Managing Chinese Threat

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 26 Jun 2014 09:29

Modi Cabinet Approves MoU for India-China Industrial Park - Sandeep Dikshit, The Hindu
Briefing reporters after the Cabinet meeting, Law and Justice and Telecom Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad said that details would be disclosed after the MoU is signed with China.

The subject will be discussed in greater depth by Vice President Hamid Ansari who leaves on Thursday for Beijing to meet his Chinese counterpart, said officials.

The trajectory of discussions has led to the Chinese agreeing to allow India to set up industrial parks there as well :rotfl: but officials said this is a futuristic proposal and could take a couple of years to materialise.

On the other hand, Beijing’s proposal has been in the works since Chinese Premier Li Keqiang visited India in May last year.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby Paul » 26 Jun 2014 16:21

China's Naval Strategy Oil & Shipping Routes

An interesting discussion between Robert Kaplan and George Friedman on the difficulties the Chinese face in SCS and Indian ocean and their strategies in trying to overcome them. Kaplan is saying China's borders have never been more secure now as in the past millenium and this is driving them to focus on the seas. Friedman thinks China's extraordinary grwoth is going to pause at best or could stall at worst. The joker in the pack is Japan...they leave the discussion at that.

Watch for the discussion on Indian ocean from 27:00 onwards. Worth watching in full

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 26 Jun 2014 16:38

India plans to set-up IT & Pharma Industrial parks in China - Virendra Pandit, Business Line

The title is totally misleading. India has only 'proposed' and our newspaperwallahs are already writing as though we have got clearance from China. Let us see what comes out of this initiative.

India has proposed to set up industrial parks in China, mainly in pharmaceutical and information technology (IT) sectors.

The Union Government, which gave an in-principle approval to the signing of an MoU at its meeting in New Delhi on Wednesday, with regard to the setting up of Chinese industrial parks in India, has made this proposal to Beijing, Jagat Shah, Interim Secretary-General, China India Trade and Investment Centre (CITIC), told Business Line here on Thursday.

Earlier, the two sides had identified five states where Chinese industrial parks would be set up in India namely Uttar Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat, Maharashtra and Karnataka.

“The idea is that the Chinese could set up their industrial parks in India in areas of their strengths. Similarly, India could set up industrial parks in China in areas like IT and pharmaceuticals,” he said.

Industrial park

Earlier this month, a 20-member Chinese business-cum-investor delegation had short-listed three locations near Sanand in Ahmedabad district to set up their units in an industrial park with an initial investment of $1 billion. They are likely to meet the Gujarat Government again for finalisation of the proposal.

Shah said Wei Wei, China’s Ambassador to India, who arrived here on Thursday, is set to meet Gujarat Chief Minister Anandiben Patel later in the day.

China is interested in investing in India especially in automotive, electronics, agro-processing, tourism and manufacturing and will participate in setting up of the industrial parks in the country. It has emerged as India's biggest trading partner in the current fiscal replacing the UAE and pushing it to the third spot.

India-China trade

India-China trade has reached $49.5 billion with 8.7 per cent share in India's total trade, while the US comes second at $46 billion with 8.1 per cent share and the UAE third at $45.4 billion with 8 per cent share during the first nine months of the current fiscal of China, which commenced in September 2013.

The NDA Government believes the move will help address India's widening trade deficit with China, which has led to the government pushing China to source more products from here, Shah said.

“This was a long pending demand to strengthen India China trade and investment ties which has now been fulfilled by the new government. In return, the Chinese Government may agree to allow India to set up industrial parks there in China.”

Gujarat has become a favoured destination for industrial investments after the then Gujarat Chief Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to China in 2011. Modi, now the Indian PM, is likely to meet Chinese President Xi Jinping on the sidelines of the BRICS summit in Brazil next month.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 27 Jun 2014 10:02

India-China trade imbalance, a matter of concern - Smriti kak Ramachandran, The Hindu
Keen to enhance bilateral ties and trade relations, India and China are likely to discuss border issues at the talks scheduled during Vice-President Hamid Ansari’s Beijing visit starting Thursday.

Speaking to mediapersons on board a special aircraft, Mr. Ansari said: “China is a very important country, our most important neighbour, with whom our bilateral trade is almost at the top. Both governments are committed to furthering relations.”

While he declined to comment on the specifics of the talks, he said all matters on bilateral issues would be taken up. Mr. Ansari, who is on his first visit to China, said both nations were keen on giving a fillip to trade and investment. “Trade imbalance is a matter of concern for us. The government is seized of the matter.” He said the issue would be taken up by Minister of State for Commerce Nirmala Sitharaman, who is accompanying him, with her counterpart.

Bilateral talks apart, the Indian delegation will also participate in the 60th anniversary of the “Panchsheel Treaty” (five principles of peaceful coexistence).

Unusual gesture

In Xian, the first stop of the Vice-President, he was received by the Vice-Governor of Shaanxi Province, Wang Lixia. As a mark of honour to the visiting Vice-President, traffic in the city was halted to allow a free passage to the Indian delegation.

A senior official said this gesture is unusual in China as traffic is usually not halted even for their own heads of government.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 27 Jun 2014 10:58

China Open to Holding First Formal Talks between Abe & Xi - Japan Times
A senior Chinese politician hopes to pave the way for Beijing and Tokyo to hold the first formal meeting between their leaders on the sidelines of a regional summit in November, a source familiar with the matter said Thursday.

“China also wants to create the environment for mutual concessions. It is important to have the environment of both sides making efforts to aim for the meeting,” the source quoted Wang Jiarui, head of the International Department of the Communist Party’s Central Committee, as saying when he held talks with Japanese opposition lawmakers Monday in Beijing.

“Leaving this situation as it is will damage both countries,” he was quoted as saying. “There are adverse effects on corporate activities and investment. We have to find a way out of the difficulties.”

Wang, however, also told a delegation from the Social Democratic Party led by chief Tadatomo Yoshida that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe first needs to make clear what he wants to discuss with Chinese President Xi Jinping if a meeting becomes possible, according to the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

“There is no point in holding a meeting between the two leaders if the prime minister maintains his wrong position toward China,” Wang said, according to the source.

Wang’s remarks are believed to have been aimed at seeking compromises or new approaches from the Japanese government over territorial and historical issues that have brought relations between the countries to their lowest point in many decades.

On Tuesday, when China’s fourth-highest ranking member of the Communist Party, Yu Zhengsheng, met with the delegation from the small opposition party, he said that whether bilateral relations can be improved depends on the choices Abe makes in the coming months.

Yu, chairman of China’s top political advisory body, said that for the leaders’ meeting to be held on the sidelines of this year’s summit of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum in Beijing, Abe needs to change his stance on two issues — war-related Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo and a group of Japan-controlled islets in the East China Sea.

Wang also attended the meeting between Yu and the Japanese delegation. Wang’s remarks, likely reflecting the Chinese leadership’s latest thinking toward Japan, have not been made public either by the Communist Party or Yoshida, who held a news conference after meeting with the two politicians.

Abe and Xi have yet to hold official talks since they each came to office more than a year ago.

Sino-Japanese relations, already strained over the Senkaku Islands, were further aggravated with Abe’s December visit to the shrine, which honors millions of war dead along with Japanese military leaders who were convicted as Class-A war criminals by an Allied tribunal.

Yu did not specify what exactly Abe needs to do when he met with the Japanese delegation, but what he meant was presumably similar to a message he conveyed to the Japanese government during a meeting last month with lawmakers from Abe’s ruling party.

Yu told the delegation of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party that bilateral relations can be repaired if Abe promises not to visit the shrine again and his government admits the existence of a sovereignty dispute over the Senkakus, a small chain of uninhabited islets off Taiwan claimed as Diaoyu in China and Tiaoyutai by Taiwan.

Since spring, senior Chinese officials have begun accepting various Japanese delegations and sending clearer signals that, while the cause of soured ties boils down to Abe’s political stance, Beijing is nevertheless willing to promote exchanges with Japanese companies, political parties and local government officials.

In the latest in a series of visits from Japan, transport minister Akihiro Ota arrived in Beijing on Thursday. He is the first time Japanese minister to visit the Chinese capital since Abe’s government was formed in December 2012.

During his visit through Saturday, Ota, a former leader of New Komeito, the junior coalition partner of Abe’s ruling LDP, is hoping to meet with senior Chinese officials and attend the 2014 Beijing International Tourism Expo.

On Friday, Ota is scheduled to meet with Chinese officials including Vice Premier Liu Yandong, Shao Qiwei, head of the National Tourism Administration, and former Chinese State Councilor Tang Jiaxuan, according to Japanese officials.

In the virtual absence of high-level government-to-government contacts between the two countries, a group led by Masahiko Komura, vice president of the LDP, also held talks with Zhang Dejiang, ranked third in the Communist Party’s powerful seven-member Politburo Standing Committee, in May.

Komura told Zhang that Abe is hoping to hold an official meeting with Xi when the APEC summit takes place in Beijing.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 27 Jun 2014 16:02

China explores security cooperation with Pakistan & India: Report - DAWN
Beijing is exploring a trilateral security cooperation with its neighbouring countries India and Pakistan, said a report published on NDTV on Friday.

Journalists representing the Global Times, an affiliate of the ruling Communist Party of China’s (CPC) People’s Daily publication group, paid a visit to Pakistan and sought views from scholars of Islamabad Institute of Strategic Studies (IISS) on a likely India-China-Pakistan trilateral cooperation.

Analysts based in Beijing consider it a vital initiative on China’s part to further its relations with India over rising concerns of the withdrawal of US troops from Afghanistan and the possible shattering effect it could posit to the region, particularly China’s Xinjiang province where security forces were currently engaged in dealing with attacks launched by the East Turkestan Islamic Movement (ETIM).

"So far no formal trilateral meeting has taken place, but the idea sounds excellent," Najam Rafique, senior IISS research fellow told NDTV about the joint trilateral mechanism.

Before that, a lot of ground needs to be covered, particularly in terms of India and Pakistan, he said.

"China can play a role in ensuring that both countries are able to disperse the historical barricades and move in terms of ensuring the security which is going to be based on not traditional military security, but economic, social and popular security in the region," he said.

Meanwhile, scholar Ahmed Rashid said China and Pakistan were currently building the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor whereas China was also developing the Bangladesh-China-India-Myanmar Economic Corridor.

He said the Chinese policy would pave way for better investment and economic relations in the region while also creating further room for cooperation.

Whereas analyst Malik Khokhar said a joint mechanism should be set up in order to reduce military hostilities among the three nations.

He said that in the absence of the mechanism, there would be unending competition because if India would compete against China, then it would definitely have more than enough capability to compete against Pakistan.

Scholar Rana Anjum said it was hoped that Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government in India would work with China and Pakistan for greater prosperity in the region.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 28 Jun 2014 09:03

Iraq chaos shows need to revive Panchsheel: Senior Chinese Leader - Ananth Krishnan, The Hindu

Jolly good. China should immediately sign a Panchsheel agreement with Iraq and the US. India should have nothing to do with this dubious approach unless we realize the perfidy and are willing to play the game to the fullest extent and pay back in the same coin, unlike last time.

As India and China mark the sixtieth anniversary of their “Panchsheel” or “five principles of peaceful coexistence” agreement on Saturday, a senior Chinese leader has pointed to the United States-led invasion of Iraq and the recent chaos in the war-torn country as underlining the need for renewing the six decades-old idea.

Speaking a day ahead of the anniversary, which will be marked here by Vice-President Hamid Ansari and Chinese President Xi Jinping, Dai Bingguo, the top Chinese diplomat over the past decade, said in an apparent reference to the U.S. that “hegemonism was staging a comeback” and referred to the war in Iraq as “a lesson” for emerging countries.

Mr. Dai, who retired as State Councillor last year and was the Special Representative on the border talks with India for a decade starting in 2003, also sought to assure China’s neighbours who are concerned about an increasingly assertive posture from Beijing in the region that his government would not “stray from its commitment” to following the “Panchsheel” mode of diplomacy. :rotfl:

The “five principles,” which refer to mutual respect for sovereignty, non-aggression, non-interference in internal affairs, cooperation for mutual benefit and peaceful co-existence, were first invoked in a 1954 treaty on trade between India and Tibet and championed by Nehru and former Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai.

Mr. Dai, however, argued that Panchsheel was “not a piece of relic in a museum, but a full principle to guide international relations in the 21st century.” “Hegemonism is staging a comeback in the form of new interventionism by Western countries,” Mr. Dai said in an address here to mark the anniversary. The new government under Mr. Xi, he said, was focusing on domestic development which “needs a sound international environment and neighbourhood.”

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby abhishek_sharma » 28 Jun 2014 09:51


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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 28 Jun 2014 13:17

China's Panchsheel Diplomacy out in the open. It has released its official map today wherein Arunachal Pradesh is shown as part of China. Just when our VP is on the Chinese soil and we are celebrating Panchsheel.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby satya » 28 Jun 2014 14:50

PRC is becoming so predictable in its actions. Coloring a google map , no new trick , is that all ? Where are those 'deep thinking ' chinese civilization card carrying mandarins? We invited Tibetian PM and he came.Let's see if PRC can get even one common Indian citizen from AP to attend swearing-in ceremony in Beijing . Oh wait! they don't have these ceremonies , but they do have proffessional actors who act like politicians/leaders by fine tuning their timing on clapping and similar hair style apart from some hired artists acting as tribals wearing tribal costumes borrowed from Unkil Hu stall for a day !All this for TV appearance ! All look same like robots clapping a fix number of times , smile precise to the milimeter on face and using one particular brand of hair color :rotfl: . Is this the leadership that is going to challenge us or even tiny-miny Philiphines ? Here's the thing: we got real people including the entire leadership of tibet ( not even mentioning AP ) on our side and territory and all PRC has is 50 cent trolls . Seem like they haven't gotten over the shock of a Tibetian PM attending along 'SAARC' leaders. Can they pull such an event by inviting ASEAN leaders ? We all know the answer . So let's chill and eat chowmin and manchurian desi tadka style .

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 28 Jun 2014 19:50

Panchsheel can act as a catalyst: Ansari - Ananth Krishnan, The Hindu
India and China have to narrow down differences and build on convergences by exploiting the potential of Panchsheel -- the five principles of peaceful coexistence -- propounded by the two countries along with Myanmar in 1954, Vice President Hamid Ansari said on Saturday.

“In our respective bilateral relations, our common interests far outweigh our differences,” Mr. Ansari said while addressing a commemorative meeting of the 60th anniversary of the five principles in which Chinese President Xi Jinping and his Myanmar counterpart Thien Sein also took part.

“On the way forward, we have to build on our convergences and narrow down our differences. Panchsheel can help us exploit this potential for cooperation and come up with fresh, innovative initiatives to improve the lives of our people,” Mr. Ansari said.

Panchsheel was enunciated by former Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru along with his then Chinese counterpart Zhou Enlai. Myanmar subsequently endorsed it.

Mr. Ansari, who is on a five-day visit to China, said India, China and Myanmar are bound by age-old linkages and geography.

“We may be at different stages of development but we can learn from each other’s national experiences,” he said.

“We need a new paradigm for global action. Our destinies are intertwined. Our quest is, should be, for a framework in which opportunities and challenges for the betterment of our societies co-exist,” he said.

“In this endeavour, Panchsheel can act as a catalyst to help us better coordinate our efforts, enhance mutual understanding, share developmental experiences and tackle trans-national threats more effectively,” he said.

In his address, Mr. Ansari said besides being ancient civilizations and neighbours, India and China are also strategic partners.

“Historically, there has been much that has bound us together, not merely through the exchange of goods and commodities but through a flourishing interchange of ideas, values and philosophies,” he said.

“The imperatives of the 21st century propel us towards a better understanding of each other’s objectives and more purposeful cooperation for mutual benefit. Greater interaction between the people of our two countries, in all fields, is a necessary condition for stronger overall bilateral relations,” he said.


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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby sanjaykumar » 29 Jun 2014 04:55

It still shows Eastern Turkestan.....wait a few years.


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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 29 Jun 2014 07:36

Cartographic depictions do not change the reality on the ground: MEA - Ananth Krishnan, The Hindu
Though India reiterated to China that Arunachal Pradesh was “an integral and inalienable” part of the country, Foreign Secretary Sujatha Singh declined to say whether the map issue figured in Saturday’s talks between Vice president Hamid Ansari and with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang.

The External Affairs Ministry in New Delhi said in a statement on Saturday that “cartographic depictions do not change the reality on the ground.” The MEA said “the fact that Arunachal Pradesh is an integral and inalienable part of India has been conveyed to Chinese authorities at several occasions including at the very highest level.”

To questions, Ms. Singh only said, “We raise all issues of concern with the Chinese leadership. Our position is well known,” after Beijing issued a new official map depicting its territorial claims on the State.

Ms. Singh said the relationship had “reached a level of maturity” where both sides raised “all issues of concern.” She declined to say what those issues were.

China issued a new “vertical map” this week, primarily to showcase its claims on the South China Sea in greater detail, amid disputes with Vietnam and the Philippines.


Asked about China’s plans to go ahead with an economic corridor connecting its western Xinjiang region with Pakistan through Pakistan-occupied Kashmir, including a proposed railway line — Chinese media said this week a pre-feasibility study was under way — Ms. Singh said, “Like I said, I don’t want to go into issues of detail. This is a discussion that is a privileged discussion.”

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 29 Jun 2014 07:39

India & China may soon ink pact on Industrial parks - Smriti Kak Ramachandran, The Hindu
India and China are close to inking an agreement on setting up of industrial parks.

On Saturday, following a bilateral meeting between the two sides, Foreign Secretary Sujatha Singh told mediapersons here [Beijing] that both countries had agreed that a growing trade deficit was unsustainable.

Without giving out the specifics, she said India was eyeing an investment of $1 trillion by China. “If trade and investment between the two countries have to grow, we need to work towards reducing the trade deficit,” she said.

The details of the industrial parks will be fleshed out at a meeting between Minister of State for Commerce Nirmala Sitharaman and her Chinese counterpart in Beijing on Monday. New Delhi is keen to address the nearly $40 billion trade deficit with China.

Indian Ambassador to China Ashok K Kantha said the issue of correcting trade imbalance was reaffirmed at the meeting between Vice-President Hamid Ansari and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang. Given China’s track record in manufacturing, India was keen to seek its involvement. Mr. Kantha said the focus would be on broad-basing economic engagement with China and enhancing two-way investment flows.

India wants greater market access to cut the deficit. The Narendra Modi government is keen to reinvigorate the manufacturing sector to create more jobs and give a fillip to the economy.

The issue of setting up of industrial parks came up during the recent visit of Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi to India and his meeting with his counterpart Sushma Swaraj.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 29 Jun 2014 07:45

Panchsheel Principles Still Relevant: Xi Jinping Smriti Kak Ramachandran & Ananth Krishnan, The Hindu
Quoting from one of Rabindra Nath Tagore’s verses on friendship, ‘... If you think friendship can be won through war, spring will fade away before your eyes’, President Xi Jinping on Friday reiterated the virtues of good relations between neighbours, peace and cooperation and amity in the region as envisaged six decades ago in the Panchsheel treaty {It is like Satan quoting from the Bible} among India, China and Myanmar. At the 60th commemoration of the Panchsheel here, he asserted that China would follow the five principles of Panchsheel even as it is ready to work with the West to uphold world peace and development.

Without taking names, he frowned upon the practice of one state flexing its muscles while “injustice and inequalities still exist in international affairs.” In his address delivered at the Great Hall of the People, located at the western edge of Tiananmen Square, he stressed the need to revisit the five guiding principles of Panchsheel, which, he said, had been endorsed by a host of international organisations and instruments. The Chinese President said no country should monopolise international affairs and with a word of caution against countries that use the “law of the jungle” by which the “strong bully the weak,” he called for strengthening South-South Cooperation and bettering North-South dialogue.

Mr. Xi spoke of adhering to territorial integrity and sovereignty, mutual non-aggression and non-interference in internal matters, and peaceful co-existence — the basics of Panchsheel, and said these continue to remain relevant and grow.

“All good things must evolve,” he said, and asserting a country’s rights over its foreign policy, he said no other state could be allowed to dictate its foreign relations.

India reciprocated its commitment to Panchsheel with Vice-President Hamid Ansari calling attention to the need for greater interaction between the people of India and China in all fields for stronger bilateral relations.

“India believes that globalisation should transform the world into, as Mahatma Gandhi had envisaged, ‘a federation of friendly, interdependent nations,’ without domination or exploitation. Panchsheel is the basis of such a world order. We need to work together to develop a framework for equitable globalisation, for genuine multilateralism, and for seeking common and fair solutions for challenges that transcend national borders and threaten humanity,” he said.

The Vice-President said there was a need for a new paradigm for global action and Panchsheel could act as a catalyst to better coordinate efforts, enhance mutual understanding, share developmental experiences and tackle trans-national threats more effectively.

We gather here today to reaffirm the timeless relevance of Panchsheel in establishing a peaceful, stable, prosperous and secure world. As the co-originators of Panchsheel, it is our duty to revitalise our friendly relations and to promote cooperation as the only way forward towards the realisation of our common goals of progress and prosperity for our peoples,” Mr. Ansari said.

Stood the test of time

President of Myanmar Thein Sein said the five principles had stood the test of time, matured and become part of the inter-state relations. :eek: “Myanmar is confident that the five principles will play a greater role in interstate relations,” President Sein said.

He acknowledged the “significant role” played by China and India in helping the economy of Myanmar and said having consistently followed the Panchsheel directives, and a non-aligned foreign policy, his country would cherish friendly ties with all nations, especially its neighbours.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby Shankas » 29 Jun 2014 09:37

Image

I think it is time we Indians started showing such maps whenever we talk about China. Seeing a separate Xinjiang and Tibet will over time have an impact. The old saying a picture is worth a thousand words applies here.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby Shankas » 29 Jun 2014 09:37

Image

I think it is time we Indians started showing such maps whenever we talk about China. Seeing a separate Xinjiang and Tibet will over time have an impact. The old saying a picture is worth a thousand words applies here.

Can someone make a map showing Lhasa and Urumqui as capitals.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby sanjaykumar » 29 Jun 2014 10:47

I thinlk this map shows the "Tibet Autonomous Region" (someone's still got an Animal Farm sense of politics). Tibet of 1948 is in fact substantial more expansive.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby Paul » 29 Jun 2014 11:06

Parts of Tibet were abosrbed into Qinghai province north of Tibet. IIRC, the dalai Lama was born in a city part of present day Qinghai state.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby svinayak » 29 Jun 2014 11:25

SSridhar wrote:Cartographic depictions do not change the reality on the ground: MEA - Ananth Krishnan, The Hindu
Though India reiterated to China that Arunachal Pradesh was “an integral and inalienable” part of the country, Foreign Secretary Sujatha Singh declined to say whether the map issue figured in Saturday’s talks between Vice president Hamid Ansari and with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang.


http://saisaonline.org/analysis/battles ... 62-walong/

Image

Image

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby Paul » 29 Jun 2014 11:56

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amdo#media ... vinces.png

They split Tibet intoo three parts and aborbed them into other provinces.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby svinayak » 29 Jun 2014 12:10

Image

Image
The Indian government's 1954 maps unilaterally delimited the Sino-Indian border in the Aksai Chin, and Sino-Indian borders are no longer indicated as undemarcated.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 29 Jun 2014 13:10

Xi calls for China Frontier Defence - Japan Times

President Xi Jinping said China should strengthen its frontier defenses on land and sea, state media reported Saturday, amid territorial disputes with neighboring nations that have accused Beijing of being increasingly aggressive in pressing its claims.

Xi made the remarks at a “national meeting” on Friday also attended by Premier Li Keqiang and Vice Premier Zhang Gaoli, Xinhua News Agency said.

In his remarks on the defense of China’s borders, Xi said the country’s weakness in the past had allowed others to bully it.

“Foreign aggressors broke China’s land and sea defense hundreds of times, plunging the Chinese nation into the abysm of calamity,” Xi added, calling on the people not to forget the history of humiliation and to build a strong frontier,” the report said. “Xi urged China’s frontier defenders to meticulously monitor and control the frontier and to mount actions to defend the country’s maritime right, while implementing an overall national security outlook.”

The nationalistic-tinged comments that were reported are Xi’s latest calling for a tougher military stance. Since becoming China’s leader during a once-in-a-decade power transition that lasted from November 2012 until March 2013, Xi has called for the country to boost its military into a force that can “win battles.”

Other officials also say China will fiercely defend territory it considers its own, but insist the country poses no threat to others.

Xi’s reference to frontiers comes as China is engaged in occasionally tense maritime disputes over territory with Japan, Vietnam and the Philippines.

On land, China has a long-standing dispute with India. And Beijing has also blamed what it calls foreign-based “religious extremists” for fomenting terrorism in its largely Muslim far-western region of Xinjiang, which borders Central Asia.

China’s Communist Party leaders have for decades stressed that under their leadership that began in 1949 the country finally overcame more than a century of humiliation by outside powers dating back to the Opium Wars of the 19th century. Under the last imperial Qing Dynasty, China also saw incursions by Western powers and Japan that secured trade and legal concessions as well as control of territory seen in China as unfair.

References to national humiliations, such as the pillaging of the Old Summer Palace by a joint British and French military expedition in 1860 and the suppression of the Boxer Rebellion in 1900 by a multinational force of Europeans, Americans and Japanese, are common examples.

The Xinhua report also said, however, that Xi urged “both the military and civilian communities to strike a balance between frontier defense and economic development.” China’s leaders, while stressing their nationalistic credentials, are keenly aware that their support also depends on how successfully they steer the world’s second-largest economy.


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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby ManjaM » 29 Jun 2014 16:53

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/416 ... enter.html

After making incursion bids in Ladakh through land route, Chinese troops have made several attempts to enter Indian waters at Pangong lake nestled in the higher reaches of Ladakh with the latest incident reported on Friday.

According to reports reaching various government agencies here, the Army had a face-off with the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) as recent as June 27 in the lake when their troops tried to enter the Indian waters.

Udhampur-based Northern Command Army spokesperson Col S Goswami declined to answer a query from PTI about the latest incursion attempts and instead was asked to "approach PRO (Army)".

However, there was no reply from his side when it was pointed out to him that he was the spokesperson of the Army.

The Spokesperson of the Ministry of External Affairs when asked by reporters yesterday about reports of fresh incursions by Chinese troops in Ladakh region merely said Indian soldiers guarding the country's borders will be able to provide an appropriate response should any incident occur on the border.

According to sources privy to the development, Chinese troops were intercepted at the imaginary line that is supposed to be the Line of Actual Control (LAC) in the lake and sent back after the face-off drill during which the army personnel on both sides wave banners claiming it to be their territory.

The incursions have taken place in eastern Ladakh and on the northern bank of Pangong Lake, located 168 km from Leh, the sources said.

The Chinese patrols used to come frequently from the northern and southern banks of this lake, whose 45 km stretch is on the Indian side while another 90 km is on the Chinese side.

However, every attempt was foiled by the Army which has been equipped with new boats.
The high-speed interceptor boats, that were bought from the US, can accommodate nearly 15 soldiers and are equipped with radars, infra-red and GPS systems.

These boats are stated to be as good as the Chinese vessels and are used to conduct reconnaissance and area domination patrols.

The sources said the Chinese patrol boats were backed up by PLA troops from the banks of the lake and the move was apparently to put psychological pressure on the Indian troops who man the area.

The situation along the banks of the lake has always remained volatile with Chinese troops being intercepted by Indian Army patrol several times after the three-week long stand-off in the Depsang plains of Daulat Beg Oldie (DBO) in May last year.

The areas where the face-off frequently occured included the Finger-VIII area, also known as Siri Jap. China has managed to construct a road up to Finger-IV area which also falls under Siri Jap area and is five km deep into the LAC, the sources said.

China in its maps claim that this area belongs to it while the Indian Army has been claiming it to be part of Ladakh.

However, as the Indian side was trying to back its claim during negotiations, the Chinese army constructed a metal-top road and claimed the area to be part of Aksai Chin area, the sources said, adding many a time the Indian Army has used the same road to patrol the area and lay claim over it.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby Paul » 29 Jun 2014 17:01

http://indianexpress.com/article/india/ ... h-reports/

Chinese troops make several attempts to enter Indian waters in Ladakh: reports


After making incursion bids in Ladakh through land route, Chinese troops have made several attempts to enter Indian waters at Pangong lake nestled in the higher reaches of Ladakh, with the latest incident reported on Friday.
According to reports reaching various government agencies, the Army had a face-off with the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) on June 27 in the lake when their troops tried to enter the Indian waters.
Udhampur-based Northern Command Army spokesperson Col S Goswami declined to answer a query about the latest incursion attempts and instead was asked to “approach PRO (Army)”.
However, there was no reply from his side when it was pointed out to him that he was the spokesperson of the Army.
The Spokesperson of the Ministry of External Affairs, when asked by reporters on Saturday about reports of fresh incursions by Chinese troops in Ladakh region, merely said Indian soldiers guarding the country’s borders will be able to provide an appropriate response should any incident occur on the border.
According to sources privy to the development, Chinese troops were intercepted at the imaginary line that is supposed to be the Line of Actual Control (LAC) in the lake and sent back after the face-off drill during which the army personnel on both sides wave banners claiming it to be their territory.
The incursions have taken place in eastern Ladakh and on the northern bank of Pangong Lake, located 168 km from Leh, the sources said.
The Chinese patrols used to come frequently from the northern and southern banks of this lake, whose 45 km stretch is on the Indian side while another 90 km is on the Chinese side.
However, every attempt was foiled by the Army which has been equipped with new boats.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 29 Jun 2014 17:13

Geographically, three mountain ranges are important in understanding the border dispute. The Himalayas (the Westernmost), the Karakoram (in the middle) and the Kun Lun (the Easternmost). They all meet at the Pamir Knot at the Wakhan Corridor. The Pamir Ranges then extend westwards first into Hindu Raj Ranges and afterwards, the Hindu Kush Ranges. Tibet lies enclosed among the Himalayas, Karakorams and the Kun Lun. The Karakoram is bounded on the northeast by the edge of the Tibetan Plateau, and on the north by the Wakhan Corridor and the Pamir Mountains. Just to the west of the northwest end of the Karakoram lies the Hindu Raj range, beyond which is the Hindu Kush range. The southern boundary of the Karakoram is formed by the Gilgit, Indus, and Shyok Rivers, which separate the range from the north western end of the Himalaya range proper.

The border story starts in the year 1865 when British Surveyor W.H.Johnson surveyed the land extent of the State of Jammu & Kashmir. The Kashmir Maharaja’s outpost at Shahidullah (now Xaidulla) made Johnson include the Kun Lun watershed (further west of the Karakoram) as part of J&K. Pangong Lake (Pangong Tso in Tibet) is the southern end of the Johnson Line and is about five hours drive from Leh through the third highest motorable pass, Chang La. The Pangong Tso is south of the great bend of the Shyok River around Siachen just before the Nubra river joins it. Thus, Shaidullah (further north of the Karakoram Pass ) made the eastern end of Johnson’s survey while Pongong Tso made the southern end of the survey for Ladakh. There existed therefore a gap in the boundary between Pongong Tso and Shahidullah through the Karakoram Pass (the Karakoram pass was never in dispute and which was already accepted as forming the border between Ladakh and Tibet). The Johnson Line thus confirmed Aksai Chin as part of J&K. By 1878, China had conquered Eastern Turkistan (later known as Sinkiang and now Xinjiang) and had erected boundary markers at the Karakoram Pass.

In c. 1897, Sir John Ardagh proposed a boundary line along the crest of the Kun Lun north of the Yarkand river (The Yarkand River orginates in the Karakoram very near Siachen Glacier. One tributary of the Yarkand is the Shaksgam river. It is the Shaksgam valley that Pakistan conceded to China in c. 1963 as part of the Border Agreement with China). This proposal fixed the gap between Pongong Tso and Shahidullah through the Karakoram Pass. These lines together became known as the Johnson-Ardagh Boundary Line.

In c. 1899, Britain re-drew the boundary as China and Britain became friends and the boundary was re-fixed along the Karakoram rather than Kun Lun further east as the Johnson-Ardagh line did. This new line was known as Macartney-McDonald Line. The Chinese never replied to the British proposal. Britain used both boundaries according to the exigencies of circumstances.

India, since its independence, has recognized only the Johnson-Ardagh Line in Ladakh which gives the entire Aksai Chin to India.

On the Eastern front, the British had demarcated the Indian boundary along the foothills of Bhutan and then along the foothills of the Tibetan pleatue right upto Tawang. In c. 1907, as part of their Great Game, Britain and Russia had agreed upon Tibet as a buffer zone between the two empires on the North East just as Afghanistan was on the North West. By c. 1910 China began to exert great influence on Tibet as the Manchu dynasty retreated. As the Chinese power suddenly collapsed in Tibet by c. 1912, the British, Tibet wanted to secure its boundaries with China and approached Great Britain for assistance. The British saw an opportunity to secure Indian borders and the British Empire called for a conference in Shimla between itself and China where it proposed Tibet as a buffer state, just like it did with Russia three years earlier. The deliberations lasted nearly nine months (October 1913 to July 1914) and mainly discussed two issues China’s suzerainty over Tibet and Tibet’s borders with India. While discussions were going on in Simla, Tibet and Great Britain signed another agreement on the India-Tibet border by March 24, 1914 at New Delhi, which is now known as the McMahon Line after the India Foreign Office Secretary, McMahon. The boundary line was drawn up on the well known principle of watershed as natural markers of boundaries. Though the Chinese representative signed the treaty, it was also later repudiated by the Chinese government

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby svinayak » 29 Jun 2014 21:17

as part of their Great Game, Britain and Russia had agreed upon Tibet as a buffer zone between the two empires on the North East just as Afghanistan was on the North West.

We see that Russia is really not keep in the change in Tibet due to past agreement with British. This was stated by the Russian govt intel head.

Now India needs to take away British away from the sub continent . India has to take away British away from the Indian boundaries

India has to redefine Indian borders with Indian interest.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 30 Jun 2014 05:56

We are open to investments: India tells China - Ananth Krishnan, Business Line
Ahead of Monday’s trade talks in Beijing — the first at the ministerial-level between the new Government in New Delhi and China — Commerce and Industry Minister Nirmala Seetharaman has said that the Narendra Modi Government would underline its intent to create a more open investment environment for foreign firms, from China and elsewhere, starting with a landmark agreement to set up at least four Chinese industrial parks in India.

Seetharaman and her counterpart Gao Hucheng will on Monday sign an MoU that will for the first time establish a formal framework for Chinese companies to invest in dedicated industrial parks. Four such parks are on the cards, once Chinese companies decide on the locations. Seetharaman said she would have a clear message for her Chinese interlocutors. “When we are inviting investment we cannot be sitting on a ton load of bureaucratic difficulty,” she said. “We are inviting investment with the sense that ease of business is important.”

She said there was “immense scope” for Chinese investment, “not just for manufacturing but many sectors where the Chinese have an advantage. Whether manufacturing or railways, we could always find out more such areas where Chinese investments can be encouraged”.

Rising expectations

Modi’s election victory has spurred rising expectations in China that India will become more investment-friendly, amid perceptions here that the Indian market has been, in recent years, less than welcoming to Chinese investment. Chinese investment in India, till date, totals $1.1 billion, according to Beijing’s figures.

“Our efforts are towards fulfilling that kind of expectation, not just from Chinese but within India too, we want to restore confidence in the economy,” the Commerce Minister said. Seetharaman said greater Chinese investment, for instance through industrial parks, would pave the way for narrowing the record trade deficit which ballooned to $31 billion last year, when bilateral trade declined from a high of $73 billion in 2011 to $65 billion. With Chinese manufacturing flooding the Indian market, Seetharaman said “What is important is to find a production activity to be centred in India so that jobs are created for Indians”.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby UlanBatori » 30 Jun 2014 07:12

Look at this place!

Or this

Chinese troops make bids to enter Indian waters in Ladakh: Reports

After making incursion bids in Ladakh through land route, Chinese troops have made several attempts to enter Indian waters at Pangong lake nestled in the higher reaches of Ladakh with the latest incident reported on Friday.

According to reports reaching various government agencies here, the Army had a face-off with the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) as recent as June 27 in the lake when their troops tried to enter the Indian waters.


I just realized why the PLA want Tibet (I mean Northern Arunachal): there's hundreds of pretty large lakes out there!

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 30 Jun 2014 08:36

Army Chief to Visit China from July 2 - The Hindu
Army Chief General Bikram Singh will be in China on a rare visit from July 2 to 5, during which he will hold talks with the top brass of the military and Foreign Ministry officials, besides addressing the military academy.

General Singh will be the second Army Chief to visit China.

His visit is taking place after a nine-year gap. The former Army chief Gen. N.C. Vij had visited China in 2005.

General Singh, who also chair of the Committee of Chiefs of Staff of the armed forces, will hold talks with General Fan Changlong, Vice-Chairman of China’s Military Commission, officials here said on Sunday. PTI

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 30 Jun 2014 11:39

India seeks easier norms for entry of its goods into China - Economic Times
Before grabbing China's offer to invest in and help develop India's infrastructure, the Narendra Modi-led government wants to ensure easier norms in return for India to export IT, pharmaceuticals, farm goods, and health and tourism services so that the trade imbalance between the two countries gets reduced.

In response to the five-year trade and economic planning cooperation plan that China submitted to India in February, the new government at the Centre has proposed to raise the the country's exports to $95 billion over the next five years from $15 billion at present.

"India-China trade in the next five years must stand at $200 billion, comprising $105 billion worth of imports and $95 billion exports," a government official familiar with the development told ET. China is now India's biggest trading partner but the trade balance is heavily skewed in China's favour.

India has said the trade deficit must be cut to one-fourth, targeting $10 billion by 2020 from close to $36 billion at present. "The only way to cut trade deficit is by asking China to invest in manufacturing activity. Rather than importing, China can manufacture machinery, heavy duty power equipment etc in SEZs (special economic zones), NIMZs (national investment and manufacturing zones) or industrial parks," said the official, who did not wish to be identified.

Image

The Cabinet has already cleared signing of a memorandum of understanding with China for setting up industrial parks in India. The five-year trade and economic planning road map prepared by India after several rounds of interministerial consultations has noted that information technology sector can be a win-win for both economies if China eases its licensing norms to allow participation of Indian companies in local projects.

Pharmaceutical companies, which rank among India's potential strengths in bilateral trade, face registration hurdles in China, where it takes three-five years for registration compared with just three-six months in India.India has also asked China to allow export of buffalo meat to the country.

China had proposed in its five-year plan to enter critical areas including telecom, railways, roads, and nuclear and solar power for investment in India. While China was silent on narrowing the trade deficit, it noted that the gap was on account of the very nature of the two economies, China's being manufacturing-led and India's services-led.

China, which has accumulated over $4 trillion of forex reserves, plans to invest $500 billion overseas in the coming years, it announced in March.

"There is no need to fear investment from China. It just needs to be leveraged well. We need investment in building our roads, railways, manufacturing. Barring the sensitive areas, flow of funds should not be discouraged from China," the official cited earlier said.

Although India has said that it will welcome investment from China in sectors like roads, effluent treatment and railways, the matter is yet to be examined by the ministries of defence and home affairs. China is keen on railways, particularly electrification, high-speed trains, wagons, last-mile connectivity and gauge conversion.

It has also identified sewage treatment and tunnel building among areas where it can offer substantial expertise. China has invested about $0.4 billion in India in the past 14 years, contributing just 0.18% to the overall foreign direct investment in the country.


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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 30 Jun 2014 14:02

China invites India to join Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank - Atul Aneja, The Hindu
China has invited India to participate in the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) — Beijing’s brainchild to steer development along the ancient “silk route” free from the influence of western-backed lenders such as the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank (ADB).

Diplomatic sources, who did not wish to be named, told The Hindu that China had sought India’s participation during the visit to New Delhi by Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi soon after the Modi government assumed office. “It is clear that the Chinese will not tie the lending from the investment bank to non-economic issues, such as human rights {China has blocked lending by ADB for projects in Arunachal while it went ahead with building the rail cum road network to Kashgar or in building the Diamar Basha dam, both on Pakistan Occupied Kashmir. It is naive to think that China would not use some excuse, if not human rights, to leverage the lending. Separately, there is a BRICS bank also on the offing with a similar investment of USD 100 B. China may also be trying to sabotage that project with its own bank} , which western-backed lenders have often leveraged as instruments of political influence and control,” the sources observed.

India is yet to make up its mind on Beijing’s offer, though partnership in the bank could, eventually, facilitate New Delhi’s access to infrastructural funding. Sources pointed out that there are major geopolitical implications in China’s offer as there is little doubt that Beijing now views India as a potential partner in an interlocking politico-economic network of neighbouring countries.

India’s entry into SCO

“If India opens its doors to Chinese investments, especially in the field of infrastructure, after taking care of the sensitivities in the security arena, New Delhi’s entry into the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) could become the prize,” the sources said. India, along with Pakistan and Iran, has observer status in the SCO, a China and Russia-led grouping, whose role would be central in defining the balance of economic and political power in Eurasia.

Analysts pointed out that following the events in Libya, Syria and Ukraine, China and Russia have reinforced their geopolitical connections, evident in the signing of a $400-billion gas pipeline deal. But New Delhi, too, could be part of this expanding arrangement, for visiting Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitri Rogozin said in New Delhi earlier this month that the extension of this pipeline to India would be “one of the largest infrastructure projects that could be conceived”.

The Financial Times is reporting that 22 countries, including some of the wealthy monarchies of West Asia, have so far shown an interest in China’s bold push to establish the AIIB, with a registered capital of $100 billion. The fund is sizeable enough to compete with the ADB, which runs on a capital of $165 billion and is dominated by Japan and the United States.

An ADB study has projected that Asia would require an annual funding of $800 billion till 2020 for developing infrastructure, offering China enough financial leg room to exercise its soft power in its neighbourhood.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 30 Jun 2014 20:28

Enough space in the world for rise of India and China: Ansari - The Hindu
There is enough space in the world for the rise of India and China, Vice President Hamid Ansari said on Monday while asserting that the two neighbours have transcended bilateral scope in ties as they view each other as partners for mutual benefit and not as rivals.

On the global stage, the two countries, that account for about 37 per cent of the world’s population, are at the forefront of the emergence of a “more democratic global order” to resolve global issues in an equitable manner, he said while delivering a speech at the prestigious Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in Beijing.

“There is enough space in the world for the development of India and China, and the world needs the common development of both countries. As two large developing countries, our common interests far outweigh our differences,” Mr. Ansari said in his speech on ‘Calibrated Futurology: India, China and the World’.

Mr. Ansari said India admires China’s achievements in terms of development and hopes to see the country become a developed country soon.

He noted that it is very rare in history that two large neighbours have become rising powers at the same time.

“Our destinies are linked by geography and history. We welcome China’s peaceful development and regard it as a mutually reinforcing process,” Mr. Ansari said.

He said the relations between the two neighbours have transcended the bilateral scope and acquired regional, global and strategic significance.

“We both view each other as partners for mutual benefit and not as rivals or competitors. It has been customary to focus on bilateral issues although both our nations face similar global challenges today. The inter-dependence for dealing with these issues will only grow,” Mr. Ansari said.

“Our primary interest is to pay attention to the task of development. For it to succeed, both countries need a peaceful periphery and an environment of tranquillity. And thus it has been the objective of both our countries to seek tranquillity and stability in our immediate neighbourhood and extended region. Only then can we bring prosperity and stability to Asia and the world,” he said.

Mr. Ansari noted that the record of Sino-India relations is a mixed one, but improving.

“The border clash of 1962 left a scar on the Indian psyche and led to a brief interregnum in the growth of ties.

Both countries renewed high-level exchanges in the late 1970s.

These paved way for expanding cooperation in the fields of trade, economy, culture and people-to-people exchanges,” he said.

Mr. Ansari is on a five-day visit to China to take part in the 60th anniversary of Panchsheel.

“The resumption in early 1980s of the pilgrimage to Mount Kailash and Lake Mansarovar generated goodwill amongst the Indian people,” MR. Ansari said.

Referring to the role the two countries could play in the near future, he said in climate change negotiations, India and China have maintained that burden sharing has to be fair and must take into account historical emissions.

“We must adhere to this principle in future negotiations. As two populous and fast developing nations, food and energy security are of vital concern to both out countries. We need to find ways of cooperating in clean energy technologies and also sharing experience in managing our respective food economy,”
he said.

“Terrorism continues to be the greatest threat to our development goals. We need to find ways to jointly tackle this scourge,” he added.

Ansari said the UN Security Council should be expanded as it “no longer reflects reality“.

He said in the years ahead, a trend of multi-polarity is emerging in the global political landscape and India and China should cooperate for mutual benefit in this evolving and developing framework.

“We are also seeing the gravity of world economy shifting towards Asia. Could the 21st century be an Asian Century? For that to happen, India and China will have to play a decisive role and create a world based on good-neighbourliness and mutual prosperity rather than one based on the balance of power calculations and animosity,” Mr. Ansari said.

Ansari opined that the responsibility for taking bilateral relations to new heights is a shared one.

He argued that while the role of governments is important, equally relevant would be the contribution of social scientists in different disciplines in the realm of ideas, perspectives and policy options.

To convey New Delhi’s position, Mr. Ansari quoted from Rabindranath Tagore’s poem :“In front lies the Ocean into that ocean of peace, my friends, let us launch our boats.”

He said as China and India together account for about 37 per cent of the world’s population, there will be a competition for resources.

“These, together, throw up contradictions that need to be resolved in a manner that is peaceful rather than laced with violence, inclusive rather than exclusive, mutually beneficial rather than discriminatory,” he said.

During his visit here, Mr. Ansari took part in the 60th anniversary of Panchsheel, the five principles of peaceful coexistence propounded by the two countries along with Myanmar in 1954, and held talks with the top Chinese leadership.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby ramana » 01 Jul 2014 05:30

SS, Please mull over this one:

Can Modi and Xi grab the moment?

CUB

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 01 Jul 2014 14:01

ramana, as usual, CUB has analyzed and written well.

IMO, the initiative to seize such an opportunity must come from China. India is not going to be (at least I hope so) 'taken in' by a play of words and rousing sentiments etc. China must not be allowed to use the "taller, deeper, sweeter, harder" type of sweet analogies with us. The Chinese side must demonstrate its genuineness unmistakably as China has a huge trust deficit with us and everyone else on Planet Earth, most especially with all its neighbours. CUB's first-hand experience in the Chinese obduracy at feigning ignorance over its own activities, and its aggressive behaviour masked by pious inanities and platitudes are the experiences of all Indian politicians and bureaucrats. The Naresh Chandra Task Force in its May 2012 report said, "The crucial concern is whether China will become militarily more assertive and nationalistic as its economic and military power grows, or whether it will abide by the policies advocated by Deng Xiao Ping". Xi Jinping's one year rule so far has shown that he is militarily aggressive. That he has accumulated all power into himself causes a lot of apprehension and misgivings in us. China is now even ambiguous about its NFU policy (not that anyone believes such policies) and this is a change recently from its traditional approach (even if it were only on paper) since Mao's days. Xi Jinping failed to reiterate this policy while addressing cadets of the Second Artillery Corps which is responsible for all land-based n-weapns and then pointedly he spoke of nuclear weapons creating a ‘strategic space’ for China propelling it towards a ’great power status’. The MSR (Maritime Silk Route) initiative is to couple economics with hard projection of naval power, now that PLAN believes that it has acquired a blue-water navy now what with its Jin-class SSBNs, 12000 Km JL-2 ballistic missiles, DF-21 CBG killers, aircraft carriers etc. It is trying to ensure its energy security and by-pass the Malacca Dilemma through multiple ways: pipelines from Russia, CAR, Myanmar, Iran; ports in Myanmar, and Gwadar; and, the Northern Sea Route along the Russian Arctic coastline. China has to go to great lengths to overcome this deeply ingrained distrust of her all around, especially in us.

China feigns ignorance but it helped Pakistan in getting n-weapons and delivery platforms. It continues to help in Pu technologies and Pu-based weapons. It continues to enhance the delivery platforms. All this while continuing to profess a 'peacefully rising China' and taking India business to USD 70B. It ingresses aggressively into our land while professing Panchsheel, the latest being Pangong Tso and cartographic aggression even as our VP is on their soil. This is not the first time it has acted in this fashion. Its official media, both State and Party-run, dismiss Indian concerns as mere 'sensationally exaggerated hype'. It is the only UNSC permanent member that refuses to support our legitimate membership. It erects all kinds of barriers for our business in China. It challenges our Navy on high seas. It issues demarches on why India should not attend the Nobel awards ceremony, or why the PM should not visit Arunachal. It wants us to scrupulously follow its 'One China' policy but does everything to undermine our integrity. It blocked our resolution on LeT/JuD and Hafiz Saeed thrice in the UNSC citing incomplete information. Today, it talks of terrorism in Xinjiang. It wanted us to be emphatic on Tibet but it wavered on Sikkim (though the two cannot even be equated).

Today, it wants to be the undisputed hegemon in Asia and wants our immense help in its unbridled ambition. It has enlisted Russia (at least it appears so) because of the foolish policies of the US administration. It has come to the conclusion that the US Pivot is all bluster as even Japan is apprehensive whether the US will come to its side on a binding treaty if it is attacked. Its constant harassment of Japan, Philippines & Vietnam is 'also' to call the US bluff and make these countries feel naked without much protection. It uses Pakistan and North Korea as its cat's paws against us and Japan, the only two countries that can mount a serious challenge to its hegemony. Through the AIIB, its new financial venture, it wants to pull the WB/ADB/JICA rug from under the American & Japanese feet.

We have to play the same game that China plays. We can keep extolling the virtues of Panchsheel, 'peaceful rise of India', closer cooperation with Japan & others but 'claim' to be not at the cost of China, transfer BrahMos & Akash to Vietnam but dub it purely for 'self defence', help Vietnam in nuclear programme (of course, for peaceful purposes only), establish full-fledged diplomatic relationship with ROC while proclaiming that the Taiwan issue is a 'historical legacy' and India would abide by whatever decisions that China & ROC take in this regard in future, dangle the carrots of opportunities in India but strictly linked to reciprocal arrangements for Indian market access in China, 'welcome' Chinese PLAN assets to Indian waters when they are traversing the IOR, etc. All this, while offering 'potential' economic opportunities wherever feasible (without compromising Indian security) to China.

Oh yes, Modi & Xi must grab the moment even as Modi makes it as 'smoothly' difficult for Xi and as beneficial for India by using the same tactics that China employs.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby merlin » 01 Jul 2014 14:46

Very good summation SSridhar. The last para especially sets out just what we must do. Now to wait and watch if the Modi government follows an assertive policy or is as much or even more subservient to China than the UPA one.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby SSridhar » 01 Jul 2014 14:50

China to let Indian experts monitor Brahmaputra in Tibet - Smriti kak Ramachandran & Ananth Krishnan, The Hindu
China has for the first time formally agreed to allow Indian hydrological experts to conduct study tours in Tibet to monitor the flows on the upper reaches of the Brahmaputra, according to a new agreement signed here on Monday during the visit of Vice-President Hamid Ansari.

In a move to assuage India’s concerns about the ongoing dam projects on the upper reaches of the river — known as the Yarlung Zangbo in Tibet — Beijing has formally agreed to allow India to “dispatch hydrological experts” to conduct study tours “according to the principle of reciprocity.”

China has in the past been sensitive about allowing access to Tibet, and Indian hydrological experts have, as yet, not been allowed to formally visit the region to monitor the river’s flows.

China also agreed to extend provision of hydrological data, from May 15 to October 15 every year on a daily basis, adding 15 days to an earlier agreement. The data will be provided by three stations at Nugesha, Yangcun and Nuxia in Tibet on the main stream of the river.

China last year gave the go-ahead for three new hydropower dams on the Yarlung Zangbo, ending a two-year suspension on new projects. Beijing has said that the projects will not affect downstream flows, but a lack of transparency on its plans has been a source of concern. China began construction on a 510-MW project in Zangmu in 2010 — so far the only major project on the river’s main stream.

The MoU builds upon an agreement to cooperate on transboundary rivers signed last year, providing technical details such as the data transmission method, frequency and cost settlement. While China will provide data on water flows, India will make available information on data utilisation in flood forecasting and mitigation.

The MoU on the Brahmaputra was among three agreements signed on Monday as Vice-President Hamid Ansari held talks with his counterpart Li Yuanchao.


I think China is throwing some minor concession to us to get major market access in India.

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Re: Managing Chinese Threat

Postby vijaykarthik » 01 Jul 2014 16:07

merlin wrote:Very good summation SSridhar. The last para especially sets out just what we must do. Now to wait and watch if the Modi government follows an assertive policy or is as much or even more subservient to China than the UPA one.


Don't think the Modi govt will be any different from any other govt wrt China. If anything, they might end up being slightly more stupid. I will love to see my words being proven wrong. But Modi doesn't seem like the fairest of guys when it comes to geopolitics.

Edited to remove negative stereotyping. Kindly do not repeat - JE Menon


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