umrao » 15 Apr 2002 20:22

I wonder how they dated the dead sea scrolls, IIIRC they did use C-14 dating, and they too were in (more) saline waters, were they not??

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Kaushal » 15 Apr 2002 20:25

Guys, a ruin the size of Manhattan (or so they say) should at least have a few bones or some organic stuff leftover

It is true you need residue of organic material (e.g.shells) to be left imbedded in the stone. You cannot date stone. But that is how they date the Pyramids. Of course you date the event related to the organic material and not to the stone. The mere fact that something is under water or that it is made of stone does not negate the possibility of radiocarbon dating, it merely makes it more difficult;

http://units.ox.ac.uk/departments/rlaha/orau/01_02.htm

"What can be dated?
For radiocarbon dating to be possible, the material must once have been part of a living organism. This means that things like stone, metal and pottery cannot usually be directly dated by this means unless there is some organic material embedded or left as a residue.

Common materials for radiocarbon dating are:

As explained below, the radiocarbon date tells us when the organism was alive (not when the material was used). This fact should always be remembered when using radiocarbon dates.

Common materials for radiocarbon dating are:

material organism event dated

bone animal last few years of the animal's life

wood,charcoal tree growth of the tree ring


linen flax plant growth of the flax

wool sheep year of sheering

parchment animal year of death of animal

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Kaushal » 15 Apr 2002 20:34

I wonder how they dated the dead sea scrolls, IIIRC they did use C-14 dating, and they too were in (more) saline waters, were they not??

Yes they used C-14 dating but they were not found in water IIRC.

http://packrat.aml.arizona.edu/deadsea.html

"The scrolls consist of some 800 manuscripts in Hebrew and Aramaic that were discovered in caves east of Jerusalem, near the ruins of Qumran on the Dead Sea, between 1947 and 1956. "

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Kuttan » 16 Apr 2002 00:49

OK, any self-respecting civilization must have had pet cats, and any self-respecting cat must have stowed away a few dead birds/ rats etc. under its pet human's bed. So there is still hope.

The trouble with this is that the archaeologists will immediately use the finding of a bird-skeleton (or bird fossil) inside a stone structure as proof that the human residents were bird-worshippers, and that the bedroom was in fact a temple.

For those interested in a succint introduction to archaeology, I recommend the Readers' Digest article called "Motel of the Mysteries". Especially the picture shown there of a proudly-smiling archaeologist wearing a toilet seat around her neck in a recreation of the "ceremonial neckwear" of the worshippers at The Motel Temple.

Thanks for the tutorial in Carbon dating. You know it - need a good education? come to BRF. :cool:

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby James Bund » 16 Apr 2002 03:04

Quick on the draw there, Kaushal.

I don't know if C-14 is generated on earth's surface (?cosmic rays, upwelling from magma). If it is not, there has to be another explanation for C-14 to work as a dating tool. May have to do with the isotope effect i.e. enzymes do in fact differentiate between isotopes and thus the C-12/ C-14 ratio in bio-organic compounds is different from the inorganic mileu.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Shalav » 16 Apr 2002 03:29

Long, long, long, long time ago we had a physics class on C14 dating.

I vaguely recall hearing something about how all living things absorb the C14 isotope as a natural process when living. Life is carbon based and just by day-to-day living creature absorb the C14 isotope. When they die absorption ceases and decay of the isotope starts. <sup>14</sup>C has a half life of ~5730 years.

I think what the happens is they measure the weight of <sup>14</sup>C as against the total weight of decayed <sup>14</sup>C (whatever the atom) + <sup>14</sup>C and arrive at a estimate of the year the organism died.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby krsai » 16 Apr 2002 04:21

Shalav, this link says with 14C, it can do it for all rocks less than 50,000 years.

Also, check out the potassium-argon dating method.
40K-40Ar

web page

What puzzles me is that what techniqes these scientists use for dating when a "stone was carved". - CARVED DATE!. I guess, the tools(made of?) to that should be what they must have looked for? Any tools then used and its date etc

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Shalav » 16 Apr 2002 05:09

Sai, it says <sup>14</sup>C dating is done on the dead organisms within the rocks.

Carbon-14 is a method used for young (less than 50,000 year old) sedimentary rocks. This method relies on the uptake of a naturally occurring radioactive isotope of carbon, carbon-14 by all living things. When living things die, they stop taking in carbon-14, and the radioactive clock is "set"! Any dead material incorporated with sedimentary deposits is a possible candidate for carbon-14 dating.
No idea re: dating of stone carvings.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Narayan_L » 17 Apr 2002 04:43

Some links on Poompuhar:

From the TN Tourism Dept:

http://www.tamilnadutourism.org/poom.htm

From the NIO website:

http://www.nio.org/marinearc/poompuhar.html

Excerpt (Apropos the "myth"):

On the east coast, south of Madras, Poompuhar is believed to be a flourishing port in the beginning of the Christian etc. The Manimekhalai, a well known Tamil epic, mentions that the Chola King had lost his son and in his great grief he forgot to celebrate the annual Indra festival. This enraged the goddess Manimekhalai who caused the city to be swallowed by the sea. Though the reference is only to a supernatural incident, it may be taken as an echo of some actual furry of high tidal waves that lashed upon the city and passed down the generation by way of folklore.

Ramana>>"My original post did refer to Ilangovan's Slippadiakaram but I deleted that part for I wanted to hear your version. What I rememeber is Kannagi flings the anklet and the kingdom of the errant king gets destroyed."

Ramana:

Thanks for the reply. In Illango Adigal's Cillapathikaram, Kannagi destroys the Pandiyan capital of Madurai through her "anger and virtue". The "flinging" is more symbolic than anything. The Pandiyan King, contrary to his expected role as a paragon of justice, put an innocent man - Kovalan to death. Illango Adigalaar describes this perfidy as having led to the moral "destruction" and "collapse" of the Pandiya ruler. A great wrong had been committed, and Madurai no longer had the right to exist.

Apparently, in those days morality, honor and justice were prized. The clinching piece of evidence was not the anklet itself, but what was in it. The stolen royal anklet contained pearls - a very Pandiya thing, while Kannagi's contained rubies.

Kovalan and Kannagi, as the story goes, are originally from the Chola port of Poompuhar (or "KaviriPukhumPattinam" in classic Tamizh, which means,"The town where the Kaviri river enters"). They move to the Pandiya capital of Madurai to start a new life, and then tragedy strikes.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Kuttan » 17 Apr 2002 07:02

Apparently, in those days morality, honor and justice were prized.
From the description of the events, the concept of "justice" was clearly separated from that of "proof" or "common sense". :)

I am confused. Last time I visited Madurai, it was a looooong way from the coast, and all they had instead was a big pond in the middle, where you could get a ride in a boat with a crew of 2 - one to row and one to bail - and if he did not get tired, you might make it to the island in the middle without swimming.

Has the erosion got so bad that Madurai is now under water? What a pity - such fine dosais at the restaurants!!!

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby krsai » 17 Apr 2002 21:43

narayanan, kannagi family moves to madurai and then the strategy strikes at poompuhar if I am reading narayan l. correct.

narayan narayan narayan!

====
Wondering all epics and stories are coincidences or stories evovled arround events, rather than the stories making the event!!

Also going by certain behaviors present tamizh generations have "inherited" it could be only the coastal regions that got swallowed and then comes the big story "as if" the whole "country" got to taste the wrath of kannagi.

In a sense true, take if bombay falls for an asteroid, the whole financial condition of India would be affected!

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Narayan_L » 18 Apr 2002 00:43

Narayanan:

That sounds like the Mariamman Theppakuzham in Madurai. Were you there for the Chithirai festival? :)

kr sai and Narayanan:

Ella postai-yum kavana-maka padiyungal, saar! :)

Firstly, there are no direct or indirect links between the disappearance of a good section of Mamallapuram and Kovalan, Kannagi, et al. I was merely responding to Ramana's request for details about Cillapathikaram. Even the supposed innundation of Poompuhar has no direct links with Cillapathikaram. Hope that clears the confusion.

Here is a twist that may bring about some new confusion. The child of Kovalan and Madhavi - Manimekalai, the subject of a great epic also titled "Manimekalai" by Ceetalai Satanaar has significant links to Poompuhar. See the brief mention of "Manimekalai" in the NIO link. I am not an expert on "Manimekalai", so can't shed any light on the supposed "myth".

"Manimekalai" is very significant in classical Tamil literature because it was the first major Tamil work that can be considered "Buddhist" in nature. It is believed that Ceetalai Satanaar was a leading Buddhist Tamil scholar of the time, and in his work, Manimekalai also grows up as a Buddhist. Remember how Buddhism was the dominant religion in India at one time. "Cillapathikaram" and "Manimekalai" are considered twin-epics, and the author of the former, was a famed Jain scholar.

kr sai:

"Tragedy strikes" in their personal life. Read the story dude!

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby ramana » 18 Apr 2002 01:08

Narayan_L, thanks for the recounting. I had read an English serialization of Sillpadikaram in Illustrated Weekly of India when A.S. Raman was the editor so the details are fuzzy. Very interesting that the Manimekalai is the daughter of Kannagi and Kovalan.

My thinking is that in the core of the myth a grain of truth could be preserved and your recounting the Manimekalai story shows that there was tidal devastation that submerged the city. Now to study the myths of surrounding coutries that the Bay of Bengal touches to see if there were similar references to tidal waves would clinch the matter.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby ramana » 18 Apr 2002 03:00

Rajeev Sreenivasan's comments in the postscript: http://www.rediff.com/news/2002/apr/15rajeev.htm

"A reader sent me the details of the exploration off the sea at Mahabalipuram. Apparently, they have discovered a large city several square miles in size with clearly manmade structures at depths of only a few metres. This certainly fits in with the local legend of the seven temples of Mahabalipuram, of which only the very last one is still standing. There are persistent stories from Tamil fishermen of other submerged cities off Poompuhar and Kanyakumari: there is the legend of the lost cities of Kumari Kandam. Coupled with the Gulf of Cambay discovery at much greater depth and possibly greater antiquity (9,500 years), the Mahabalipuram discovery, which could be 4,000 years old, points yet again to the need for rewriting Indian history and getting rid of the colonial and Marxist lies that have been its shame.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby svinayak » 18 Apr 2002 03:38

Apparently, in those days morality, honor and justice were prized.
All the rulers and nobles who subscribed to this were considered aryavartha All the kings in the south considered themselves as Aryans.


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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Narayan_L » 18 Apr 2002 05:40

Ramana>>"Very interesting that the Manimekalai is the daughter of Kannagi and Kovalan."

Ramana:

I must confess that I erred in describing Manimekalai as the child of Kannagi and Kovalan. My apologies for the rather significant error. Manimekalai was the child of Kovalan and Madhavi. I will modify my previous post to reflect the correct info. Thanks.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Kuttan » 18 Apr 2002 07:44

Interestinger and interestinger. This Kovalan certainly seems to have "lived". It is a shame that Indian folk drama and music are not developed into the extravagant opulence of European Opera.

All good things come to an end - and hence I too must cast aside the mask of anonymity and reveal myself as one of the leading scholars of clasical music in the West. Through serious study I have just discovered that most of the "Grand Opera" of the West consists of such deep plots as:

a. "My lover who is 37 years younger than me has finally run off with the maid and so I'll kill myself" This is called "Dido's Lament" , apparently the pinnacle of British musical composition, if you don't count the earlier one which goes: "Goddess Diana and her silly flower-girls came rushing down the mountain and the girls went running after Her Majesty the even-sillier Queen of England because she had the better deodorant "

b. "What is the best Strategic Plan for conducting hanky-panky with my maid servant without having to marry her?" A masterpiece of Italian Opera, apparently. I forget the name because the traffic was pretty heavy on I-85 when I was hearing this.

c. " My Master seduced the Commandante's daughter, and she threw a slipper at him and called him a rat, and the Commandante came out and my Master murdered him, and was in turn deservingly shaheedized". This is called "Don Giovanni" - very famous Mozart Opera.

The story of Kovalan, Madhavi and Kannagi would easily knock these lightweights out, if only it were set to music with tickets sold for $200 each, and the attendees were forced to appear in costumes costing $600 each.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby vkrishna » 18 Apr 2002 11:48

narayanan,
just as a sidetrack, the storyline of the opera is usually inconsequential (IMO), but the music it has been set to is what makes it "great" (Eg. Don Giovanni has some lovely music-again IMO also I cannot understand the language :) ).

Thyagaraja has actually written one opera (or dance drama as it is called in India), the story of which is taken from an episode in the Ramayana (i am not sure of this), I don't know of other such compositions and doubt that this is played very often. There are some art forms in India which can easily be adapted into opera- the Yakshagana in Karnataka comes to mind. However, as they exist they are amazingly rich in folk music and drama. They sometimes show these on local television as well and they are really beautiful renditions of stories.
BTw, I have read an english translation of the Silappadikaaram and one of the most memorable passages in it for me was the passage (in poetic form) where Kannagi curses the King-it had great power even in translation; sadly I cannot read Tamil and can only imagine how it must read in the original Tamil.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby ramana » 18 Apr 2002 23:27

Narayan_L, THanks for the update and clarification.
N^3, there are a number of operas based on Indian themes. Need to dig them up. About five or six. BTW, you need to liven up the GOAT thread with some bon-mots! Needs update after the bombing accuracy results were released.
vkrishna you are right its the music and not the story that is important.
Now back to subject : ARCHAEOLOGY IN CONTEMPORARY PARLANCE

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Umrao » 18 Apr 2002 23:54

Kuchipudi is full of opera themes

example 1) Mandook sapatham, a story which details the marriage of Ravan to Mandodhari!!
Mandookam in sanskrit/(malayalam too?) is a frog, Udharam--> womb/stomach,
that which is born out (or with) frog's stomach ( dont blame me if you cant stomach this!!)

example 2) Girija Kalyanam, the story of Girija (Giri--> mountain, ja born of , parvathi the daughter of Himavantha)

manymore such excellent ballets/opera's are prevalent in (S) Indian dances, I think Jayadeva's
ashtapadi /dasa avtara's are also perormed as ballet.

Most of the fine arts are in any case closely adult (e) rated hence the thrill even when the fat lady sings!! :)

JMHO

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby ramana » 19 Apr 2002 00:30

Umrao, It is possible that the names are figurative and not litteral. What I am saying is somehow Mandodhari has some charcteristics of Mandookam and not literally frog-borne. I know of many silly sounding family names in Andhra.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby vkrishna » 19 Apr 2002 04:07

Ramana,
I know of an opera called "Padmavati" by Alfred Roussel which is based on an Indian story. Another is "savithri" by Gustav Holst which is the story of satyavan and savithri. One of the modern classical composers, Philip Glass has also composed an opera called "Satyagraha" based on part of the freedom struggle (i think). This is one of his more important works-incidentally, Pt Ravi Shankar has had a lot of influence on his work. Holst has also composed other pieces based on Indian works of literature etc- a work called "Indra" and "choral hymns from the RgVeda" etc. I don't know of others.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Kaushal » 19 Apr 2002 06:52

Many years ago i attended Phillip Glass' opera on the Mahabharata at the SF Opera. Frankly i did not find it enjoyable, although I do give credit to Glass for attempting it.

Kaushal

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Kaushal » 19 Apr 2002 07:13

Another oceanographic explorer from yesteryear

http://www.cnn.com/2002/TRAVEL/NEWS/04/18/obit.heyerdahl.ap/index.html

Thor Hyerdahl dead at 87

Kaushal

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Kuttan » 19 Apr 2002 08:07

I had no idea that the Kon-Tiki expedition was in 1947 - always thought it must have been shortly before I read the (highly condensed) account in Readers Digest in the late 1960s early 70s.

101 days in the Pacific!!!!! I flew one moonlit night across from Hawaii (as passenger!!) to LA near the speed of sound, and it still looked like such an immense distance. Can't imagine someone traversing that on a raft.

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby H Vyas » 21 Apr 2002 05:31

Delibes' famous "Flower Duet" (the theme British Airways uses in its ads) is also from an opera set in India. The story is about a British soldier seducing a Hindu princess. Sorry, i forget the name of the opera as such.
-------
as it turns out...doing a simple search on "Flower Duet" on yahoo turned up the answer: Leo Delibes' (a frenchman) "Lakme"

enjoy...

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Re: Lost City found off the Mahabalipuram coast

Postby Gerard » 21 Apr 2002 06:10

BBC's Horizon this weekend took a look at Hancock's theories (celestial alignment of Angor Wat and Giza pyramids) and really tore into them.

I was really shocked with his previous theory that Antartica was site of the ancient Atlantis civilization and a massive tectonic shift suddenly shifted it to polar position.
He seems to brush off "inconvenient" scientific facts with ease. Quite loose with his "evidence".

No wonder NIO didn't mention him in its press release.


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