International Naval News & Discussion

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby wig » 14 Jun 2020 20:16

https://www.forbes.com/sites/hisutton/2 ... 406a402ffd
Why The Catastrophic Fire On A Nuclear Submarine Is Nothing To Gloat About
extracts
As details emerge of the fire aboard the French submarine Perle on Friday 13, it seems unlikely to me that the boat will be returned to service. Whichever way you look at it, the fire is a terrible blow for the French Navy (Marine Nationale). Their submarine fleet is already stretched. But France’s misfortune brings home a basic reality that it could happen to any navy.


fires on submarines can deform the hull rendering it unusable

In general, fires aboard submarines can be harder to put out. This is because of the cramped spaces aboard, and also because there are very few openings into the submarine. And they can be more devastating than a similar fire aboard a surface vessel because the heat can deform the steel hull. On a surface vessel this can be repaired more easily, but with a submarine it can make the hull weaker so that it is no longer safe to dive. This is why I am not optimistic that she will be repairable.


On Friday June 12, 2020 at 10:35 a.m., a fire started at the front of Perle, while in drydock for maintenance and repair at the military port of Toulon. Firefighters battled the fire for 14 hours

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby Philip » 15 Jun 2020 04:55

Fires aboard subs have been experienced by almost all navies including the IN. The hulls may not be so badly affected,but the equipment inside,cabling,ducting,etc. will have gone up in smoke.Having started in the bows,you can be sure that the sonar is kaput,the torpedo room in shambles,and a 14 hr. fire would've even had time to spread affecting the main control room/ command centre destroying it in full. From reports so far recd., the N-plant appears to have been unaffected. Let's see if the cost of repairs aren't unaffordable ,otherwise it would be the full time.

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby brar_w » 18 Jun 2020 17:57

Add another German program to the list of systems that will need replacement much ahead of the replacement actually being available. They need something by 2025, but the Franco-German A-320 based MPA is still in "study" phase and won't deliver until 2030 assuming no delays.

Germany Halts P-3 Orion Mission Systems Upgrade as MPA Alternatives Examined


Germany’s Defense Ministry has put a halt to an ongoing midlife upgrade (MLU) of its fleet of Lockheed Martin P‑3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) as it shifts to examining potential replacements. The news emerged via Reuters on June 16 after a confidential ministry document detailing the shift in Defense Ministry approach was leaked.

The document – drafted for review by the parliamentary defense committee – allegedly shows that the Defense Ministry opted to drop the Orion MLU process following an economic feasibility study.

The legacy fleet of eight P-3C Orions were purchased secondhand from the Netherlands in 2005, with the first unit entering German service in April 2006 following upgrades to the fleet’s 20-year-old systems conducted at Manching in Bavaria prior to delivery.

After a government report released in April 2011 noted that the aircraft suffered from operational limitations, Germany sought rectification through an upgrade program via the U.S. Department of Defense’s government-to-government Foreign Military Sales (FMS) mechanism. A request for sale to Germany of elements allowing for the procurement, integration, and installation of hardware and software required for upgrading the Orions’ mission computer and acoustic systems was approved by the U.S. State Department, with notification then given to Congress by the Pentagon’s Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) on April 11, 2014.

A contract was then agreed to between the German government, Lockheed Martin and Airbus Defence and Space on July 22, 2015. The contract called for production of eight midlife upgrade kits (outer wing, center fuselage and horizontal stabilizer) by Lockheed Martin, with Airbus responsible for installation of the kits on the German P-3Cs at its Manching facility.

Additional planned upgrades formed part a broader modernization aimed at retaining the German P-3C Orions in service out to 2035.

But the cost and technical issues cropping up during the upgrade process – along with heavy damage inflicted on one P-3C unit in March 2020 – forced the Defense Ministry to acknowledge that delays in the ongoing modernization effort and consequent lack of fleet-wide operational readiness made termination of the mission equipment upgrades practical. However, according to the Defense Ministry, the rewinging measures being undertaken will continue in order to prevent an immediate capability gap from emerging.


As a short-term solution, the Defense Ministry is examining platforms to bring into service by 2025. These include the C-295 Persuader MPA variant from Airbus, the Rheinland Air Service (RAS) 72 Sea Eagle, and the P-8A Poseidon from U.S. aerospace giant Boeing.

Notably absent from the list of alternatives put out via press release by the German Defense Ministry on June 17 is the Kawasaki Heavy Industries P-1 now in service with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) being pitched by Kawasaki globally as a potential MPA solution.

Germany’s longer-term MPA solution will most likely be found via the Maritime Airborne Warfare System development program, set to be undertaken jointly by France and Germany post-2025 with an eye on achieving a new maritime patrol capability by 2030. The two countries signed a letter of intent (LOI) to develop this capability at the ILA exhibition in Berlin in April 2018 and have already have agreed to award manufacturers a two-year common requirements study determining the technical and financial elements involved.

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby brar_w » 23 Jun 2020 08:41

USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) and USS Nimitz (CVN 68) dual-carrier operations in the Philippine Sea -

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The ships and aircraft assigned to both strike groups began coordinated operations in international waters demonstrating the United States’ unique capability to operate multiple carrier strike groups in close proximity.

While at sea, the strike groups will support air defense drills, sea surveillance, replenishments at sea, defensive air combat training, long range strikes, coordinated maneuvers and other exercises. LINK

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby wig » 23 Jun 2020 10:01

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-liby ... SKBN23P2SJ

NATO to investigate Mediterranean incident between French, Turkish warships

excerpted

French Armed Force Minister Florence Parly said that on June 10 Turkish warships flashed their radar lights three times at the French warship Courbet in the eastern Mediterranean.

She said the Courbet was on a NATO mission to check whether a Turkish vessel, the Cirkin, was smuggling arms to Libya after it turned off its transponder, failed to identify itself and did not give its final destination.
She added that Turkish sailors had also put on bullet-proof vests and stood behind their light weapons during the incident.

“There cannot be any complacency with regard to such behaviour. This particularly serious incident must be dealt with and our allies share our concerns because eight European allies gave me clear support today in NATO,” Parly told French lawmakers after the ministerial meeting.

“This act was extremely aggressive and cannot be one of an ally facing another ally who is doing its work under NATO command,” she said.

A senior Turkish defence ministry official told Reuters on Thursday that France’s “baseless” claim was not backed up by any concrete evidence, and said the French ship was making fast and dangerous manoeuvres that breached NATO principles and navy security rules.

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby brar_w » 23 Jun 2020 18:31

House Defense Bill Pushes Hypersonic Weapons for Zumwalt Destroyers

Specifically, the bill calls for the Navy to start integration efforts on the Zumwalt class no later than Jan. 1, 2021.

Commander of Naval Surface Forces Vice Adm. Rich Brown has expressed interest in putting hypersonic weapons on the Zumwalt class, saying that the ship’s larger size, power generation and missile launcher compared to the Arleigh Burke-class DDG made it a great host for the conventional prompt strike weapon.

“I have got to tell you, I am thoroughly impressed with the capabilities that that destroyer will bring into our fleet. As a matter of fact, I would love to have six more of them, because the capabilities are that good. If you look at conventional prompt strike, I can think of no other better platform than to put conventional prompt strike on that platform. And then once that happens, or if that happens, make no mistake, it will put the fear of god into our adversaries once we marry those two platforms together,” he said during a media call.

The report to Congress that the NDAA language mandates would begin to address some thorny issues related to use of force, risk of escalation, command and control and more.

The submarine community has worked out some of these issues, having a Navy platform using a national strategic weapon – nuclear missiles – in its Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine (SSBN) program. Though it would be the Virginia-class SSNs firing off strategic hypersonic CPGS weapons – and those crews would have to manage having both strategic weapons for national tasking as well as their own weapons for self-defense and strike missions within their Navy fleet chain of command – it’s likely that some of the submarine community’s understanding of command and control, underwater communications, and training for national tasking could be put in place on the attack subs.

However, no surface ships today are equipped with these kinds of strategic weapons and have to deal with these kinds of issues.


This would be an interesting development to follow though I suspect, the move, in large part, is motivated by the desire of the democrat led House to wean away the US Navy from conventional prompt strike off of submarines given their previous objection based on unsubstantiated and nonsensical arguments around launch ambiguity.

The USN for its part has quietly hinted at removing one, or both, of the AGS on the Zumwalt class and replacing it with a conventional gun and the Virginia Payload Module (adding the VP tubes right out of the submarine design) so that it can accommodate the large diameter (30+ inches) 4000+ km intermediate range hypersonic glide weapons. Alternatively, they could try squeezing the more advanced high L/D wedge shaped H-BGV that Lockheed and Raytheon are developing for the USAF (AGM-183 A and B ) and DARPA, and have it sit atop a smaller diameter booster. Though I suspect that would not be an intermediate ranged weapon which then calls into question the need for something in the 1000 mile class as apposed to something 2x or 3x of that. The additional range will be a game changer in the Pacific theater and would severely call into question the need for the US Army to field a similar weapon (the Hypersonic CPS capability actually IOC's with the US Army in 2023) given the basing challenges of land based intermediate range systems..That may not sit well with the Army focused top brass at the Pentagon (SecDef and JC).

The three Zumwalt class destroyers, along with the SSN fleet could carry the mission through the 2020's, and into early to mid 2030's (along with USAF bombers, and possibly fighters), while the Large Surface Combatant (Ticonderoga replacement) comes in during the 2030's in larger numbers.

Image

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby brar_w » 27 Jun 2020 22:29

The crew of carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) has spent 161 days at sea while on station in the Middle East – breaking a record set during the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks, according to the Navy.

The carrier and guided-missile cruiser USS San Jacinto (CG-56) left Naval Station Norfolk, Va., on Jan. 17 for a graduation exercise that shifted into its eventual deployment. They have been at sea ever since.

“Although Naval History and Heritage Command does not specifically track continuous days underway for naval vessels, it has two modern documented days-at-sea records, both of which are now broken,” the Navy said in a statement.

“In Feb. 2002, the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) operated for 160 days straight in support of post-9/11 response. And it was again, Ike, who held the record of 152 days consecutively underway during the Iran hostage crisis in 1980.”



https://news.usni.org/2020/06/25/carrie ... erty-ports

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby brar_w » 01 Jul 2020 06:40

It seems Japan is gunning for a 2025-2030 time-frame to operationalize a 5th gen naval fighter. This will probably allow for a more smoother transition from building/buying F-35A's to building/buying a mix of A's and B's.

Japan begins refitting first of two Izumo-class carriers to support F-35B operations


Tokyo has begun the process of converting the first of two Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) Izumo-class helicopter carriers into aircraft carriers capable of supporting the operations of the short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF).

As confirmed by Janes on 30 June, the Japan Marine United (JMU) Corporation recently started conducting refit work on JS Izumo at the company’s Isogo shipyard in Yokohama City.Janes understands that the modifications will be made in two main stages meant to coincide with the vessel’s periodic refit and overhaul programmes, which take place every five years.

While initial modifications are taking place during the refit and overhaul planned for this fiscal year, the final changes are only expected to be made during the vessel’s next overhaul in FY 2025, after which a series of tests and sea trials are expected to follow.

The 248 m-long, 24,000-tonne Izumo class has been built with weight considerations for the F-35B in various parts, including the stowage, elevators, and flight deck. However, further modifications are needed such as reinforcing the flight deck to support additional weight, placing additional guidance lights, and fitting the ship with heat-resistant deck spots for vertical landings, among other things.

It is still unclear, however, whether a ski-jump will be added.

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby brar_w » 01 Jul 2020 19:23

Laying the Foundation for EMALS on CVN 79, John F. Kennedy.



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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby MeshaVishwas » 10 Jul 2020 00:21

I would pay to watch a "How do they do it..." Episode on this:

:shock:

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby MeshaVishwas » 13 Jul 2020 01:52


Brings back scary images from the INS Sindhurakshak fire tragedy.
Hope that no life loss occurs.

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby brar_w » 24 Jul 2020 19:06

They've come a long way after dethroning Lockheed Martin for the next generation SPY radar for AEGIS -

Raytheon Delivers First SPY-6 Radar Array To U.S. Navy’s Newest Destroyer


Raytheon Missiles & Defense delivered the first AN/SPY-6(V)1 radar array for installation on the future USS Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125), the U.S. Navy's first Flight III guided-missile destroyer.

The 14′ x 14′ modular array was transported by truck from the company’s automated 30,000-square-foot Radar Development Facility in Andover, Massachusetts, to Huntington Ingalls Industries shipyard in Pascagoula, Mississippi. The SPY-6(V) family of radars delivers significantly greater range, increased accuracy, greater resistance to environmental and man-made electronic clutter, advanced electronic protection, and higher reliability than currently deployed radars.



The video shows all the shipsets for the first in class ship as ready to be shipped. This in addition to the two arrays that they delivered a few years ago for development and integration testing.


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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby Philip » 25 Jul 2020 16:26

Sad news about the Bonhomme Richard. Some reports said that the on- board fire suppression systems weren't on due to repair work going on. World over more warships and subs have been lost or severely damaged not in battle but in port,during repairs/ refits!
The amphib BH is another ringing of whatever equiv. of rhe Lutine Bell exists in the USN.There's so much of inflammable carried material aboard during refits and so many accidents that it beggars the imagination why better fire prevention methods and protocls aren't in place.

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby brar_w » 25 Jul 2020 20:21

Huge Pacific Exercise Centered On Guam Brings Allies Together Amid Growing China Threat

Australia has joined forces with the U.S and Japan for a huge trilateral exercise that is being held in the Indo-Pacific region over the coming months. The collaboration brings together the Australian Defense Forces, U.S. Navy, U.S. Air Force, and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, which are engaged in the regional deployment.

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) has dispatched an impressive fleet of fighters, tankers, and an airborne early warning aircraft to Andersen Air Force Base, on the U.S. Pacific island of Guam, as part of the Regional Presence Deployment. This particular phase of the activities runs from July 21 to August 2. The series of events are designed to act as a clear example of how the U.S. is partnering with regional allies amid concerns over security in the Indo-Pacific area, including the South China Sea.

More than 150 RAAF personnel deployed to Andersen AFB as part of a series of training events originally unveiled by Australian Defence Minister Linda Reynolds in early July. The RAAF Air Task Unit on Guam includes F/A-18A Hornets from No. 77 Squadron, EA-18G Growlers from No. 6 Squadron, an E-7A Wedgetail airborne early warning and control aircraft from No. 2 Squadron, and KC-30A Multi-Role Tanker Transports (MRTTs) that will collectively conduct advanced air-sea integration drills with maritime forces.

Australian and Japanese naval flotillas joined the U.S. Navy’s Nimitz class aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) and her associated Carrier Strike Group in the Philippine Sea on July 19. It marked the start of the joint exercises that are taking place throughout Southeast Asia and will later move on to Hawaii. Australia and Japan both share long-standing alliances with the U.S. and this year marks the 60th anniversary of the treaty of mutual cooperation and security between America and Japan.

Complementing the land-based air power, the Royal Australian Navy involvement includes the first-in-class amphibious assault ship HMAS Canberra, along with first-in-class destroyer HMAS Hobart, the Anzac class frigate HMAS Arunta, and fleet replenishment ship HMAS Sirius. The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) involvement is based around the Akizuki class destroyer JS Teruzuki. “The experience in this exercise will give us tactical and operational advantages and make our friendships stronger, in addition to our regular joint exercises with both like-minded navies,” commented Capt Sakano Yusuke of the JMSDF...


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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby brar_w » 29 Jul 2020 22:33

Japan Shows Yet Another ASM-3 Design


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The appearance of a test airframe for the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) ASM-3 in July shows that the Japanese have worked through at least five configurations for the supersonic anti-ship missile. Instability in the integrated-rocket-ramjet design suggests difficulty in development apart from officially acknowledged inadequacy in range.Two major variations in configurations were envisioned in 2009, just before the program was launched. Two more have been seen in photographs and an official drawing, and now there is one more. Further, the newly revealed configuration may not be that of the production weapon.

Deputy Defense Minister Yamamoto Tomohiro published a photo of the test airframe—possibly, but not necessarily, a complete missile—after a visit to MHI’s Komaki-Minami Plant at Nagoya on July 14. Obviously an air-to-surface weapon using integrated rocket-ramjet propulsion, it was accompanied by an “ASM-3” placard to remove any doubt as to its identity.

Unpainted, it was clearly not a production round.

Originally scheduled to be developed in 2003-10, the ASM-3 program was deferred to 2010-16. Last year, when it had not entered service, then-Defense Minister Iwaya Takeshi said it needed to be modified for more range because of the improved reach of naval air defense systems of “some countries” (one of which was presumably China).

The original version reportedly had a range of less than 200 km (125 mi.); the new one will be able to fly more than 400 km, the Mainichi newspaper says. Its speed, presumably in cruise, is reported as Mach 3.

Designs have varied externally in at least five respects: There have been two body lengths, two inlet shapes, varying positions of the inlets relative to length, differing fin sizes, and the presence or absence of fairings running along the body. The body may also have two different diameters. Different designs also seem to have different sizes of cross-sections for ramjet inlet boxes.

The test airframe that Yamamoto revealed had the short body, aft-swept, 2D inlets in a midlength position and fairings. And if there are two diameters, which is difficult to judge from photographs, the test airframe had the fatter one.

The inlet shape seen on July 14 was foreshadowed in an official 2009 illustration of a missile that (the ministry implied then) would be the operational system, appearing before 2020. But that one had the long body.Two other ASM-3 configurations have previously been seen in photographs; both had only forward-swept inlets of 3D, pen-nib form. One of those missile configurations, apparently the earliest, had the long body and no fairings. Another had the short body with fairings. Yet another design, shown in a 2009 drawing, was similar, but its inlet positions were different.

The purpose of the fairings is unknown. They could carry fuel lines or electrical or signaling wires. Designers will normally try to minimize drag by burying such features inside a missile’s cylindrical body. A long body would hold more fuel, consistent with greater range—yet now, after the government has said more range is needed, it displays a short body design (but perhaps a fat one). There is no guarantee that this is the currently intended production configuration.

Integrated rocket-ramjet propulsion is used for all versions that have been seen. The ASM-3 first accelerates under the power of a solid-propellant rocket in its rear. When that burns out, covers over the inlets come off and the ramjet takes over, burning liquid fuel. Ramjet exhaust goes through the rocket’s nozzle, first passing through the space formerly occupied by the rocket propellant.

The ASM-3 is supposed to arm the MHI F-2 strike fighter, which now carries the subsonic ASM-2 anti-ship missile. When the supersonic missile was judged last year as not ready for service, the F-2 was not ready to accept it anyway: The fighter needed a new mission computer, which was still under development.

The government has not said when the ASM-3 will be ready nor when the F-2 will be ready for it. Meanwhile, Japan is buying the Kongsberg subsonic but stealthy Joint Strike Missile for strikes against surface targets, including ships, by Lockheed Martin F-35A Lightnings.

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby brar_w » 30 Jul 2020 19:08

First sight of buddy store on MQ-25A unmanned refueller


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First images have emerged of the underwing pod installation on Boeing’s MQ-25A Stingray carrier-borne unmanned aerial refuelling system ahead of the start of flight testing.

The MQ-25A is intended to provide US Navy (USN) carrier air wings with a robust organic refueling capability to improve the combat of embarked strike fighters and extend the reach of the carrier air wing on the aircraft carriers.Boeing was in August 2018 awarded a USD805.3 million engineering, manufacturing and development (EMD) contract by the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) for the design, development, fabrication, test, delivery, and support of four MQ-25A unmanned air vehicles, including integration into the carrier air wing for an initial operational capability in August 2024.

Boeing has built a company-owned flight test article, T1 (N234MQ), to support the development programme. T1 began flight test activities in September 2019, accumulating approximately 30 flight hours up to February 2020.

The MQ-25A is expected to deliver up to 15,000 lb of fuel at 500 n miles. Aerial refuelling operations will be undertaken using two standard buddy pods, one under each wing, paying out a refuelling hose and basket. These buddy stores, already in service on USN F/A-18E/F Super Hornets, are built by Cobham.

Images showing T1 fitted with the Cobham buddy store under its port wing were earlier released on 20 July by Democrat Senator Tammy Duckworth after she had visited the Boeing facility at MidAmerica regional airport in Mascoutah, Illinois, the previous week. Boeing later released a short video on social media showing the pod installation process being undertaken inside its hangar at MidAmerica airport.

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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby brar_w » 30 Jul 2020 20:12

A great rundown of what efforts the US Navy is putting in place ahead of the first unit deployment for the F-35C cruise.

Navy’s First Operational F-35C Squadron Fires Missiles As It Preps For Inaugural Cruise


The U.S. Navy’s first operational front-line Lockheed Martin F-35C unit, Strike Fighter Squadron 147 (VFA-147) “Argonauts,” has completed two key milestones in preparation for its maiden deployment next year. The squadron will be the first to take the F-35C to sea on a cruise as part of Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) aboard the USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) in 2021.

The “Argonauts” completed a Weapons System Evaluation Program (WSEP) in combination with the U.S. Air Force in May and June at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida. This was followed by a “5th Generation Advanced Readiness Program” in July at NAS Fallon, Nevada, alongside its fellow CVW-2 F/A-18E/F Super Hornet squadrons VFA-2 “Bounty Hunters,” VFA-113 “Stingers,” and VFA-192 “Golden Dragons.”

The “Argonauts” deployed to Eglin alongside other CVW-2 tactical jet squadrons for WSEP, which is a live missile firing event hosted by the 83rd Fighter Weapons Squadron from May 27 to June 12. A media release from the resident 53rd Wing said its units “facilitated the firing of 26 air-to-air missiles during this event.” The release added: “CVW-2 participated in the event to prepare them for their real-world deployment next year in support of geographic combatant commander taskings.”

The Eglin event, known as “WSEP East 20.09” included CVW-2, the 53rd Wing, 325th Fighter Wing F-22A Raptors that are based at Eglin due to damage at Tyndall AFB that was inflicted by Hurricane Michael, plus Eglin’s 33rd Fighter Wing, which flies F-35As.


A WSEP can be tailored for air-to-air firings, which is also known as “Combat Archer,” or air-to-ground launches, which is “Combat Hammer.” Both are designed to provide an end-to-end evaluation of the complete weapons system, including the aircraft itself, the building and loading of the missiles, and the actual firing, guidance, and ultimate lethality of the weapons. It has become a somewhat common event for U.S. Navy, USAF, and U.S. Marine Corps fighter squadrons ahead of a major combat deployment.

In addition to being a part of CVW-2’s work-up in preparation for its deployment, the 83rd FWS supported operational test shots to gather data. One of the more significant events included AIM-120D Software Improvement Program missiles. This likely relates to System Improvement Program 3, the newest operational version of the AIM-120D, which itself is a major leap on capability above the previous AIM-120C variant.

Raytheon Missile System received a $38.6 million contract for System Improvement Program 3 Engineering Manufacturing and Development upgrades for the AIM-120D Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM) in September 2017. The contract provides for software development to improve the AIM-120D's performance against more advanced enemy threats.

F-35As and F-35Cs fired seven AIM-120Ds and an EA-18G Growler fired one, according to the news release. It added: “These weapon firings provided valuable data and feedback to combat air force and fleet warfighters and informed strategic weapons allocation and movement decisions.”

“Thank you all very much for the herculean effort you and your teams provided CVW-2. With your world-class support, we were able to complete 15/15 OFRP — Readiness required shots over the last two weeks,” said Captain Matthew Thrasher, the commander (CAG) of CVW-2.

“This event improved readiness of CVW-2 in preparation for real-world tasking, support of operational test objectives, and gathered critical F-35A/C weapons employment data,” said Col Nicholas Reed, commander, 53d Weapons Evaluation Group (WEG).

Following WSEP, the elements of CVW-2 moved to NAS Fallon in July for the next round of preparatory training. Traditionally known by the Navy as SFARP, the Strike Fighter Advanced Readiness Program, the F-35 squadron has coined it the “5th Generation Advanced Readiness Program.” This training will have included a pivotal role for VFA-147’s new TOPGUN graduate, who oversees the squadron training program. The squadron’s Facebook page remarked, “We crushed it!!!”

A traditional work-up cycle would next see CVW-2 going into carrier qualifications (CQ) and TSTA, the Tailored Ship's Training Availability. This is designed to support the aircraft carrier’s crew and prepare it to bring the entire air wing aboard. Air Wing Fallon follows, where the CVW comes together for a five-week exercise that brings together all the elements of the CVW, working together in complex exercises on the Fallon Range Training Complex. Finally comes COMPTUEX (Composite Training Unit Exercise), which is basically Air Wing Fallon, but fly from the carrier, and integrates all the Carrier Strike Group’s naval assets with the air wing and each other.

The USS Carl Vinson is expected to arrive in San Diego, California, shortly, following a maintenance period in Bremerton, Washington. The first cruise with the F-35C will also coincide with the first Navy deployment with the new Bell-Boeing CMV-22B Osprey Carrier Onboard Delivery (COD) tiltrotor. VRM-30 “Titans” is now in possession of two CMV-22s at its home base at NAS North Island, California, and the squadron will also make its first operational detachment aboard the USS Carl Vinson in 2021.The deployment for CVW-2 in 2021 will mark a major milestone in U.S. naval aviation history. The “Argonauts” will be taking a brand new fighter on a maiden cruise for the first time since the Super Hornet joined the fleet in 2002. Above all else, the F-35C will finally give the Navy's carrier's air wings the stealth capability they were promised 30 years ago.

So, suffice it to say that there is a lot of pressure on the Argonauts and their sister squadrons to get it right!


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Re: International Naval News & Discussion

Postby MeshaVishwas » 03 Aug 2020 21:36


Must watch!


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