Intelligence & National Security Discussion

ramana
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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby ramana » 21 Sep 2013 08:08

MI is out of massa's orbit. Hence all these news leaks to rope them in.
Purohit and all is to make it a rogue outfit that needs massa;s tender kiss of death.

IB and RAW(from begining) are already under massa's care.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby chetak » 21 Sep 2013 09:27

ramana wrote:MI is out of massa's orbit. Hence all these news leaks to rope them in.
Purohit and all is to make it a rogue outfit that needs massa;s tender kiss of death.

IB and RAW(from begining) are already under massa's care.


Spot on.

This is a devious plot to hobble and control the MI.

VKS is just icing on the cake.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby aditp » 21 Sep 2013 15:25

What / Who is massa? Yamrikha or Man Mahon or G-O-I or else?

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby Aaryan » 21 Sep 2013 16:01

So according to our liberal media TSD was a unit set up by Gen VK Singh only.. I never knew that he was so powerful that he could have set up a private intelligence unit for his personal illegal covert operations without government approval and also he could have destabilized a stable State government just by 1.2 /1.9 crores and here stupid me was thinking that with that amount of money i cant even topple a municipal corporation.. Also he must be really powerful as correct me if i am wrong but i guess never in the history of IA it happened that Army found some one guilty and instead ordering a Court of Inquiry or Court Marshal the report is send to the government and then even government out of fear of this powerful General dos nothing for six months and then selectively leaks certain content of the report to their favorite news paper... See how powerful is this General and how helpless is our Army and Government and out HONEST PM

PS: Please read it as a Rant/Sarcasm

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby williams » 21 Sep 2013 18:36

One thing is for sure. Gen VK Singh has rocked the establishment too much and I think they are very scared of the General joining politics. I think the General is laughing his head out watching these jokers. This shows how shabby our ministries are WRT public responsibility. Any danger to the status quo is met with near comical (and of course criminal) character assassination of individual whistle blowers. It is also the time to question how clean is our Mr clean AKA. Surely he is not clean if he is standing by when national security is being compromised by petty secretaries in the MoD.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby KrishnaK » 22 Sep 2013 00:52

Read what Gen. Panag has to say on twitter. The snooping on politicos was most likely true. No matter how dirty the politicos are, the army cannot be allowed to indulge in something like that. For their own reputation at the very least.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby Lilo » 22 Sep 2013 01:10

^^Hain ..?
Don't politicos them selves indulge in snooping on one another using IB and state pulice agencies ?
And what if the so called CT was true .. .. What if politicians are in cahoots with anti-national elements . Dogvijay and IM ring any bells ?

If you don't believe above will you at least believe that Mumbai underworld interests (especially Dawood and ISI)is enmeshed with xongi politicos - and their wheeling dealings?

There is some thing called counter-intelligence - a thankless job - someone has to do it though. If it was the army or military intelligence which was mandated with it so be it.
Ohh BTW remind me after the next terror attack when some one says Massa is ohh so tfta ohh so efficient - they never allowed a terror attack to succeed etc.
Its because they spied on their mothers and grandmothers even - using their own NIA and people even after knowing this allow them to continue with their job.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby KrishnaK » 22 Sep 2013 01:39

Lilo,
Stop peddling that nonsense. Every time the Army undertook a coup in the "padosi mulk" it was always politicians are too corrupt. The army has to step in to do that thankless job of cleaning up the mess. No matter how venal the political class is, the army has no business stepping out of their mandate and should be reined in if they have done so.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby Lilo » 22 Sep 2013 02:12

Who is speaking about a coup here ... Unless you base your source to be Bekar Dupatta of IE - the self proclaimed first among the wellwishers of indian Army.
And if you have some logic to present behind your handwaving gesture of "stop this nonsense" pliss to do so.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby ramana » 22 Sep 2013 03:07

Its possible that Omar bhai got fingered by the Paki contacts who were being monitored by MI. Then one thing led to another.

But NSA Menon will be in the loop in all this as head of the entire intel apparatus.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby KrishnaK » 23 Sep 2013 00:13

Lilo,

Lt Gen H S Panag(R) ‏@rwac48 19 Sep
@ncbipindra @saurabhjoshi Snooping happened!As also the Mobilisation Training Exercise!Both deliberately&brilliantly planned!

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby Karan M » 23 Sep 2013 01:04

Wasn't Panag on the opposite side of the VK Singh issue from day one? Taking his tweets as cent per certain evidence appears dubious at best.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby nits » 23 Sep 2013 12:58

India among top targets of spying by NSA

Among the BRICS group of emerging nations, which featured quite high on the list of countries targeted by the secret surveillance programs of the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) for collecting telephone data and internet records, India was the number one target of snooping by the American agency.

In the overall list of countries spied on by NSA programs, India stands at fifth place, with billions of pieces of information plucked from its telephone and internet networks just in 30 days.

Collection of metadata is serious business. Several Information Technology experts The Hindu spoke to said a detailed account of an individual’s private and professional life can be constructed from metadata, which is actually the record of phone number of every caller and recipient; the unique serial number of the phones involved; the time and duration of each phone call; and potentially the location of each caller and recipient at the time of the call. The same applies to e-mails and other Internet activities of an individual. The high volume of metadata taken from India — 6.2 billion in just one month — means that the U.S. agency collected information on millions of calls, messages and emails every day within India, or between India and a foreign country.

It’s true that Boundless Informant doesn’t intercept content, but the top-secret documents obtained by The Hindu show that this internal NSA tool focusses on counting and categorising the telephone calls and Internet records as well as on storing and retrieving it, which could give intelligence-gathering agents the records of calls and message times, identities, addresses and other information needed to track people or pick content.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby sum » 23 Sep 2013 13:44

At Jantar Mantar, 20 protest quietly: We are spies, you see

Amid noisy demonstrations by farmers from various parts of the country, Jantar Mantar Marg is playing host to around 20 people, quietly occupying a corner.

Consciously, they don't want to make too much noise or draw much attention to themselves. One protester explained that it was second nature to them. "We are spies, you see," he said.

The demands of these former spies are quite ordinary: recognition of service, compensation for the work they have done over the years and money to support their families. They said if their demands were not met, they would resort to a hunger strike.

"We want compensation for the time we were in prison as well as assurance that our children will get jobs. We have many secrets to hide and we do that even now out of love for our country. But the government has failed us. The prisons took away our youth and the government is taking away our future," Vinod Sawhney, president of the Jammu Ex-Sleuths' Association, said.

Leading the protest is Gopal Das, who in April 2011 was brought back to the country after spending 27 years in a Pakistani prison on charges of spying.

"I was 25 when I was apprehended in Pakistan. I spent my entire youth there. I have come back to my village in Gurdaspur, but there is no work. The government has been of little help. At least, I got some recognition for my work but what about the others?" Das said.

One of those who returned to India after 18 years in a Pakistani prison is Gurbaksh Ram from Ferozepur in Punjab. "I worked as a spy and was sent across the border when I was only 18. I was caught when I was 22. I spent my youth in a prison. In 2006, thanks to my brother's relentless efforts, I returned to the country under a prisoner-exchange programme. I'm not married. Yet, for all the sacrifices we made for the country, I receive no compensation and now work as a daily-wage labourer at a construction site," Ram said.

Others like Ram Prakash from Jammu recalled his days in a Pakistani jail. "They used to interrogate us using horrible methods. When I finally came home, I was physically incapable of doing any work. I now live at the mercy of my brother, with no income of my own. If militants who give up arms can be rehabilitated, then why can't the government do anything for us. They refuse to even acknowledge us," Prakash said. He has no teeth and his arms have been left weak because of what he endured in jail.

Among the protesters are families who said their loved ones were still serving time in jails across the border. Seema, wife of Sunil Kumar, said, "Why is it that I have to keep petitioning officers to bring my husband back? Why does the government not do anything on its own? It is them who asked my husband to risk his life."

Other spies languishing in Pakistani jails, they said, include Raj Kumar, Om Prakash, Kuldeep Kumar Yadav, Kuldeep Singh and Tilak Raj.

:( :(

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby Philip » 23 Sep 2013 21:17

Going getting tougher for the Naxals.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city ... 908821.cms

Intelligence slip giving Naxalites sleepless nights
Soumittra S Bose, TNN | Sep 23, 2013,

Rajnandgaon/ NAGPUR: Fragile intelligence network was a major concern for the security agencies earlier when the Naxalites were dominating the show. However, the scenario has changed with the rebels now worried over their dwindling intelligence network.

Chhattisgarh's Rajnandgaon police said that a Maoist document of Maharashtra Rajya state committee, seized during action this month, revealed that the reds were unhappy about their fledgling intelligence and security forces' growing intelligence networks. The document was replete with several growing concerns which the top cadres had expressed including the increased presence and operations of the forces.

A senior official of the Rajnandgaon police said that the security agencies have managed to make inroads into the Naxalite formations. "Police now have managed to plant special conduits in the Naxalite outfits who are moving around with the guerillas under different covers. The messages regarding the Naxalites' movements are directly coming to the higher police officials," he said. The senior officer also stated that Central agencies and state forces closely toiled for these kinds of developments for several months before the success was achieved. "The political will brought government help. The focus strengthened on increasing manpower and firepower in the Naxalite zones apart from stepping up budgets on various heads including gathering of intelligence," he said.

After an encounter on Maharashtra-Chhattisgarh border, police found documents where Naxalites expressed that several of their earlier safe zones could no longer be considered impregnable as forces started moving into such regions. The Naxalites have also expressed concerns regarding the presence of a large number of paramilitary forces in the jungles. The reds have also cited the examples of frequent encounters in Maharashtra and Chhattisgarh to underline the fact that the guerillas now need to remain on high alert.

A senior official of Maharashtra police said that security forces penetrated deep into jungles following specific inputs of Naxalite presence.

"We have learnt through our intelligence cells that Naxalites too have been left stunned by the sudden approach of the cops at places which they never expected and at such point of time," he said. The officer said that the Gadchiroli police's C-60 commandos had managed to gun down six, including a senior cadre, Naxalites at Govindgaon at Aheri in January this year in the night after the rebels just finished their meeting. Earlier, security forces discouraged night operations.

A section of the cops too feel that paramilitary forces, like Indo-Tibetan Border Police (ITBP) deployed in Chhattisgarh and Cobra battalion and their parent unit of Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF), have quickly acclimatized to the local conditions after initial hiccups. "The paramilitary forces now have started parallel and joint operations along with patrolling and other duties on the same footing with the district forces which have given real boost to the anti-Naxalite operations," said a senior official. "The Naxalites have expressed in their documents that there is a serious slowdown in recruitments and decreasing manpower which has affected their dominance in several pockets. The security forces in the same period doubled their strength and increased their penetrations into the so-called Naxalite strongholds," he said.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby KrishnaK » 23 Sep 2013 23:51

Karan M wrote:Wasn't Panag on the opposite side of the VK Singh issue from day one? Taking his tweets as cent per certain evidence appears dubious at best.

Could very well be the case. That doesn't mean his opinion ought to be rejected outright either. I am opposed to justifying any snooping on political masters in case it did happen. The army has no business going there, however corrupt the politicians.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby krishna_krishna » 24 Sep 2013 05:37

V K lays out pretty well it is for getting the names of the asset and treason of high order :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8iv3dXixa70

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby Victor » 24 Sep 2013 08:17

krishna_krishna wrote:V K lays out pretty well it is for getting the names of the asset and treason of high order :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8iv3dXixa70

"let me tell you...many people will be charged for murder because they have leaked out this info...". Gen VKS sounded very definite about this and seems certain this will happen. I look forward to seeing the day and hope none of the rats escape.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby williams » 24 Sep 2013 16:51

VK Singh is in for a long fight it looks like. Still it is sad that sensitive national security issues are discussed in the public domain.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby vishvak » 24 Sep 2013 20:04

Is it not strange that any defense personnel could be mistreated for politics that he doesn't understand or for following orders. In any case courts are not for just exclusive or selective arbitration.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby Murugan » 24 Sep 2013 20:38

The army has no business going there, however corrupt the politicians.


Should Army monitor force's person dealing with a corrupt politician or not? Or a corrupt politician is calling an army officer/army men? hain?

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby KrishnaK » 24 Sep 2013 21:08

Murugan wrote:
The army has no business going there, however corrupt the politicians.


Should Army monitor force's person dealing with a corrupt politician or not? Or a corrupt politician is calling an army officer/army men? hain?

I'm pretty sure there are rules for such situations. I don't know for sure, but I'd bet NO. The MI has a mandate on where to operate and there's a reason for that.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby Murugan » 25 Sep 2013 08:01

You mean to say that if a corrupt politician calls up a force's man to influence him or for some sinister reason or just a talk, who is also under surveillance, the TSD/MI will switch off the appratus monitoring the force's man? Arrey bandh karo, ye to SP ka Minister/Karyakarta hai, bandh karo (nonsense) And will run to DefMin for approval ? If it is like that , than it is nonsense and idiotic. No IB/MI/RAW unit operate without mandate and without reason, of course, a person in this field knows very well.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby Pratyush » 25 Sep 2013 10:47

Gentlemen, when the IA was required to set up the TSD by the MOD. It must have been for specific purposes. Unless people know what the purpose was. Every act of the TSD will look illegal to them. Even if, it is well within the bounds of Law.

This just goes to show the venality of this corrupt regime.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby Austin » 25 Sep 2013 12:19

US targeted Indian diplomats with sophisticated bugs - report
The Hindu newspaper, which has been collaborating with the Guardian newspaper reporter Glenn Greenwald, said the Indian offices were on a top-secret list of countries chosen for intensive spying.

The NSA "selected India's UN office and the embassy as (a) 'location target' for infiltrating their computers and telephones with hi-tech bugs," the paper said, citing a secret internal document from the spy agency.

It said India's missions were marked for various snooping techniques including one codenamed "Lifesaver" which "facilitates imaging of the hard drive of computers."

India and the US have put past difficulties behind them and become firm allies over the last decade, with Prime Minister Manmohan Singh set to meet US President Barack Obama in Washington on Friday.

The revelations about US spying activities, leaked through documents obtained by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, have already strained relations between Obama and his foreign allies, notably Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff.

The Hindu's report gives more detail on previous revelations published in the Guardian by Greenwald in July that 38 embassies and diplomatic missions were targeted by the NSA, including India's.

New Delhi has previously defended widespread snooping on Internet users and phone calls by US intelligence agencies, saying such scrutiny had helped prevent "terrorist attacks."

But the foreign ministry expressed concern about suspected spying on its diplomatic missions in July and said it would raise the issue with US authorities.

The new revelations are likely to lead to calls from the opposition in India for the government to take a firmer line with Washington.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby ramana » 25 Sep 2013 19:07

Austin, I don't know why the US had to go to such truuble to bug the Indian offices. They could have got it for free from the officers who: have gmail accounts which are already under surveillance, have servers in India most likely with MMS permission and get all the traffic.Must be compulsive bugging to justify their pay grade.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby Austin » 25 Sep 2013 20:43

I am sure they just dont want to bug the gmail account but the entire contents of the computer may be some proprietary crypto algo which we are using to send email or encrypt internet traffic , listening to conversation other then email/voice chat or other electronic means.

UN office out there in NY is a perfect place for NSA to spy on virtually every thing they can the first thing one must do is to move the office from US to some neutral country this will reduce if not eliminate aggressive spying by US or GCHQ

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby KrishnaK » 26 Sep 2013 10:11

Austin,
IMVHO, it's a lot likelier we using the same encryption algorithms as everybody, only longer keys. It'll be keys they're after, failing which, they'll try to mount MITM attacks, like in the case of gmail certificates. They have shown a preference for lifting as much cleartext as possible from keyboards, screens, any unencrypted data on hard disks etc. Breaking code in real time is tough, even for the NSA. Not sure if this has been posted here before
Groat picked the lock on the code room—a small, windowless space secured for secret communications, a standard feature of most embassies—and the team swept inside. Groat opened the safe within 15 minutes, having practiced on a similar model back in the States. The woman and two other officers were trained in photography and what the CIA calls “flaps and seals”; they carefully opened and photographed the code books and one-time pads, or booklets of random numbers used to create almost unbreakable codes, and then resealed each document and replaced it in the safe exactly as it had been before. Two hours after entering the embassy, they were gone.
from The CIA Burglar Who Went Rogue.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby chackojoseph » 28 Sep 2013 07:50

This is old article, and we added some info on 11 Sept. It includes Directorate General Security A look back into India’s special agencies

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby anmol » 02 Oct 2013 10:46

Google/State Department/CFR exec giving money to Bollywood execs for psyops:

Original: wikileaks.org/Op-ed-Google-and-the-NSA-Who-s.html

Op-ed: Google and the NSA: Who’s holding the ‘shit-bag’ now?
wikileaks.org | Aug 27th 2013

By JULIAN ASSANGE


It was revealed last week, thanks to Edward Snowden, that Google and other US tech companies received millions of dollars from the NSA for their compliance with the PRISM mass surveillance system.

So just how close is Google to the US securitocracy? Back in 2011 I had a meeting with Eric Schmidt, the then-Chairman of Google, who came out to see me with three other people while I was under house arrest. You might suppose that coming to see me was gesture that he and the other big boys at Google were secretly on our side, that they support what we at WikiLeaks are struggling for: justice, government transparency, and privacy for individuals. But that would be a false supposition. Their agenda was much more complex, and as we found out, was inextricable from that of the US State Department. The full audio and transcript of our meeting is available online here.

The pretext for their visit was that Schmidt was then researching a new book, a banal tome which has since come out as The New Digital Age. My less than enthusiastic review of this book was published in the New York Times in late May of this year. On the back of that book are a series of pre-publication endorsements: Henry Kissinger, Bill Clinton, Madeleine Albright, Michael Hayden (former head of the CIA and NSA) and Tony Blair. Inside the book Henry Kissinger appears once again, this time given pride of place in the acknowledgements.

Schmidt’s book is not about communicating with the public. He is worth $6.1 billion and does not need to sell books. Rather, this book is a mechanism by which Google seeks to project itself into Washington. It shows Washington that Google can be its partner, its geopolitical visionary, who will help Washington see further about America’s interests. And by tying itself to the US state, Google thereby cements its own security, at the expense of all competitors.

Two months after my meeting with Eric Schmidt, WikiLeaks had a legal reason to call Hillary Clinton and to document that we were calling her. It is interesting that if you call the front desk of the State Department and ask for Hillary Clinton, you can actually get pretty close, and we have become quite good at this. Anyone who has seen Doctor Strangelove may remember the fantastic scene when Peter Sellers calls the White House from a payphone on the army base and is put on hold as his call gradually moves through the levels. Well, WikiLeaks journalist Sarah Harrison, pretending to be my PA, put through our call to the State Department and, like Peter Sellers, we started moving through the levels, and eventually we got up to Hillary Clinton’s senior legal advisor, who said that we would be called back.

Shortly afterwards another one of our people, WikiLeaks’ ambassador Joseph Farrell, received a call back to discuss the parametres of the call with Hillary, not from the State Department, but from Lisa Shields, the then-girlfriend of Eric Schmidt, who does not formally work for the US State Department. So let’s reprise this situation: The Chairman of Google’s girlfriend was being used as a back channel for Hillary Clinton. This is illustrative. It shows that at this level of US society, as in other corporate states, it is all musical chairs.


That visit from Google while I was under house arrest was, as it turns out, an unofficial visit from the State Department. Just consider the people who accompanied Schmidt on that visit: his girlfriend Lisa Shields, Vice President for Communications at the Council on Foreign Relations; Scott Malcolmson, former State Department advisor; and Jared Cohen, advisor to both Hillary Clinton and Condoleezza Rice, a kind of Generation Y Kissinger figure — a noisy Quiet American as the novelist Graham Greene might have put it.

Google started out as part of Californian graduate student culture around San Francisco’s Bay Area. But as Google grew it encountered the big bad world. It encountered barriers to its expansion in the form of complex political networks and foreign regulations. So it started doing what big bad American companies do, from Coca Cola to Northrop Grumman. It started leaning heavily on the State Department for support, and by doing so it entered into the Washington DC system. A recently released statistic shows that [url=https:/www.nytimes.com/2013/06/03/business/susan-molinari-adds-to-googles-political-firepower.html?pagewanted=all]Google now spends even more money than Lockheed Martin[/url] on paid lobbyists in Washington.

Jared Cohen was the co-writer of Eric Schmidt’s book, and his role as the bridge between Google and the State Department speaks volumes about how the US securitocracy works. Cohen used to work directly for the State Department and was a close advisor to both Condoleezza Rice and Hillary Clinton. But since 2010 he has been Director of Google Ideas, its in-house ‘think/do’ tank.

Documents published last year by WikiLeaks obtained from the US intelligence contractor Stratfor, show that in 2011 Jared Cohen, then (as he is now) Director of Google Ideas, was off running secret missions to the edge of Iran in Azerbaijan. In these internal emails, Fred Burton, Stratfor’s Vice President for Intelligence and a former State Department official, describes Google as follows:


Google is getting WH [White House] and State Dept support and air cover. In reality they are doing things the CIA cannot do…[Cohen] is going to get himself kidnapped or killed. [url]Might be the best thing to happen to expose Google’s covert role in foaming up-risings, to be blunt. The US Gov’t can then disavow knowledge and Google is left holding the shit-bag. [/url]


In further internal communication, Burton subsequently clarifies his sources on Cohen’s activities as Marty Lev, Google’s director of security and safety and... Eric Schmidt.

[url]WikiLeaks cables also reveal[/url] that previously Cohen, when working for the State Department, was in Afghanistan trying to convince the four major Afghan mobile phone companies to move their antennas onto US military bases. In Lebanon he covertly worked to establish, on behalf of the State Department, an anti-Hezbollah Shia think tank. And in London? He was offering Bollywood film executives funds to insert anti-extremist content into Bollywood films and promising to connect them to related networks in Hollywood. That is the Director of Google Ideas. Cohen is effectively Google’s director of regime change.

That Google was taking NSA money in exchange for handing over people’s data comes as no surprise. When Google encountered the big bad world, Google itself got big and bad.

For more on Google, see:

See also:


GIFiles: Egypt - Google ** Suggest you read

GIFiles: Re: More on Cohen

GIFiles: Re: Goggle Shitstorm Moving to Gaza (internal use only)

GIFiles: [url=https:/search.wikileaks.org/gifiles/?viewemailid=1123044]Re: Google’s Cohen Activist Role[/url]

GIFiles: Re: movements.org founder Cohen

GIFiles: Re: discussion: who is next?

GIFiles: Re: GOOGLE’s Jared Cohen update

GIFiles: Re: GOOGLE & Iran ** internal use only - pls do not forward **

GIFiles: GOOGLE Loose Canon Bound for Turkey & UAE (SENSITIVE - DO NOT FORWARD)

GIFiles: Re: [alpha] GOOGLE - Cohen & Hosting of Terrorists

GIFiles: [alpha] Jared Cohen (GOOGLE)


[url=mailto:?subject=Wikileaks%20News:%20About%20WikiLeaks]Send to Friend[/url] Print


Relevant portion of relevant wikileak:-
Classified By: DCM Richard LeBaron for reasons 1.4 b, d 1. (C) Summary. EUR Senior Advisor for Muslim Engagement Farah Pandith and S/P Member Jared Cohen met with a wide range of UK government leaders, community activists, think tanks, artists, and Muslim youth during their October 9-14 visit to the UK. Government officials stressed that the UK's problem with extremists is a domestic as well as a foreign policy issue, since all recent successful and thwarted terrorist attacks were perpetrated by individuals from Muslim communities in the UK. Muslim youth from deprived areas expressed less concern with UK and U.S. foreign policy than with the chance to have their voices heard in British society, while those with more education focused on disagreements with UK foreign policy and the need to use the arts to address cultural tensions and reconciliation. Bollywood actors and executives agreed to work with the USG to promote anti-extremist messages through third party actors and were excited about the idea of possibly partnering with Hollywood as well. Community activists discussed how they are working to empower their communities and help shape the debate against extremism in UK Muslim communities. One highlight of the visit was a day trip to Leicester, which Pandith said was arguably home to the most conservative Islamic population she had seen anywhere in Europe. End summary.
[..]
Bollywood --------- 16. (SBU) On October 10, Pandith and Cohen met with a cross section of the South Asian community working in film to discuss the potential of working with the Indian film industry - "Bollywood" - on delivering an anti-terrorism message. Participants included Director of Arts Versa Mohsin Abbas, Channel 4 TV Head of Multicultural Programming Farouk Dhondi, Producer Director Mahmood Jamal, Locations Manager Amjad Khan, and singer/actress Humeira Akhter, who has strong links with top Bollywood actors/actresses. A lively discussion produced a number of possible ideas, including developing ways to promote existing anti-terrorist films, and to develop funds for similar productions. Once such an anti-extremist genre is established, participants believed that major Bollywood figures would be willing to speak out on the issue. Humaira Akhtar has already gotten back to Pandith on possible stars in Bollywood interested in such a project.

kit
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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby kit » 03 Oct 2013 20:08

not a long time back ,top secret Indian cipher codes were allegedly copied and the buildings were 'accidentally' put on fire to camouflage the incident ..

Garooda
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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby Garooda » 03 Oct 2013 20:27

Who are the likely Bollywood actors and executives ?

ramana
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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby ramana » 03 Oct 2013 20:39

All those aspiring/clamoring for Oscars for third rate films are one source.

They have been promised to raise their stature and are not getting it.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby Garooda » 03 Oct 2013 21:06

ramana wrote:All those aspiring/clamoring for Oscars for third rate films are one source.
They have been promised to raise their stature and are not getting it.

I had my thoughts and doubts about celebrities in general being used or exploited by the intelligence
communities from way back in time especially Hollywood (even during WWII).
I can think of several western celebrities involved in humanatarian causes at global level.
Bono, Leonardo DiCaprio, Sean Penn, George Clooney, Angelina Jolie, Jason Bourne..err Matt Damon vagairah vagairah.
Hollywood played a big hand on both sides during WWII. Especially psyops and injecting the
western culture during the cold war with soviets.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby ramana » 03 Oct 2013 21:28

Start reading "Man called Interpid" a WWII book.

Garooda
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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby Garooda » 03 Oct 2013 21:50

Thanks. Will surely try to. I'm assuming its a typo as you meant 'Intrepid' and not 'Interpid'.

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby sum » 04 Oct 2013 05:42

kit wrote:not a long time back ,top secret Indian cipher codes were allegedly copied and the buildings were 'accidentally' put on fire to camouflage the incident ..

Any news reports of this "fire", Saar?

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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby vasu raya » 04 Oct 2013 06:16

Delivering us from surveillance

New Delhi can pursue a series of small, simple measures to help check NSA’s snooping without seriously affecting India-U.S. ties

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s reluctance to raise the slightest murmur of protest against the U.S. National Security Agency’s (NSA) spying excesses during his American trip leaves us with one question: will NSA surveillance continue unabated? India has displayed a stunning lack of political will to even broach the issue with Washington D.C. Perhaps, this was inevitable: a Prime Minister humiliated at home by his own party can hardly be expected to sour the one foreign policy achievement that defines his legacy. Dr. Singh was busy ensuring the India-U.S. nuclear deal is operationalised before he demits office to worry about concerns that actually affect the lives and businesses of Indians.

Consensus

This is unfortunate because NSA surveillance is an area where rare consensus has emerged among the BRICS countries. At the U.N. General Assembly session in New York last week, BRICS Foreign Ministers “expressed concern” at the “unauthorised interception of communication and data,” without calling out the NSA in specific. But there exist no international regulations to protect civilians from such surveillance because the U.S., the United Kingdom and Israel in particular are opposed to any cybersecurity treaty. In 2010, Russia — backed by Brazil and China — tabled a draft convention on cybercrimes at the U.N., only to be shot down by the West. The Russian proposal specifically targeted intrusive technology and cyber attacks — the sort of stuff the NSA is adept at. But the U.S. successfully spun the narrative around to suggest autocratic countries like Russia and China wanted to clamp down on the Internet. A year later, The New York Times would reveal the U.S. and Israel had used precisely this technology to infect nuclear reactors in Iran with the Stuxnet virus.

The U.S. used the same pretext last December in Dubai when the U.N. deliberated an international communications treaty under the auspices of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). The Obama administration, however, refused to sign the International Telecom Regulations and asserted that cybersecurity be kept out of the treaty’s mandate. It insisted the Internet be unregulated to leave it “free and open.” Months later, leaked NSA documents courtesy Edward Snowden would reveal how the U.S. arm-twisted telecom companies and Internet service providers for confidential user data. Had the U.S. signed on to the ITRs, the NSA’s PRISM programme would have amounted to a gross breach of its treaty obligations.

At the ITU negotiations, India chose regrettably to side with the U.S. This July, The Hindu disclosed how India’s Central Monitoring System (CMS) intercepts private communication in the same vein as the NSA. Given that India and the U.S. signed a Memorandum of Understanding in 2011 to share “cybersecurity information and expertise,” it would not be surprising to learn that much of the CMS’ capabilities stem from our cooperation with the U.S.

Holding back

There are then three plausible reasons behind India’s refusal to take up the NSA revelations with the U.S. One, Prime Minister Singh does not wish to sully the piece de resistance in his foreign policy tab. Two, New Delhi worries about a potential blowback in ties especially on technology transfer, private investment and defence cooperation. Third, the government needs to sustain its own monitoring and intercepting of communication, for which it needs U.S. assistance.

The moral basis for these justifications is shaky. Yet, with all its reservations about publicly airing grievances with the U.S., India still has a good opportunity to help rein in the NSA’s mandate. Diplomacy offers enough avenues to do so without substantially affecting India-U.S. ties.

Three steps

For starters, India could revive an IBSA (India-Brazil-South Africa) proposal from 2011 to set up a U.N. Committee for Internet- Related Policies (CIRP), and submit it again to the U.N. General Assembly. CIRP would comprise a rotating group of 50 countries serving in an advisory capacity on Internet governance policies. This committee would be positioned ideally to highlight egregious surveillance schemes of the U.S. and other countries. First tabled at the 66th UNGA session, this idea met with opposition from the West and advocates of Internet freedom. But in light of new circumstances, and great resentment against the U.S. and NSA’s practices, mooting CIRP is sure to generate much discussion at the U.N. The IBSA proposal should be coupled with a draft resolution for the General Assembly to adopt: one that strongly denounces practices of global surveillance and use of interceptive technologies against governments.

Second, when Parliament convenes for the winter session, the Congress party — or any party or independent legislator, for that matter — could table amendments to the National Security Act and the Official Secrets Act. Broadly, the amendments would stipulate it is a punishable offence for Indian or India-based Internet and telecom companies to share confidential information about Indian citizens, public-sector institutions, and officials with foreign governments. The enforcement of these provisions, if enacted, would be supervised by a parliamentary committee. The chances these amendments are passed by Parliament are frankly slim. But the parliamentary debate that would ensue will surely include sharp and critical comments on U.S. surveillance programmes, all of which go on the record as the opinion of India’s sovereign body.

Third, India could help formulate a BRICS Charter for Internet Governance, given that there is substantial agreement among member states. Among the provisions in the draft charter could be an idea adapted, ironically, from the George W. Bush administration — the Proliferation Security Initiative. The PSI was a mechanism set up by the U.S. and endorsed by “volunteer” countries to target the shipment of arms to Iran and North Korea. The simple idea behind PSI was this: while the West could do little to influence policy in Tehran and Pyongyang, it held all the economic cards to ensure these policies were not implemented. BRICS countries retain a trump card when it comes to Internet governance: their massive consumer base. To be sure, the charter should not punish or sanction Internet companies that collaborate with the U.S. government for surveillance. BRICS members would circulate an annual “name and shame” list of such companies to multilateral avenues and civil society forums across the world. The negative publicity would do more than its fair share to make IT companies rethink their surreptitious collaboration with the U.S.

These are modest, but not conclusive, proposals that India could articulate to help check the NSA’s surveillance programmes.

They are not aimed at setting back India-U.S. ties — in fact, pursuing such policies would only boost India’s reputation as a pursuer of independent foreign policy.

arun.sukumar@thehindu.co.in

ramana
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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby ramana » 05 Oct 2013 06:21

All this is nice but what about Snowden revelation that the server is in new delhi?

vasu raya
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Re: Intelligence & National Security Discussion

Postby vasu raya » 05 Oct 2013 07:22

^^^

GoI perhaps is asking the US based social networking sites to place their servers under Indian jurisdiction to have better control on the content hosted so technically any India based server shouldn't be a threat unless allowed. Anyways lets see what the newly formed Cyber command by the defense services does.

There are far too many riots in India that are aggravated by social media based false propaganda. Could computing might have answers on the financial aspects of hosting such Jurisdiction restricted servers and content. In some other thread about Sunil Mittal it was pointed out that national laws override any corporate policies in a multi-national company.


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