Solar energy in India

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RamaY
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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby RamaY » 17 Mar 2013 21:17

Theo_Fidel wrote:Javee hopefully this helps. There is 40,000 acres of roof in Greater Chennai area alone. Unlike USA our roofs are concrete, so simple brace will be OK. Also we can have shade....


Theo garu,

Slowly but surely it will come. We need a right mix of solar/technology/consumer to get best results.

For example all street lights can be made solar powers with backup support from regular power. Most of new apartments/houses already have solar powered hot water. The next step is to get solar powered a/c, washing machines etc., as independent units and use legislation to enforce them because these can be called luxury items. As prices go down it will become economical to connect new housing permits with at least 1kw solar panel installations. Now that the LED lights becoming common (with xxxx hrs of guaranteed life) it should not take much time to bring grid dependency of domestic consumption to a minimum (a 1000mw for entire state).

That leaves the grid power to industrial use, which requires quality power.

The Agri sector must be completely transformed to renewal energy. There are already 2hp solar pump sets available. States/center should bite the bullet and give huge subsidies in this front, making sure that the manufacturing companies are 100% Indian owned because we are looking at minimum 3-5 crore units required and costing Rs 5-10 Lakh Crore rupees ($100-$200b).

Combined with NM's proposal to convert city waste into compost for Agri purposes thus reducing chemical fertilizer subsidies program this whole thing is doable in a 5-year term.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby RamaY » 17 Mar 2013 21:20

Purti develops new solar water pump

NAGPUR: BJP national president Nitin Gadkari, who also heads the Purti group that owns several sugar factories in Vidarbha, said his company had developed a new agriculture pump that runs on solar power. For last few years he has also demonstrated use of solar fencing for protecting farms from attack of wild animals.

On display at SCZCC premises on Tuesday, on the sidelines of the conference by AgroVision, was a pump gushing out water. Gadkari claimed that engineers of his group had developed it by integrating electronics in a power pack to convert AC power to DC from the solar panels that harness sunlight to produce electricity.

"It's my mission to rescue Vidarbha farmers. So, I conceived this idea of a cheap solar pump. As compared to Rs7 lakh cost of the pump brought from the government agency MEDA, we are offering it at Rs5 lakh on no-profit-no-loss basis. Besides, Purti group will offer a subsidy of Rs1 lakh to needy farmers. After availing of the government subsidy and Purti's discount, many farmers will be able to afford the pump at a net cost of Rs2.5 lakh.

"This will solve the problem of load-shedding and high energy cost," said Gadkari. He also exhorted farmers to produce ethanol from husk, stalks and other bio-waste. Soon, we will have motorcycles run on ethanol. An Indian auto company has started exporting these bikes to Brazil. I am in talks with this automaker to introduce them here," said Gadkari. Use of ethanol will save country by cutting the huge crude oil import bill, he added.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby RamaY » 17 Mar 2013 22:22

XPosting

Suraj wrote:Suntech, China's Solyndra, implodes
China has for some time been subsidizing its solar industry and betting big on clean energy.
But the huge bet seems to be crumbling now, and at the center of it is Suntech Power Holdings, one of the world's biggest solar panel-makers.

In November, a U.S. trade panel approved tariffs of between 24 - 36 percent on Chinese solar-panel imports, after it ruled that domestic solar panel-makers were hurt by illegal dumping.

They argued that Chinese solar panel manufacturers could sell their products dirt cheap because they were extremely heavily subsidized by their government. Suntech was subject to an even higher 36 percent tax.

Suntech has also been the subject of controversy for some time over its finances. Bloomberg reports that the company had been amassing debt for quite a while and that it reached close to $2 billion as of August 2012.

Another huge blow to the company was its discovery that €554.2 million in German government bonds that it was given as collateral for its investment in Global Solar Fund "may not have existed and the company may have been a victim of fraud." That dispute was settled last week.

Then, Suntech announced that it had entered a forbearance agreement with holders of $541 million in bonds due today, and said it will not make the payment but is working with bondholders to restructure the debt.
...

Suntech's stock is down nearly 98 percent since 2008 as this chart shows. In the past year, it's been down nearly 80 percent



Anothe solar company bites dust.

Very interesting and scary. In US a $b sterling energy systems went down and I remember another solar pv company going down too...

What is the matter?

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby member_20317 » 21 Mar 2013 22:50

Solar powered Air Conditioners and Agri Industry usage of Solar power makes sense. Cheaper variety SPVs installed along the edges of the fields can do a lot to get rid of power shortages in rural areas, if the grid is unreliable. Even if the grid is good the dependence can be reduced with much better reliability.

The killer app can be the NM mantra. Seems like these guys have struck upon the Big-Mac business model. Land valuations being used to make the balance sheets stronger.

In my home state the people have taken to these SPVs but the usage is still limited and is a subsidy outflow. They use if for say a TV a few hours of lighting (one or two CFLs) and some Pankha rather rarely.

NM did mention electrifying the IB-LOC using SPV. Remember that photograph some months back which showed the full fencing on the border.

With a big country the usage for Solar can easily match that of a good size Uropain country.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby RamaY » 22 Mar 2013 22:54

City of Hyderabad spends >10 crores per month in electricity bills for its street lights.

A capital investment of Rs 100 crores will help provide >100,000 street lights with ~50,000 hours (11 years at 12hrs/day) life.
http://www.solarstreetlightsindia.in/in ... tent&id=51

That would be same as 10% current electricity bills.

Imagine the savings across India....

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby SaiK » 23 Mar 2013 20:38

RamaY wrote:XPosting

What is the matter?

chinese capitalism.. all state controlled, what else you expect. the same result will happen if indics follow. luckily many defence products survive because tax payer backup and the long term security concerns and patriotism.

simple logic, even yum bee yay guys fails to understand - demand vs supply balancing

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 27 Mar 2013 10:28

http://cleantechnica.com/2013/03/25/ind ... er-tender/

The north Indian state of Punjab has issued a fresh tender for installation of 300 MW of solar power capacity.


Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 22 Apr 2013 23:28

Citigroup is projecting Solar PV as hitting 0.25 Cents / watt by 2020. LCOE of roughly 6 cents / kw by 2020. Residential system installed cost of $1.12 per watt.

Image

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby RamaY » 12 May 2013 06:44

New technology to instantly convert solar energy into electricity

A Vijayawada-based solar energy equipment manufacturer, Jyothi Solar Power Projects has claimed that by using two new technologies together with the existing photo-voltaic (PV) panel system, 91 per cent :eek: of the Sun’s energy could be converted into electrical power.

At a meeting to showcase the technologies here on Saturday, P. Lakshminarayana, Director-Technical of the company said they had applied for patents.

They include ‘Twintin’, a system based on sensors that could synchronise PV panels with the Sun’s movement, thus capturing maximum heat and a Multi-Junctional Device (MJD) with Nano technology that could instantly convert solar energy into electrical power.

Asked about when the product would be available in the market, he said it would be a few more months for the necessary approvals and stamp of recognition to come. “We have already got patent approvals by the Indian Research Association,” he stated. Government of India would get royalty for 20 years for the first international research patent (Space Solar Exploratory Research). In two months, the company’s technical team would prove the technology by generating 40 megawatts of solar power in the presence of scientists from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, USA. A young scientist with Jyothi Solar Power Projects, Prasanna Kumar said the cost would work out to between Rs. 1 and 1.2 lakh per kilowatt of electrical power produced. Currently, he said between 14 and 16 per cent of solar energy was converted into electrical power in India.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby member_20317 » 13 May 2013 15:21

RamaY wrote:New technology to instantly convert solar energy into electricity

A Vijayawada-based solar energy equipment manufacturer, Jyothi Solar Power Projects has claimed that by using two new technologies together with the existing photo-voltaic (PV) panel system, 91 per cent :eek: of the Sun’s energy could be converted into electrical power.

At a meeting to showcase the technologies here on Saturday, P. Lakshminarayana, Director-Technical of the company said they had applied for patents.

They include ‘Twintin’, a system based on sensors that could synchronise PV panels with the Sun’s movement, thus capturing maximum heat and a Multi-Junctional Device (MJD) with Nano technology that could instantly convert solar energy into electrical power.





Reminded me of the following 2 posts made earlier one in jest one serious:

krishnan wrote:While riding bike with one of my relative...he remarked something about solar power that almost made me loose balance and fall down

"these guys are stealing power from sun...dunno what will happen to the sun"

:rotfl:


and telling you he was very serious...



And

Best Research Cell efficiencies including multijunction
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/35/Best_Research-Cell_Efficiencies.png


Wiki has this to say on multijuctions:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multijunction_photovoltaic_cell
Multi-junction solar cells or tandem cells are solar cells containing several p-n junctions. Each junction is tuned to a different wavelength of light, reducing one of the largest inherent sources of losses, and thereby increasing efficiency. Traditional single-junction cells have a maximum theoretical efficiency of 34%, a theoretical "infinite-junction" cell would improve this to 87% under highly concentrated sunlight.



Added later:
If I (science illiterate) understand it correct then this is like the radar energy absorption by certain kinds of RAM paints/tiles, not all of which work at all frequencies and materials are choosen to optimize the absorbent characteristics to specific frequencies.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Lalmohan » 13 May 2013 16:29

^^^ there must be some sort of optimisation to be done between junction type and exposed area and how you get maximum 'return' of energy per sqcm, etc.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Vipul » 07 Jun 2013 03:32

AP receives bids for 350 MW solar PV power units at Rs 6.49

Thirty-four bidders have accepted the Rs 6.49 per unit price offer for solar photovoltaic power project development under the Andhra Pradesh State policy. Of the 1000 MW on offer, the aggregate bids resulted in response for about 350 MW.

According to Energy Coordination cell, the response has been positive. The State aimed at attracting companies to set up about 1000 MW capacity through competitive bidding process. Of the total bids, 34 bidders accepted the offer price of Rs 6.49 per unit approved by the Group of Ministers (GoM) for installing 350 MW solar power plants.

The State Government in November 2012 directed AP Transco to ensure setting up of 1000 MW solar power plants through the process of competitive bidding route.

Accordingly, the bidding process conducted on the e-procurement platform. The technical and financial bids of the tender were opened on February 15, 2013 and March 5, 2013 respectively. Totally 181 bidders with 331 bids were qualified in the 161 locations.

The complete details of the bids were put up before the Group of Ministers which requested for further course of action in the matter. They decided to offer Rs 6.49 per unit to all technically qualified bidders.

And 30 days time was given to all bidders to communicate their willingness. The last date for receipt of willingness from the bidders was June 4, 2013.

While seven bids of 53 MW accepted Rs 6.49 per unit, some 27 bidders with total capacity of 297 MW accepted the GoM price with certain conditions like change in location, increase in capacity and increase in rate if given.

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 07 Jun 2013 20:02

Vipul thanx for that.

Looks like a new benchmark low. Rs6.49. The AP bid documents did not have an inbuilt escalator which TN had included. This means that the cost of power from these units 25 years from now in 2038 will still be Rs6.49. Ignore inflation, rupee devaluation, etc. I have yet see any other power source come close to beating this number.

GOI thinks that by next year once the logistic and infrastructure issues are sorted out next year will see the first Sub Rs 6 bids. The panels being used here are 14%-16% efficiency ones. One can do a straight projection on what the price will be once the 22%-24% panels become mainstream, followed by the 28%-30% panels being used at the high end right now, followed by the multi junction panels with 40%++ efficiency!

The options continue to open out for the Indian economy.

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 15 Jun 2013 01:44

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2013-0 ... r-licenses
Azure Power India Pvt. and Solairedirect SA were among winners of licenses to build a total of 250 megawatts of solar power in India’s Punjab state.

The state sold 200 megawatts of contracts of 5 megawatts to 30 megawatts each to companies with experience in the industry, Balour Singh, director at the state Punjab Energy Development Agency, said today in a phone interview. It auctioned another 50 megawatts for projects of 1 megawatt to 4 megawatts, he said.

Eight companies won licenses for the larger projects. World Bank-backed Azure Power submitted the lowest bids, pledging to sell power from two sites of 15 megawatts each at 7,670 rupees ($133) a megawatt-hour and 7,970 rupees a megawatt-hour. Other winners in the category were France’s Solairedirect, Welspun Energy Ltd., Lanco Infratech Ltd. (LANCI) and Moser Baer India Ltd. (MBI)

Nineteen companies won licenses for the smaller plants, with bids ranging from 7,200 rupees a megawatt-hour to 8,710 rupees a megawatt-hour, Singh said.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Vipul » 21 Sep 2013 02:48

Areva Solar’s maiden project in India to be online this year-end.

French energy group Areva Solar’s maiden project in India, considered one of the largest solar power projects in Asia, would be online by this year end, a top company official said today.

Areva Solar was selected by Mumbai-based Reliance Power Ltd for building a Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) installation of 250 MW capacity.

“Towards the end of this year, you can see the commissioning of the plant...”, Areva Solar India Managing Director Siddhartha Ghoshal said in a presentation at a conference here.

He said this was one of the largest solar power projects under the National Solar Mission, which plans to add 20,000 MW of solar power by 2020.

Declining to reveal the total project cost, he said the cost that involves the Areva Solar part was about Rs 10.5 crore per Mega watt.

“It is a project awarded to us by Reliance Power. I am unable to give the total project cost. We have partnered with Larsen and Toubro Chennai, Pune-based Thermax and Engineering India Ltd for this project”, he said.

The project, coming up on 600 acres in Rajasthan, close to Pokhran, would employ 2,000 people, with a localisation level of 60 per cent. “It is a huge scale project. Reliance Power will use Areva Solar’s CLFR technology,” he said.

Areva Solar is developing the project adopting the Compact Linear Fresnel Reflector (CLFR) technology, that uses reflected sunlight to heat liquid filled tubes that generate high pressure steam producing electricity via turbine.

The project would represent a reduction of around 557,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions annually compared with a coal fired plant.
.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Vipul » 21 Sep 2013 07:19

India to build world's largest solar power plant in Rajasthan.

India will build the world's largest solar plant to generate 4,000 mw from sunlight near the Sambhar lake in Rajasthan that will sell electricity at an estimated rate of Rs 5.50 per unit.

The proposed solar project's capacity is about three times India's total solar power capacity and comparable with coal-fired ultra mega power projects of Tata PowerBSE -1.02 % and Reliance PowerBSE 0.21 %. "Being the first project of this scale anywhere in the world this project is expected to set a trend for large scale solar power development in the world," a government statement said.

It would be set up and run by a joint venture of five public sector utilities BhelBSE 1.12 %, Powergrid Corporation of India, Solar Energy Corporation of India, Hindustan Salts limited and Rajasthan Electronics & Instruments Limited, the statement said.

The first phase of the project, which would be 1,000 mw is expected to be commissioned in 2016. "Based on the experience gained during implementation of the first phase of project, the remaining capacity would be implemented through a variety of models," it said. The project would 23,000 acre of land out of which 18,000 acre would be provided by Hindustan Salts limited. The tariff is expected to be competitive.

"Government is considering a tariff of Rs 5.50 per unit of solar power generated for this project," said Ashwini Kumar, director (solar), solar energy corporation. Notably, Rs 5.50 per unit would be the lowest ever tariff for solar power in the country, which is expected to be the benchmark reference tariff for the upcoming phase of the national solar mission as well.

"We would route a part of the finance through viability gap funding, rest would be tied through power purchase agreements with power distribution companies," said Kumar.

The current cost of solar power in the country is around Rs 7 per unit. With the project setting the benchmark cost Rs 5.50 per unit, it is expected to bring down the cost of solar power further.

"Solar power at the rate of Rs 5.50 per unit would surely bring in buyers. Prior discussion with the government, distribution companies and ministry of finance have yielded that solar power at this rate is most viable for finance and purchase," said Amit Kumar, Associate Director (energy & utilities) at PwC.

Solar Energy Corporation is also trying to get a part of viability gap funding from national clean energy fund managed by the ministry of finance, said Kumar.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby SaiK » 22 Sep 2013 04:08


MHO, not a sound decision to do this.. canals need sun light directly hit on the water to kill water bourne bacterias.

Why on canals?

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby krishnan » 22 Sep 2013 06:39

So we should have open terrace tanks in india ?? i am not sure whether it will make much difference, but you will have to give up something to get something. Once guj gets other source of income they can take out the solar panels on the canal

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby SaiK » 22 Sep 2013 10:04

solar panels and distributed feedback grid system is the way to go.. every home should have a mandatory solar installation. those that are not used, will be fed into the grid.

on grid systems are not (or has it started?) available in desh?

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby chaanakya » 22 Sep 2013 10:14

SaiK wrote:solar panels and distributed feedback grid system is the way to go.. every home should have a mandatory solar installation. those that are not used, will be fed into the grid.

on grid systems are not (or has it started?) available in desh?

On Grid systems are available, on pilot basis.Standards are not yet firmed up by CEA.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Vipul » 26 Sep 2013 03:02

Solar mission is another scam, says CPI (M).

A group of CPI(M) MPs have written to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh demanding an investigation into the activities of Jawaharlal National Solar Mission.

The MPs said in the letter that the “solar scam” could be as big as the 2G and the coal scam and the project was designed to help private companies to make windfall profits.

The MPs said the benchmark price fixed by the Government agencies for the off-grid roof top solar units is around 2,10,000 per 1 KVA. They said in Kerala, a consumer pays Rs 1,15,000 to install 1KVA solar power at his house, while the balance of Rs 95,000 will go to the empanelled Solar Company, through the implementing agency of the State as Centre and State Government subsidies.

The MPs argued that the actual cost of panels is about Rs 70,000 per 1 KVA. “This is resulting into windfall profits for companies who are ‘fortunate’ enough to get empanelled by the Government. By investing just Rs 70,000, these companies are getting a profit of around Rs 1,40,000 thousand, which is a profit of 200 per cent,” the MPs said in the letter.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Lilo » 26 Sep 2013 03:05

Vipul wrote:
The MPs argued that the actual cost of panels is about Rs 70,000 per 1 KVA. “This is resulting into windfall profits for companies who are ‘fortunate’ enough to get empanelled by the Government. By investing just Rs 70,000, these companies are getting a profit of around Rs 1,40,000 thousand, which is a profit of 200 per cent,” the MPs said in the letter.


Theo ji et al , Is this true ?

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 28 Sep 2013 10:12

Impressive. Once the mirrors are localised 90% of Solar thermal is local!

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-09-2 ... -2010.html

Areva SA (AREVA) says the cost of building a solar-thermal power plant in India has fallen by about a third since 2010 thanks to local manufacturing.

The French company is building a 21-billion-rupee ($336 million), 100-megawatt plant for Reliance Power Ltd. (RPWR) awarded in a December 2010 auction.

“Today, when I look at future projects, there is a 30 to 35 percent” reduction in how much it would cost to build a similar project, Siddhartha Ghoshal, managing director of Areva’s local solar unit, told a conference in New Delhi today. “That’s mainly due to the localization of materials.”

All 10 of India’s proposed solar-thermal plants, comprising 500 megawatts of capacity, missed deadlines to start operating earlier this year, hobbled by escalating costs and difficulties importing equipment. Only one has been finished so far, Godawari Power (GODPI) & Ispat Ltd.’s 50-megawatt plant, completed in June after a lack of local parts drove the project 20 percent over budget.

Solar-thermal plants use mirrors to focus sunlight on liquids to produce steam for turbines. Areva sourced 60 percent of the equipment for Reliance’s plant in India, though it had to import the mirrors, Ghoshal said. If Indian mirrors had been available, 90 percent of the project’s equipment would have been local and the savings even greater, he said.

Areva said this week that it expects the Reliance plant to start operation by the end of December.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby member_20317 » 28 Sep 2013 12:29

Ma look what I found

http://www.cercind.gov.in/2013/orders/SO242.pdf

lots of numbers.

Caveat - order has numbers before that of recent Rupee dive.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Pratyush » 30 Sep 2013 11:08


manju
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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby manju » 13 Oct 2013 17:34

am constructing house in desh and my place has plenty of sun light available through out the year.

Currently, I definitely plan on a solar heater.

Is there scope for more- to use solar power for a house? Any links appreciated. I am looking at technology that has been tested and is in the market and is ready to be used off the shelf.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby chaanakya » 13 Oct 2013 18:12

Its all standardised. Put a Solar water heater.

Depending on load put 3 or 5 kwp SPV power plant with battery. Can control remotely and see the performance as well.

Sukam can be tried with solar inverter.

http://www.su-kam.com/Solar-Solutions.aspx

Use LED lights/tubelights and reduce power consumption to bare minimum.


You can calculate AC load and size battery accordingly. Take five star rated AC and super efficient fans of 10 watt power.

slightly costly but effective in the long run.

Theo_Fidel

Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Theo_Fidel » 08 Nov 2013 23:37

315 MW project in AP. Despite the recent confusion.

http://www.pv-tech.org/news/315mw_power ... ra_pradesh
---------------------------------

Meanwhile MNRE Solar phase-2 will require 50% of equipment to be domestically sourced. Thin film loop hole is closed. USA is going to have a cow!.
Total tender is for 750MW.

http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/ind ... 254566.ece

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby kish » 13 Dec 2013 00:35

Manufacturing infrastructure, supply chain seems to be the challenge. Cost of solar energy would come down drastically if these challenges are addressed.

Transforming India's Future With Solar Power

Over the past three years, India has taken a significant step forward in implementing its green growth agenda by commissioning 2,000 MW of solar power at the world’s lowest tariff.
Solar power can reduce India’s dependence on imports of diesel and coal for power generation, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and contribute to energy security.
If India is to achieve its ambitious target of adding 20,000 MW of solar capacity by 2022, a number of measures must, however, be undertaken.

In the short span of three years, India has made impressive strides in developing its abundant solar power potential. It has added capacity at a commendable pace, and successfully reduced the costs of solar energy to around $0.12 per kWh for solar photo voltaic (PV) and $0.21 per kWh for Concentrated Solar Power (CSP), making India amongst the lowest cost destinations for grid-connected solar power in the world.

Growth in the energy sector is key for India as more than 300 million of the country’s people still lack access to electricity, and industry cites energy shortages as a critical barrier to growth. The development of solar power will help India produce clean energy and contribute to reducing emissions per unit of GDP by 20-25% by 2020, over 2005 levels.

Development of solar power in India

India’s concerted efforts to develop solar power began in January 2010, when the country launched the Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission (JNNSM) as one of the eight missions under the country’s National Action Plan for Climate Change. The Mission’s aim was to deploy solar power on a large scale and position India as a major world power in solar manufacturing as well as research and development.

The first phase of JNNSM (2010-13) witnessed enthusiastic participation from Indian and international investors in the grid-connected segment. The strategy adopted the innovative mechanism of bundling relatively expensive solar power with power from the unallocated quota of the Government of India’s thermal power stations, which is relatively cheaper. It also followed a reverse bidding mechanism that enabled qualified bidders to benefit from declining global prices for solar components, thereby reducing the purchase price of both solar PV and CSP for the utilities.

Since planning for JNNSM Phase II (2013-17) will commence soon, it is important that it be based on sound analysis of lessons learnt from the first phase. The Government of India (Ministry of New and Renewable Energy) therefore commissioned a study in 2012 to identify the key challenges that could impede the expansion of the program. The report, Paving the Way for a Transformational Future: Lessons from JNNSM Phase1: Lessons from Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission Phase I (pdf), supported by the World Bank's Energy Sector Management Assistance Program (ESMAP), is based on consultations with key stakeholders and identifies the following issues as requiring closer attention:

1. Increase access to funds from commercial banks and attract private financing

Under Phase I of the program, scheduled commercial banks mostly shied away from lending for solar projects while export credit agencies, multilateral financial institutions, and some nonbanking financial institutions took up most of the financing. However, given that most infrastructure lending in India has been led by commercial banks, the solar program too will need their active participation to scale up to the levels envisaged.

2. Develop shared infrastructure facilities such as solar parks

The provision of publicly developed infrastructure frees private providers to focus on solar power development, increases efficiency, and lowers costs. Gujarat, for example, was the first state to declare a solar policy (2009) and today, is at the forefront of solar power generation in India. Its first solar park, developed on waste land in Charanka (Patan district), has the largest solar capacity in Asia. The park provides developers with already developed land along with critical infrastructure, including facilities for power evacuation and transmission, roads and water, thereby ensuring the rapid development of solar projects.

3. Use India’s comparative advantage to develop a niche in the manufacturing value chain

India’s solar PV manufacturing capacity is limited and does not straddle the higher technological echelons of the industry. This is because India’s manufacturers lack the raw materials, do not have access to low-cost financing, and face underdeveloped supply chains. In CSP, where local manufacturing is more complex, India has not been able to manufacture some critical components. Either technology suppliers are limited and their products patented or the lack of natural resources poses an impediment. India should therefore seek to define and develop its manufacturing capabilities in specific parts of the value chain where it enjoys a comparative advantage and can emerge as a globally competitive producer. An earlier ESMAP-World Bank study, Development of Local Supply Chain: A Critical Link for Concentrated Solar Power in India has identified the potential for reducing the costs of CSP components in India through local domestic manufacturing.

The World Bank has identified the development of solar power as one of the key elements of its Country Partnership Strategy with India. Accordingly, it will continue to strategically engage with the Government of India to scale up solar power in India, specifically in the lagging states. The findings from the study will be disseminated to the central and state governments as well as to market actors to ensure a shared understanding of the issues and analysis presented.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby uddu » 14 Dec 2013 16:23

There is an area where the nation can save hugely when it comes to electricity.
Statistics show that 20% of the 229 GW power generated is for lighting that amounts to 45.8 GW
10 percent is used by CFL in India and about 90 percent is still incandescent.
So 41GW electricity still used for powering incandescent bulbs.
If we switch over to LED's the power required will be 4.1GW and we could easily save 37 GW of electricity which is more than the electricity produced in India in a year from all sources.

Even if the usage of CFL level is considered to be 50 percent of lighting, introducing LED's for Incandescent bulbs will save 20 GW of electricity.

The cost of LEDs bulbs has come down drastically and is affordable at Rs.549
http://shop.moserbaer.in/456-product-LE ... -Bulb-BULB
http://shop.moserbaer.in/457-product-LE ... -Tube-TUBE
Hope the prices will come down further and we'll be able to save one year addition of electricity just by switching to LED lighting.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby uddu » 17 Dec 2013 06:01

Geolit 9W bulb come at the same price. So there is progress with wattage and higher lumen at same or reduced cost. Beginning of the LED revolution in terms of lighting systems.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby uddu » 17 Dec 2013 06:26

A Solar Sunrise in India
http://www.business-standard.com/articl ... 144_1.html

A new World Bank report titled 'Paving the Way for a Transformational Future: Lessons from JNNSM Phase' predicts India will become a global leader in the development of solar power and credits a lot of its success to the centre’s Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission (JNNSM) and individual state missions for helping India take giant leaps in implementing its green agenda.

THE ACHIEVEMENTS

Since its launch 3 years ago, installed capacity of solar power in India has increased from a meagre 30 MW to more than 2000 MW. More importantly, cost of solar energy, which at one point was prohibitively unaffordable has come down to as little as Rs 3.5 crore per megawatt or Rs 3.5 per kWh according to the Gujarat Energy Research and Management Institute (GERMI) from around Rs 15 per kWh when the mission was launched, making India one of the lowest cost destinations for grid-connected solar photo-voltaic (PV) power.

Two unique features of the government’s mission have led to this transformation according to the World Bank.

A) High cost solar power was bundled with lower cost unallocated thermal power to reduce the net average cost of electricity for distributers and end consumers, making solar energy more affordable.

B) Introduction of reverse auctioning (where sellers typically decrease prices to undercut each other and offer the lowest bid to the buyer) led to fierce competition for contracts and developers drove down prices by giving significant discounts to CERC (Central Electricity Regulatory Authority) set benchmark tariffs during bidding.

A global decline of prices in solar components further aided developers to reduce tariffs, making the prospect of solar energy attractive and viable.


Delhi airport hosts mega solar power plant
http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/com ... 460185.ece



The GMR Group-operated Delhi International Airport has become the first in Asia to host a mega solar power plant on its premises.

A 2.14 MW solar plant has just been set up and is all set for ribbon-cutting, it is learnt.

Vast areas

India has 136 airports, some of which are spread over vast pieces of land.

For example, the Hyderabad International Airport is spread over 5,400 acres while Chennai sits over 4,000 acres.

Large-scale solar plants are possible. Hyderabad, for instance, can house 25 MW.

{Another area where we can install solar panels is all along India's rail network. There is no need for land acquisition. May be holding a huge potential.}

Solar power installation costs fall through the floor {related to U.S solar installation. Still relevant to this thread considering the fall of solar power installation cost}
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/ ... _the_floor

Solar power system to be installed in Odisha polic stations
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/new ... 466804.cms

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby uddu » 03 Jan 2014 21:35

http://www.greenpepperenergy.com/index. ... lar-power/
Roof over roads to tap solar power?
Image
India’s major roads may double up as solar highways, if an innovative proposal by some scientists gets the government’s approval. The proposal is the brainchild of scientists at the Gujarat Energy Research and Management Institute (GERMI) in the state capital.

In a paper just published in the International Journal of Energy, Environment and Engineering, the scientists say highways can be used to generate solar power, if a roof of solar panels was laid over them, across the length of the roads.

The photovoltaic (PV) panels that convert sunlight into electricity is normally spread out on land. “While the price of PV panels is falling day by day, the price of land and its availability are constraints in the development of solar power, especially in India,” says Tirumalachetty Harinarayana, director of GERMI and one of the authors of the paper.

“Our proposal overcomes this obstacle by using the space over the highways for placing the PV panels,” Harinarayana. “This space can contribute to energy generation without extra land costs.” The proposal by Harinarayana and co-worker Pragya Sharma is based on case studies they carried out on two highways passing through Gujarat, using computer simulation.

From their computations, they estimate that a PV roof cover over the four-lane 205 km-long Ahmedabad-Rajkot highway can generate 104 MW of power while the Ahmedabad-Vadodara national highway, 93 km long, can generate 61 MW of electricity.

“We can suggest that the same concept can be extended for use on the 52,584-kilometre long national and state highways in India with four lanes or more,” the scientists said. The four-lane 5,839-km long Golden Quadrilateral Highway, for example, connecting Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai and Kolkata, can potentially generate 4,418 MW of power while the North-South-East-West Corridor highway of 7,300 km connecting Srinagar, Kanyakumari, Porbandar and Silchar has 5,524 MW capacity of power generation.

“If having solar panel roof over the national highways proves successful, one can think of using all our rail network as well for solar energy generation,” Harinarayana said. The GERMI scientists claim that apart from producing power, the solar highway concept, if implemented, can generate jobs for both skilled and unskilled people.

“Additionally, the shade provided by the over-head solar panels would result in improved vehicle efficiency and longer tyre life, besides reduction in road maintenance costs,” Harinarayana said.

“Another benefit of having a roof over the highways is rainwater harvesting at selected locations,” he said. The scientists point out that the Jawaharlal Nehru Solar Mission (JNSM) launched by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh in Jan 2010 could not reach its target of 1,200 MW electricity by March 2013 due to various problems. “Again, there is no roadmap or clear plan to reach its 20 GW target by 2022,” said Harinarayana. He said the solar highway concept has the potential for large-scale generation of electricity with grid connectivity in short time.

“This requires one-time investment for constructing a simple elevated structure covering the national highways,” he said. According to Harinarayana, Gujarat state is ideally suited to take a lead in implementing the proposal.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Rishirishi » 04 Jan 2014 08:26

Another great benefit is the shade such a system will give. Can be good for indian summers. Perhaps the military could chip in, as it would be impossible for sats to see the movement on the ground. I am sure that must have some strategic importance at certain places.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Rishirishi » 04 Jan 2014 09:48

vina wrote:
Right now molten salt CSP costs roughly $ 4 Billion per 1,000 MWhr of installed capacity.

:rotfl: :rotfl:

No wonder solar and wind and other folks who drink their own cool aid are in cloud cuckoo land. So to have 24 hrs of power out of solar, you need to build atleat THRICE the capacity (assuming that only 8 hrs of usable supply is available) and then you need to have ultra expensive storage to be able to use it for the other 16 hrs!

Case in point, wind power. Southern TN is in the grip of a SEVERE power cruch, with folks getting little power and that too very intermittently and at odd hours. How is that ? Coz wind power (where South TN has the largest installed base in the country), is available only for 6 months in a year! What about the other 6. Good question!

Now you know why Koodankulam is vitally imporant and will happen, come what may. Not delivering power is lot more expensive in votes than the lunatic nutter anti nuke and turn coat collared folks sponsored agitations. The politicos know that math really really well and the anti Koodankulam folks have zero public sympathy in any of the "ideological" opposition. Sure, they must insist on EVERY safety precaution and requirement. Beyond that, they lose the audience.


Norway has a lot of hydro electric. They have connected all of scandinavia, and Norther Europe, in a single grid system. When there is a overflow of power from coal, wind or Nuclear, they simply purchase the overflow electrisity at dumping costs, and pump water up to the mountains. When there is a shortage, the hydro turbines are put in service.

India has a lot of hydro electric and could probably use a simmilar strategy. India is the 5th largest hydro electric producer in the world with a installed capacity of 35 000 MW. The identified potential is some 94 000 MW. Hence a solar, wind and hydro strategy is workable for India.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby a_bharat » 04 Jan 2014 10:35

uddu wrote:http://www.greenpepperenergy.com/index.php/roof-over-roads-to-tap-solar-power/
Roof over roads to tap solar power?

Good idea, if economical.

Any estimates on the additional cost required for creating the raised platform (height of 15-20 ft.)? There are lots of waste-lands available at the rate of about Rs. 20,000 per acre.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby SaiK » 07 Jan 2014 05:24

solar roof over road is excellent plan except one thing..

our boozed truckers and idiots can bang into the polls every other second.

so, we need heavy bundobast around each pole. strong iron multi level protection so that trucks don't direcly hit the pillars. this will increase cost.

i'm sorry, India is poor in security and safety planning. corrupt construction practices further deteriorate quality of them.

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby Prem » 22 Jan 2014 01:23

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/0 ... t-success/

India Almost Doubled Its Solar Power In 2013 With Big Plans For More
India added just over 1 gigawatt of solar energy to its electrical grid last year, a major milestone that nearly doubles the country’s cumulative solar energy capacity to 2.18 gigawatts. After a slow start to the year, solar installation picked up rapidly — a good sign that India will be able to meet its ambitious solar targets going forward. India hopes to install 10 GW of solar by 2017 and 20 GW by 2022. The Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission, launched in 2010 by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, aims to help the country achieve success with solar energy deployment. India is currently in the planning stages of building the world’s largest solar plant, which would generate 4 gigawatts in the northwestern state of Rajasthan. “This is the first project of this scale anywhere in the world and is expected to set a trend for large-scale solar power developments,” Ashvini Kumar, director of Solar Energy Corp, one of five public utilities that will run the plant, told Business Insider.
In the last decade India’s renewable energy capacity has gone from just under 4 GW to over 27 GW as of this month. Wind energy makes up about two-thirds of this total, with small hydropower contributing nearly 4 GW and biomass over 1 GW.Last weekend India and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) signed a Memorandum of Understanding to cooperate to promote renewable energy, especially solar. “The MoU has come at a time when India is struggling to implement ambitious plans to reach out to the population without access to modern forms of energy across the country,” said Jarnail Singh, India Program Manager at the Climate Group.In a further indication that renewable energy has a large role to play in India’s future, last year the largest coal company in the world, Coal India, starting pursuing commercial solar power plants to cut costs. The company explained its logic, in part, by saying “India has an abundance of sunshine and the trend of depletion of fossil fuels is compelling energy planners to examine the feasibility of using renewable sources of energy like solar, wind, and so on.”

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Re: Solar energy in India

Postby saip » 22 Jan 2014 02:35

SaiK wrote:solar roof over road is excellent plan except one thing..

our boozed truckers and idiots can bang into the polls every other second.

so, we need heavy bundobast around each pole. strong iron multi level protection so that trucks don't direcly hit the pillars. this will increase cost.

i'm sorry, India is poor in security and safety planning. corrupt construction practices further deteriorate quality of them.

Then use Railways right of way. They already have pillars for electrification.


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