1962 Indo-China War: News & Discussion

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1962 Indo-China War: News & Discussion

Postby Rakesh » 11 Nov 2018 19:06

Where is the 1962 Indo-China War thread? I cannot find it at all.

If someone can find it, please move this post there and delete this thread.

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https://twitter.com/ragarwal/status/1034321999055663104 ---> Letter by Sardar Patel to Nehru on 7 Nov 1950 on Chinese threat and how to deal with it. Sardar died just about a month later, and little/no action was taken by Nehru on his suggestions. 12 years later we had the 1962 debacle.

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wig
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Re: 1962 Indo-China War: News & Discussion

Postby wig » 18 Nov 2018 10:53

http://www.dailyexcelsior.com/battle-ri ... -1962-war/

The Battle of Rizangla – A Glorious Chapter of 1962 War
extracted from the above article
Major Shaitan Singh Bhatti, PVC and the soldiers under his command faced up to the Chinese. Outnumbered and outgunned the men died where they fought on 18 Nov 1962

The small Indian formation was left to their fate as the supply line was not regular. The Rizangla feature had a high hill at its back so no artillery shelling could be carried out to support the troops on Rizangla. Digging defences in the rocky soil was nearly impossible and the paucity of oxygen at a height of 16000 feet made movement of partially acclimatized soldiers difficult. The Ahirs were mainly armed with antiquated. 303 single shot bolt action rifles of the Second World War vintage which yielded an easy advantage to the enemy equipped with the modern weaponry.
Despite these locational and logistic disadvantages the Ahirs under the able leadership of their company commander Maj. Shaitan Singh Bhatti were in high spirits. On the night of 17-18 Nov. heavy snow storm had overtaken the battle zone and icy winds were benumbing any living being there.. In the early morning our patrols noticed massive Chinese intrusion through the gullies. Though the Chinese had brought their assaulting troops to their forward assembly under the cover of inclement weather, their intentions to give sudden surprise to the vigilant Ahirs failed miserably. The Indian soldiers were ready to face the assault of the dragons. Around 0500 hrs, the first wave of Chinese was sighted by the Ahirsmanning the defences and they were greeted with a hail of LMGs, MMGs and mortars fire. Scores of the enemy died, many were wounded but the rest duly reinforced and continued to advance. Soon the gullies leading to Rizangla were full of Chinese corpses. Constant wave after wave of the Chinese launched four more attacks which were beaten back. This dwindled the strength and ammunition of the defenders also and there was no hope of replenishments in the God’s forsaken place.
By now the Chinese realized that Rizangla was not a cake walk and they resorted to heavy artillery and concentrated fire of recoilless guns. Our Jawans had no artillery support and no bunkers on the rocky feature. Simultaneously the Chinese had a detour and attacked from the back. In the meantime Major Shaitan Singh was moving from platoon to platoon motivating the depleting command. In the process he was hit by the enemy LMG fire on his arm but undaunted he kept motivating, regrouping and reorganisinghis handful men and weapons. His Company Hay. Major kept persuading him to move to safer place but he did not want to leave his comrades. Grievously injured and bleeding profusely, he was later pulled to safer place behind a boulder where he froze to martyrdom during the night. The Ahirs had fought bravely and even came out with bayonets when need arose. Naik Chandgi Ram a wrestler of repute had killed 6-7 Chinese single handedly with bayonet till he fell to martyrdom. Silence of war had engulfed Rizangla as the last round had been fired and the last soldier had bled to martyrdom. The Ahirs had exhibited a rare saga of unprecedented courage, valour and supreme sacrifice. 114 out of 120 soldiers sacrificed their lives. It is one of the few battles in the annals of war history of the world where such a high percentage of fighters fought so doggedly and fearlessly and attained martyrdom. There is only one other instance in the subcontinent where a similar bravery was exhibited. In 1897, 21 brave Sikh soldiers had killed 600 Afghans in the battle of Saragarhi before laying down their lives.
In January, 1963 a local shepherd while wandering over Rizangla saw the awesome spectacle of the soldiers frozen to death but still clinging to their damaged weapons, mostly with empty magzines and bulged barrels due to excessive firing. A month later the first Indian party under the aegis of Red Cross retrieved the bodies. The grateful nation conferred Maj. Shaitan Singh with Param Vir Chakra- the highest gallantry award. Eight soldiers were conferred Vir Chakra and some others were also conferred with honours. This is perhaps the only action where so many honours have been conferred in a single operation. We pay our homage to these brave soldiers year after year on their memorials near Chushul and in Rewari, Haryana. It has been aptly inscribed on their memorial: “How can a man die better? Than facing fearful odds/ For the ashes of his father/ And temples of his Gods.”


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