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Tracking India's Admission into International Groups & Bodies

The Strategic Issues & International Relations Forum is a venue to discuss issues pertaining to India's security environment, her strategic outlook on global affairs and as well as the effect of international relations in the Indian Subcontinent. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
vishvak
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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby vishvak » 15 May 2016 10:57

It is obvious that
* nuclear watchdogs must have been thrown bones to not bark when nuke proliferation was going on.
* proliferation must have been from those with know how of nuke tech, and virtual silence/ignorance of others.

One needs to be careful about 'international' things that are actually monopolies in guise of legit humane endeavours. Like UN declaration of universal human rights that is routinely twisted to spread selective propaganda.

I think Indian state should promulgate some basic 'international' declaration to not let guards down against such behaviour and identify perpetrators clearly that push for exclusivist gangs and monopolistic outlooks to the detriment of average human rights and such and such therein.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 20 May 2016 19:38

India counters China, says no need to sign NPT for NSG membership - PTI
India on Friday rejected China's contention that it must sign the NPT to get membership of the Nuclear Suppliers Group , saying France was included in the elite group without signing the Non-Proliferation Treaty .

"I think there is some confusion here. Even the NPT allows civil nuclear cooperation with non-NPT countries. If there is a connection, it is between the NSG and IAEA safeguards and with export controls," external affairs ministry spokesperson Vikas Swarup said.

He was asked about a Chinese official linking China's support to India's bid for NSG to the country signing the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).

"NSG members have to respect safeguards and export controls, nuclear supplies have to be in accordance with the NSG Guidelines. The NSG is an ad hoc export control regime and France, which was not an NPT member for some time, was a member of the NSG since it respected NSG's objectives," said Swarup.

China has opposed India's bid to get NSG membership on the ground that it was yet to sign the NPT. Its Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang had said all the multilateral non-proliferation export control regime including the NSG have regarded NPT as an important standard for the expansion of the NSG.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 24 May 2016 15:22

India can't equate itself with France on NSG: China - Saibal Dasgupta, Economic Times
China will not budge from its stance against India's entry into the powerful Nuclear Suppliers Group ( NSG ), and assume the same approach for "all-weather friend" Pakistan, because neither country has ratified the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty ( NPT ), the Chinese foreign ministry said on Monday, ahead of President Pranab Mukherjee's four-day China tour.

"China, along with other countries, has been maintaining that there should be a thorough discussion on whether non-NPT countries can join NSG, and this decision should be made on consensus. This applies to all non-NPT countries, including Pakistan," said Hua Chunying, the ministry's spokesperson, at a media briefing.

India recently said there was no rule that restricts NSG membership to NPT signatories, citing the example of France, which had become a member despite not ratifying NPT for a while. Countering the Indian argument, Hua said, "France was a founder of the NSG so the issue of its acceptance... does not exist."

Mukherjee arrives in the southern city of Guangzhou on Tuesday evening, and will reach Beijing late Wednesday. He will meet Chinese President Xi Jinping and other top officials before leaving Beijing on Thursday.

China has been building nuclear power plants and conducting other commercial deals in the nuclear energy sector, which some observers see as a violation of NPT. But it wants to block India because an NSG membership will make it possible for New Delhi to access sensitive technologies and materials from different parts of the world, analysts here [Beijing] said.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby kit » 24 May 2016 17:24

can we sign the NPT and do what China does ? ..namely proliferate to Vietnam , Taiwan etc ?

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby schinnas » 24 May 2016 18:31

India's admission to NSG finally boils down to whether US has enough leverage and muscle power to make China toe its line. When India was granted an exception to NSG during Bush Jr's regime, Bush had to personally call Cheen leadership to make it go through. In the past 8+ years since then, Cheen has grown in stature and with all the posturing around South China Sea, Cheen may not be so willing to budge this time around. Or it may be asking for unacceptable quid-pro-quo (such as admitting Pukistan into NSG).

We will get to know the collective answer to these two questions:

1. How much leverage US has over China
2. How much of a priority it is for US to get India into NSG.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby JE Menon » 24 May 2016 19:07

schinnas, IMHO, it's not really an issue. What we are doing with our insistence is to get China to commit, to show it's hand. It is doing so nicely. The group is a useless entity at this point, as is the NPT which is to be contemptuously ridiculed.

Remember where we are without membership. The kind of expertise in the nuclear field that India has built up, in 10 years the members will be coming to us for tech sharing. Or bilateral quid pro quos will be worked out. That is much more in our interest than the worthless NSG "membership"...

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby arun » 28 May 2016 08:22

X Posted from the “India Nuclear News and Discussion 4 July 2011” thread:

Mark C. Toner
Deputy Spokesperson
Daily Press Briefing
Washington, DC
May 27, 2016 …………………………………..

QUESTION: Jahanzaib Ali from ARY News. Sir, it is reported that NSG, the Nuclear Suppliers Group, meeting soon in early June to consider membership of India, that U.S. supports. So is the forthcoming meeting being organized by the U.S. or was it already on NSG calendar?

MR TONER: You’re talking about the Modi visit or the meeting of the Nuclear Suppliers Group?

QUESTION: I said NSG. NSG.

MR TONER: Look, deliberations about the prospects of new members joining the Nuclear Supplier Groups are an internal matter among the current members. I don’t have much to say beyond that other than that I think they meet regularly. This I not a specific meeting, I believe – not set up to particularly talk about this issue.

QUESTION: So does the – State Department confident that it has already generated a consensus in NSG in favor of India?

MR TONER: Well, look, all I can say is that during his visit to India in 2015, President Obama did affirm the U.S. view that India meets missile technology control regime requirements and is ready for membership. But it’s a consensus body, so we’ll wait and see how the vote goes.

QUESTION: So in the Foreign Relations Committee a couple of days ago, one of the senator says that guaranteeing exemptions to India for the NSG membership would affect Pakistan’s nuclear choices and it can produce further battlefield nuclear weapons. So the question is that, sir: Except giving pace to the nuclear arms race in the region, what really the United States is gaining in getting India into NSG?

MR TONER: Into the Nuclear Suppliers Group?

QUESTION: Yeah.

MR TONER: Well, again, it’s – this is not about an arms race and it’s not about nuclear weapons. This is about the peaceful civil use of nuclear energy, and so we would certainly hope that Pakistan understands that.

QUESTION: Sir, Pakistan also desires to become the member of NSG.

MR TONER: That’s right.

QUESTION: The United States support Pakistan for that?

MR TONER: They have made public their interest, and certainly any country can submit its application for membership. And we’ll consider based on a consensus decision.


Link here:

Clicky

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby Vipul » 03 Jun 2016 02:27

India joins ballistic missile proliferation regime HCoC.

India today joined a global ballistic missile proliferation regime but made it clear that it will not have any impact on the national security as well as country’s missile programmes.

External Affairs Ministry Spokesperson Vikas Swarup also said that India’s bid to enter the Missile Technology Control Regime was “on track” and the process to grant the membership was expected to be completed “soon”. While briefing reporters here, Swarup said,”India has joined the Hague Code of Conduct (HCoC) against Ballistic Missile Proliferation by notifying the HCoC Central Contact in Vienna through diplomatic channels.”

The HCoC is a voluntary, legally non-binding international confidence building and transparency measure that seeks to prevent the proliferation of ballistic missiles that are capable of delivering weapons of mass destruction.

When asked if India’s joining HCoC will effectively mean that country has to shelve its Agni missile programme, he said, “Our national security interest will not be impacted in any manner, whatsoever, by joining HCoC.”

He also said, “India’s joining the Code signals our readiness to further strengthen global non-proliferation objectives.” Asked about India’s bid to become member of nuclear control regimes, Swarup said,”As far as MTCR is concerned, our application is on track and well-received, and we expect that process of India’s membership would be completed soon”.

He also added that the country was in discussions with other control regimes like Wassenaar Arrangement for the membership.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby Vipul » 03 Jun 2016 02:31

^^^ India shooting itself on the foot by trying to commit itself to MTCR. Music to China's ears. No leverage of the threat of giving Agni to Vietnam and others inimical to the Chinese interests.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 03 Jun 2016 13:53

Strategic balance hinges on NSG’s non-discriminatory approach: FO - DAWN
ISLAMABAD: Sustain­able civil nuclear energy is essential for Pakistan’s future energy security and economic development and a non-discriminatory appro­a­ch by the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) is imperative to maintain strategic balance in the region.

Speaking at the weekly brie­fing on Thursday, Foreign Office spokesman Nafees Zakaria said, “Any country’s specific exception will not be beneficial for non-proliferation regime and will affect strategic stability of South Asia and credibility of the NSG itself.”

He said Pakistan’s application for membership of the NSG stood on solid grounds of technical experience, capability and well-established commitment to nuclear safety.

On the NSG membership, he said, Pakistan had a principle-based stand of adoption of a non-discriminatory, equitable and criteria-based appro­a­ch, which was supported by a large number of NSG members.

Mr Zakaria said Pakistan had been operating secure and safeguarded nuclear power plants for over 42 years. He said Pakistan’s membership of NSG was in the interest of nuclear training countries as it would promote the group’s objective of non-proliferation.

Referring to an agreement signed between Japan and India on building six nuclear power plants in Andhra Pradesh, he said Pakistan’s position on the matter was clear that there should not be any discriminatory treatment to a country which was not even a party to the Non-Prolifera­tion Treaty. “It will further add to the reasons behind disturbing strategic stability in the region,” the spokesman said.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 03 Jun 2016 15:45

India applies for NSG membership ahead of PM Narendra Modi's US visit - Pranab Dhal Samanta, Economic Times
India's biggest diplomatic battle since the nuclear deal has begun in earnest — New Delhi has quietly submitted its formal application for membership of the Nuclear Suppliers Group ( NSG ) ahead of PM Narendra Modi's visit to the US starting June 4.

The application was pushed through on May 12, almost a week before Pakistan sent its case. And the first big test will be on June 9-10 at a closed-door NSG meet in Vienna.

Senior diplomats, who didn't want to be identified, told ET that the PM himself has been burning the telephone lines, reaching out to heads of government across the 48-member body to pitch for India's case.

The submission of the application, which comes after nearly seven years of talks with NSG and its various forums, has set Modi regime up for a big fight with China, an NSG member that is batting for Pakistan.

The process began in last week of April when India transmitted what is called the 'adherence to NSG' document to International Atomic Energy Agency. This lists all the laws and rules that have been changed or inserted to streamline India's regime in line with NSG guidelines. India submitted its application on May 12.

As part of an overall strategy, President Pranab Mukherjee undertook a visit to China on May 24 to sound out Beijing. There was no clear response, but China agreed to get officials on both sides talking to each other. China was a hold-out even when NSG gave a one-time waiver to the Indo-US nuclear deal, but gave in after then US president George W Bush called up his then Chinese counterpart Hu Jintao to persuade Beijing.

Now, big diplomatic push will come from the PM when he goes to the US on June 4. New Delhi is counting on Washington to send out a strong and clear message that will set the tone for the crucial NSG technical meet on June 9-10, where India's application will be assessed. The action will then shift to the June 24 NSG plenary in Seoul, where the case is likely to be put up on the agenda.

Hectic diplomatic activity has started. The message has been two-fold: First, if India needs to meet its climate change commitments of aiming for 40% non-fossil fuels in the country's energy mix, it needs to be formally a part of the nuclear trading club. Second, India's NSG membership will automatically ensure the business environment is kept more predictable and stable regardless of change in governments.

By tradition, NSG is a closed-door club that takes decisions only by consensus. While the group doesn't require a member to be a signatory to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), its guidelines are aimed at checking proliferation and misuse.

The group was, in fact, formed as a reaction to India's first nuclear test in 1974. China's questioning has been on the special treatment for India. And that's why it floated a criteria-based approach, whereby any country which meets a certain set of agreed norms could be considered for membership, including Pakistan.

This conversation on India's membership too had hit a wall with the civil nuclear liability law. And this hurdle was cleared only after a resolution could be found during US President Barack Obama's visit last year.

Until then, the nuclear liability conundrum had put off all important countries looking to invest in this sector. Most of these countries are also key NSG members.

In line with that understanding, an insurance product was created that US major Westinghouse has now bought into. Diplomats told ET that they are in final discussions with the insurance regulator and by the time Modi is in the US, a more forward-looking language on a final contract may be announced.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 04 Jun 2016 09:55

India seeks help of friends for NSG entry - The Hindu
Weeks after China announced that it intends to block India’s membership of the Nuclear Suppliers Group, the Ministry of External Affairs confirmed on Friday a high-power campaign was under way aimed at “engaging all members of the Nuclear Suppliers Group” in the run-up to the extraordinary plenary that NSG will host in Vienna on June 9. The plenary is likely to consider India’s application to become a member of the group.

India’s quest of NSG membership is likely to feature prominently during the visit of Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Switzerland, the U.S. and Mexico which are part of his five-nation trip beginning on Saturday.

“This [membership of NSG] has been an objective that we have pursued for many years now. We believe we made a lot of progress and that has led us to formally apply to NSG some days ago. We are engaging all NSG members regarding this issue,” S. Jaishankar, Foreign Secretary, told the media at the MEA on Friday.

The more NSG-focused leg of the five-nation trip will begin with Mr. Modi arriving in Switzerland on Monday and going onward to the U.S. on June 6.

The Prime Minister will visit Mexico, a critical NSG member, for a day before returning to India on June 9. Both Mexico and Switzerland are known as “non-proliferation hardliners” who constitute a strong group in the NSG.

While NSG’s Chairperson Rafael Grossi told The Hindu in November 2015 that he would begin consultation with various countries that are part of the 48-member group for India’s membership, the process of India’s admission received an early jolt from China on May 19. Beijing announced that it sought membership of NPT as a precondition for any new membership of the NSG. India has traditionally opposed the NPT as a discriminatory instrument and did not sign it. President Pranab Mukherjee subsequently paid a visit to China.

On the eve of Mr. Modi’s five-nation tour, the South Korean ambassador to India Hyun Cho extended a personal note of support for India’s membership in the group which controls supply of nuclear material and technology in the world.

Track record matters

“South Korea happens to be the chair of NSG meetings this year. It is high time that India gets invited to NSG as it has an impeccable track record,” he said. “What matters to NSG members is the track record of an applicant.”

“Getting us into the NSG will help facilitate nuclear trade with us,” Mr. Jaishankar said
, while arguing that India’s growing energy needs require a re-ordered nuclear supply regulation.

Mr. Jaishankar deconstructed the argument which has been extended by “non-proliferation hardliners” who say that to become eligible for the NSG, India should first become a signatory of the NPT. “NSG is a regime – a flexible arrangement among states which is quite different from the NPT which is a treaty.”

He argued that membership will help both India’s plans to move away from fossil fuel reliance and said that the NSG already exempted India once in 2008 when it noted “the energy needs of India” after it separated military and civilian reactors in 2008 following the India-U.S. civil nuclear agreement.

Experts had cautioned that China’s opposition is a serious threat. However the “extraordinary plenary” at the NSG will discuss “new applications” including those from India and Pakistan.



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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby vera_k » 05 Jun 2016 03:29

No exceptions for a nuclear India

Ideally, Mr. Obama could take advantage of the ties he has built and press for India to adhere to the standards on nuclear proliferation to which other nuclear weapons states adhere.


Have to agree with this statement. All other nuclear weapons states got in AFTER they had proliferated nuclear weapons technology to other countries.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby sanjaykumar » 05 Jun 2016 04:39

NYT might be better off pontificating on garbage pick up days in the boroughs rather than matters beyond their level.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby sivab » 05 Jun 2016 17:52

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/new ... s?from=mdr

India likely to enter missile technology control regime this week

India is likely to enter the missile technology control ( MTCR ) regime this week, a move that will boost the country's efforts to purchase Predator drones from the US and export its high-tech missiles to friendly nations.

An announcement in this regard is anticipated as early as this week, possibly during Prime Minister Narendra Modi's visit to the US at the invitation of US President Barack Obama , sources tracking the development told PTI.

The major breakthrough comes days after India announced that it is subscribing to 'The Hague Code of Conduct' against Ballistic Missile Proliferation, which is considered to be complementary to the missile technology control regime (MTCR).

The Obama administration has strongly backed India's membership into MTCR and three other export control regime -- Australia Group, Nuclear Suppliers Group and the Wassenaar Arrangement.

Since 2008 India has been one of the five countries that are Unilateral Adherents to MTCR.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby schinnas » 06 Jun 2016 16:51

Successful visit of PM Modi to Switzerland. India gets Switzerland's support to join NSG. Switzerland has been one of the countries opposed to India's entry to NSG. Let us hope Modi gets similar success in Mexico as well.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 619774.cms

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 06 Jun 2016 16:52

Switzerland backs India’s NSG membership bid - PTI
India, on Monday, got the backing of Switzerland in its bid to become a member of the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) ahead of the group’s crucial meeting. The two countries also resolved to strengthen cooperation in combating tax evasion and black money.

Swiss President Johann Schneider-Ammann announced his country’s support to India’s membership in the 48-member grouping after holding comprehensive talks with Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

Agreeing to expand cooperation in tackling the problem of Indians stashing away unaccounted money in Swiss banks, the two leaders also had talks on stepping up ties in areas of trade, investment and vocational training.

“We have promised India support in its efforts to become a member of NSG,” Schneider-Ammann said at a joint media interaction.

India has been pushing for membership of the bloc for last few years and had formally moved its application on May 12. The grouping will take up India’s application in its plenary meetings on June 9 in Vienna and June 24 in Seoul.

“I am thankful to the President for Switzerland’s understanding and support for India’s membership of the NSG,” Mr. Modi said.

The NSG looks after critical issues relating to the nuclear sector and its membership will help India expand its atomic energy sector.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 06 Jun 2016 17:06

Now, Modi has to work his magic on Mexico. Then, we will isolate China in NSG.

We should then turn the tables on China when its membership comes up for hearing in MTCR.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 07 Jun 2016 12:22

US expects India to join Missile Technology Control Regime 'very quickly': Official - PTI
India may join the Missile Technology Control Regime ( MTCR ) "very quickly" as there are no longer any major obstacles and things are moving positively, a senior US official has said.

"We do expect that India will join MTCR very quickly. I think things are moving positively," a senior Obama administration official told PTI when asked about the possibility of India joining the 34-member group.

"There are no longer any major obstacles that we are aware of," the official said yesterday.

US President Barack Obama has strongly backed India's membership into the MTCR and three other export control regime - Australia Group, Nuclear Suppliers Group and the Wassenaar Arrangement.

The move will boost India's efforts to purchase Predator drones from the US and export its high-tech missiles to friendly nations.

However, on India becoming a member of Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) where China is openly opposing it, the Obama administration is keeping its fingers crossed for the moment.


"On NSG, there is a process that is still ongoing. I do not think the NSG plenary is not meeting until later in this month. Let's see how it goes but the US is absolutely, categorically, unreservedly committed to India's membership in the NSG.

"The US and India and other friendly countries are working actively together to see that India get there," the official, who requested anonymity, added.

Established in April 1987, the voluntary MTCR aims to limit the spread of ballistic missiles and other unmanned delivery systems that could be used for chemical, biological, and nuclear attacks.

The MTCR regime urges its 34 members, which include most of the world's key missile manufacturers, to restrict their exports of missiles and related technologies capable of carrying a 500-kilogramme payload at least 300 kilometres or delivering any type of weapon of mass destruction.

Since 2008, India has been one of the five countries that are Unilateral Adherents to MTCR.

After MTCR's announcement, India and the US are expected to fast-track their discussion on sale of predator series of unmanned aircraft for the Indian military.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 07 Jun 2016 15:59

US backs India's bid for nuclear group membership - PTI
Backing India's bid to join the Nuclear Suppliers Group ( NSG ), the US has said by becoming the member of the elite grouping the country would be in a stronger position to be a "good citizen" on proliferation- related issues.

"Having gone down the path of the civil nuclear agreement with India, and having invested a significant amount of time in building up our cooperation with India as it relates to nuclear security," Deputy National Security Advisor Benjamin Rhodes told a Washington audience.

Rhodes remarks on India came in response to a question about why some countries like China are opposing India's membership in the 48-member NSG.

"..I think the bottom line for us is that we believe that through engagement with India and through engagement with groups like the NSG, we are in a better position to support India as a good citizen on these issues," Rhodes said.

He said the US believed that engaging India and trying to bring it into international processes will be more effective in promoting the country's security protocols.

"And frankly, it takes place against continued conversations that we have with India about their approach to nuclear weapons; and of course, the support that we've always expressed for diplomatic efforts between India and Pakistan," Rhodes said in response to a question at an event organised by the Arms Control Association.

Based in Washington, Arms Control Association is a think-tank that had opposed India-US civil nuclear deal and is now opposing India's membership to the NSG.

Rhodes remarks on India came in response to a question on India about why some countries are opposing India's membership to NSG.

"So, I think the bottom line for us is that we believe that through engagement with India and through engagement with groups like the NSG, we are in a better position to support India as a good citizen on these issues going forward," Rhodes said.

"Of course, we'll take seriously the concerns of other nations, but again for us I think this is part of a broader context where we've decided to take this approach with India. And we've seen it bear some fruit, particularly on issues related to nuclear security," he said.

"So again, we understand the concerns, but in many ways we're dealing with a challenge that was fairly far advanced by the time we took office. And we decided to sustain the previous administration's decision to pursue that civil nuclear cooperation broadly," he said.

"Then what we've tried to do is nest it in these international bodies and protocols so that, again, India is in a stronger position to be a good citizen on proliferation- related issues," Rhodes said.


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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby Vipul » 07 Jun 2016 18:45

^^^ SSridharji if we try to block China from becoming member of MTCR it will respond by giving medium range ballistic missiles to Bangladesh, and even Myanmar, Srilanka and Nepal if they willing to take it.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 07 Jun 2016 18:50

Posting the full article thar ranjan.rao has posted above.

India 'clears final hurdle to join Missile Technology Control Regime' - Agencies, ToI
The members of the Missile Technology Control Regime, a key anti-proliferation grouping, have agreed to admit India, diplomats said, in a win for Prime Minister Narendra Modi as he meets President Barack Obama in Washington on Tuesday .

The diplomats, with direct knowledge of the matter, said a deadline for the members of the 34-nation group to object to India's admission had expired on Monday. Under this so-called 'silent procedure', India's admission follows automatically.

The major breakthrough comes days after India announced that it is subscribing to 'The Hague Code of Conduct' against ballistic missile proliferation, which is considered to be complementary to the missile technology control regime ( MTCR ).

India had applied for its membership last year.

But it was facing strong opposition from a few member countries of the MTCR where decisions are based on consensus.

The Obama administration has strongly backed India's membership into MTCR and three other export control regime — Australia Group, Nuclear Suppliers Group and the Wassenaar Arrangement.

Established in April 1987, the voluntary MTCR aims to limit the spread of ballistic missiles and other unmanned delivery systems that could be used for chemical, biological, and nuclear attacks.

The MTCR regime urges its 34 members, which include most of the world's key missile manufacturers, to restrict their exports of missiles and related technologies capable of carrying a 500-kilogram payload at least 300 kilometers or delivering any type of weapon of mass destruction.

Since 2008 India has been one of the five countries that are unilateral adherents to the MTCR.

After MTCR's announcement, India and the US are expected to fast-track their discussion on sale of predator series of unmanned aircraft for the Indian military.

The Predator drone, which recently eliminated the Taliban leader in Afghanistan, is the preferred tool of the CIA.

Membership into MTCR is a huge boost for India's ability to procure this capability.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 07 Jun 2016 18:52

Vipul wrote:^^^ SSridharji if we try to block China from becoming member of MTCR it will respond by giving medium range ballistic missiles to Bangladesh, and even Myanmar, Srilanka and Nepal if they willing to take it.

Vipul, can there be anything worse than giving nukes, missiles, targetting coordinates, a second strike capability (on the way), MIRV (on the way) etc to Pakistan? BD, Myanmar, Sri Lanka & Nepal are not Pakistan and China cannot do us any more damage than what it has already done.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby member_27581 » 07 Jun 2016 19:33

^^^It's also another question what china can gain from joining MTCR. Not sure who will be willing to sell it against the wishes of Uncle Sam. Rest all either they have it or have some domestic program that will make over time. Especially with their funding and doggedness.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby Vipul » 07 Jun 2016 19:37

A medium range ballistic missile equipped Bangladesh on the other flank will mean extra security measures and complications for India. With India adhering to MTCR we will be shooting ourselves in the foot and will have no similar leverage vis-a vis Vietnam and other countries in the South China Sea.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby member_23370 » 07 Jun 2016 20:13

So the MTCR was all about Predator drones? Brahmos is on paper < 300 km range and only 200-300 kg warhead so no need to worry.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 08 Jun 2016 03:47

Will work together to ensure India is in NSG: Japan - ToI
Japan's ambassador to India has said his country supports India's bid for the Nuclear Suppliers Group membership. "We hope India will be part of the NSG," said envoy Kenji Hiramatsu here on Tuesday, assuring that Japan would be working with India to make sure it becomes a member of the NSG. This comes even as India, Japan and US started preparations to launch this year's Malabar naval exercise off Japan's coast this weekend, sending a strong message to China.

In an exclusive conversation with TOI, Hiramatsu, said, "We are trying to promote our defence and security relationship with India. Last year, both Prime Ministers decided Japan should be part of Malabar exercise regularly. Therefore, Japan is hosting the exercise between 10 June to 17 June." The exercise, which is normally held in autumn, will be held on the eastern Okinawa maritime area in western Japan, he said.


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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 08 Jun 2016 07:16

ranjan.rao wrote:^^^It's also another question what china can gain from joining MTCR.

In any case, China applied for membership to MTCR and was rejected because of its poor proliferation record. Benefits apart, there is a prestige in being a member of such clubs. It is even more so if one is unable to become a member! As simple as that.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby Kashi » 08 Jun 2016 07:25

SSridhar wrote:In any case, China applied for membership to MTCR and was rejected because of its poor proliferation record. Benefits apart, there is a prestige in being a member of such clubs. It is even more so if one is unable to become a member! As simple as that.


Prestige is all fine and dandy, but in the world of hard-nosed Realpolitik, what do we really gain from joining MTCR that China does not by staying out. No country in their right mind will be willing to supply sensitive and advanced missile/propulsion/guidance technology to China even if they were in MTCR. The American and European arms embargoes stand to this day.

Likewise, we cannot expect such technologies to become suddenly available to us (that were completely out of bounds before) now that we are a full fledged member of the MTCR high-table.

If our RM is to be believed, we are unlikely to see an influx of imported missiles. GoI has also ruled out any cap on our missile programme even after we join MTCR.

So how does the situation change on the ground?

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 08 Jun 2016 07:44

Vipul wrote:A medium range ballistic missile equipped Bangladesh on the other flank will mean extra security measures and complications for India. With India adhering to MTCR we will be shooting ourselves in the foot and will have no similar leverage vis-a vis Vietnam and other countries in the South China Sea.

Vipul, China is a violator of treaties it signs, whether they are bilateral or multilateral. We have the bitter experience of Panchsheel. It violated NPT and is constructing two nuclear plants in Chashma and even more audaciously two more in KANUPP, claiming fraudulently that they were grandfathered before China signed NPT. It violates UNCLOS in the Indo-China Sea blatantly and even claims that the ITLOS has no jurisdiction over its claims to the Indo-China Sea. It refused to participate in the arbitration proceedings. In addition to Pakistan, China has been responsible for transfers of prohibited technologies to North Korea and Saudi Arabia after it accepted its obligations under NPT & MTCR (China is not a member of MTCR but agreed to abide by the original 1987 Guidelines and Annexe). So, there is no guarantee that it wouldn't violate the MTC Regime and transfer ballistic missiles to member states of the Indian Subcontinent if it so wishes, even after becoming a full-fledged member.

It is very obvious that China (and Pakistan) want(s) to box us within the so-called 'South Asia' geography and that too in unfriendly terms with the other members of this region.

Thus, it quickly grasped the opportunity to supply arms to the Sri Lankan military when coalition dharma stopped Man Mohan Singh in his tracks upon pressure from his Tamil Nadu coalition partner, the DMK. It lent the island state enormous amount of loan for infrastructure development at high interest rates and SL capitulated and conceded strategic space allowing PLAN's JIN-class SSBNs to dock at the Colombo port. This is a major security concern for us. So, we have to expect that it will play mischief through BD, with or without MTCR etc. We have to be constantly on the guard and be one-up on PRC.

The same things have happened with Maldives, Seychelles, Mauritius etc which were firmly under the Indian sphere of influence. They never had even a Chinese embassy before but now have offered basing facilities to PLAN.

We have to assume that China is an irresponsible state and would behave recklessly and be prepared for any eventuality. There is no guarantee whatsoever that just because it is a member of a control regime, it will abide by its rules.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 08 Jun 2016 09:58

Kashi wrote:Prestige is all fine and dandy, but in the world of hard-nosed Realpolitik, what do we really gain from joining MTCR that China does not by staying out. No country in their right mind will be willing to supply sensitive and advanced missile/propulsion/guidance technology to China even if they were in MTCR. The American and European arms embargoes stand to this day.

Likewise, we cannot expect such technologies to become suddenly available to us (that were completely out of bounds before) now that we are a full fledged member of the MTCR high-table.

If China would gain by staying out, why did it apply for membership?

MTCR is a voluntary organization of all key missile producers. Why do countries want to be in MTCR? I see the following three reasons, in no particular order. The first is that if you are a serious missile producing nation, you would want to be recognized as such and rub shoulders with others in the same elite club. It may give many hidden advantages. Why do people want to be members of elite clubs? So, it is just not dandy & fine but beyond that too. The second is that transfer of technologies among member countries will be easier, especially Category-II dual-use items such as sub-assemblies, components etc. without attracting 'sanctions' as happened in the case of cryogenic engines from Glavkosmos which setback our space programme by a decade or more. The third is an implicit recognition that we are a nuclear power because except for the P-5 (less China because it is not part of MTCR) no other country with ballistic missile programmes is part of the MTCR (exceptions being Ukraine & South Korea but they are non-nuclear weapons states and are signatories to NPT. Ukraine is not involved in serious missile development and South Korea's missiles are restricted to North Korean geographical requirements alone).

If our RM is to be believed, we are unlikely to see an influx of imported missiles. GoI has also ruled out any cap on our missile programme even after we join MTCR.

So how does the situation change on the ground?

MTCR is not for missiles alone, but also includes all 'unmanned delivery systems'. That is why there is talk now of 'Predator' drones. Let us be clear. The US is the single gorilla in MTCR and it is solidly behind our entry into the control regime. On RM's reported observation, I am simply unable to understand. What 'ballistic missiles' are we planning to import? Why should we? Other types of missiles are not restricted by MTCR anyway.

GoI's ruling out of any 'cap' on missile production/testing is a good sign that indicates that Agni-VI delay is not to be miscontrued with abandoning that missile, under possible US pressure, as a pre-condition for joining MTCR.

NPT ayatollahs surreptitiously drew a redline behind our back, the 1964 deadline, and excluded us from being a P-6 legitimately commensurate with our size and influence. We are doing everything to force our entry into that through other means. We don't want to be left out of any policy-making & enforcing bodies in key areas.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby Kashi » 08 Jun 2016 12:34

^^ Thanks for the explanations SS. The next few months should be interesting to see if the orders for drones start coming through.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby Vipul » 08 Jun 2016 17:43

SSridharji i am well aware of the lizards mentality. What i am concerned about is how we have boxed ourselves in by limiting ourselves from providing some real game changers to Vietnam and other who oppose the chinese.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 08 Jun 2016 18:36

Vipul, BrahMos is not limited by MTCR. It is limited only by Russian concurrence. Vietnam cannot develop nuclear weapons, at least not in the near future. So, ballistic missiles are useless for it. BrahMos is a game changer in Indo-China Sea. Distance between Da Nang & Sanya is less than 300 Kms. Of course, BrahMos can also be fitted on the Vietnamese naval ships.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 08 Jun 2016 19:52

Why India needs NSG membership - ToI

Uranium is found and mined in only a handful of countries and India isn't one of them. Which is why PM Modi's is working hard on securing global support for India's membership to the 48-member Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG)—the body that controls the export of uranium required in nuclear reactors.

Image

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 08 Jun 2016 20:13

India will soon join missile treaty club - Suhasini Haidar, The Hindu
India came closer to the first of four nuclear regimes it is trying to gain entry into, with countries belonging to the 34-member Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) raising no objection to India’s membership later this year.

Diplomatic sources confirmed to The Hindu that after a proposal, circulated by the current Dutch chairperson of MTCR, had met with no objection by the deadline on Monday, India’s membership is a “done deal”, with only “formalities and protocol” remaining. The government didn't officially comment on the development, but at a press conference in Washington after the Modi-Obama meet, Foreign Secretary Jaishankar said that President Obama had welcomed "our imminent entry" into MTCR.

Meanwhile, the MTCR chair has now begun the next stage of formalities for India, which require each of the 34 member countries to send a “diplomatic note” stating formally that they accept India’s membership. “This could take weeks or even months, given the internal processes of each country,” an official well-versed with the procedure said. India will also soon receive membership documents which it must ratify and return, the official told The Hindu.

India’s membership had been blocked in 2015 by Italy, that seemed to link it to the standoff over the detention of the Italian marines. With the return of the second marine, Salvatore Girone, to Rome on May 29, the sources said, “Italy is no longer blocking the consensus.”

Procedural formalities

“Mission almost accomplished,” said former Chair of the MTCR Norwegian diplomat Roald Naess in a tweet on Monday, adding that “Only some procedural formalities remain before India becomes member of MTCR.” Speaking to The Hindu from Dublin, Mr. Naess, who was the Chair in 2015, said India’s membership to the MTCR had been “a priority from the start”, recounting how a block had been placed on the emerging consensus just three weeks before the plenary in Rotterdam last year.

“We look forward now to India joining the annual plenary session in October 2016 in Seoul this year as a member,” Mr. Naess said over the telephone.

Access to missile tech


Entry to the Missile regime, which regulates nuclear proliferation by restricting export of missiles carrying more than “500-kilogramme payload with a range of at least 300 kilometres”, as well as “unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) with mass destruction capabilities”, is expected to clear the way for India to export high-tech missiles and purchase hardware like the U.S. Predator drones.

India is also hopeful of building on the MTCR entry with membership to the Nuclear Suppliers Group, and the Australian and Wassenaar arrangements next.
However, experts say the MTCR membership is clearly different from the NSG, which will take up India’s application at a special session this week.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby Prem Kumar » 08 Jun 2016 23:42

SSridhar: other than Predators, I wouldn't be surprised if USA offers older-version Tomahawks to India. It will help kill the Nirbhay program. The Rajat Pandits & other assorted import-lobbies will have an orga$m.

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Re: Tracking India's Admission into International Groups

Postby SSridhar » 09 Jun 2016 09:58

After Switzerland, Mexico extends support to India for NSG membership - Suhasini Haidar, The Hindu
With hours to go for a special session of the Nuclear Suppliers Group meeting in Vienna on June 9-10, to discuss India’s application for membership, India scored another vote of support from Mexico.

“As a country we are going to be positively and constructively supporting India’s (membership at the NSG) in recognition of the commitment by PM Modi to the International agenda of disarmament and non proliferation of nuclear weapons.” Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto said after a meeting with Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

Mr. Modi was in Mexico on the last leg of his 5-nation tour, and his visits to both Mexico and Switzerland, which also announced its support, were aimed at garnering their backing for the NSG, especially given that both countries have held strong positions on no-proliferation in the past.

The China concern

India’s biggest concern from the 48-nation group comes from China, that argues that NSG members must be signatories to the Non-proliferation treaty (NPT). India, Pakistan, North Korea, Israel and South Sudan are amongst the countries that aren't signatories to the NPT, which India believes is discriminatory.

Given China’s public opposition, India has been working on whittling down other countries in the NSG in a bid to isolate China. In particular, Pakistan’s application for membership, which will also be taken up at the extraordinary 2-day session in Vienna starting Thursday, is expected to queer the pitch slightly.

A report by a prominent news agency on Thursday also indicated that a few other countries remain skeptical of India’s membership chances during the session that leads up to a plenary in Seoul on June 24, 25.

Quoting “three diplomats” aware of proceedings, the Bloomberg news service reports said that some NSG countries still want “tighter monitoring by international nuclear inspectors as well as iron-clad assurances that Indian activities in its civilian nuclear program won’t be used for military purposes.”

U.S. committment

The report also quoted a letter U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry sent out to NSG members appealing for support to India, “India has shown strong support for the objectives of the NSG and the global nuclear nonproliferation regime and is a ‘like-minded’ state deserving of NSG admission,” Kerry wrote, as a part of the U.S.’s commitment from the 2008 civilian nuclear deal to help India win access to international nuclear regimes. Mr. Kerry is on his way back from meetings in Beijing, although it was unclear if he had raised the NSG issue with the Chinese leadership.

Significantly Mr. Kerry’s letter indicated that India would not oppose Pakistan’s membership on the basis of its “regional” issues, but would take a merit-based approach to all other applications to the NSG.

India decided in 2012 to pursue full membership to the NSG, which gave it an exceptional “country-specific” waiver in 2008.

Over the past few years, the government has stepped up its campaign for the membership and hosted current NSG chair Rafael Grossi in Delhi last year. “This [membership of NSG] has been an objective that we have pursued for many years now. We believe we made a lot of progress and that has led us to formally apply to NSG some days ago. We are engaging all NSG members regarding this issue,” S. Jaishankar, Foreign Secretary, told the media at the MEA in Delhi last week before the PM left for his tour.

Mr. Modi arrivied in Mexico city from Washington for a visit that lasted a few hours, before he returns to New Delhi on Friday morning.


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