India Border Watch: Security and Operations

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby putnanja » 08 Jan 2015 09:40

Makes my blood boil to read this. We really had traitors at the helm for the last 10 years

http://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-others/we-dont-think-twice-before-pulling-the-trigger-we-know-delhi-is-with-us/?

...
The border personnel also say there has been a marked difference in their response since the NDA government came to power. “Earlier if any of us was killed, we were asked to show restraint and not retaliate much. The man sitting on the border kept waiting for permission from seniors. Now, we don’t even think twice before pulling the trigger. We know Delhi is with us,” said the BSF commander. BSF DG D K Pathak too said the government is supporting the force like never before. “All the senior government including the National Security Advisor is in constant touch with us. The death of every border personnel is a personal loss.”
...

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby krishnan » 08 Jan 2015 10:48

from above
"BSF officials said power cuts were frequent in the borders areas, which means floodlights and other search lights might go blank for a few seconds. There is a power backup, but that takes time to be activated"

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby pankajs » 08 Jan 2015 13:11

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/indi ... 802726.cms
Land identified for displaced border residents
JAMMU: Authorities in Jammu & Kashmir's Kathua district have identified land to shift border residents displaced due to cross-border firing along the India-Pakistan border.


http://www.theindianawaaz.com/index.php ... 8&catid=19
Govt asks BSF to make bunkers within houses along Border
Union Minister in PMO Jitendra Singh has said that the government has given suggestions to the Director General of the Border Security Force to set up bunkers within houses along the International Border for people affected by shelling and firing by the Pakistan forces.

Mr Singh visited several border areas and camps in Kathua district yesterday to take stock of the situation. Talking to reporters, he said, DG BSF has assured that a plan would be formulated for the setting up of bunkers within houses.

The Minister said that people in the border did not want India to stop its response till Pakistan surrenders. He said, he was happy and proud of the morale of the people, who are saying that they are satisfied with the kind of reply by our forces. Mr Singh said, the troops are firing four bullets for each bullet fired by Pakistan.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby pankajs » 08 Jan 2015 13:20

Going back a little >>

IIRC, Home minister said something to the effect "Pakistan has not learnt any lesson". I guess this was in reference to the BSF reply to the previous round of border trouble.

IMHO, Who ever made that statement is the one who has not learnt the lessons of the last 65 years!

Clearly, once bakis made this a civilization fight, between Hindus and Muslims, it will end only with the destruction of one state (I am not talking of people here). At best we can have a temporary truce when the bakis are wounded and but they will use the truce to regroup and rearm for the next round of escalations. This is history and there is the mentality as documented by UnFair in her latest book.

We cannot hope to *teach* bakis a lesson that will make them stop; we can only hope to *restrain* it while working on a longer term solution. We can only hope to inflict a sufficient punishment/damage for a temporary respite all the while preparing to face the next escalation. This is at a tactical level.

At the strategic level we will have to ensure that the *civilization fight* that the bakis have fostered on us is *negated* at the earliest preferably without a fight. If there has to be a fight it has to be on bak territory and between bakis.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby member_28840 » 08 Jan 2015 14:14

putnanja wrote:Makes my blood boil to read this. We really had traitors at the helm for the last 10 years

http://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-others/we-dont-think-twice-before-pulling-the-trigger-we-know-delhi-is-with-us/?

...
The border personnel also say there has been a marked difference in their response since the NDA government came to power. “Earlier if any of us was killed, we were asked to show restraint and not retaliate much. The man sitting on the border kept waiting for permission from seniors. Now, we don’t even think twice before pulling the trigger. We know Delhi is with us,” said the BSF commander. BSF DG D K Pathak too said the government is supporting the force like never before. “All the senior government including the National Security Advisor is in constant touch with us. The death of every border personnel is a personal loss.”
...



Its not even so much that we were "showing restraint" that bothers me. Even if there was a directive to shoot back, we would have run out of ammunition faster than the bakis given the sorry state of our reserves. Glad that situation is being taken care of by Modi govt, so we can afford to shoot back 4+ times the volume of fire that we are taking.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby schinnas » 08 Jan 2015 15:06

Instead of 4 bullets for 1, we should adopt a policy of 10 hits in Pukiland for 1 hit in Desh. In other words, make each bullet count and set the directive result based.

There is a big difference between these two types of directives. In one case the BSF / Army would be forced to think more about inflicting maximum casualties without wasting too much resources unnecessarily. More importance to covert operations and sniper operations will happen. In the other scenario, there is no focus on result oriented goal.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby ramana » 08 Jan 2015 19:28

The GOI is handling the situation quite well and deserves the nation's thanks.

The media outrage shows the snakes and scorpions lurking in our midst.

Pravin Swami clearly bats for TSP and US.

The good thing is English media is very narrow coverage on TV channels.

Its mostly in 300 range. Even DD News!!!

Most people listen to local news and Bhakti Channels which are in low 100s.


I got to see the English TV coverage of the boat terrorists and had to switch off the TV.

its not only Indian National Congress (INC) that needs to reflect whether its Indian and National but also the English media in India.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby K Mehta » 08 Jan 2015 22:26

Saw KT show with GP and some raw official rana banerjee, some paki aziz and journo jyoti malhotra on TV, they are saying that for the sake of the people living in the border areas we should stop this aggressive response. GP told as long as infiltration happens firing would happen.

Funny thing is that all interviews from the border areas have shown people who want a final solution, they don't want to remain under the threat of paki firing and want it to be solved once and for all.
Edit: saw ssji and others posts on the same, would like to clarify that I saw only some part, so maybe wrong on JM part. Started watching after I saw GP, changed the channel after I got the drift.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby kmkraoind » 09 Jan 2015 09:15

How Pakistan's dealers drugged Punjab: BSF report says smugglers in border villages are paid to 'conceal and clear' heroin consignments

If NaMo's govt minimizes drug menace, then India can have multiple benefits, save Indian youth from drug and put them to productive purposes and choke funds for ISI.

Image

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby Vipul » 09 Jan 2015 09:19

‘We don’t think twice before pulling the trigger… We know Delhi is with us’: BSF commander.

It’s 4 degree Celsius, but BSF constable Vijender donning a bulletproof jacket, which weighs around 16.5 kg, and holding a 4.5 kg gun cannot afford to drop guard even for a second. Vijender, who is posted at the zero line along the International Border at Samba in Jammu and Kashmir, has two troubles — ceasefire violations by Pakistan and possibility of floodlights going off anytime.

BSF officials said power cuts were frequent in the borders areas, which means floodlights and other search lights might go blank for a few seconds. There is a power backup, but that takes time to be activated. One of the forward posts right along the zero line runs on generator throughout the day. “We are on constant vigil but if the power goes then we have to be doubly prepared. This because when the area plunges into darkness, there are chances of infiltration attempts. They are just waiting to cross,” said another BSF constable posted in Samba.

The Indian Express visited one of the border outposts in Samba where BSF personnel said in this cold too, they were putting up in morchas, which only had tin roofs as cover. There is a morcha at every 50 metre along the 192-km long IB. Officials said Pakistan has not installed floodlights along its border.

“They have hardly put any floodlight or search light on their side. Erecting floodlights will defeat their purpose as there are continued attempts to infiltrate from their side,” said a BSF commander who did not wish to be identified. “For the past two days there is zero visibility at the border due to fog. We are not complaining… at least our condition is better than our colleagues posted in Kashmir valley. At times like this, the pressure is more to be on alert as Pakistan has initiated new round of firing,” said company commander Hari Lal.

District Collector Mubarak Singh said the BSF has power backup in the border areas. “Sometimes due to unforeseen situation the power supply can go off. But, the BSF has an alternate supply plan. Nobody can guarantee 24 hours continuous supply as sometimes situations occur, which are beyond control,” said Singh.

The border personnel also say there has been a marked difference in their response since the NDA government came to power. “Earlier if any of us was killed, we were asked to show restraint and not retaliate much. The man sitting on the border kept waiting for permission from seniors (Congressi Bast**ds). Now, we don’t even think twice before pulling the trigger. We know Delhi is with us,” said the BSF commander. BSF DG D K Pathak too said the government is supporting the force like never before. “All the senior government including the National Security Advisor is in constant touch with us. The death of every border personnel is a personal loss.” -

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby Sudip » 11 Jan 2015 00:47

BSF In Eastern Theatre


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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby Aditya G » 12 Jan 2015 23:10

Meanwhile ...

BSF trooper injured by Bangladeshi smugglers
IANS | Jan 10, 2015, 06.21PM IST

KOLKATA: Two days after a BSF trooper was killed by Bangladeshi smugglers, a similar attack by the miscreants Saturday left another trooper injured near the Bangladesh border in West Bengal's North 24 Parganas district.

The incident occurred near Angrail Border Outpost (BOP) when about 100 Bangladeshi cattle smugglers attacked a BSF party.

"Constable Ramachandra was hit by a bullet in the abdomen when the smugglers opened fire at a BSF party. He has been admitted to the RG Kar Hospital in Kolkata where his condition is stable," said a BSF officer.

As BSF refrains from using lethal force, it did not open fire and the smugglers managed to escape taking advantage of darkness and dense fog, added the officer.

The attack comes two days after BSF constable Rashikul Mondal was killed by Bangladeshi cattle smugglers near Khalsi BOP in the district.

The BSF had lodged a strong protest over the killing of Mondal with the Border Guard Bangladesh headquarters in Dhaka.

In 2014, at least 78 BSF troopers were seriously injured in attacks by Bangladeshi smugglers across the South Bengal Frontier.


Cattle smugglers? And they have the gall to injure a borderman every 5 days?

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby Aditya G » 12 Jan 2015 23:28

Why are Pak Rangers targeting BSF at IB?

1. Aid infiltration. But it Jammu is the best point to infiltrate?
2. Ambitious Pak Rangers commanders.
3. Indian Army response along LoC got too hot to handle.
4. Perceived weakness of BSF defences compared to IA. Wait till those 105 mm guns open up.

http://indianexpress.com/article/india/ ... -response/

Written by Vijaita Singh | New Delhi | Posted: January 12, 2015 3:48 am | Updated: January 12, 2015 1:04 pm

At 11.40 am on December 31, 2014, BSF constable Ram Gowria, who was patrolling the zero line along the International Border (IB) in Jammu with seven colleagues was shot dead in what has been described as a sniper attack from across the border. Gowria was shot twice — on his temple and abdomen. He collapsed immediately. This was followed by week-long tension at the IB, with more than 10,000 people forced to flee their homes and take refuge in temporary shelter homes. What started as local tension snowballed into an international issue, with the BSF seeking an apology from their counterparts — the Pakistan Rangers.

It is not certain whether Gowria fell to a bullet fired by the Pakistan Rangers or if he was targeted by one of the militants waiting on the other side to cross over into India. As soon as Gowria was killed, BSF opened fire and four Rangers who were spotted patrolling the zero line near Dhandhar, roughly 150 metres away, were also shot dead.

In order to give a “befitting” reply to Pakistan, BSF fired from almost all 22 posts in Samba and Kathua district. Then they sought an apology from Pakistan. “We told them quite clearly that either you say sorry or face the consequences. They did not listen to us and we kept firing at their posts. The jawan was patrolling the zero line as part of an agreed border defence mechanism; this was like backstabbing {Typical Paki behaviour ... never learnt from Kargil}. Though we are prepared for sniper attacks, attacking a jawan who is patrolling the zero line was just not acceptable to us as both sides are vulnerable at that point,” said a BSF officer on condition of anonymity.

Following this, Pakistan made desperate attempts to contact the DGMO and the defence secretary in New Delhi to ease the situation as India refused to talk. When they did not get any hearing, Sartaz Aziz, advisor to the Pakistan PM on foreign affairs, wrote a letter to Foreign Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj protesting against the BSF.

Emboldened by the Centre’s backing, there is a “sea change” in the way the BSF is dealing with ceasefire violations and the killing of its men along the border. “We are no longer mute spectators. The leadership is with us and we have been given a free hand to reply to Pakistan,” said a company commander at a BSF post in Samba. The change comes after the NDA government came to power and message went down the line that every firing from across the border would be taken “very seriously”.

National Security Advisor Ajit Doval is in constant touch with BSF DG DK Pathak and, unlike earlier times, no intermediaries are involved. “We, however, never initiate the fire. We sometimes even ignore one or two rounds fired from their side,” said Pathak. {NFU}

The 192-km-long IB in Jammu had been relatively peaceful since 2003, when India and Pakistan signed the ceasefire pact. However, the border, which Pakistan refers to as the “working boundary”, has become the new battleground since October 2013. “While earlier we were asked to give only measured response, Pakistan started violating the agreement since July last 2014. It continued for almost two months, only to stop briefly, and then resumed again in October. The fresh round started from New Year’s eve,” said the official. Security forces are confused with the pattern of firing this time. In 2012, only 16 ceasefire violations were reported along the IB. In 2014, that number stood at 140.

“While earlier almost all the border outposts or BOPs in Jammu were targeted, this time only the Hindu-dominated Samba and Kathua are being targeted. We cannot say anything with certainty but this has been the trend in 2014 and even now,” said the company commander.


Compare this to the 250-km Line of Control (LoC) in Jammu sector, which is defended by the Indian Army and has witnessed no ceasefire violation in the past 45 days. “Unlike the IB, which is a settled boundary, this boundary is yet to be defined. So the Indian Army is deployed here. Here, too, we have villages dotting the boundary but it has remained largely peaceful. Unlike the BSF, here we are posted beyond the fencing. The risk is more… just last year, two Army jawans were abducted and beheaded by the Border Action Team (BAT) of Pakistan in this sector,” said a senior Army official.

He added that while the aggressive response of the BSF could be new for them, the Army always maintained the same line. “We try to maintain calm and peace at LoC in the interest of India. But when need arises, we give quite a tough time to Pakistan. Unlike the BSF, we don’t have to ask our Delhi headquarters every time for such a response. The Indian Army has its own policy. The BSF has recently woken up to this aggressive posture, but we have always been like this,” said the Army official. {During UPA no officer would have dared said this}

Security forces say Pakistan is trying to incite trouble along IB due to its densely populated civilian population. “This may be a new strategy by Pakistan to disturb the IB by targeting its civilian population. They hope India falls into their trap by reacting aggressively,” said a senior Home Ministry official.

India has also readied an alternate plan for the safety of border residents. Minister of State, PMO, Jitendra Singh told The Indian Express, “We have identified alternate parcel of land where the border residents can go whenever there is a situation like this. They get to keep both the places and can always shift to the alternate accommodation being given by the government whenever there is shelling at the border. This will save them from living in temporary shelters.” He said the state administration has identified 3,700 kanals of land in Kathua district for this purpose.

Balak Ram Sharma, a resident of Baingalar, which was pounded by mortar shells last week, said such a move is long overdue. “We have been demanding bunkers and an alternate place to live for quite some time. If the government has taken a decision, we welcome it. In 2014, we spent almost four months in shelter homes,” Sharma said.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby vishvak » 13 Jan 2015 15:59

If pakis can target BSF at IB, does it not mean that Pakis have done their job at LAC and now moving onto another boundary. We should not let the barbarians who plan such misadventures off the hook and worse not let one boundary messed up after another is made LAC.

Step by step pakis are increasing boundary dispute along with mixing various nomenclatures to make it look civilized. Pakis will let rabid dogs across just to claim more disputed boundary while promising 72 hurris and hurrahs in jannat. I think we need to keep the focus totally on LAC and not allow any more disputes unless and until the whole of J&K becomes part of India.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby Aditya G » 13 Jan 2015 19:33

Here is a good look at BSF Floating BOPs. We need to appreciate how multi-faceted and capable BSF is. These guys defend the worst of borders - even if the border is not on land!

"Seema Prahari Durga":

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-yDJNnRExh6w/V ... rs_BSF.jpg

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-2Tmf_ggSuSE/V ... ce%2B1.jpg

The platform is as large and equipped as a seaward defence boat of the navy. Dont see any HMG mount though.

http://homelandmag.blogspot.in/2014_09_01_archive.html

The idea of spending a few days in the Sundarbans on a floating BOP may sound rather exotic to the uninitiated with images of being surrounded by lush mangrove forests and the occasional glimpse of the wild life looming in the horizon. The reality however is a far cry. Literally meaning ‘beautiful forest’ owing to the extensive presence of Sundari trees (the mangrove species Heritiera fomes) the Sundarbans are brutally hot and humid for most part of the year. Also famous as the home to the majestic Royal Bengal Tiger (roughly 270 according to a 2011 census), the oppressive weather and the presence of the man-eating dangerous feline render them a far cry from being ‘sundar’ or beautiful. The Sundarban forest lies in the Bay of Bengal, the delta lying at the confluence of the Padma, Brahmaputra and Meghna rivers across southern Bangladesh and covers some 10,000 km2, of which about 6,000 are in Bangladesh. The Indian part of Sundarbans is about 4,110 km², of which about 1,700 km² is occupied by water bodies in the forms of river, canals and creeks of meandering across this mangrove forest.

A large part of the border between India and Bangladesh comprises of the Sundarbans, located in the south-western part of Bangladesh between the river Baleswar in the East and the Harinbanga in the West. The Sundarbans is the largest contiguous mangrove forest in the world and the International Boundary (IB) between India and Bangladesh passes through a channel of rivers namely Kalindi, Ichhamati, Raimangal and Haribhanga.

This area is dominated by BSF with the help of floating and land based Border Outposts (BOPs). To maintain a visible presence in this region, the BSF has inducted six floating border outposts, each supported by two medium crafts and approximately six dozen fast patrol crafts. A floating border outpost houses 30 – 35 crew members with force multipliers such as modern surveillance equipment, high tech communication systems and weapons including medium and light machine guns. A floating BOP will typically be at ‘sea’ for three weeks at a stretch and during this time the lifeline remains the speed boats who perform daily ADAM duties such as bringing fresh water, vegetables, food, medicines and even newspapers for the staff. As the dominant force in the region, these floating BOPs perform the task of maintaining a close watch on the fishermen, protecting the Sundarbans and also act as floating check points.

Boats moving from Bangladesh to India are routinely inspected for illegal immigrants, livestock, drugs and currency. To understand the challenges faced by the BSF and the role played by them in promoting a sense of security among the people living in the border areas, the Homeland Warriors team decided to spend a few days with the 03 and 41st battalion of the BSF earlier in March 2014.

The India-Bangladesh border is perhaps one of the most heavily populated and impoverished border in the world and is also considered the bloodiest. Unlike India’s northern and western borders, the blood spilled along the Bangladesh border is not owing to religion, ethnicity or culture, or marginalisation of local population but it is largely due to smuggling of goods – a business that is worth a few billion rupees a year. It is estimated that over a million and a half cows are smuggled into Bangladesh every year, supported by a cattle running mafia that has over the past many decades built a network across large parts of North and Eastern India. The sheer scale of operations and the economic interests involved across both sides of the border make policing a limited option. While legalising the trade is an unlikely option, the views of the former Director General of the BSF, UK Bansal summarises the ground reality when he stated “We all have to think about it seriously. It is not a problem that can be solved by policing”.

Interestingly, the local inhabitants of the region claimed not to ‘know’ any smugglers but appeared to be well aware of the intricacies of their operations and locations from where the cattle originate. Ultimately it all boils down to the basic economics of demand and supply. So profitable is cattle smuggling that villages along the main national highways often erect check posts to collect a ‘transit tax’ from every passing vehicle that is transporting cows. :roll: And when these vehicles do reach the border areas, it is a game of cat and mouse between the cattle mafia and the guards of the Border Security force, entasked to curb and check illegal activities along the international border.

What is most intriguing is the fact that if cattle smuggling is indeed a huge problem as everyone claims, then how does cattle from north India end up moving so freely all the way to the Eastern border in the first place? Surely various state police forces and other central agencies are aware of this large-scale bovine movement and therefore the long term solution eventually lies with the states forces and not solely with the BSF.

In 1986, the Indian parliament approved construction of the India-Bangladesh border fence a move aimed to reduce the intensity of illegal activities taking place along the border, check infiltration of terror groups and manage regional fears of illegal immigrants tipping religious majorities in the Assam province. After many years of delay, this ‘impregnable fence’ is ‘almost’ complete and once ready the fence will cover over 3,436 kilometres of Indo-Bangladesh border, making it the longest geopolitical barrier in the world. But a quick walk along the fence exposes the actual ground reality, and why guarding this impregnable fence is such an unwieldy task for the BSF jawans.

The fence which runs parallel to the main roads and is visible to the general public consists of double-rows of fencing and concertina wire, eight to twelve feet in height and very impregnable, and built on the same lines as the Indo-Pakistan border fence. However, as one travels further away from the main roads and towns, the fence becomes nothing more than sporadic posts with a few strands of barbed wire strung between them. At some locations the fence abruptly ends to accommodate a road connecting two villages – one on the Indian side and the other on the Bangladeshi side. The problem is compounded by the fact that the border cuts across heavily populated villages, market places, roads and railways and common agricultural land and at some spots, the International Border actually runs through people’s homes. Half the house falls in India and the other in Bangladesh ! :eek:

In order to maintain a close vigil, the BSF has created a small picket at every half a kilometre, accommodating two to four men whose main task is to provide security to the local villagers, stop illegal smuggling and immigration. Names and records are maintained at the BSF outpost of every villager, their family, occupation and residence. This helps in keeping a track of all movement near the border and checks illegal activity and infiltration. The manning of Eastern Borders is quite complex, especially since this is a ‘friendly border’. In order to maintain these friendly relations, the BDR and BSF operate under joint-guidelines for management of the Bangladesh-India borders. These guidelines set the ground-rules for day-to-day management so that both the forces can operate within close proximity displaying much camaraderie.

Joint India-Bangladesh Guidelines (JIBG) for Border Authorities emphasise strict checks, regular and frequent contacts and the exchange of information and intelligence at appropriate levels between border authorities in order to contain smuggling and cross-border criminal activities or untoward incidents at the border. Organising regular sports competitions between the two border forces is another popularly deployed technique to erase the adversarial image that persists and help build mutual trust and confidence. Apart from operational issues such as sharing of intelligence, this approach needs maturity and skill. It is mandatory for the BSF officers and jawans posted in this region to quickly understand their surroundings and have a clear understanding of the geography, demographics, economics and politics of this critical and rather unique border area as each of these plays a key role in the management of this border.

However, the challenges are far too many and the job of the BSF troops is easier said than done. To begin with, the weather in the Sundarbans is oppressively warm and harsh and to make matters worse, these border outposts are normally stationed in remote areas, completely cut off from civilisation. Often living in extremely cramped conditions and with limited or no mobile connectivity, the soldiers need to be constantly motivated - a role played extremely well by the commanding officers.

A few candid conversations and one-to-one interactions with officers and a few jawans of the BSF, reveal that their life in the Sundarbans based on five emotions - frustration, repetition and minimal variation from their day to day routine, lack of privacy and above all, isolation. “Boredom is our biggest enemy”, said an officer on the Floating BOP, “even when we try and rotate the daily tasks, we are still stuck in the middle of a river. And to make matters worse, there is no live television, mobile connectivity and because of the salty water all our electronics regularly stop working”.

Perhaps, the most telling observation made by the Homeland Warriors team was that since most of the BSF jawans do not hail from the area, they are unable to speak in Bengali. Therefore, communication becomes a huge problem and leads to a major disconnect with the local populace. Another major concern that was repeatedly raised by Bangladesh was the use of force by the BSF and this led to the alienation of those inhabiting border areas and created hostility towards the men and women in uniform. To resolve this, the BSF has consciously taken the decision to induct and use non-lethal weapons wherever possible. While this has drastically brought down the casualties and injuries in border areas, it has however brought up the number of instances where smugglers and cattle mafia now openly challenge the BSF; this invariably leads to higher casualties amongst the BSF jawans.

Besides manning the huge border posts, BSF also plays a key role in winning the hearts and minds of the locals. At one BSF border outpost, it was very heartening to observe a steady stream of people filling their buckets with clean drinking water, while at another border outpost, village elders were found seeking the advice of the commanding officer to resolve a property dispute. At the end of the day, it is the soft skills of these soldiers that come handy to rectify almost any and every situation.

It doesn’t take long to realise that hidden beneath the vast expanse and beauty of the Sunderbans, lies one of the most inhospitable and unforgiving lands in the world. The snaking border that divides the two countries runs for 1,300 miles, across thick jungles, marshlands and moving tides and is manned by a force that needs to be visible but also responsive.

Surprisingly, despite the hardships, the jawans on board the FBOP are focused, walk tall with straight shoulders and remain cheerful despite the unrelenting afternoon heat. And if the high temperature and humidity are not enough to dampen spirits, navigation of the swollen tidal rivers in the monsoon months is another challenge. Standing at the port side of the FBOP, the commanding officer proudly told the HW team that “if required these boys would be happy to spend many more nights on the FBOPs as long as the borders of India remain protected”.

Inauguration of the much pending ‘joint retreat ceremony’ on the zero line of Bangladesh-India border at the Benapole-Petrapole in November 2013 by the Bangladesh and Indian Home ministers Mhiuddin Khan Alamgir and Sushil Kumar Shinde, respectively are small albeit significant steps to augment the existing cordial and harmonious relations between BSF and BGB, the two Border Guarding Forces.

As Canadian author Yann Martel reveals in his much acclaimed work Life of Pi , “All living things contain a measure of madness that moves them in strange, sometimes inexplicable ways. This madness can be saving; it is part and parcel of the ability to adapt. Without it, no species would survive.” Perhaps, it is this very madness, this very ability to overcome and survive, no matter what, that enables these border land warriors to live up to the challenges and accept their call of duty even amidst the tranquil wilderness of the striking Sudarbans. - Karanjit SIngh

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby ajay_hk » 22 Jan 2015 08:38

India-China border: Now, faster green nod for roads, infrastructure
NEW DELHI: A government panel on Wednesday cleared as many as 53 projects, including power, railways, roads and irrigation canals, while the environment ministry decided to ensure faster green clearance for border roads and infrastructure projects for ITBP- a paramilitary force which is deployed along the India-China border.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby pankajs » 31 Jan 2015 00:32

BSF on the LOC :shock: I was always under the impression that LOC was the domain of the Army. Perhaps this is what the Bakis refer to as working boundary in Kashmir.

Mission Kashmir


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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby Bibhas » 01 Feb 2015 00:44

pankajs sir: The video you posted is simply awesome. Thanks for sharing.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby srin » 01 Feb 2015 10:46

Nice video indeed. Was the firing at around 11:00 mins and consequent operation a re-enactment and not the real thing ? I hope so - the cameraman was in front of the troops and seemed to be blocking their vision if not their line of fire

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby pankajs » 03 Feb 2015 16:28

Seems the folks at the border have better gear and clothing these days. Good to know.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby pankajs » 03 Feb 2015 16:30

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/new ... 103775.cms
Hi-tech fencing plan led to rise in Pakistan firing: BSF
The BSF assessment is that the news of laser walls, ground sensors to detect tunnels and thermal imaging cameras being installed to stop infiltration frustrated Pakistan Rangers who launched an attack to disrupt the process.

"Normally, border guarding forces of both countries are supposed to inform each other of any defences we may be building on the border. However, both sides continue to violate this norm and clandestinely build defences. Given our superior capabilities, we build more to stop infiltration—a threat that Pakistan does not face. It was just after such news reports that firing began," said a senior BSF official.

Sources said an incensed Pakistan recently even disallowed cutting of tall grass that grows near the border and which is cut periodically to clear line of sight. "It is a regular practice to inform Pakistan Rangers about cutting of grass and then go ahead with it. They never object. This time they did. We had to send an armed contingent to help clear the undergrowth," said the officer.

Meanwhile, as firing continues to rage between the two forces, as many as 40 bunkers are being built in various villages on the border to ensure civilian lives are not harmed during Pakistan shelling. "These bunkers are being built under the Border Area Development Programme and would help save civilian lives," said the official.

Good to know.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby vishvak » 03 Feb 2015 19:16

Most important thing in the above news clip: It was just after such news reports that firing began

:rotfl: We don't have to wait till UN gives a signed declaration that we are facing barbarians across the border. We need to temper defenses on the western border with irregular warfare to deal with such openly hostile "neighbor".

There is probably a misconception in the report about how pakis are also doing "build defences" activities on their side. If I am not mistaken, pakis switch off watch towers at times, give covering fires to push terrorists across the border and generally indulge themselves in attacking villagers on the other side of border with mortars etc.

At places, pakis have NO watch towers to talk of paki defense.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby pankajs » 05 Feb 2015 11:33

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/new ... 126793.cms
Defence minister Manohar Parrikar orders coastal security survey to identify isolated spots
NEW DELHI: Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar held a review of coastal security on Tuesday, deciding to set up a dedicated marine police force and to survey all landing points along the entire Indian coastline to identify isolated spots, which could be used for landing arms and explosives and also for infiltration of terrorist and criminal elements. National Security Advisor, Cabinet Secretary, the Navy chief, secretaries of home, petroleum, fisheries, shipping and the Coast Guard chief were invited for the meeting.
....
Initially, the Centre had suggested recruiting ex-servicemen, but "after deliberation it was felt that a dedicated marine police personnel to work on regular basis be created by the states/UTs... a dedicated marine battalion of 1000-2000 personnel on the lines of "creek crocodile" being raised by BSF to guard the creek area of Gujarat is being explored," says a note prepared for the review meeting.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby Sagar G » 15 Feb 2015 16:22

Light up the border boys, time to celebrate :twisted:


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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby Aditya G » 13 Mar 2015 21:59



A timely coverage by Vishnu, in light of increasing clamour for Army withdrawal from J&K.

According to Lt General Subrata Saha, the Army's 15 Corps Commander, "There is some kind of infusion of better technology, for instance, for navigation. They are using good quality GPS compared to when I was a Brigade Commander on the LoC almost a decade back. Earlier, they would come in with sports GPS equipment. Now they are coming with absolutely high technology GPS systems. Their reliance on radio sets is a bare minimal and its only for the terminal stages of communication (when they have engaged the Indian Army). A lot of the communication is happening on Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP), over Skype and so on."


Cant we demand the manufacturers of the GPS unit to explain how their unit ended up with terrorists?

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby Karthik S » 29 Apr 2015 16:38

Hope this materializes:

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/new ... 090250.cms

"Bharat Mala: PM Narendra Modi's planned Rs 14,000 crore road from Gujarat to Mizoram"

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby williams » 01 May 2015 11:28

Here is a little story from Gen VKS book on how things were in the LoC. I really understood the meaning of "commanders getting a free hand" phrase after reading this. Hats off to the current government on the new rules of engagement.

Each company commander was given a manual as thick as a telephone directory. Listed in extensive and minute detail were all sorts of probable situations and the dos and don’ts that were the SOPs. It was regularly emphasized to all and sundry right down the chain of command, that come what may, we were not to deviate from the prescribed actions. The Pakistan Army obviously had no such restrictions. When any movement became visible to them, they might fire or not depending on their mood at the moment. More often than not, they would fire at random, just for the heck of it. It was much the same story all along the LOC, which extended for hundreds of kilometres on either side of us. On our side, at least at Durga, there was no Indian civilian movement. The Pakistanis, on the other hand, would regularly follow a routine to mock us. There was one habitual offender who, weather permitting, would appear almost on cue at a given time. We had no option but to follow the laid-down SOPs. As company commander I would shout at the trespasser to draw his attention and blow a whistle three times in the form of a warning. When this was also ignored, I would move on to the next step— which was for the company commander to call the battalion base, seeking permission to fire a warning shot. A call from the post would have the CO scrambling to the phone. ‘Have you shouted and blown the whistle thrice?’ ‘Yes, sir!’ ‘Well, do it again!’ So with the CO listening in on the field telephone, we would shout, clap and blow whistles. He would make us do this four to five times. ‘Wait on,’ he would say, connecting to the brigade. The commander would say to the CO, ‘Have you shouted, and blown the whistle thrice?’ ‘Yes, sir!’ ‘Well, do it again!’ Now the brigade commander and the CO would be patched in and listening. After a while they would say, ‘Okay... just wait a minute,’ brigade would in all likelihood call the GOC. By then the Pakistanis would be gurgling with delight. They would regularly shout across, ‘Janaab, tumhara to order Dilli se aata hai.’ (Your orders have to come from Delhi.) It was all very humiliating. This went on for a few days. To add further salt to our wounds, the offending Pakistani would deliberately unwrap his lungi and flash us every time we whistled. Then, getting bored, he would cover himself, and sit and sun himself on a large rock. Two to three hours later, he would collect his motley cattle and leave. The length of his stay would determine the length and intensity of our hysterical telephonic tsunami. At this rate, we were fast losing the battle for moral ascendancy. We decided that enough was enough. A sniper was positioned to zero in on the rock on which the good shepherd would eventually rest. ‘Don’t kill him,’ I briefed the sharpshooter, ‘just put a round through his lungi on the rock between his legs.’ At the appointed hour the Pakistani appeared. I shouted, blew my whistle. He gave us his vulgar retort. I waited, then shouted, blew the whistle again. The Pakistani played his part perfectly, ignoring all our warnings. This went on for a while, after which he tired of the game and made a beeline for his throne, his legs straddling it like a saddle. The thwack of the bullet and the resultant g-force generated by a high velocity round hitting the target sent the Pakistani vertically upwards. As the bullet ricocheted off the stone, the retort of the rifle reached him half a second later. By that time, he had already made it across the open ground, running at full tilt. That was the end of it, and we never had that problem at Durga again while we were there.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby member_22539 » 01 May 2015 13:56

^I wish they aimed a little higher. It would have spared us another generation of such degenerate vermin gallivanting at the border.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby deejay » 01 May 2015 19:18

^^^ In case they did, they would never write it. It is best this way. A Baki doing what they do best - downhill skiing.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby VinodTK » 10 May 2015 07:56

Why Defence Ministry may fund railways projects worth almost Rs 1.4 lakh crore near India-China border
th Infantry Brigade was defending Walong under numerous handicaps. There being no road beyond Tezu which is 230 km south. There was a severe shortage of artillery, rations, ammunition, winter clothing and defence stores at Walong.

This inscription at a war memorial in Arunachal Pradesh's sleepy town of Walong explains why the Indian Army was forced to retreat from the eastern-most locations along the McMahon Line during the 1962 India-China war. Over five decades later, concrete roads have been built up to the border.

And, now, if the government has its way, railway tracks will be laid up to Tezu and Tawang in Arunachal Pradesh and Leh in Jammu & Kashmir, thereby providing a leg up to mobility of troops and ammunition in the north-eastern state that borders China.
:
:
:

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby Sudip » 11 May 2015 18:33

It seems like there is a motorable road running along the entire Pakistan border in Gujarat. But it stops at Rajasthan.

I wonder why has this been accomplished in Gujarat only and no other state. I could not find any documentation about this road on the net.

Do states have a say in this? Does anybody have any insights on this road?

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby Kakkaji » 16 May 2015 05:24

Border Infrastructure: Modi government driving strategic projects with radical changes

A radical new approach is now being adopted to accelerate projects to unclog these bottlenecks, along with work on hundreds of other strategic projects, as the Narendra Modi government sharpens focus on creating infrastructure along India's borders. From the Bharat Mala project (it envisages a road network along India's land boundary, stretching from Gujarat to Mizoram) to Sagar Mala (under which a coastal infrastructure will be set up along the nation's vast shoreline), the government's intention is clear: bring about a road and infra construction boom to help drive trade.

While the idea is not new, the approach has been different - a newly created corporation has been empowered to execute projects worth Rs 34,300 crore and has been freed of red tape that traditionally binds government agencies on mega projects. And, execution has been rapid with road projects of nearly 3,200 km activated in the past year.

Consider this: In Port Blair, a detailed study on what could be India's first undersea transportation tunnel is set to commence soon. The idea is to construct a 1.5-kilometre tunnel connecting the capital of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands to Bamboo Flat. Oversea connection is impossible due to the heavy naval activity in the area.

A similar undersea project is also being planned in West Bengal, to connect Sagar Island and Kakdwip with a 3.5 km tunnel. In the Northeast, Union Minister Nitin Gadkari last month, dedicated the final Indian stretch of the Stilwell road, right up to the Myanmar border. The Asian Development Bank is preparing a project report on connecting Manipur's capital Imphal with the town of Moreh near the border.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby prahaar » 17 May 2015 10:27

BSF at Rann of Kutch. Never seen such footage about the Gujarat border, including Sir Creek (which means Shared creek in Kutchhi not name of some British official).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nJ05UrB4wEw


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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby Aditya G » 28 May 2015 19:09

suspected BAT operation:

http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-new ... 51155.aspx

Three army personnel and a militant were killed on the Line of Control in Tangdhar sector of Kashmir on Monday.

According to an official, a group of four to seven infiltrators had probably sneaked into the Indian side on Sunday night near Darshan Post along the LoC opposite to Pakistan's Chhajula Post.

"The group of infiltrators, after being challenged, opened indiscriminate fire with sophisticated weapons. The fire was retaliated by the army and a fierce gunfight erupted," an official said.

The incident came just hours after a staff member of government-run telecom operator BSNL was killed and two more were injured when militants opened fire at the company's office in north Kashmir's Sopore district, about 50km from Srinagar. In another encounter on Monday, a militant and a soldier were killed in Kashmir’s Kulgam district.

Speaking on the encounter in Tangdhar, the official said, "The army has foiled the infiltration bid by militants. Three soldiers and a militant have been killed and a junior commissioned officer (JCO) is injured so far in the operation against a group of infiltrators."

According to an army statement, a patrol party of a forward battalion led by a JCO, moving close to the LoC, noticed some movement and intercepted the group.

"In a heavy exchange of fire, the group was defeated and they retreated after leaving behind one dead militant from whom one AK-47, one pistol...were recovered,'' said Col NN Joshi, defence spokesperson based in Kashmir.

During the firefight, four jawan sustained injuries. "Three of them succumbed to his injuries while one is out of danger," he added.

According to reports, an operation was underway

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby Aditya G » 30 May 2015 18:14

Praveen Swami ... FWIW

http://indianexpress.com/article/explai ... ign=buffer

Written by Praveen Swami | Updated: May 25, 2015 12:28 am

Last summer, in the midst of his scorching march to power in New Delhi, Prime Minister Narendra Modi voiced the rage of a nation that wanted vengeance for the lives it had lost to terror. “They did nothing,” he said, assailing Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s apparently bovine response to the 26/11 Mumbai terrorist attacks. “Indians died, and they did — nothing.”

“Talk to Pakistan in Pakistan’s language,” he went on, “because it won’t learn lessons until then.”
Last month, though, when 26/11 perpetrator Zaki-ur-Rehman Lakhvi walked out of prison, the Prime Minister’s language was remarkably flabby: “All nations should commit,” he said, “that they will not provide shelter to terrorists but punish them”.

His government even opened the way for renewed India-Pakistan cricket matches earlier this month — the kind of thing Prime Minister Manmohan Singh was mercilessly pilloried for.

Eschewing the showy violence of the rampaging elephant, Modi has gone with the other, slower, much-maligned way of war: to plod, step by step, along a perilous path, ignoring abuse and exhortation. It may dismay some of his hawkish cheerleaders — but it also shows a clear grasp of reality.

For years now, leading figures in this government — notably National Security Advisor Ajit Doval — have advocated the use of offensive covert means to degrade terrorist infrastructure. This is polite language for assassinating terrorist leaders and blowing up their assets — a strategy that, in theory, stops short of war. Like most shiny offers, though, this one too comes with hidden costs.
Terrorists, notably, are certain to retaliate against attack. Given India’s anaemic intelligence and police resources, no one can guarantee a pre-emption of a Lashkar-e-Toiba urban bombing campaign to avenge the assassination of, say, Lakhvi.

Israel, covert action advocates would argue, has shown that the backlash can be absorbed — and defeated. They are right. In 2002, Israel eliminated the head of Hamas’s military wing, Salah Mustafa Shehade. Backed by a public prepared for the wave of suicide bombings that followed, Israel’s government slowly ground down Hamas’s military capability. It isn’t clear Indian voters would show similar resolve.

The story, moreover, isn’t as simple as it seems. Shahade’s wife and nine children were killed along with him — sparking off outrage which legitimised a wave of retaliatory suicide bombings, and boosted Hamas’s standing among Palestinians.

Modi’s second option — retaliation along the Line of Control — hasn’t worked out quite as planned, either. The Modi government’s first acts included mortar-for-bullets escalation along the India-Pakistan frontier in Jammu. The idea was to inflict costs on Pakistan’s armed forces for provocation along the Line of Control. The strategy, however, didn’t deter back-to-back fidayeen attacks that took place in March — and, moreover, provoked a flood of refugees.

Even worse, from the Army’s point of view, continued firing would have made rebuilding the Line of Control fencing difficult — thus hurting a key element of India’s counter-terrorism infrastructure.
It could be argued that the aggressive posture on the Line of Control failed because it wasn’t aggressive enough: cross-border retaliation, after all, posed no real threat to well dug-in Pakistani forces. This wouldn’t have been true, hardliners argue, if Indian forces were willing to actually humiliate the Pakistan army by grabbing territory along the Line of Control — the third option.
However, it is far from clear if India’s armed forces can deliver a decisive win — making this third option risky. In a thoughtful paper published this month, the scholar Walter Ladwig III reviewed the state of both countries’ forces, concluding that in “the most likely conflict scenarios India is unlikely to achieve the strategic surprise necessary to make a limited offensive succeed”.

The use of air power against terror camps isn’t much of an option either. In August 1998, the United States fired missiles into Afghanistan, seeking to avenge bombings which killed 224 people. In all, 75 missiles, each priced at $ 1.5 million, killed six jihadists. Moreover, Pakistan could hit back, targeting Indian industrial infrastructure, which is much more expensive than tent-and-donkey-cart training camps.

The bad news is this: the current choice, maintaining the status quo, is reaching its sell-by date. The US will soon be out of Afghanistan — and will thus exercise less leverage over Pakistan. Pakistan itself is unravelling. Its India-hating army chief Raheel Sharif — who lost his brother in the 1971 war — is under seige by the jihadis, and cannot risk being seen as buckling.

In the last three years, notably, Kashmir has seen a slow uptick in Indian security forces fatalities, reversing the post-2002 trend — an ominous portent. New Delhi can only deter Pakistan, though, if its forces dominate each step of the deterrence ladder.

That means developing covert assets to make acts of terrorism prohibitively costly, to have policing and intelligence systems that will ensure jihadist retaliation has a low probability of success, and to have military means that leaves an adversary in no doubt of swift defeat.


The study quoted in the article:

http://users.ox.ac.uk/~mert1769/Convent ... 20Asia.pdf

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby satya » 31 May 2015 18:25

^^^ Went through the 'thoughtful paper' cited above & quoted in article . What's thoughtful in stating the obvious ie total numbers ( soliders , tanks & so on on ) , terrain and man-built fortifications . Why he forgot to mention that 1/3rd of the TSPA divisions assets failed to mobilize during Op. Parakaram due to lack of spares , non-functioning transport vehicles ( include armor if what i heard is true ) and serious lack of war -reserves = Mushy's Kargil Downhill skiing again ( man ! he is stubborn ) . Is this what Brits taught TSPA GHQ about logistics and war reserves ? Where is the equal equal in manpower quality as the author hints at ?
Again author sings the same old tune of TSPA's advantage of shorter line of communication , first to reach the spot but what happen next ? What if at same place , the first to arrive TSPA's troops receive an unexpected prize from IA's artillery/MBLRs rounds already in waiting ? Don't tell me that how we know where they will gather as if its a big secret for there are not many places left given the level of urbanization on their side . Did the author ever wonder who will stand up to welcome IA's strike corps post artillery's first place prize ceremony ? Here's the thing in my simple understanding : You reach early you are dead (artillery ) , you reach late we declare party over(wait for IA's CSD to do its business )= ceasefire /loss of face for TSPA hiding far far away from border ? Did he missed the obvious left behind artillery pieces near border by IA's exercising troops just like that he glosses this over again open sources . Its one thing to gloss over but its another when reality bites back , he better ask those who did downhill skiing in Kargil .
Author ignores TSPA's serious lack of AAD cover whatever it has is rudimentary but he makes it look like at par if not better than IA's .I can go on but let's leave it at that . I am not going to talk about his air force assessment for its simply childish . But then what to expect from a Brit other than finding nothing wrong in loyal servants quarters ie TSP . If only if NDA-2 can get artillery in massive number combined with good AAD cover we can do a cold start doctrine on tractors borrowed from Punjab farmer for transportation . Just get numbers and range in artillery right sooner the better.
Anpther thought : TSPA's AAD will always suffer for neither US nor PRC would like their air -defense systems get known by the other so all TSPA will get is 'export-version' . No wonder India began getting serious offers on air defense systems once Akash became a reality .

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby Prasad » 31 May 2015 22:55

Sushma Swaraj just shot down the cricket diplomacy nonsense. So there goes one of swami's pillars of his $hithouse story.

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby Aditya G » 07 Jul 2015 00:09

http://www.newindianexpress.com/nation/ ... 04708.ece1

Army Operation Along LoC Enters Third Day
By Fayaz Wani Published: 06th July 2015 05:15 AM Last Updated: 06th July 2015 08:59 AM

Email5
SRINAGAR:After foiling an infiltration bid of militants along the Line of Control (LoC) in Uri Sector of Jammu and Kashmir on Friday, the Army, for the third consecutive day on Sunday, continued its combing and search operation along the LoC to flush out hiding militants, if any.

“Additional troops have been rushed to the spot to assist in the combing operations,” a senior army officer said. The reinforcement was rushed to the Uri sector after the Army foiled an infiltration bid of militants in Uri sector on July 3 (Friday) and killed a militant during the initial gunfight.

The official said no fresh contact has been established with the militants since Saturday when another militant was killed. “So far two militants and an Army man have been killed in the operation,” they said adding three weapons and three backpacks were recovered from the scene of the gun battle.

An Army official said due to the robust counter infiltration grid in place along LoC, the militants failed to breach the security layer and were detected before they could have sneaked.

According to defence sources, it was the sixth infiltration bid to be foiled by the Army along LoC in Kashmir this year. “15 militants were killed while foiling these infiltration bids,” they said. Last year the Army had killed 59 militants along the LoC in Kashmir.

Army men and officials deployed along LoC have been put on maximum alert in view of growing threat of infiltration bids by militants following melting of snow in the upper reaches. A senior army official recently said that about 300 militants are ready to infiltrate into the State to cause disturbances.

....

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Re: India Border Watch: Security and Operations

Postby member_27581 » 14 Jul 2015 22:35

https://www.facebook.com/TheIndianNationalist?fref=nf
Dont know how true or false this is, but the news made my day. Will he keep his head?
IndianArmy kills Pakistani terrorist who beheaded Lance Naik Hemraj
The militant that was killed by Indian Army yesterday in Poonch along the Line of Control (LoC) has been identified as Anwar khan who was involved in the beheading of Lance Naik Hemraj in January 2013.
Yesterday, a group of militants tried to sneak into the Indian side along the LoC in Balnoie area of Mehndar tehsil.
The troops guarding the LoC challenged the infiltrators, resulting in the encounter in which one militant Anwar Khan was killed.
Mohammad Anwar Khan was the one who beheaded Hemraj on January 8 2013. Anwar alias Azhar was paid Rs five lakh as reward by ISI for beheading Hemraj.


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