Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

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V_Raman
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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby V_Raman » 21 Sep 2020 23:11

will the president sign or hold off on the agri bills? looks like pushback from unexpected quarters like baba ramdev etc.?

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby Vips » 22 Sep 2020 04:10

Govt sets foodgrain output target at record 301 mn tonnes for 2020-21.

The government has set foodgrain production target at a record 301 million tonnes for the 2020-21 crop year, up nearly 1.5 per cent from the previous year's output, on the back of good monsoon rains and higher acreage in the kharif season.The target for the 2020-21 crop year (July-June) was set at the National Conference for Rabi Campaign 2020, which was held on Monday to review the progress of the kharif (summer-sown) season and plan for the rabi crops.

Addressing the event, Agriculture Minister Narendra Singh Tomar congratulated farmers and state governments for record foodgrain production of 296.65 million tonnes in the 2019-20 crop year. "The conference set a target of 301 million tonnes of food grains production for 2020-21." an official statement said.

Rice production target has been fixed at 119.6 million tonnes (MT) in 2020-21 as against 118.43 MT output in the last year. The target of wheat output has been set at 108 MT as compared to 107.59 MT. Coarse cereals output target is almost at at 47.80 MT as against 47.48 MT in the previous year. Pulses production target has been is xed at 25.60 MT, up from 23.15 MT output in 2019-20, while that of oilseeds was set at 37 MT as against the estimated output of 33.42 MT last year.

Tomar also complimented the farming community and states for higher sowing in the kharif season despite the COVID19 pandemic and lockdowns.
Kharif sowing during this year up to September 11 stood at 1,113 lakh hectares, which is 46 lakh hectares more than normal. Tomar said the government is taking revolutionary steps to strengthen agriculture infrastructure and economic condition of the farmers. Recently, the Agricultural Infrastructure Fund (AIF) scheme worth Rs 1 lakh crore for four years was launched for creating Agriculture Minister Narendra Singh Tomar congratulated farmers and state governments for record foodgrain production of 296.65 million tonnes in the 2019-20 crop year.

Recently, the Agricultural Infrastructure Fund (AIF) scheme worth Rs 1 lakh crore for four years was launched for creating facilities for cold storage, warehouse, packaging, ripening and waxing plants by agri-entrepreneurs, farmers' association and local government agencies.

The minister further said that two bills relating to freedom of marketing for farmers have been passed in Parliament. The Farmers' Produce Trade and Commerce (Promotion & Facilitation) Bill 2020 and the Farmers (Empowerment and Protection) Agreement on Price Assurance and Farm Services Bill 2020 will give a boost to farmers engaged in agriculture and allied activities, he added.

Farmers will get freedom to sell their produce at different places. The government will continue the practice of procurement at minimum support price (MSP) through the existing network, he added.

Tomar further said the government has set a target of covering 100 lakh hectares in five years under micro-irrigation. A dedicated Micro Irrigation Fund (MIF) of Rs 5,000 crore has been created with the National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD) for expanding coverage of micro-irrigation. In the year 2019-20, about 11 lakh farmers have benefitted by the adoption of drip and sprinkler irrigation system. During the last five years, an area of 47.92 lakh hectare has been covered under micro-irrigation in the country, which includes 11.72 lakh hectares for the year 2019-20 which is a significant achievement, he said.

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby darshan » 10 Oct 2020 03:32

If Modi doesn't remind to change diaper, then it won't get changed. Poor chap has to tend to everything. Obviously capabilities and expertise were there but no one wanted to utilize it till wanting to look good in front of the boss. Bunch of non self starters.

Real thanks goes to xitler.

GSFC’s indigenous variety of ‘Calcium Nitrate’ & ‘Boronated Calcium Nitrate’ launched
https://www.deshgujarat.com/2020/10/09/ ... -launched/
New Delhi: Union Minister of State for Chemicals & Fertilizers and MoS ( I/c) for Shipping Shri Mansukh Mandaviya launched indigenous variety of Calcium Nitrate’ & ‘Boronated Calcium Nitrate’ manufactured by Gujrat State Fertilizers and Chemicals -GSFC India Ltd through video Conference .

‘Calcium Nitrate’ & ‘Boronated Calcium Nitrate is being manufactured for the first time in India. Till now, it was imported from other countries.
...
GSFC launched these two products in the retail market for the first time from Solan in Himachal Pradesh and Bhavnagar in Gujarat. Currently total production capacity of GSFC for these two products is 10,000 Metric Tons (MT) per year. Within three months, production is expected to increase to 15000 MT per year. The Minister was informed that GSFC plans to increase it to 30,000 MT in 9 to 12 months.
....
Last year, around 1.25 lakh metric tons (1,23,000 tons) of Calcium Nitrate was imported in the country. Of this, 76% was imported from China and the rest from other countries like Norway and Israel. The total import value of this 1.25 Lakh Tons is Rs. 225 crore. The GSFC itself imported and sold 4600 MT last year.

Calcium nitrate is used as a water-soluble fertilizer in agriculture. In addition, this product is also used in wastewater treatment and to increase the strength of cement concrete.

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby V_Raman » 10 Oct 2020 03:41

Unbelievable that an economy of our size does not manufacture these things!! And we cry about employment generation!!

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby Kakkaji » 12 Oct 2020 06:51

Prof Ashok Gulati's take on the Farm Bills:

From Plate to Plough: MSP in the age of surplus

Having analysed the MSP business over decades, let me say clearly that the regime was the creation of the era of scarcity in the mid-1960s. Indian agriculture has, since then, turned the corner from scarcity to surplus. The policy instruments of dealing with shortages are different from those dealing with surpluses. In a surplus economy, unless we allow a greater role for markets and make agriculture demand-driven, the MSP route can spell financial disaster. This transition is about changing the pricing mix — how much of it should be state-supported and how much market-driven. The new laws are trying to increase the relative role of markets without dismantling the MSP system. Let me also say that, currently, no system is perfect, be it the one based on MSP or that led by the markets. But the MSP system is much more costly and inefficient, while the market-led system will be more sustainable provided we can “get the markets right”.

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby nandakumar » 12 Oct 2020 11:37

Kakkaji wrote:Prof Ashok Gulati's take on the Farm Bills:

From Plate to Plough: MSP in the age of surplus

Having analysed the MSP business over decades, let me say clearly that the regime was the creation of the era of scarcity in the mid-1960s. Indian agriculture has, since then, turned the corner from scarcity to surplus. The policy instruments of dealing with shortages are different from those dealing with surpluses. In a surplus economy, unless we allow a greater role for markets and make agriculture demand-driven, the MSP route can spell financial disaster. This transition is about changing the pricing mix — how much of it should be state-supported and how much market-driven. The new laws are trying to increase the relative role of markets without dismantling the MSP system. Let me also say that, currently, no system is perfect, be it the one based on MSP or that led by the markets. But the MSP system is much more costly and inefficient, while the market-led system will be more sustainable provided we can “get the markets right”.

It is more than 10 days since paddy would have been harvested in Punjab, Haryana, Western UP etc. Is there any information on private procurement outside of the mandis? I haven't come across any.

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby Yagnasri » 13 Oct 2020 05:10


darshan
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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby darshan » 14 Oct 2020 04:20

It may be worth for companies in India to venture into this field as water and food issues are only going to get worse.
It could also help generate IP and know how to setup similar systems in other countries. I'm sure that there are many graduates coming out of universities that could be put to work.
Inside Singapore’s huge bet on vertical farming
https://www.technologyreview.com/2020/1 ... -security/
From the outside, VertiVegies looked like a handful of grubby shipping containers put side by side and drilled together. A couple of meters in height, they were propped up on a patch of concrete in one of Singapore’s nondescript suburbs. But once he was inside, Ankesh Shahra saw potential. Huge potential.

His grandfather had founded the Ruchi Group, a corporate powerhouse in India with offshoots in steel, real estate, and agriculture; his father had started Ruchi Soya, a $3 billion oilseed processor that had been Shahra’s training ground.
...
With VertiVegies, Sekaran was farming vertically: growing vegetables indoors, with towers of crops stacked one on the other instead of in wide, sprawling fields, and in hydroponic solution instead of soil. He was growing food without exposure to weather or seasons, using techniques pioneered by others, in a country that was badly in need of a new way to meet its food needs.
...
Without production of its own, Singapore saw its food supplies take a big hit. Imported raw food rose 55% in price in 12 months, and commodities such as rice, grain, and maize as much as 31%. The state was forced to absorb hikes in the costs of basics like cooking oil, bread, and milk—something made even tougher by the fact that China, from which Singapore imports around $600 million worth of food each year, had experienced its worst winter weather in 50 years, destroying crops and further pushing up regional food prices from late 2007 to mid-2008.
...

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby ashbhee » 21 Oct 2020 01:12

I did not know every bit of Heeng / Asafetida used in India was imported. It looks like they have started a project to cultivate now.
I hope they succeed. This will cash crop for the barren regions of Ladakh, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand and Arunachal Pradesh.

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/ind ... 751722.cms

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby NRao » 25 Oct 2020 19:56


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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby rrao » 25 Oct 2020 20:47

For the last 15 days rains have brought havoc both in TS and AP destroying rice ,cotton and other crops. thousands of farmers have suffered losses. this time the yield was good in TS. all got washed away !!! in hyd many suburbs got inundated in rain water for days and water was flowing through colonies reminding of rivers in fury. all happened due to many illegally legal colonies have come up on nizam's era ponds and naalaas!! news forecast is now a days is so bad that none of the local news channels refer to the Insat weather images and project an analytical weather forecast!!! many roads and bridges got washed away and its love all !! ultimately the poor farmer suffers!!! onions have gone to Rs90/kg and tomatoes also varying from Rs 40-60 /kg

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby SBajwa » 27 Oct 2020 23:52

Paddy is being sold at 1800 rs per quintal in Punjab and Haryana while 1000 rs on UP. Lots of farmers from UP are transporting to Punjab Haryana

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby Yagnasri » 28 Oct 2020 03:19

As they should be doing. I am all for farmers getting a better price than dalals looting farmers. While it may be a loss for the middle class in the short run but one can be sure that UP dalals and GoUP will wake up and increase the price.

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby SBajwa » 28 Oct 2020 03:36

Grain Drain: Farmers in Uttar Pradesh sell paddy below government rate to repay loans
While the Centre continues to assure farmers that it will stand by the minimum support price of Rs 1,888 per quintal, farmers are being compelled to sell their paddy at Rs 1,200 a quintal or less.


Arvind Shukla
| Updated: Last updated on October 13th, 2020,

Jarnail Singh from Kabirganj in Pilibhit district in Uttar Pradesh has just returned from Paliya Mandi a dejected man. The 50-year-old was unable to sell his 250 quintals of ‘good quality’ paddy. “I had taken a trolley of paddy to the mandi, but no trader bought it even though I was willing to sell it at a much lower price than the government’s minimum support price (MSP) of one thousand eight hundred and eighty eight rupees per quintal,” Singh told Gaon Connection. The farmer was offering to sell his paddy at Rs 1,100 a quintal, Rs 700 less than the government fixed rate; even then, there were no takers, he said despondently.

Despite repeated assurances by the central government that it would safeguard the minimum support price (MSP) for the farmers, and that the latter would not be adversely impacted by the new agri laws that caused such an uproar in the agrarian community, the story on the ground is unfolding rather differently.

Farmers like Singh are finding it almost impossible to sell their produce at the MSP. They are desperate to sell because they have no godown to store their unsold paddy in and they need money to sow the next crop of potatoes or wheat. “The bank loan has to be repaid, the workers need their payment…” the distraught farmer trailed off. They find themselves holding unsold paddy, hard pressed for money and vulnerable to exploitation by middlemen to whom they are forced to sell their paddy at a throwaway price.

While the agri acts had also assured the farmers that they could directly sell their produce at the mandis, that is also not happening. “The government procurement centres invariably find fault with the quality of the paddy if brought to them directly by the farmers. But, when we sell the same farha (bad grain) to the traders at throwaway prices, it miraculously becomes all right,” Jarnail Singh complained to Gaon Connection.

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby SBajwa » 28 Oct 2020 03:45

Modi and yogi did good but now we have problem of way too much paddy and traders exploiting by not paying MSP

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby Rishirishi » 28 Oct 2020 05:17

SBajwa wrote:Modi and yogi did good but now we have problem of way too much paddy and traders exploiting by not paying MSP


You can't blame the traders. They actually provide a way out for the farmers, by stocking oversupply. Yes it is very unfortunate that the farmers do not get more for their produce and India needs to find a way to fix the problem. Farmers can't live with such a problem. Maybe farming should be taken over by larger corp. style farms, with economies of scale. But for that to happen, small farmers have to sell the land to big ones (or leases it).

The average farm in India is only 1 hectar v USA where the average farm is 175 hectar. Small farmers strugle to implement modern farming techniques.

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby SBajwa » 28 Oct 2020 06:02

Then why the government of India sets the Minimum support price? If the traders are already using capitalist means to buy/sell grain?

Problem is the government of India got its farmers very much dependent on Wheat, Sugarcane and Paddy and now with plenty problem., market cannot support it.

The only solution is to have Amul type cooperatives where farmers sell them their crops and these coop., converts them into finished products (biscuits, breads, flour, etc, etc)

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby nandakumar » 28 Oct 2020 11:39

SBajwa wrote:Then why the government of India sets the Minimum support price? If the traders are already using capitalist means to buy/sell grain?

Problem is the government of India got its farmers very much dependent on Wheat, Sugarcane and Paddy and now with plenty problem., market cannot support it.

The only solution is to have Amul type cooperatives where farmers sell them their crops and these coop., converts them into finished products (biscuits, breads, flour, etc, etc)


The single biggest impediment to replicating Amul model (milk) to other agricultural crops is the nature of the product itself and its manner of consumption. In India, predominant mode of consumption of milk is in liquid form (packed in sachets or bottles. Now excess milk can be converted to powder, milk fat and non-fat solids (SNF) and reconverted to liquid milk. Grains or fruits and vegetables don't offer this flexibility. Oil seeds is perhaps the only other category which lends itself to orgainsing farmers into cooperatives. Also edible oils can be stored for a reasonable length of time to smoothen out volatily in oilseed output. Amul has successfully demonstrated it with the hugely popular 'Dhara' brand of sunflower and groundnut oil. But then Amul had already become huge brand and 'Dhara' could ride piggyback on it. Other State milk cooperatives have not been able replicate it because unlike GCMMF other State Government managed cooperatives don't make money (actually incur huge losses) and hence haven't ventured into this.

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby V_Raman » 28 Oct 2020 13:31

why did the govt. bring in the law change so close to harvest? would it have been better if the effective date was set to be like Dec?

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby Yagnasri » 28 Oct 2020 14:00

I read a report that farmers are sending their crop to Punjab as the price is 1800 Rs there whereas in UP it is 1100 Rs.

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby Uttam » 29 Oct 2020 01:33

Sugar consumption stagnant in India; need to bust myths about its use: Govt

Joint secretary in the food ministry Subodh Kumar Singh said there is “a campaign against sugar and sugar products in India that they are harmful and are the main cause of obesity and diabetes”. “We are a sugar producing country and have surplus sugar. But our per capita consumption is very less. This is because rich people who can afford do not want to eat sugar… If sugar is harmful, it should be harmful in all developed and other countries where sugar consumption is more than the world’s average,” he said.


The above statement is really misinformed and I desperately hope that this official is taken to task for making such a statement. There is enough highly substantiated evidence against health affects of added sugar. The west is suffering big time because of high sugar consumption. Indian with a high rates of diabetes will see even worse health if sugar consumptions rate go up. Here are some papers about detrimental affects of sugar:

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmoa1203388
https://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMp0902392
https://doi.org/10.2337/dc13-2085

I am not on twitter. I hope somebody here can share it with policy honchos.

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby V_Raman » 29 Oct 2020 02:57

Indian govt should plan for sugar consumption going down worldwide - reduce our output gradually - the awareness is going up pretty fast and we might not be able to export soon - in a decade...

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby Uttam » 29 Oct 2020 03:12

Sugarcane is also water intensive crop. All the more reason to not lean on sugar.

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby nachiket » 29 Oct 2020 03:27

Uttam wrote:Sugarcane is also water intensive crop. All the more reason to not lean on sugar.

This is easier said than done unfortunately. The sugar industry in places like MH and UP is heavily politicized. Too many politicians own profitable sugar mills which incentivize local farmers to plant sugarcane rather than any other crop because of guaranteed sales to the local sugar mills. This causes huge problems in water stressed regions like Marathwada where irrigation is practically non-existent and a shortfall in rain causes chaos with farmers attempting to pump as much of the scarce groundwater as they can to save their crop. But they can't or won't shift to any other crop and the local politicians have a vested interest in making sure they don't. The local economy also depends on the sugar industry. No one has been able to untie this knot yet.

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby kvraghav » 29 Oct 2020 12:01

India is having lot of diabetes cases. The consumption of Rice and Sugar will only go down.

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby pandyan » 02 Nov 2020 07:36

USA will be very happy to supply corn syrup at discounted rates for important partner. Don't get high hopes about reducing sugar consumption.

Look at this title
World’s Largest Consumer of Sugar Wants Its People to Eat More
Pratik Parija

More like correct title should be "Sugar Mills in india wants its people to eat more sugar"

In a world where sugar has attracted increasing scrutiny for its impact on health and obesity, there are moves afoot in the biggest consuming country to persuade people to eat more of the sweetener.

Mills in India are eyeing increased consumption as a way to cut the nation’s chronic oversupply, which stems partly from the favorable incentives provided to growers in politically powerful rural areas. High production costs mean the country finds it hard to sell sugar on the global market without subsidies.


Consumption in India has stagnated at 19 kilograms per capita per year compared with a global average of 23 kilograms

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby disha » 11 Nov 2020 05:11

Here is how UP government is slowly stumbling into a beautiful solution for cow slaughter, stubble burning and organic farming.

1. UP government has 135 gaushalas. It can have more, say one for each district where cows (and buffaloes) can be retired.

2. Stubble from all the crops is sent over to the gaushalas as feed.

3. Cows eat the feed and give off valuable manure which is recycled into the fields.

4. Several farms into organic and semi-organic practices will benefit. Less use of chemical fertilizers and less outgo of subsidy.

This is what Punjab, Haryana, Bihar and every other state can do.

https://swarajyamag.com/news-brief/yogi-adityanath-government-shows-the-way-to-tackle-stubble-burning-launches-barter-scheme-to-benefit-paddy-farmers

^Read the rest above.

And there is more:

5. Infirm cows (and buffaloes) on dying can give their skin off for ahimsa leather. <- This becomes an excellent value add. The carcass can be used for wild animal parks.

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby Haresh » 11 Nov 2020 21:30

disha wrote:Here is how UP government is slowly stumbling into a beautiful solution for cow slaughter, stubble burning and organic farming.

1. UP government has 135 gaushalas. It can have more, say one for each district where cows (and buffaloes) can be retired.

2. Stubble from all the crops is sent over to the gaushalas as feed.

3. Cows eat the feed and give off valuable manure which is recycled into the fields.

4. Several farms into organic and semi-organic practices will benefit. Less use of chemical fertilizers and less outgo of subsidy.

This is what Punjab, Haryana, Bihar and every other state can do.

https://swarajyamag.com/news-brief/yogi-adityanath-government-shows-the-way-to-tackle-stubble-burning-launches-barter-scheme-to-benefit-paddy-farmers

^Read the rest above.

And there is more:

5. Infirm cows (and buffaloes) on dying can give their skin off for ahimsa leather. <- This becomes an excellent value add. The carcass can be used for wild animal parks.


"The Uttar Pradesh government had also looked at the option of buying machinery to tackle stubble burning. It has asked farmer cooperatives to buy the machinery and offered them various incentives."

What sort of machinery is available ? is it manufactured in India, can the state govts license it for manufacturing, this would help provide jobs.

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby Rahul M » 11 Nov 2020 23:40


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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby disha » 13 Nov 2020 00:40

Stubble burning is more a failure of the babooze and the polity.

India produces millions of tons of stubble from rice and wheat. All of that stubble can go to gau-shalas that can take the cows and buffaloes into retirement and get back valuable manure. This manure can go back into the fields for free.

Problem is that the babooze and the polity have not been able to price the manure. It is actually green gold. Once it is prized instead of treated as waste, the entire equation changes.

Here is how other countries do it: https://swarajyamag.com/ideas/power-from-biomass-bio-energy-compost-how-other-countries-manage-the-issue-of-stubble-burning

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Re: Indian Agriculture and Agro-based Industry

Postby tandav » 14 Nov 2020 19:14

rrao wrote:For the last 15 days rains have brought havoc both in TS and AP destroying rice ,cotton and other crops. thousands of farmers have suffered losses. this time the yield was good in TS. all got washed away !!! in hyd many suburbs got inundated in rain water for days and water was flowing through colonies reminding of rivers in fury. all happened due to many illegally legal colonies have come up on nizam's era ponds and naalaas!! news forecast is now a days is so bad that none of the local news channels refer to the Insat weather images and project an analytical weather forecast!!! many roads and bridges got washed away and its love all !! ultimately the poor farmer suffers!!! onions have gone to Rs90/kg and tomatoes also varying from Rs 40-60 /kg



In USA most developments have a mandatory detention pond on the premises that are designed to hold storm water and release it over 48 hrs. In India these rain water retention ponds have become real estate causing all these problems. Poor city planning illegal colonies and even worse implementation is to blame


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