China Military Watch

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Patrick Cusack
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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Patrick Cusack » 13 Aug 2009 03:40

Thanks Agni-3SL I guess

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby saip » 13 Aug 2009 04:17

Breaking india into pieces -- looks like another case of lost in translation. That article was published according to the website in 2006 in chinese and went thru several iterations. Someone seems to have mistranslated the website name as the official chinese website and our ddm picked it up.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/news ... 886609.cms

How about starting an exercise as to how many pieces china can be broken up?
Hongkong, tibet, uighuristan, shangaistan (it is too rich to support rest of china) etc.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby VinodTK » 13 Aug 2009 07:11


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Re: China Military Watch

Postby VikB » 13 Aug 2009 10:41

NRao wrote:VikB,

It is one thing for a Chinese to include "Tamils" in a plot to break up India (I actually think the dimwit Chinese was thinking of Tamils from SL).


Sir, didnt get you there :?:

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Patrick Cusack » 13 Aug 2009 11:03

"People in glass houses should not throw stones at others" They will get what they give.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby ashi » 16 Aug 2009 00:44


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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Paul » 16 Aug 2009 06:51

http://geimint.blogspot.com/2009/04/dra ... corps.html

The site does not list the recent news about the basing of missiles being based out of tibet and NSA's alarm. I bet it could be a new base for 2nd arty div's to target India. Do not discount missiles being transferred from other bases to target India.

If china thinks Taiwan will come to the motherland peacefully then it's claim on Arunachal takes highest priority.


INTRODUCTION

China possesses one of the largest land-based missile forces in the world. While intercontinental parity with the US or the USSR was never one of the goals of the PLA during the Cold War, a rapidly modernizing 2nd Artillery Corps is becoming a far more viable international deterrent force in the current world. Capable of inundating the region surrounding China with hundreds, if not thousands, of conventional and nuclear armed missiles, the PLA's 2nd Artillery Corps deserves credit and recognition as one of the most devastating military branches found in any military worldwide.



2nd Artillery Corps missile units are organized into what the PLA refers to as "bases". There are six bases, each located in a different geographical area. Described in the terms used by the Russian military, these bases are analogous to Russia's Missile Armies. Each base has numerous subordinate missile brigades, with each brigade maintaining one or more garrisons, various underground facilities (UGFs), rail transfer points, and field launch positions.

Missile garrisons are not difficult to identify once their location can be narrowed to a certain geographical area. These facilities will typically contain administrative and support infrastructure for assigned personnel, and various garages for housing missile TELs and support equipment. Garrisons supporting field deployable systems such as the DF-21 or DF-31 will typically possess high-bay garages or other similar structures used for checkout of system components.

Rail transfer points are not typically able to be identified with any certainty unless missile equipment is visible at the railyard. However, the likely rail transfer points are those railyards in closest proximity via roadway or connecting railspur to the missile garrisons. Ergo, these facilities have been marked as the likely rail transfer points.

Identifying field launch sites for the 2nd AC's missile force can be a difficult proposition, and there are likely hundreds of such locations as yet unlocated. Careful analysis can be used to identify likely locations, however. The majority of these positions will contain a hardened concrete pad where the associated missile will be erected for launch. Certain missile systems will typically have very similar or even identical launch positions. Usually, it appears that most units within a given base will adopt a similar launch site design for a given missile type, although this is not uniform.


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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Paul » 16 Aug 2009 08:15

From the patriot alliance network...


Running out of Time in India a true insider: China's armed forces ready to hand India a
Strategic deployment in China to India can be divided into two aspects, one is the construction and military deployment in the battlefield, one of India's win with the support of neighboring countries. The main newspapers in India it is the latter, a very lively noisy, but in fact even greater role in the former, and this is our real strong threat.

The domestic battlefield for the construction of India mainly concentrated in the southwestern Tibet and the Xinjiang region, and two more things that the opening of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway and Airport Construction Shiquanhe. According to open source, open every day of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway trains 12 pairs of passenger and freight, except for three pairs of passenger cars can use outside the nine pairs of goods; from July 2006 to May 2007 the Qinghai-Tibet Railway a total of 2,080,000 tons of freight, 6600 tons daily. According to the figures above can be calculated, if the Qinghai-Tibet Railway to carry out intensive one-way transport, then a week in Tibet up to the delivery of 63,000 tons of materials, which are sufficient to protect our military mountain five combat brigades continued. In other words, after the opening of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway, India can not afford to no longer way to the threat of war of attrition retreat of our army. Qinghai-Tibet Railway focus on prevention and Shiquanhe Airport is ready for the attack. The airport is located in the town of Tibet Ngari Shiquanhe, 4500 meters long runway, you can take off and land Su -27, H--6, -8 and so I shipped the Air Force combat and support aircraft; the entire northern region of India Shiquanhe airport in a radius of 1000 range of 1000 meters, that is to say I am completely in the scope of Air Force air combat. Shiquanhe airport, the future of India should be worried about in the provocation of its military and civilian facilities in the North was against the Air Force I, and our major economic and military targets in India to combat outside the scope of Indian retaliation to the difficulty of completely different. In the preparation of weapons and equipment, I air force planes, army vehicles are required to have high altitude combat capability. If the Army used several armored vehicles are air-cooled diesel engine, and special features to enhance the mechanical supercharger to combat the thin air caused by high altitude engine power drop in armored vehicles in order to avoid lack of mobility in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Also the deployment of army in Tibet, a special multi-function for mountain combat engineering vehicles field. -27 With the Soviet Air Force taking off and landing ability of the plateau are a number of reports, army personnel and even took first prize for scientific and technological progress. 4000 meters high in fact is very common for fighters, as long as enough length of roll, taxiing to take off faster without difficulty; -27 China after the introduction of the Soviet Union can not be taken off the plateau because the original ban on aircraft avionics systems below 1500 meters in height to lay down their landing gear, which as long as the change in the electronic board that can be solved simply without any difficulty. Therefore, the army declared it a time when scientific and technological progress award from the mouth to declare war, rather than from the research I conducted. The deployment of our military forces is also a part of India's strategic deterrence. Sino-Indian border in two things, our military has deployed 13 of border defense regiments, and another 52 mountain infantry brigade in charge of possession of offensive South mountain jungle combat, 53 mountain infantry brigade in charge of the western part of the border at high altitude offensive combat, the 13th Group Army No. 149 Division (Eastern Section) and Article 21, paragraph 61 army divisions (the western part) at any time to provide support to Tibet. These forces, the Indians in the border conflict and the small and medium-sized accounting for less than a cheap war. In order to protect the mainland Tibet forces, army man developed oxygen masks, food and other special plateau special equipment, in order to avoid altitude sickness as a result of a major area of troops altitude sickness and the reaction to high altitudes, can be quickly carried out to ensure that support units to form a fighting capacity . This point do not attract much attention, but real improvement in our army's deterrent capability against India. These are specific for the deployment of India, in other areas also affected the progress of our army to India China's strategic posture, and enhance our country's in the game with India at the time of the means. Such as India and Pakistan competing for the development of ballistic missiles, and its long-range ballistic missile Agni -3 range of coverage in China just in Beijing, Shanghai region, which is a threat to our country should not interfere in his war with Pakistan. Our army in the ballistic missile intercept technology has made considerable progress, a number of successful intercept tests, the current level in the world after the United States (Israel belongs to the technical development of the United States). If our military deployment in Tibet flag -9 anti-aircraft missiles, India will be able to implement the interceptor missile launch, thereby reducing the threat of India to me.they are referring to the MRSAMS deal with Israel In short, our military operations to India are quite well prepared, the entire Tibetan region in both offensive and defensive military deployment, should war break out we will be able to immediately spread the flames of war in India. Backed up in support of our military border patrols are also in the attitude, the border conflict have the upper hand on many occasions, but there are no more than publicly reported. this is important, they think they are having the upper hand in border intrusions and patrol level confrontations

In addition to the strength of military preparation, our
country is also prominent in the diplomatic strengthened India's neighboring countries to support and assistance, such as Pakistan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Sri Lanka and other countries have been China's military assistance.

Let us look at Sri Lanka, this small country at the southern tip of Indian peninsula, from the geographical point of view of the Bay of Bengal and the North Indian Ocean has a strong ability to control, but also effectively restrain the Indian Navy. Especially in Myanmar and the military bases located in line with the time, can effectively cut off India's Andaman - Nicobar Islands and the local community ties and undermine India's control of the Bay of Bengal. China's military assistance to Sri Lanka's main arms export, the majority of the ground equipment, such as the 81-style automatic rifles, 63 armored vehicles, WZ551-style six armored vehicles; Sri Lanka Air Force is equipped with several K-8 primary trainer , FT-Intermediate -5 trainer, F-7 fighter jets, transport aircraft medium-sized -8, the Navy bought the 037-type submarine chasers. Although Sri Lanka imports a lot of my arms, but he deeply influenced by Indian, Sri Lankan domestic and India, the Tamil Tigers Tamil state within the territory of certain associated persons, India has used this as an excuse to send troops to participate in the civil war in Sri Lanka.
After all, next to India, Sri Lanka, beyond the reach of our support, so for his assistance is to improve relations between the two countries to avoid completely the side of India, in China to participate in concrete actions to contain very little. Bangladesh used to be part of Pakistan, the third Indian war in the Middle East has been occupied since independence from Pakistan. As the number of poor people, and surrounded by Indian territory, so I can not count on what he can make a contribution, we can only focus on low-end rifles and armored vehicles for sale, he did not completely win over the side of India only. Myanmar in Southeast Asia is our important military partner. Due to historical reasons, Myanmar has been dominated by the West exclude the international community, its domestic military government at all times by the United States, supported by the threat of pro-democracy, we must seek China's support in order to safeguard national stability of the regime, the relatively good relations between China and Burma. Our military cooperation with Myanmar, including arms sales, the establishment of military bases and other support agents, the level and scale than with the cooperation of Sri Lanka and Bangladesh. Face-to-face as a result of their own poverty and backwardness in Myanmar, so we have the weapons sales to Taiwan are a number of the army with guns and armored vehicles, in addition to strong attack -5, Shanghai and Hainan-class patrol boats and other more complex level of the navy and air force equipment. Although China has always claimed that our military policy is defensive in nature, and never pursue overseas military bases, but in fact the beginning of my long ago in the Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean to establish small and medium-sized military bases. These bases to satellite observations, radio reconnaissance, the primary purpose of Ships, usually built in China's interest in military bases around the country or, for example, China's satellite observation station of Kiribati is located in the United States around the western Pacific Missile Range. China's military bases in the Bay of Bengal including the Chief of Myanmar Islands 17 islands, above the building of China's satellite observation stations, radar stations, radio listening posts and naval bases, in addition to the library Protopic Cambodia also established a radar station on the island and Naval Base. These bases to monitor the Indian in the Bay of Bengal and the northeastern part of the local radio communication links, Indian surveillance aircraft over the Bay of Bengal, and for our military ships entered the Bay of Bengal (especially submarines) to provide logistical support. Myanmar's military government has no effective control over all land in its territory there are still more than the guerrillas; these guerrillas in part by China's support, in some cases the requirements should take some actions in China to meet China's Foreign Affairs and military action. Northern Chinese autonomy regime allies bold direct the People's Liberation Army is a small, green uniforms, small e, large banners, red banners with the army is the same. Pakistan is China's most important military cooperation partner countries, their importance is still on North Korea, while China's military cooperation with Pakistan and the size of which is the highest level, and far beyond the other partners.
In the arms trade, the Pakistan Army bought 59 of our country-style, 80-type battle tanks, both tanks in 88C has been developed based on the joint MBT-2000 main battle tanks; Pakistan Air Force F-purchased -6, -7 F fighter planes, -5 strong attack aircraft, jointly developed by the FC-1 "Xiaolong" fighter planes, is negotiating the purchase of fighter jets F--10; Pakistani Army purchased four F-22P missile frigate; As more hidden radar, communications equipment is not well known, but the less I believe it will not.
China's control in order to avoid the whole of India in South Asia in the past few decades continued to support Pakistan. Opening of CMB's Highway is open for Pakistan a lifeline in times of war, so that our country can be a steady flow of aid into Pakistan, and India need not worry about Pakistan maritime blockade. In the third India-Pakistan war, the development of the occupied Dongba, the Indian Army attack in the western part of Pakistan city of Lahore, Pakistan Army is about to break through the defense case, the Chinese Government issued an ultimatum to India require a cease-fire immediately, otherwise the Chinese government to retain the power to take all necessary measures. This statement is to force India to give up in order to force the government solve the problem of the idea of India and Pakistan, to save the country's largest ally, Pakistan; this statement at the same time Saudi Arabia has also caused a huge reaction, the old king of Saudi Arabia changed the views of our for more than a decade to Saudi Arabia after the export value of China's 3.6 billion U.S. dollars of Dongfeng -3 had paved the way for long-range ballistic missiles. Strategy not only in close cooperation between the two countries and their armed forces at the tactical level, there is a positive co-operation.

Near the western end of the Sino-Indian border dispute between India and Pakistan zones of Kashmir, the border line just across from the foot of the Himalayas, the Indian side of the territory of our country than to be higher than several kilometers of land. Army I-to-air long-range search radar, radar, etc. Coordinate and guide the deployment to the border line, condescending India is monitoring the hundreds of kilometers inside the border of the airspace, flew once found on the Indian informed the Pakistani military, to guide them took off to intercept. So although the Indian air defense radar network to Pakistan in every possible way to suppress the destruction, but the total time of Pakistan Air Force aircraft to intercept the Indian Army. Although our country out of diplomatic considerations rarely published, acknowledge the situation of our military cooperation with the outside, but this does not mean that our army does not fight back only beaten, but also does not mean that our government is only the case of grazing sheep. Country's strategic layout never relax. Is this guy narrating an incident near siachen that was not reported in mainstream media



They have more faith in Myanmar and Pakistan than in Sri Lanka for now
More importantly, they think they are well prepared.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Philip » 21 Aug 2009 17:42

http://www.jamestown.org/single/?no_cac ... 9bec3926d0

China,a "soft" naval power? The foll. paper has several intersting viewpoints about China's strtegy of "softening" the appearance of its massive naval build-up,depicting itself as "good" responsible naval power ready to take its place in international naval operations like combating piracy,etc.This is China's strategy...stealth.Before you realise what the danger from China,it will be too late.

Is China a "Soft" Naval Power?

Publication: China Brief Volume: 9 Issue: 17August 20, 2009 09:06 AM Age: 22 hrsCategory: China Brief, Military/Security, Foreign Policy, Featured, Home Page, China and the Asia-Pacific By: James Holmes , Toshi Yoshihara

China created a stir late last year when it announced that the People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) would commence policing the Gulf of Aden for Somali pirates. Two PLAN destroyers and a combat logistics ship arrived on station off the Horn of Africa this past January. By most accounts, Chinese commanders have coordinated their efforts smoothly with other antipiracy contingents, notably the U.S.-led Task Force 151, the European Union's Operation Atlanta, and individual detachments dispatched by the likes of India and Russia. Nevertheless, skeptics saw ulterior motives at work in the Chinese expedition. China is finding that controversy follows great-power naval actions.
Chinese spokesmen cataloged various reasons for the extended Indian Ocean deployment. Senior Colonel Ma Luping, director of the Navy Operations Department in the PLAN General Staff Headquarters Operations Department, told reporters that the mission's main goal was to protect Chinese (and Taiwanese) merchant ships and crews, as well as ships carrying supplies to Africa on behalf of the U.N. World Food Program. Xiao Xinnian, the PLAN deputy chief of staff, said the cruise would allow China to showcase its "positive attitude in fulfilling its international obligations," burnish its "image as a responsible power" (fu zeren de daguo xingxiang), and demonstrate the PLA's capacity to enhance "world stability and peace" while "handling multiple security threats and fulfilling diverse military tasks" (Xinhua News Agency, December 23, 2008).


Beijing means to prove that it is a reliable defender of the global maritime order by tangible deeds. For some time Chinese strategists have debated the part that "non-war military operations" (fei zhanzheng junshi xingdong) can play in coping with nontraditional security threats like piracy. Analysts contend that combating such challenges will not only fulfill China's responsibilities as a rising great power, but also help it accrue "soft power" over time, enhancing its attractiveness vis-à-vis fellow Asian nations [1].


Beijing was stung by its inability to contribute to tsunami relief in 2004-2005, for instance, and set out to correct the naval shortcomings exposed during the aid effort. Procuring transport aircraft, landing vessels, and a hospital ship has bolstered the PLAN's capacity for this high-profile non-war military operation (Washington Times, January 26; Jiefangjun Bao [Liberation Army Daily], June 4, 2008). China's soft-power strategy seems based on the premise that a nation can store up international goodwill by supplying "international public goods" like maritime security, which benefit all nations with a stake in the international order.


PLAN patrolling the Gulf of Aden, which will also buttress China's ability to project power along the African seaboard and prosecute high-seas combat operations, is mentioned sotto voce—if at all—by the Chinese leadership. Portraying China as an inherently benevolent sea power—a power that Asians need not fear as it constructs a great navy—is central to Chinese maritime diplomacy. Yet as with all narratives, the reality is subjective and more complex. Good diplomacy is seldom good history.


The "Inevitable Outcome" of Chinese Maritime History


Counter-piracy is the archetype of an international public good. Ships remain the most economical way to transport bulk goods. On the order of 90 percent of world trade (by volume) travels aboard ship. Freedom of the seas, suppression of piracy and terrorism, and regional peace, consequently, are increasingly essential to the "good order at sea" on which globalization relies [2]. The PLAN leadership recently embraced good order at sea as one of the Navy's core missions. Admiral Su Shiliang, the PLAN chief of staff, penned an article in the official Navy newspaper, Renmin Haijun (People's Navy), that ordered his service to "strengthen preparations for maritime non-war military operations in a targeted fashion" while further honing its capacity to fight and win conventional battles at sea (Renmin Haijun, June 6).


Influential Chinese officials and scholars are increasingly thinking in terms of soft power as a way to augment China's comprehensive national power. President Hu Jintao told the 17th Party Congress, "Culture has become a more and more important source of national cohesion and creativity and a factor of growing significance in the competition in overall national strength" [3]. Fudan University scholar Shen Dingli contends, "China's 'harmonious diplomacy' has been well received by countries in the region," even as "U.S. influence in Asia has been diminishing." Accordingly, President Barack Obama is attempting "to remold the image of the United States in the region with soft power and smart power," reinvigorate relations with Asian nations, and "tactfully counter the impact of rising big powers in the region" (Phoenix TV [Hong Kong], July 23).


As Shen observes, China too can tap major reserves of soft power. Chinese leaders have invoked the Southeast and South Asian voyages of the Ming Dynasty admiral, Zheng He, with increasing frequency to justify Beijing's claims that China's rise poses no threat. Tales of the Ming "treasure fleet," in effect the first foreign squadron ever forward-deployed to the Indian Ocean, appear to act as a proxy for China's conduct at sea today. The rationale goes like this: dynastic China refrained from conquest even when it possessed a big navy. Thus, declares Chinese vice minister for communication Xu Zuyuan, Zheng He's journeys to the Indian Ocean prove that "a peaceful emergence is the inevitable outcome of the development of Chinese history" (Xinhua News Agency, July 7, 2004) (authors' emphasis). China's peaceful rise, that is, is not only a matter of policy but a veritable law of history—or so Beijing would have target audiences believe.


Maritime security is interlaced with Chinese soft power. Speaking at Cambridge University in February 2009, Premier Wen Jiabao conjured up Zheng He's "peaceful" missions to convey Beijing's deeply embedded aversion to power politics and military dominion. "The idea that a strong country must be a hegemon does not sit well with China," proclaimed Wen. "Hegemonism is at odds with our cultural tradition, and it runs counter to the wishes of the Chinese people" [9]. This was a startling claim, given that the tributary system Zheng rejuvenated had everything to do with power politics. Wen's diplomacy was apt, his history shaky.


Similarly, while celebrating the 60th anniversary of the PLAN's founding, PLAN commander Admiral Wu Shengli drew a straight line from Zheng He to contemporary Chinese maritime strategy. That the "world's strongest fleet [the Ming navy] at the time … did not sign any unequal treaty, did not expand claims to any territory, and did not bring back even one slave," declared Wu before 29 naval delegations, proved that "the Chinese people are active practitioners of the harmonious ocean worldview"—to this day (Renmin Haijun, April 22).
Whether or not Asian audiences accept the Chinese version of history will determine the efficacy of China's naval soft power. Governments cannot deploy soft power the way they dispatch army brigades or impose economic sanctions. According to its proponents, however, soft power lubricates the diplomatic machinery, helping leading powers ease suspicions about their motives and gather support for initiatives they deem worthy of pursuit. If so, Chinese soft-power overtures could pay off handsomely.


Setting the Bar High


Despite his enthusiasm for soft power, Harvard scholar Joseph Nye warns that the kinder, gentler approach has pitfalls if taken to excess. Public goods can become an excuse for meddlesome policies, he says, while "sometimes things that look good in our eyes may look bad in the eyes of others" [4]. Or a nation's diplomacy can become too soft. For instance, India abounds in cultural appeal, and indeed, the late Sinologist Lucian Pye maintained that China "has come in a poor second to the Indian culture in attracting other peoples." Yet, "India is now regarded as a soft state," laments former Indian national security adviser Brajesh Mishra, because its physical might lags behind its power of attraction (India Today, July 23).


In portraying itself as a categorically benign nation, China has set itself an almost unreachable standard. If its behavior falls short of the Zheng He standard, it will be held to account. For instance, historians depict Zheng's voyages as more than a gesture of goodwill. The size, sophistication, and combat power of the Ming fleet, declared the late Edward Dreyer, were deliberately calculated to overawe audiences in the South China Sea and the Indian Ocean—to the extent that using force was unnecessary to impose Chinese emperors' political will [5].


If the Zheng He voyages were in fact an exercise in power projection, it would help explain why some Asian observers read dark meaning into the PLAN counter-piracy deployment rather than accepting it as the act of a benign China. The PLAN has acquitted itself well off Somalia, rendering useful service from a public-goods perspective. Yet at the same time, the Navy has shown it is no longer a coastal defense force, short on the capacity to replenish fuel, arms, and stores at sea or relieve deployed forces on station. It has been experimenting with a more ambitious fleet.


That fleet is now making its debut. This is not lost on wary Indian commentators, who depict counter-piracy as China's first step onto a slippery slope toward a permanent naval presence in the Indian Ocean. Many in New Delhi appear utterly convinced that Beijing intends to militarize its "string of pearls," or network of basing agreements with South Asian states. One well-known analyst sketches a Sino-Indian "rivalry arc" all the way from Japan, along the first island chain, and through the Indian Ocean. Not so coincidentally, the arc's western terminus lies off of Somalia [6].


For India, which fancies itself South Asia's foremost power, signs of Chinese naval skill and capability portend future trouble—trouble that might require India not only to fortify its defenses in the Indian Ocean but also to project power into the Pacific, delivering a riposte to Chinese deployments near the subcontinent. It is no accident that this year's annual Malabar exercise will take place not off India's Malabar coast but off the coasts of Japan and Okinawa, bringing together the Indian, U.S., and Japanese fleets. Nor is skepticism confined to the Indians. The efficacy of China's charm offensive in the South China Sea remains an open question.


Lingering Questions


Three issues associated with soft power deserve close scrutiny. Chinese counter-piracy provides a test case for this approach to diplomacy. First, to what extent does soft power yield hard results? Soft-power advocates appear to assume nations will set aside their interests if provided enough public goods or if a nation boasting sufficient power of attraction asks them to do so.


That is doubtful. Beijing may well find that fellow Asian leaders respond politely to their Zheng He narrative yet still abstain from Chinese-led ventures. Perhaps soft power eases qualms about a nation's actions—a useful thing in itself from China's standpoint—but cannot summon forth positive action. Standing by passively while big powers do something is easy; expending lives and treasure on another's behalf can be both hard and politically hazardous.


Second, is any nation's appeal universal? Council on Foreign Relations scholar Walter Russell Mead says no, pointing out that not all people feel the tug even of America's open, liberal society. Evidence emerging in the Indian Ocean and South China Sea supports Mead’s claim. China's "smiling diplomacy" seems destined to meet with some combination of enthusiasm, indifference, and—as the Indian case shows—disbelief. How Beijing conducts itself over time will determine whether it succeeds.


Third, how can a nation sustain its soft power once it begins to use hard power? It is relatively simple to sustain an attractive image when that image remains an abstraction, pure of messy realities. Beijing can tell its story however it wants. Yet as it starts deploying naval power in new theaters, China's beneficent image will be tested against empirical evidence. What appeals to one foreign audience may not appeal to another, and Chinese soft power may decay as Beijing acts in its own interests.


China's admittedly attractive civilization, then, provides no guarantee of diplomatic and military success. If Beijing—or any other government—sees soft power as a talisman to brandish in the face of stubborn challenges, its hopes are apt to be frustrated.


Notes

1. Jonathan Holslag, "Embracing Chinese Global Security Ambitions," Washington Quarterly 32, no. 3 (July 2009): p. 109; Joel Wuthnow, "The Concept of Soft Power in China's Strategic Discourse," Issues & Studies 44, no. 2 (June 2008): pp. 1-28.
2. Joseph S. Nye Jr., "The American National Interest and Global Public Goods," International Affairs 78, no. 2 (2002): p. 239.
3. Wen Jiabao, "See China in the Light of Her Development," Speech at Cambridge University, United Kingdom, February 2, 2009, Foreign Ministry Website, www.fmprc.gov.cn/eng/wjdt/zyjh/t536420.htm.
4. Nye Jr., "The American National Interest and Global Public Goods," p. 239.
5. Edward L. Dreyer, Zheng He: China and the Oceans in the Early Ming Dynasty, 1405-1433 (Old Tappan, N.J.: Pearson Longman, 2006), p. xii.
6. Gurpreet Khurana, "China-India Defense Rivalry," Indian Defense Review 23, no. 4 (July-September 2009), www.indiandefencereview.com/2009/04/chi ... valry.html.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Dmurphy » 22 Aug 2009 00:57

PLA's newly launched website : http://eng.mod.gov.cn/

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby svinayak » 24 Aug 2009 03:29

http://www.reuters.com/article/technolo ... JI20090820

China launches defense website in transparency bid

Thu Aug 20, 2009 8:18am EDT

BEIJING (Reuters) - China's normally secretive Defense Ministry on Thursday launched a website (www.mod.gov.cn), in a new bid to allay overseas criticism over its military transparency and the build-up of its armed forces.

The site, which also has an English edition (eng.mod.gov.cn/), has been long mooted, and comes at a time when China has been ramping up investment in its military to introduce new high-tech weapons.

"The aim of the Defense Ministry's website is to let the outside world know about China's defense policies ... and show off the good image of the military's powerful, cultured and peaceful forces," says a welcome message.

China's military is the world's largest, and reported budget spending has grown by double digits in recent years.

But the secrecy of the country's political system makes its Asian neighbors and Washington wary about its military intentions.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Ranjan » 24 Aug 2009 06:11

Acharya wrote:http://www.reuters.com/article/technologyNews/idUSTRE57J0JI20090820

China launches defense website in transparency bid

Thu Aug 20, 2009 8:18am EDT

BEIJING (Reuters) - China's normally secretive Defense Ministry on Thursday launched a website (http://www.mod.gov.cn), in a new bid to allay overseas criticism over its military transparency and the build-up of its armed forces.

The site, which also has an English edition (eng.mod.gov.cn/), has been long mooted, and comes at a time when China has been ramping up investment in its military to introduce new high-tech weapons.

"The aim of the Defense Ministry's website is to let the outside world know about China's defense policies ... and show off the good image of the military's powerful, cultured and peaceful forces," says a welcome message.

China's military is the world's largest, and reported budget spending has grown by double digits in recent years.

But the secrecy of the country's political system makes its Asian neighbors and Washington wary about its military intentions.

:D My Oh My !!!! This is interesting!!! But guys guess what ...I went through the website and the most interesting part is the fact that under the Military History part they have started it from 1967 ... which means they have not taken any "official stand " on the 1962 issue if that is what I understand since this was supposed to be part of the transparency stuff :twisted:

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby VikB » 24 Aug 2009 10:39

One question to gurus.

Assuming that all the recent efforts from Indian side are in place ie the new mountain division with 50,000 troops, T 72s replacing Vijyantas in North east, three airforce (revived) bases equipped with Sukhois - are these sufficient from purely defensive Indian view point to counter the Chinese attempt, if any of adventure in future?

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Philip » 26 Aug 2009 14:13

China now takes on a new enemy,the weather!

Beijing vows rain will not fall on its parade
Beijing has declared its weather-fighting forces will ensure no rain falls on October's National Day parade, which will mark the 60th year of Communist Party rule.

By Malcolm Moore in Shanghai
Published: 10:30AM BST 25 Aug 2009

Zhang Qiang, the deputy head of the city's "Weather Modification" office, told state media that anti-rain rockets would be ready for the celebration. President Hu Jintao will oversee an enormous military parade on Tiananmen Square.

"From weather records for the National Day in Beijing in the past three decades, we see a 30 per cent chance of rainfall, mostly drizzle," said Guo Hu, head of the Beijing meteorological bureau.

Before the Olympic Games last year, Beijing fired 1,104 anti-rain rockets from 21 sites around the capital to ward off an approaching rain belt. The rockets "seed" clouds with chemicals such as silver iodide in order to disperse them.

Whether or not the rockets work is still a matter of debate. Mr Zhang said the rockets could disperse some clouds but not prevent a large storm.

Ye Qian, the assistant president of the Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences said there was no effective way to change the weather. "Artificial rain reduction is like boiling water. If you want to stop the boiling, you must turn off the fire before it reaches the boiling point. But we just cannot find the point," he said.

The Communist Party is focusing all its efforts on the 60th anniversary celebrations, and hotel rooms across Beijing have already been booked out for the thousands of visiting officials from across the country.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... arade.html

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby yogi » 28 Aug 2009 02:16

Did the war with China just start?

India, China armies clash in Sikkim?

The Indian and Chinese armies have reportedly been locked in sporadic exchanges of fire in Sikkim, where the two countries share a high-altitude border, since Tuesday night.

A senior defence ministry official in Kolkata, where the Eastern Command is based, said the conflict had been on at Nathu-la pass — 54 km east of Sikkim’s capital Gangtok. In a statement issued on Thursday, the Ministry of Defence, however, denied any shooting on the border. The defence official, who refused to be identified, said, “The gunbattle intensified during the early hours of Wednesday. There are, however, no reports of any death or serious injuries.” He said although India had not deployed any additional forces in the area, all civilian traffic had been stopped. But the ministry statement said the roads had been closed in the area because of landslides. The official said, “The skirmish caused concern as at a special joint meeting on August 15 both sides reaffirmed their resolve to strengthen the existing friendship.”

Situated at 14,140 feet, Nathu-la reopened for trade in 2006 after the 1962 Sino-Indian War.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby pmund » 30 Aug 2009 23:03

Bloody Chinis now sabre-rattling in Kashmir.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/news ... 951836.cms

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby VikB » 31 Aug 2009 09:48

Chinkies are trying a Kargil.

The 2002-2008 period of having the Commie as*es in the Govt is going to cost us a lot.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Nihat » 31 Aug 2009 11:00

they will sense and perhaps correcty so that the 2009-12 period is their window of oppurtunity to strike limited damage , hurt indias self esteem and more importantly downplay the India Story in International circles which is more than a hindrance for China as at this juncture they are looking to catch up with US rather than compared with India.

beyond 2012 all current programs will start to kick in including the MRCA, ABM , A-3 SL - I , nuke subs , MRSAM , AWACS etc etc. If I were a Chinese leader looking at all the dismal news coming out about the status of our military , drought in several districts , slowdown in strategic alliance with US owing to Obama's Af-Pak centric policy , I would be inclined to start a limited war within a year or two , just to make my adversary realize that border disputes will not be taken easily and that you are still an awful long way behind us

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby VikB » 31 Aug 2009 12:21

I have a sickening/sinking feeling in me - Chinese are already here. They are occupying some of the heights. They probably have opened many fronts from Ladakh to Arunachal. Bhutan also probably.

I hope that this Kangrass walas get their act together and do some deft diplomatic manoeuvring accompanied with strong Armed forces response on the ground.

I fervently hope I am wrong.
Last edited by VikB on 31 Aug 2009 13:53, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby ovein » 31 Aug 2009 13:04

Say the chinese wanted to adopt the paki doctrine in kargil and capture some strategic heights in ladakh, Arunashal Pradesh etc. Then will India able to give the similar response?

Theoritically is it possible to capture heights. I am not sure if we back off from the forward posts in winters. But if now there are some positional skirmishes then it might also be so.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby AdityaM » 31 Aug 2009 13:12

ovein wrote:Say the chinese wanted to adopt the paki doctrine in kargil and capture some strategic heights in ladakh, Arunashal Pradesh etc. Then will India able to give the similar response?
Theoritically is it possible to capture heights. I am not sure if we back off from the forward posts in winters. But if now there are some positional skirmishes then it might also be so.

Is this the correct time for them to start holding on to peaks?
Whats the window of opportunity in the himalayas before the snow falls?

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Philip » 31 Aug 2009 13:54

With the "heightened" Chinese activity on our northern borders,the GOI should take exceptional measures for speedy defence decisionmaking,as was done during Kargil.Immediate orders of additional equipment already in service with the armed forces must be done,as evaluating new eqpt. will take time.The disgraceful delay in artillery for the Army cannot be condoned whatsoever and heads must roll for the inordinate delay.If the Chinese do a "bandicoot operation" a-la Gen.Mushar-rat,we will have no worthwhile artillery to fight them with,with such depleted numbers of Bofors and will have to use our depleting IAF to do the job.Secondly,the Chinese will not abandon their troops unlike the cowardly Pakis and will use the skirmishes to legitimise their land grab og the Indian Himalayan territory.I sugggest that if the Chinese try any Himalayan stunt,then the best way is to sink all their shipping transiting the IOR especially their oil tankers! The Chinese economy will grind to a rapid halt.

While India is at a weak point militarily on the ground in the Himalayas vis-a-vis the Chinese,we are in a stronger postion against them in the maritime arena.China lacks carriers and has not enough naval forces for power projection.In addition,all Chinese naval forces will have to transit the Malacca Straits (the shortest route into the IOR) and pass therugh waters dominated by our A&N island chain,which will make it easier for us to monitor and intercept them.How capable the huge Chinese naval sub fleet is at such operations far from their mainland and coastal bases is another Q altogether.Their surface forces will be very vulnerable to our naval and landbased aircraft right from the Gulf to the Malacca Straits.The very first act that the Indian armed forces should do if Chgina attacks or invades Indian territory is to sink or capture Chinese oil tankers plying from the Gulf.China will be forced to stop its adventurism and withdraw.We will have them by the throat.

By the time the PLAN has carriers in service and can project power deep into the IOR and Pacific,a few years from now,we would've had the time to remedy the shortfalls in eqpt. and the window of opportunity would've closed by then.The Pakis miscalculated at Kargil never expecting us to use the IAF to evict them.So to must we use the IN to destroy China's maritime trade throughout the IOR,and even attack them in the SA.China Sea.it is our most lethal weapon.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby rahul_h » 31 Aug 2009 15:05

Nihat wrote:they will sense and perhaps correcty so that the 2009-12 period is their window of oppurtunity to strike limited damage , hurt indias self esteem and more importantly downplay the India Story in International circles which is more than a hindrance for China as at this juncture they are looking to catch up with US rather than compared with India.

beyond 2012 all current programs will start to kick in including the MRCA, ABM , A-3 SL - I , nuke subs , MRSAM , AWACS etc etc. If I were a Chinese leader looking at all the dismal news coming out about the status of our military , drought in several districts , slowdown in strategic alliance with US owing to Obama's Af-Pak centric policy , I would be inclined to start a limited war within a year or two , just to make my adversary realize that border disputes will not be taken easily and that you are still an awful long way behind us



I totally agree with your statement even i think so and kongres leaders doesn't care about such a huge threat from China,Pakistan,Bangladesh,Nepal and even more from terror groups such as let and al qaida everyone is testing India its Defence preparedness its foreign policies & weakness and interest of our prime minister(economy).
and these leaders are sending weak messages to our neighbours by signing sharm el sheikh (whatever it is) & by not reacting to the chinese move on eastern borders and building ports in our neighbour.........

China watch us as weak and stupid neighbour + the greatest hurdle in becoming a recgnised super power well as sole power in Asia . China watches uus as Competitor in every business from taping overseas oil reserves and mining to stealth fighters and futuristic technology we are ready to be developing in the few years to come + attracting more US dollars from Multinatinals. They want a monoply in Asia not compettion they want to treat India in the same way as US did with our frnds soviets.

India needs to have strong Foreign and defence policy with quick decison making by our leaders. Franklt speaking if i would have been the commander in chief of peoples liberation army than by 2012 i may give orders to attack INdia with allies.
I think they must have started thinking this Evil act and INdia must be prepared for the worst to be happening in the coming future.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby tripathi » 31 Aug 2009 15:57

deleted
Last edited by tripathi on 31 Aug 2009 16:28, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Nihat » 31 Aug 2009 16:19

well , if I didn't know any better - this could very well be an article piece from Arundhati Roy's latest editorial.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Rahul M » 31 Aug 2009 16:25

tripathi, you have made quite a few inane posts in the last couple of days and what's more you haven't explained them even on being requested to do so by JaiS.
kindly explain those posts ASAP or be ready to receive warnings for each of those.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby tripathi » 31 Aug 2009 16:28

These posts being just OT as such.

if you realised that yourself, you had no job littering perfectly working threads
where people make an effort to genuinely contribute, discuss and understand.
consider this to be an unofficial warning.
Rahul.
Last edited by Rahul M on 01 Sep 2009 00:00, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: edit.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Ranvijay » 31 Aug 2009 16:28

Deleted
Last edited by Ranvijay on 31 Aug 2009 17:24, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby tripathi » 31 Aug 2009 17:14

irrelevant post.
Last edited by Rahul M on 01 Sep 2009 00:01, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: OT post.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Ranvijay » 31 Aug 2009 17:28

irrelevant.
Last edited by Rahul M on 01 Sep 2009 00:01, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: OT post.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby parshuram » 31 Aug 2009 17:37

IMHO these latest incursion line kept fresh by Chinese is simply the trailer of things to come. I am really surprised by th statement made by army chief . How does he defines "alarming". They came they hovered and we only came to know thru locals . No Air defense, No scrambles....

Chinese keep coming and embarrass right in our face. I mean we are really waiting them to launch first ... and then some divine intervention. India lays claim over whole of aksai chin . do we do he same ..

it is simple that Chinese are not bothered and they will never untill unless they taste thir own medicine ....

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby vavinash » 31 Aug 2009 18:08

With eunuch PM's this country has (like tripathi) what do you expect? Give the chinkis a slap on the face they will go away whining like the mongrels they are. Its when you don't pay back that these vermin's start acting like they are top dogs.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Liu » 31 Aug 2009 20:42

severy days ago, CCTV reported that china had worked out the global biggest vertical extruding machine .

such huge machine can press huge metal components and is very useful to manufacture huge military or industrial platform such as AC,spaceships,space shuttles,nuke power,wind-power,petrol and aircraft-manufacturing.

before the maching rolled out, the global biggest vertical extrudig machine is in USA and is used for Yankee's defence industry .

Tsiinghua University,Yanshan University,North Heavy Industry,Taiyuan Heavy Industry and some other institution work together and finished the development of the huge machine.
Image

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Kanson » 31 Aug 2009 21:15

^^^ where it is located ? any idea?

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Liu » 31 Aug 2009 21:28

Kanson wrote:^^^ where it is located ? any idea?

it is located in a mega city called Baotou, Inner Mongolia.

the video

<embed src="http://player.youku.com/player.php/sid/XMTA4NTUxMDI4/v.swf" quality="high" width="480" height="400" align="middle" allowScriptAccess="sameDomain" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"></embed>

http://player.youku.com/player.php/sid/ ... MDI4/v.swf

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Chinmayanand » 31 Aug 2009 23:13

Liu wrote:severy days ago, CCTV reported that china had worked out the global biggest vertical extruding machine


How reliable is this machine since it's coming from China... China has a big reliability and quality problem.. :rotfl:

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby Paul » 01 Sep 2009 00:47

Worst comes to worst, the PLA may have hundreds, if not thousands of pieces of heavy capital equipments that they may be able to bring to bear on us. Guderian’s observation of the Red Army when during the great encirclement comes to mind here – “We could outflank them, encircle them, but could not outfight them.” This is what may well happen in Ladakh.

Even in the 1960s, PRC had 13- 14 trained and armed divisions in Tibet. With Indira Gandhi as the PM, they were anticipating an Indian attack through western Tibet and did not want to take any chances. They had a 5 - 7 ton road right upto the border in Tawang in the runup to 1962. After the PRC occupied Khurnak fort in Ladakh in the early 1950s, the IA woke up to the threat and mounted BOPs in Ladakh and NEFA. General LP Sen and Gen Thorat implemented a three tier policy (J&K grid system and LOC policy comes to mind here) where the BOPs were to be the beacons and the actual defence would fall with the second and third tier.

We need to post excerpts from Brig Dalvi’s book to understand the terrain and deployments in Tibet. The PLA was composed off battle hardened soldiers who could march for days with a bag of rice and tea leaves and live off the land …they even ate the pigs that were used by the Lamas to clean the feces in the monasteries.

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby AdityaM » 01 Sep 2009 12:40

There was a media report that the Chinese helicopter threw old expired food cans in the area.
Now why would they throw this trash here?

Is it to show at a later date that this area was very much under chinese control for long, especially since there is now material evidence in the form of food cans that chinese products dated XYZ year will be found in that area

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby govardhanks » 01 Sep 2009 14:10

Those old food thorwn should be checked for presence of any biological weapons .

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Re: China Military Watch

Postby parshuram » 01 Sep 2009 15:02

AdityaM wrote:There was a media report that the Chinese helicopter threw old expired food cans in the area.
Now why would they throw this trash here?

Is it to show at a later date that this area was very much under Chinese control for long, especially since there is now material evidence in the form of food cans that Chinese products dated XYZ year will be found in that area


I have a friend of mine in Indian army who has been on border patrols along EDITED border. Acc to him this is usual practice . Incursions are far more then they are reported and we too return the favor .

Chini's will come and they will leave things like wrappers of noodles, meat , wine bottles and Indians will return the favor by leaving "bidi's" etc etc ..

But helicopters this is a bold statement on part of Chinese, might be due to some heavy patrols being spotted in Chinese Territory by PLA and they too return the favor, But this is my opinion. we too need to up the ante
Last edited by Rahul M on 02 Sep 2009 04:56, edited 2 times in total.
Reason: the word chink and/or chinki is not acceptable.


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