Indian Space Program Discussion

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bala
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Indian Space Program Discussion

Postby bala » 18 Apr 2008 06:00

K Mehta wrote:This issue of current science has a special section on Indian space programme. Can this be put into the first post of the topic? Would be really grateful if Individual pdf are linked with author names. I will post it in the next post, please make it the first post of the discussion.


Current science issue with special section on Indian space programme

The articles are in PDF format
Evolution of Indian launch vehicle technologies
S. C. Gupta, B. N. Suresh and K. Sivan

Spacecraft technology
V. R. Katti, K. Thyagarajan, K. N. Shankara and A. S. Kiran Kumar

Applications of space communication
A. Bhaskaranarayana, B. S. Bhatia, K. Bandyopadhyay and P. K. Jain

Remote sensing applications: An overview
Ranganath R. Navalgund, V. Jayaraman and P. S. Roy

Space astronomy and interplanetary exploration
P. C. Agrawal, B. V. Sreekantan and Narendra Bhandari

Developments and achievements in atmospheric sciences and space meteorology in India
A. Jayaraman, P. C. Joshi and R. Ramesh

Space mission planning and operations
V. Adimurthy, M. Y. S. Prasad and S. K. Shivakumar

Organizational systems, commercialization and cost–benefit analysis of Indian space programme
K. R. Sridhara Murthi, U. Sankar and H. N. Madhusudhan

Legal environment for space activities
K. R. Sridhara Murthi, V. Gopalakrishnan and Partha Sarathi Datta

- original post by bala follows -

PSLV-C9 first stage at the Vehicle Assembly Building in Sriharikota.

Image
Last edited by Gerard on 26 Mar 2009 16:37, edited 3 times in total.
Reason: Current Science Articles on Indian Space Programme Added

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Postby rakall » 23 Apr 2008 15:11

[quote="RaviBg"][url=http://www.hindu.com/2008/04/18/stories/2008041854971300.htm]“Core-aloneâ€

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Postby Kakarat » 24 Apr 2008 19:34


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Postby Arun_S » 24 Apr 2008 20:28

Kakarat wrote:Photo Gallery

I wonder what is the green cone on the right background:
Image

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Postby Kalantak » 24 Apr 2008 20:42

ISRO to launch 10 satellites at one go
Chennai, April 23

The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) will create a record of sorts, when it launches 10 satellites, including eight nano satellites from abroad, in a single mission on April 28 from the spaceport of Sriharikota.

ISRO sources said today that the satellites would be launched by the 12th flight of ISRO’s workhorse Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle PSLV-C9.


This was for the first time in the history of India’s space programme that 10 satellites would be launched in a mission, after it successfully launched four satellites when PSLV-C7 carried CARTOSAT-2, Space Capsule Recovery Experiment (SRE-1), Indonesian LAPAN-TUBSAT and Argentina’s PEHUENSAT-1 in January 2007.

The bunch of satellites to be launched from the second launch pad of the SHAR Range on April 28 included India’s Cartosat-2A, weighing 690 kg, and Indian Mini Satellite (IMS-1), weighing about 83 kg, which would have new technologies, including miniaturisation technology.

It would be sent for remote sensing purposes. With a resolution of one metre, Cartosat-2A would be used for mapping purposes.

The other eight satellites were nano satellites and they together weigh about 50 kg. The satellites were from Canada, the Netherlands, Denmark and Germany.

ISRO has fixed the launch time at 0923 hrs and the final countdown would be fixed soon.

The satellites will be launched by the core-alone 44-m-tall and 230-tonne PSLV, without the strap-on motors.

ISRO officials said it would be an international mission, as the sleek PSLV would be placing 10 satellites in the intended orbit in one mission. [b]“'It will be a tricky mission as the satellites have to be put in the orbit at the right time and in right angle one after anotherâ€

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Postby ramana » 24 Apr 2008 21:06

The 'green' cone is the shroud or nose/payload fairing to cover the paylaod through the dense atmosphere in early stage of flight.

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Postby disha » 24 Apr 2008 22:14

ramana wrote:The 'green' cone is the shroud or nose/payload fairing to cover the paylaod through the dense atmosphere in early stage of flight.


I wondered that, but that looks too small. Also in one of the photo gallery, the green cone does not match the payload fairing.

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Postby Praveen » 24 Apr 2008 22:44

I wonder about the other big satellite. It looks like a minutarized version of Cartosat - 2A
Image

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Postby Neela » 25 Apr 2008 13:46

disha wrote:
ramana wrote:The 'green' cone is the shroud or nose/payload fairing to cover the paylaod through the dense atmosphere in early stage of flight.


I wondered that, but that looks too small. Also in one of the photo gallery, the green cone does not match the payload fairing.


Looks small because of the focus of the picture prolly. The engineer on the other side should give a clue on the size of the nose cone.

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Postby Shankar » 25 Apr 2008 17:01

all that glitters is real gold

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Postby kanoji_angre » 26 Apr 2008 11:31

[quote="Kalantak"]ISRO to launch 10 satellites at one go
Chennai, April 23


ISRO officials said it would be an international mission, as the sleek PSLV would be placing 10 satellites in the intended orbit in one mission. [b]“'It will be a tricky mission as the satellites have to be put in the orbit at the right time and in right angle one after anotherâ€

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Postby Neela » 26 Apr 2008 14:00

Image
Awesome pic from one of the towers!

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Postby SaiK » 26 Apr 2008 14:17

is the green just for the needed distance in placements for the cartosat-2a, and ims1 on the left?

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Postby Shankar » 26 Apr 2008 16:00

Can the capability developed with this mission be used to develop MIRV missiles? I would appreciate it if some members clarifies on this issue.


not exactly MIRV injection is some what different technology particularly with respect to the weapon bus and its injection into orbit

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Postby Shankar » 26 Apr 2008 16:04

n
a MIRV, the main rocket motor (or booster) pushes a "bus" (see illustration) into a freely-falling suborbital ballistic flight path. After the boost phase the bus maneuvers using on-board small rocket motors and a computerised inertial guidance system. It takes up a ballistic trajectory that will deliver a reentry vehicle containing a warhead to a target, and then releases a warhead on that trajectory. It then maneuvers to a different trajectory, releasing another warhead, and repeats the process for all warheads.
Minuteman III MIRV launch sequence: # The missile launches out of its silo by firing its first stage boost motor (A). # About 60 seconds after launch, the 1st stage drops off and the second stage motor (B) ignites. The missile shroud is ejected. # About 120 seconds after launch, the third stage motor (C) ignites and separates from the 2nd stage. # About 180 seconds after launch, third stage thrust terminates and the Post-Boost Vehicle (D) separates from the rocket. # The Post-Boost Vehicle maneuvers itself and prepares for re-entry vehicle (RV) deployment. # The RVs, as well as decoys and chaff, are deployed during backaway (unlike the figure suggests this occurs at the start of the midcourse phase, so during ascent) # The RVs and chaff re-enter the atmosphere at high speeds and are armed in flight. # The nuclear warheads detonate, either as air bursts or ground bursts.

Details are closely-held military secrets. The bus's on-board propellant limits the distances between targets of individual warheads to perhaps a few hundred km[1]. Some warheads may use small hypersonic airfoils during the descent to gain additional cross-range distance. It is possible the buses can release decoys to confuse interception devices and radars, such as aluminized balloons or electronic noisemakers.
Testing of the Peacekeeper re-entry vehicles, all eight (ten capable) fired from only one missile. Each line represents the path of a warhead which, were it live, would detonate with the explosive power of twenty-five Hiroshima-style weapons.
Testing of the Peacekeeper re-entry vehicles, all eight (ten capable) fired from only one missile. Each line represents the path of a warhead which, were it live, would detonate with the explosive power of twenty-five Hiroshima-style weapons.

Accuracy is crucial, because doubling the accuracy decreases the needed warhead energy by a factor of four for radiation damage and by a factor of eight for blast damage. Navigation system accuracy and the available geophysical information limits the warhead target accuracy. Some writers believe that government-supported geophysical mapping initiatives and ocean satellite altitude systems such as Seasat may have a covert purpose to map mass concentrations and determine local gravity anomalies, in order to improve accuracies of ballistic missiles. Accuracy is expressed as circular error probable (CEP). This is simply the radius of the circle that the warhead has a 50 percent chance of falling into when aimed at the center. CEP is about 90–100 m for the Trident II and Peacekeeper missiles.

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Postby Shankar » 26 Apr 2008 16:15

The MIRV concept resulted from the convergence
of missile technology improvements, concerns about
Soviet work on ABM systems, and the desire for
improved accuracy. Early in the development of
Minuteman III, it became clear that a liquid-fueled
fourth stage was needed for higher delivery accuracy.
Further consideration led to the concept of using
additional fuel in the fourth stage to independently
target multiple RVs and penetration aids. Meanwhile,
the ability of missile systems to deploy individual
satellites through use of a post-boost control system
had been demonstrated in the U.S. space program in
October 1963. In December 1964, Secretary of Defense
Robert McNamara approved development of a MIRV
system for Minuteman III. By early 1965, the Navy's
Strategic Systems Project Office had developed
baseline design requirements for the C-3 missile th


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MIRV

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Postby Gerard » 26 Apr 2008 16:29

Are MIRVs and Satellite Integration and Dispensation Mutually Inclusive?: An Analysis of India’s Capabilities

http://www.cdi.org/PDFs/IndiaMIRV.pdf

April 10, 2008
By Kartik Bommakanti

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Postby Gerard » 26 Apr 2008 21:18

Battle lines in the final frontier
"In many ways, India is the country that scares me the most. The Indian Air Force, for a decade, has been trying to kick-start a space weapons program," she says. The argument is gaining traction in New Delhi, not least because of China's activities and because India does not want to be left behind on space weapons as it was on nuclear weapons.

India did not have nuclear weapons when the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty was signed in the late 1960s. It opted out so it could pursue them, but has been treated as something of a pariah since. Critically, its non-participation in the treaty has hampered India's ability to source uranium for civilian purposes.

"If there's to be a treaty [on space weapons], they want to be much further ahead," Hitchens says. "It's a potent political argument and it frightens me because if India moves forward and develops anti-satellite weapons, then the Pakistanis will want to do something and so will the Iranians.

"The dominoes will fall and, once you reach a critical mass, it will be very hard to stop, and very dangerous up there."

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Postby Gerard » 26 Apr 2008 23:10


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Postby Gerard » 26 Apr 2008 23:17


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Postby Gerard » 27 Apr 2008 17:48

Mission to space may not be a 'manned' one: ISRO
ISRO is not sure whether it would be a man or a woman who will have the privilege of being an astronaut for this ambitious programme.

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Postby rsingh » 27 Apr 2008 18:14

10 sats in one go.....................thats a world record. Bhuuuu these Chanykian Yindus :D :D

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Postby kanoji_angre » 27 Apr 2008 21:27

Shankar and Gerard - Thank you very much.

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Postby ranganathan » 27 Apr 2008 21:32

Russian dnepr launched 16 in one go last year.

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Postby rsingh » 27 Apr 2008 21:50

From NDTV

The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), set up 35 years ago, may be a baby among the world's space faring nations. But, it is competing with the other biggies to set world records.

And the mission, which is going to give ISRO an edge over other competitors, is the launch of India's latest Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV).

The launch vehicle is scheduled to take off on Monday morning from Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh and will launch 10 satellites - a feat that could create a world record.


It seems NDTV has part time panwalas as journalists :evil:

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Postby Sai.U » 27 Apr 2008 22:35

The article posted by Kalantak wrote:The bunch of satellites to be launched from the second launch pad of the SHAR Range on April 28 included India’s Cartosat-2A, weighing 690 kg, and Indian Mini Satellite (IMS-1), weighing about 83 kg, which would have new technologies, including miniaturisation technology.


I'm glad the "TWSAT - Third World Satellite" has been renamed to something more marketable.

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Postby Gerard » 28 Apr 2008 00:51

Is the "green cone" the right size for the mini-Sat?

Does it look compatible with any previous Indian launch vehicle?

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Postby UPrabhu » 28 Apr 2008 00:54

Gerard wrote:Is the "green cone" the right size for the mini-Sat?

Does it look compatible with any previous Indian launch vehicle?


The base of the mysterious green cone can be seen in this picture

http://www.isro.org/pslv-c9/eight.jpg

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Postby Gerard » 28 Apr 2008 01:39

Ah... so it held the Mini-SAT.

Was that meant to be launched on some other vehicle?

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Postby Gerard » 28 Apr 2008 01:39


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Postby Anujan » 28 Apr 2008 05:07

RaviBg wrote:The Indian satellites were built at the ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore. While Cartosat-2A will have a resolution of one metre, the other one is an experimental satellite. Certain new technologies are being tried in this satellite.


Cartosat 2 (the earlier Cartosat) Image of Perth airport (for map making purposes onlee) sourced from ISRO's site. My madrassa math says 2A as good as 2 onleee because it is second standard "A" section in primary school.
Image

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Postby hnair » 28 Apr 2008 05:24

IMS-1, I like that little fella. :twisted:

A far cry from the under 40 kg bundle of joy that was the Rohini series.

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Postby anupmisra » 28 Apr 2008 06:41

Gerard wrote:Battle lines in the final frontier
"...if India moves forward and develops anti-satellite weapons, then the Pakistanis will want to do something and so will the Iranians".


What can the pukis do except to go find a bigger begging bowl!

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Postby UPrabhu » 28 Apr 2008 09:01

Stupid DD is giving me stream with no sound... any alternate link for the launch telecast? NDTV or ibnlive covering?

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Postby Tilak » 28 Apr 2008 09:21

Liftoff !! + 45 secs 8)

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Postby Tilak » 28 Apr 2008 09:22


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Postby Sanjay M » 28 Apr 2008 09:24

anupmisra wrote:
Gerard wrote:Battle lines in the final frontier
"...if India moves forward and develops anti-satellite weapons, then the Pakistanis will want to do something and so will the Iranians".


What can the pukis do except to go find a bigger begging bowl!



Well, Reagan's proposal of the SDI program helped to scare the Soviets into spending in that direction. Reagan's defense buildup helped to drive the Soviet economy into the ground. Maybe an Indian military space program could help do the same to Pakistan.

On the other hand, Pak might simply choose to piggyback on China, as it has done in the past. It remains to be seen what China is unwilling to share with Pak.

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Postby Tilak » 28 Apr 2008 09:35

Cartosat-2A, IMS-1 deployed successfully !!!

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Postby rahulm » 28 Apr 2008 09:37

IMS 1 separated.

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Postby Santosh » 28 Apr 2008 09:38

Tilak, where are you watching it? Any online streaming video?


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