India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

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NRao
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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby NRao » 28 Dec 2015 05:37

Surya,

A couple of things.

Long story short, F-1. From there my research took care of my status. Had applied at IISc and was advised to stay put.

I very much doubt an H-1 of today would have been able to get a visa then. Two diff times, cannot compare.

Secondly, I have come across cousins - from the US/India - interviewing for the same position!!!

The non-US company I work for reserves a certain number of positions for employees who would like to work in diff countries (a nice feature). BUT, I have lost out on good positions because these were reserved for someone from abroad. Eh? They prefer to keep me on the bench and they give it to someone who would like to work in the US for a year or 18 months. Very nice feature until you realize that my rating is gone to the dogs (compared to others I am on the bench, no promotions for sure, reduced increments/bonuses, etc) and all because someone could be brought so easily on an H-1. Tell me why would I not be phobic?

Like I said, Prof Juluri needs to get taste of real life. Be a common citizen, without a job for 18-24 months, live is a posh part of the Bay area, have a family, two kids in college, mortgage and taxes to pay, maintain life-style, - reinvent yourself every 4-5 years (because H-1/off-shoring takes your livelihood), etc. And, yet sleep well.

People do that.

Corporations do not and macro-economics can never reflect such details.

Let me put it this way. If H-1 is given to people from other nations, it is equally OK for a US citizen to his/her rep and get it regulated. It is not a phobia.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby UlanBatori » 28 Dec 2015 05:51

I agree that it is perfectly fine for US voters to influence lawmakers to pass the needed laws. But it is never OK to incite hatred against other people who are obeying the law. If one asks Prof. Juluri it may turn out that getting where he is now, did not happen without some serious effort and sacrifices. And even today, it is a struggle just to be able to express his opinions without being attacked and without people ACTUALLY trying to "steal his job". All the time. And maybe he has no time to sleep with all the effort needed to fight those off?

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby NRao » 28 Dec 2015 05:54


I heard a debate the other day. Interest rates in the US are below 3 percent. In India for commercial loans they are like 12 percent. If India is to allow American companies that borrow money at 3 percent, to compete head-on with Indian businesses that have to pay 12 percent, then, logically, Indian companies that can obtain labor at $3/hr should be allowed to compete head-on in the US for contracts, with US companies that have to pay $15/hr. If that does not happen, then, hey, :P to American businesses.


Two things.

1) This is again at a corporate level, does not reflect the idea of "stealing our jobs". Corporations are - today - acting in their own interest - American, British, French or Indian.

2) The Indian business can participate in a swap to get hold of the lower interests in the US - been there for decades. They can also trade for swaps on stock exchanges - buy a swap for example. And, they do do that. How else do you think these guys can effectively compete in all areas?

The problem with India (Indians?) is that culturally we are low risk (a lot of noise of course). There is a huge amount of work to be done within India - but it is risky and therefore Indians do not want to pick up that work. Just check out the number of players WRT Smart Cities in India.

On "competition" - it needs to be equal in most respects. Secondly, I would like it to be at the top levels. Competing for Java programmers and UI developers and call centers will only get you so far.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby krishna_krishna » 28 Dec 2015 06:04

NRao I agree that is perfectly fine for US voters to influence lawmakers to pass whatever laws they think/believe/perceive to be good for them, after all it is their country. However let me tell you a real story about struggle to fill out an advance IT position in remote north east town, HR was adamant to have non visa person, wait one whole year and not a single resume, even they tried to expand to person work from other offices (although first time in the history of the company) where someone is given option to work from other office big texas superb still no luck people were H-1 and no success. Finally they gave up hired our contractor and transferred H1 completed the project and that project is making 200k /month for the company. His salary was around 100k/ annum, go figure.

What people should look at it is a competitive world and times have changed. If you cannot change the laws in your country and you do all the ronna dhona about job stole by H1 is mediocrity at its best.

Regarding Java and UI developers they earn whatever level of intelligence by doing an honest labor and with the population India has no harm in them getting gainful employment but it is not right to ciritize someone/some other country siting afar on what they should or should not do , I would say mind ur business.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby A_Gupta » 28 Dec 2015 06:11

Sorry to interrupt, but "Entrepreneurs don’t have a special gene for risk—they come from families with money". This is for the US of A. The link below is to a popular article, which reports the research.

http://qz.com/455109/entrepreneurs-dont ... ith-money/

“If one does not have money in the form of a family with money, the chances of becoming an entrepreneur drop quite a bit,” Levine tells Quartz.


The real test will be with the second-generation of Indian origin people in the USA - are they culturally low risk? and with the children of Indians in India who have made money. This "Indians are culturally low risk" is, IMO, simply explained by the scarcity of family capital. Everyone follows pretty much the same laws of economics.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby NRao » 28 Dec 2015 06:16

I agree that it is perfectly fine for US voters to influence lawmakers to pass the needed laws. But it is never OK to incite hatred against other people who are obeying the law. If one asks Prof. Juluri it may turn out that getting where he is now, did not happen without some serious effort and sacrifices. And even today, it is a struggle just to be able to express his opinions without being attacked and without people ACTUALLY trying to "steal his job". All the time. And maybe he has no time to sleep with all the effort needed to fight those off?


We are going off on a tangent here.

Yeah, I agree. Empty beer cans/bottle, spiting, .. seen it. ...................... I had friends of German decent that complained about it in the 70s. Jews, Polish, Mehico, .......... Agreed it is not OK to incite ............. etc, etc, etc. But that is not what is being discussed here.

Are those that are making his life miserable H-1 resources (rhetoric)? That should be the determining factor.

IF I go to my representative and request him/her to regulate H-1s, what am I to say other than they are a threat to my job? And, if there are enough of us it could be viewed as phobic. No corporation will do that for me. On the contrary teh corp will go and ask for more H-1s

However let me tell you a real story about struggle to fill out an advance IT position in remote north east town, HR was adamant to have non visa person, wait one whole year and not a single resume, even they tried to expand to person work from other offices (although first time in the history of the company) where someone is given option to work from other office big texas superb still no luck people were H-1 and no success. Finally they gave up hired our contractor and transferred H1 completed the project and that project is making 200k /month for the company. His salary was around 100k/ annum, go figure.


Back when I came to the US, THAT exact scenario was reserved for a H-1. Specialized resource for a position which no US citizen would fill. normally they went on to get a GC too. That is a good situation to look for resources from abroad. IMHO.

However, how would you react if your boss told you to train an H-1 for your job and then get a pink slip? What would you do?

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby NRao » 28 Dec 2015 06:20

A_Gupta wrote:Sorry to interrupt, but "Entrepreneurs don’t have a special gene for risk—they come from families with money". This is for the US of A. The link below is to a popular article, which reports the research.

http://qz.com/455109/entrepreneurs-dont ... ith-money/

“If one does not have money in the form of a family with money, the chances of becoming an entrepreneur drop quite a bit,” Levine tells Quartz.


The real test will be with the second-generation of Indian origin people in the USA - are they culturally low risk? and with the children of Indians in India who have made money. This "Indians are culturally low risk" is, IMO, simply explained by the scarcity of family capital. Everyone follows pretty much the same laws of economics.


No problem, a far better topic to discuss.

So, any such research on India?

Since the original article is a subscription unable to read it. But this does go against most what is taught in school.

More l8r.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby krishna_krishna » 28 Dec 2015 06:21

However, how would you react if your boss told you to train an H-1 for your job and then get a pink slip? What would you do?[/quote]

Have been through that but guess what was rehired after six months since the company where the outsourced work went could not support.
I understand it does not happen all the time, however what I would do is do my best to prevent undo it but if I could not and if it is beyond my control. Learn to be competitive ,learn skills that are rare and competitive (Thats what i did during those six months)

But I did not blame any single H-1's not even the person I trained who took that job on behalf of that consulting company.

In that case I forgot to mention we also took an intern who had recently finished masters from a near local university she quit within a month of being trained and all while waiting more than year plus to come and join.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby Gus » 28 Dec 2015 06:42

NRao - corporations are people my friend.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby NRao » 28 Dec 2015 07:24

Gus wrote:NRao - corporations are people my friend.


I guess.

A group that do not have to fear being replaced by a H-1. :lol:

One who creates the phobia and cares less about it.


Anyways, I think this topic is done.


Before I sign off, there is a nice article in WashPost on "Digital dissenters"

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby ramana » 28 Dec 2015 10:49

NRao
Yes its a mixed emotions issue. Feel your pain at H-1 visa replacement. Juluri is writing at xenophobia in the opposing views.
Regardless cloud services will make H-1 for IT redundant. Folks will come on B1 for meetings.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby Raja Bose » 28 Dec 2015 11:30

Surya wrote:
I can ask that question because I have been impacted by H-1s (very badly).


Just out of curiosity? (only broaching topic because of your comments - )
Did you not come here through H1? Unless somehow through some family or marriage or lottery??

If Yes then it makes your viewpoint interesting

Even if No - unless you were born here - unlike TSJ - it makes your viewpoint interesting


One need not necessarily come to US via H1B or GC onlee. I came thru F-1->O-1->GC.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby Singha » 28 Dec 2015 13:48

i have been thinking a bit about capitalism.

we have been through about six centuries of western invented free market capitalism now. some end results.

- a basket of currencies are strong high value, rest are weak.
- of the strong, not all nations produce anything that great but are part of the right group and geographical area so they get a good ride (greece, portugal, norway,iceland)
- everything thats manufactured of significant value and quality - PC, phone, car, machinery, TV,software,computer parts is priced worldwide "in US dollars" or more(due to local taxes, transport etc). this hurts the purchasing power and std of life of a significant majority of the world population and eats into their savings.
- only a few strong developing countries are able to sell even essential medicines cheaply under govt mandate (india), the rest suffer and hence medical tourism to india or smuggling of medicines from india. medicines are 3x costlier in bangladesh. china also has many costly meds like cancer drugs that visitors buy from here.
- the strong currency countries who enjoy relative parity with the US dollar are ok with this, rest 4.5 billion are in the permanent doghouse
- everything is rigged to support the purchasing power and value of the US dollar - oil trade, arms deals, commodities pricing, international banks . the justification is that "US is the biggest market"

so we have sights like even medium tech products levi jeans made in TN costing the same in chennai as it does in austin. or $20 nike shoes costing $100 in shanghai as in SFO.

I am not sure when/where its going to end and developing countries will enjoy a better std of life. very very few developing countries in the past 5 decades have made it into respectable territory - all under some special US blessings - singapore, taiwan, soko and japan(well japan was developed even before ww2 so more like rebuilding). 3 out of nearly 150 developing countries.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby NRao » 28 Dec 2015 17:26


i have been thinking a bit about capitalism


The problem is rather simple. There is really no model, which is what economics runs on, that has corruption as part of it. So when does corrupt practices enter and how do we authenticate them is not understood, but very well experienced.

Rarely watch movies, but did see the "Big Short" yesterday.

India is not a poor nation. In fact it is a very rich nation. But how does the majority of the population tap into that us the question. Instead people are investing time in reviving the river Saraswati. Go figure.

Ramana,

The laws of Karma apply equally to everyone. No discrimination there.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby A_Gupta » 28 Dec 2015 18:58

http://nationalinterest.org/feature/whe ... asia-14741
"Where Is America in Japan and India's Plans for Asia?"
Richard Fontaine, president of the Center for a New American Security in Washington, D.C., opines:
Washington should welcome the new links between its Japanese ally and its Indian strategic partner and encourage their further growth.

The new warmth serves American interests in profound ways. By balancing China and ensuring that it rises in a region where the democratic powers are also strong and working together, closer ties between Tokyo and New Delhi help anchor a peace that is favorable to prosperity and liberal values. They demonstrate that, contrary to Beijing’s claims, the story of Asian security is about much more than an American fixation with “containing” China. And at a time of declining U.S. military resources and rising commitments in the Middle East and Europe, Indo-Japanese cooperation helps reduce gaps that would otherwise emerge in the rebalance of U.S. policy toward Asia.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby TSJones » 28 Dec 2015 19:14

Singha wrote:i have been thinking a bit about capitalism.

we have been through about six centuries of western invented free market capitalism now. some end results.

- a basket of currencies are strong high value, rest are weak.
- of the strong, not all nations produce anything that great but are part of the right group and geographical area so they get a good ride (greece, portugal, norway,iceland)
- everything thats manufactured of significant value and quality - PC, phone, car, machinery, TV,software,computer parts is priced worldwide "in US dollars" or more(due to local taxes, transport etc). this hurts the purchasing power and std of life of a significant majority of the world population and eats into their savings.
- only a few strong developing countries are able to sell even essential medicines cheaply under govt mandate (india), the rest suffer and hence medical tourism to india or smuggling of medicines from india. medicines are 3x costlier in bangladesh. china also has many costly meds like cancer drugs that visitors buy from here.
- the strong currency countries who enjoy relative parity with the US dollar are ok with this, rest 4.5 billion are in the permanent doghouse
- everything is rigged to support the purchasing power and value of the US dollar - oil trade, arms deals, commodities pricing, international banks . the justification is that "US is the biggest market"

so we have sights like even medium tech products levi jeans made in TN costing the same in chennai as it does in austin. or $20 nike shoes costing $100 in shanghai as in SFO.

I am not sure when/where its going to end and developing countries will enjoy a better std of life. very very few developing countries in the past 5 decades have made it into respectable territory - all under some special US blessings - singapore, taiwan, soko and japan(well japan was developed even before ww2 so more like rebuilding). 3 out of nearly 150 developing countries.


one must also keep in perspective where and how far India has come in the last 70 years. furthermore India was a much higher controlled state/socialist economy just 25 years ago.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby Singha » 28 Dec 2015 19:41

prosperity and stability of 100 years(so far) seems necessary to be preceded by 3-400 years of unbridled looting by force of arms and cheap/free exploitation of resources...to provide the feedstock for industry and new innovation. maybe tomorrow it is attracting people also as the feedstock for industries like services (in this the US is several notches above the rest of the OECD).

no country in the last 1000 years has become prosperous without stepping very strongly on the toes of others and snatching resources & land / beggaring others / rigging trade via control of seas and guns / special favours from the top dog countries ... even china was given its factory trade ladder as cookie for secretly turning against the ussr after 1972.

universal peace and prosperity seems like a distant myth to be worshipped in textbooks and religious hymns only. at any given era, there exist a 'kabila' or 'group' of nations which are rich and the rest a vast amorphous mass of poor. slowly another gang comes to the fore, some nations move from one group to another deftly.

very few cases exist of rich nations becoming poor within 100 years...its a gradual decay that takes some 300-500 years to reach a nadir from the zenith. argentina in 1920s was in top10 richest per capita income nation , even today after decades of not-so-distinguished rule and performance, it is still solidly a upper middle income country with a per-capita income far higher than brazil and mehico.

the temperate regions of the world even the agrarian(chile, argentina, new zealand) or resources players (norway, iceland, australia) at present juncture have the advantage of low population density, closed borders to control any forcible influx and hence a good base to enjoy high per capita incomes.

the landgrab that took place in N / S america and oceania around 300 years ago will serve them for another 300-500 years nicely in terms of resources if they can retain political stability and defend these gains.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby NRao » 28 Dec 2015 19:54

The latest nation to join this band of bandits is called "Stock Holders".

Not going to get better. Either stomp on others or get stomped.

OT. Sorry.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby TSJones » 28 Dec 2015 20:34

I am no hooray fan of MNCs for that matter. but my pension plan largely depends on them. and for all its problems, it's far better than the alternative, the socialist state.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby JwalaMukhi » 29 Dec 2015 01:20

Most companies and local economy love immigrants. The new immigrants including H1s, especially those with purchasing power, have unmet needs and help local economy by buying homes, renting homes, to new cars etc. That itself is very attractive for local economies. Hence, the parochialism is generally disregarded until and unless it affects the bottomline.

There are not many people who will buy more homes, more cars, more stuff and more service, more tax base, that is the meat and potatoes of US economy. This engine can only purr if there is need. More multiple vacation homes, multiple cars by same owners are not a solution.

That said, Toyota and Honda (most cars that are actually made in USA) will willingly lobby to have increase in H1s (purchasing power), while most cars made in mexico, elsewhere (companies - ford, GM) will be agnostic.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby NRao » 29 Dec 2015 04:15

Go Nick, Go.

Flying the Wright way, Nick Engler lands in India with an inspiring mission

Today is the 112th anniversary of the historic 12-second flight by Wright Brothers at Kitty Hawk, (North Carolina) in the United States. On December 17, 1903, Wright Brothers' Flyer managed a 12-seconds flight, which eventually changed the face of mankind.
Plane lovers across the world celebrate December 17 as Aviation Day and remember the contribution of two hardworking bicycle mechanics in Wright Brothers. They still continue to inspire aviators for gifting early lessons in the art of flying.
Almost four decades after Flyer's maiden flight, Walchand Hirachand set up the Hindustan Aircraft Ltd (now Hindustan Aeronautics Limited) in Bangalore in 1940, now Bengaluru, the undisputed Aviation Capital of India.
On this special day, OneIndia caught up with Nick Engler, the man on a globetrotting mission, spreading the story of Wright Brothers by setting up Flyer simulators. One such simulator went live at the Visvesvaraya Industrial and Technological Museum (VITM) last year, the first from Flyer series in the country.
Nick, is the Director of Wright Brother Aeroplane Company (WBAC) in Dayton, Ohio. In his first ever visit to India, Nick says he became fascinated with the Wright Brothers in 1984, when he learned to fly.
* Our mission is to inspire youngsters through Wright Brothers
* You can also build your own scenery, even an airport
* Lots of people are showing interest in simulators
* My wife is my co-pilot in all my missions

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby Prem » 05 Jan 2016 04:26

Trump's campaign is looking more and more like that of Modi. American people feel let down and now hungry for 56Inch Seena leadership.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby sukhish » 05 Jan 2016 04:47

Jhujar wrote:Trump's campaign is looking more and more like that of Modi. American people feel let down and now hungry for 56Inch Seena leadership.


I was about to say this, you stole my words.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby sukhish » 05 Jan 2016 04:49

no questions are being asked from trumph, all the right wing releagous anti - immigrants are together to vote him to power. But I'am still not 100% sure if he will win the general elections, he will probably get the nomination.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby Singha » 05 Jan 2016 06:53

for hillary to lose, middle class white women have to adandon her and instead x-vote for trump. staying home will not do.
he also needs to splinter the dems latino vote bank.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby habal » 05 Jan 2016 07:10

Jhujar wrote:Trump's campaign is looking more and more like that of Modi. American people feel let down and now hungry for 56Inch Seena leadership.


i had said this 2 months ago on this forum.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby habal » 05 Jan 2016 07:13

Singha wrote:for hillary to lose, middle class white women have to adandon her and instead x-vote for trump. staying home will not do.
he also needs to splinter the dems latino vote bank.


USA has world famous Diebold voting machines. You click on Kerry, print out says 'thanks for voting' from smiling George Bush.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby Yagnasri » 05 Jan 2016 08:22

Which Bush? papa or baba??

I am very surprised to see that US do not have a reasonable voting process in most of the places. Even registering voters at the public cost is also not there. It is as if the system do not want wider public participation.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby A_Gupta » 07 Jan 2016 19:33

Alyssa Ayres:
http://blogs.cfr.org/asia/2016/01/07/in ... -can-help/
In War on the Rocks, I provide the backdrop of the recent history of conflict in South Asia, and elaborate on what Washington can do to help. In a nutshell, the single most useful thing the United States can do is to unequivocally pressure Pakistan to end support for terrorist groups — not just some, but all — that destabilize India and the region.


War on the Rocks article:
http://warontherocks.com/2016/01/lookin ... stan-ties/

What Washington Should Do to Help India–Pakistan Ties

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby NRao » 07 Jan 2016 19:44

A_Gupta wrote:Alyssa Ayres:
http://blogs.cfr.org/asia/2016/01/07/in ... -can-help/
In War on the Rocks, I provide the backdrop of the recent history of conflict in South Asia, and elaborate on what Washington can do to help. In a nutshell, the single most useful thing the United States can do is to unequivocally pressure Pakistan to end support for terrorist groups — not just some, but all — that destabilize India and the region.


War on the Rocks article:
http://warontherocks.com/2016/01/lookin ... stan-ties/

What Washington Should Do to Help India–Pakistan Ties


Nice, but not worth waiting for such behavior.

Indians need to act within a time frame and not wait for events to go their way (*may be* under some special circumstances).

Why is that in economics India can pave the way for the region and not for security?

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby NRao » 07 Jan 2016 20:08

Another angle, not too dated:

foreignpolicy.com :: David J. Karl :: Oct, 2015 :: The Desi Factor in U.S.-India Relations

Narendra Modi’s visit last month to the San Francisco area highlighted a signal immigration story: The great prominence of Indian-born entrepreneurs and executives in Silicon Valley and the key role they play in America’s technological dynamism. But an equally important, if under-noticed, tale was also at play: How the increasing stature of Indians in U.S. society has changed the way all Americans think about India and the resulting impact on U.S. foreign policy.

According to a Gallup survey conducted earlier this year, more 70 percent of the U.S. public has a positive impression of India, a score on par with Israel’s traditionally-high favorability rating. This is the latest indicator of how decisively American perceptions about the country have shifted in a relatively short period of time. Not too long ago, India was widely regarded as the very epitome of what the term “Third World” meant – decrepit, destitute and pitiable.

For many decades most Americans were inclined to the views of President Harry S. Truman, who dismissed India at its birth as an independent state as “pretty jammed with poor people and cows wandering around streets, witch doctors and people sitting on hot coals and bathing in the Ganges.” His Secretary of State, Dean Acheson, had an even more incisive perspective: “by and large [Indians] and their country give me the creeps.”

When Daniel Patrick Moynihan was the U.S. ambassador to India from 1973-75, he regularly lamented that Washington was utterly indifferent to the country’s fate; writing in his diary, he confided that it “is American practice to pay but little attention to India.” In a cable to the State Department, he complained of dismissive attitudes, “a kind of John Birch Society contempt for the views of raggedly ass people in pajamas on the other side of the world.”

Public opinion kept close track with official attitudes in Washington. Harold Issacs’s classic 1958 survey of U.S. elite opinion on China and India, Scratches on Our Minds, revealed that influential Americans held very negative perceptions of the latter, associating it with “filth, dirt and disease,” along with debased religious beliefs. Influential books in the 1960s, most notably Paul Ehrlich’s The Population Bomb, rendered dim portraits of India’s political coherence and economic prospects. The country did not even rate mention in either Paul Kennedy’s much-discussed 1987 book, The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers, or John Mearsheimer’s 2001 book, The Tragedy of Great Power Politics. And in the summer of 1991, editorial writers at the New York Times advised readers to “pity India” because the country was in danger of fragmenting along sectarian lines.

A State Department analysis prepared in the early 1970s found that U.S. public opinion identified India more than any other nation with such attributes as disease, death and illiteracy, and school textbooks throughout this period regularly portrayed it in a most negative light. This view was again underscored in a 1983 opinion poll, in which Americans ranked India at the bottom of a list of 22 countries on the basis of perceived importance to U.S. vital interests.

So, what accounts for the fundamental shift in American perceptions? An obvious part of the answer lies in the turnabout in India’s outlook that began with the major economic reforms launched in 1991. According to World Bank data, India has now supplanted Japan as Asia’s second-largest economy as measured on a purchasing power parity basis. Lawrence H. Summers, when he served recently as President Obama’s chief economics adviser, took to touting the virtues of the Indian development model.

And the teeming masses that horrified Paul Ehrlich into apocalyptic prognostications are now viewed as a vast reservoir of highly-trained brainpower threatening to sap the U.S. edge in innovation. A widely-publicized 2005 report issued by an eminent group of U.S. business and scientific leaders warned that America’s competitive position is being eroded by the emergence of skilled labor forces in India and China. This theme was regularly picked up by President Obama in the early years of his term.

But an equally central piece of the explanation lies in the remarkable growth of the Indian-American community. Nearly invisible three decades ago, it is now the third largest immigrant group in the country and occupies leading positions in government, business, academia and the health care professions.

Consider, for example, the election of Bobby Jindal and Nikki Haley to the governorships of Louisiana and South Carolina (respectively), states in the heart of the Old Confederacy. Or how the U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for South Asia as well as the U.S. Ambassador in New Delhi are persons of Indian origin.

Witness too the recent insider-trading trials involving the Galleon Group hedge fund – in which the key defendants, witnesses and prosecutors traced their roots to India – highlighted the rise of Indian-Americans on Wall Street. Or the recent appointments of Satya Nadella and Sundar Pichai as the chief executives of iconic U.S. tech companies Microsoft and Google (respectively).

Consider also the dramatic impact on Silicon Valley, where Indians are involved in more start-ups than any other immigrant group and play high-profile roles in venture capital. According to a 2012 Kauffman Foundation report, Indian immigrants established one-third of Silicon Valley start-ups in 2006-2012, up from about 7 percent in 2005. Indeed, Indians founded a markedly greater number of engineering and technology firms than did immigrants from other countries, including those from China and the United Kingdom.

Although the Indian community remains relatively small – about one percent of the overall U.S. population – its rapid development as one of the nation’s most successful communities gives it an influence wholly disproportionate to its size. A number of studies have found that Indian-Americans rank higher in educational attainment and income levels than the national average and substantially higher than other immigrant groups. As one analyst puts it, “Indians in America are emerging as the new Jews: disproportionately well-educated, well paid, and increasingly well connected politically.”

According to a new Pew Research Center report, 77 percent of Indian immigrants to the United States have at least a college degree, compared to the national average of 27 percent. Another Pew study finds that Indian Americans lead all other Asian sub-groups in income and education levels. And a 2010 RAND Corporation study reports that Indian-American entrepreneurs have business income that is substantially higher than the national average and higher than any other immigrant group.

The evident success and prosperity of the Indian community has had a real impact on U.S. foreign policy. First, it has helped change public opinion on India in relatively short order, since it is difficult to dismiss or disparage a country that has produced immigrants who have so rapidly become respected and prominent in U.S. society.

Second, the community’s growing impact catalyzed stronger interest about India in Washington beginning in the mid-1990s, helping in turn to reverse America’s traditional disregard of the country – recall, for instance, how the U.S. ambassador’s post in New Delhi was vacant for the Clinton administration’s first year. This interest played an important role in the lifting of U.S. economic sanctions levied against India in the wake of its 1998 nuclear tests, and in securing the ratification of the landmark U.S.-India civil nuclear agreement a decade later.

Third, the Indian-American community has been at the forefront in building critical societal linkages between its native and adoptive countries. Consider, for example, the dynamics operating at the turn of the millennium. At the same time as Washington was imposing sanctions in response to the 1998 nuclear tests, concerns about the “Y2K” programming glitch led businesses on both sides to set the foundation for today’s strong technology partnership.

The significant role played by these societal bonds leads Fareed Zakaria to compare U.S.-India ties to the special relationships the United States has with Great Britain and Israel. And Shashi Tharoor, formerly India’s minister of state for external affairs, has likewise remarked that “in 20 years I expect the Indo-U.S. relationship to resemble the Israel-U.S. relationship, and for many of the same reasons.”

Although they are often overlooked by national policymakers, non-governmental ties fostered by the Indian-American community will be one key in securing the long-term growth of the evolving bilateral partnership. As Indian foreign secretary S. Jaishankar remarked last year when he was serving as Delhi’s ambassador in Washington: “[The] India-U.S. relationship has changed dramatically. When one thinks about the transformation of our ties, it is natural to attribute it to some good diplomacy on both sides…but to me, the basis for transformation of this relationship is the Indian-American community.”

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby NRao » 07 Jan 2016 20:33

Another view point:

foreignpolicy.com :: Jayita Sarkar : MArch 2015 :: Strategic Passing: Why India Will Not Be Pakistan 2.0 in U.S. Asia Policy

Despite turning page for a new chapter in U.S.-India ties, New Delhi will not replace Islamabad as Washington's willing and subservient ally in an increasingly complex world. Here's why.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby NRao » 07 Jan 2016 21:36

There have been some noise of folding Pakistan and Afghanistan (from CENTCOM - orange) into PACOM - red. Looking forward if that comes about. I think it would benefit India a lot. It is serious enough to get Pakis riled.

Image

(The proposal includes CENTCOM getting teh entire horn of Africa (Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya and all in between) and getting rid of AFRICOM and rolling Africa into EUCOM.)

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby Philip » 08 Jan 2016 04:49

I've just posted elsewhere that the US has a policy of "3 strikes and you're out" for even petty offences which sends you to prison. In the case of Pak,this policy has been abandoned allowing Pak to commit terror crimes against India ad nauseum ,for ever and ever amen!

Furthermore,America adds insult to injury by demanding that India parleys with Pak for a "Piss in our time" scrap of paper, a humiliating version of the Treaty of Versailles where we hand over to Pak the choicest cuts of Kashmir. It is long past time to put an end to this farcical and demeaning diplomatic dance with the US and call a spade a spade.Further rewards of arms for Paki terror must see India suspend arms acquisitios from the US until Pak is brought to heel.

In the past there have also been some US ambassadors and State Dept. officials who have behaved more like Paki p*mps and wh*res rather than batting for Uncle Sam.Robin Raphael is a name that comes to mind immediately.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby g.sarkar » 08 Jan 2016 08:41

Philip wrote:I've just posted elsewhere that the US has a policy of "3 strikes and you're out" for even petty offences which sends you to prison.

The 3 strikes law is a state law not a federal law. Some US states have it, some do not. In California, 3 felonies could give you a life sentence under this law. If the first 2 were serious felonies, the 3rd could be very minor such as stealing socks from a departmental store (often called shoplifting), and this could get you 15 to life. Recently, I understand that the law has changed, to get life, the 3rd has to be a serious crime too.
All this has nothing to do with India or Pakistan.
Gautam

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby Vayutuvan » 08 Jan 2016 10:43

"Three strikes you'r out" is used to discipline kids (my experience - ymmv)

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby Philip » 09 Jan 2016 11:28

Good luck to this! This affects soldiers of any nation grievously injured in battle and offers hope for the future of at least partial rehabilitation for the injured. Strange that it has taken so long for research to have begun despite 2 world wars and other conflicts during the last century.

US military funds research into lab-grown testicles for wounded soldiers
Hundreds of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans have injuries that make it difficult or impossible to conceive children
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... diers.html

By David Lawler, Washington
08 Jan 2016

The US military is funding research into lab-grown testicles for soldiers whose battlefield injuries leave them unable to conceive children.

More than 50,000 American troops have been wounded in action in Iraq and Afghanistan, the majority by improvised explosive devices. *(This is a staggering number of wounded soldiers,and does not include the numbers of other allied casualties)

The catastrophic effects of those explosions can be seen in the hundreds of soldiers who have lost arms and legs, those who can no longer dress themselves and those who can no longer walk.

But for some soldiers returning from war, the most devastating injury is not immediately visible.
An estimated 440 soldiers wounded in Iraq alone sustained injuries that would make it more difficult, or in many cases impossible, for them to conceive children.

Pentagon-backed research at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine in North Carolina could fundamentally alter the prognosis for such individuals.

Doctors there have managed to reconstruct intact testicles using stem cells from soldiers themselves.

These testicles can create sperm, and could ultimately be inserted into the patients whose cells were used to grow them.

The most significant obstacle, however, is that the testicles produced in the lab thus far have been near-microscopic in size.

Dr Anthony Atala, the institutes's director, says considerable work remains before their breakthrough yields a viable end-product.

"We can make them small, but we’re working hard to make them larger"

Dr Anthony Atala
“The future plans are to grow the testicular tissue, expand the cells and put it back into the patient,” he told Motherboard, a technology news website. “But for a whole testicle, there is a very rich blood-vessel supply and that’s the challenge. We can make them small, but we’re working hard to make them larger.”

Dr Atala concedes that it will be at least a decade before lab-grown testicles can be produced, tested, and approved.

The costs involved could, at least initially, prove prohibitive. But the US military's investment in the project suggests the Pentagon believes it could one day help wounded veterans.

There are alternative steps, short of growing a new testicle, that could increase the likelihood of such soldiers being able to have children.

British Army doctors, for example, collect and store sperm from soldiers who suffer severe genital injuries as a matter of procedure. Soldiers also have the option of having their sperm frozen prior to deployment.

Some genital injuries could also be prevented by protective gear already issued to US troops, which include a Kevlar plate to cover the groin area.

Many soldiers elect not to wear the gear, however, because it is uncomfortable and because they do not believe it will withstand an explosion.

Sergeant Aaron Causey of the US Army, who lost his legs had his testicles damaged in an IED explosion in Afghanistan, doubted that the protective gear would have made much difference had he been wearing it.

“This groin protector is essentially a flap that hangs down in front of your groin,” he told Motherboard. “It’s really not going to do much in the case of a blast, it’s more there for getting shot. I was more worried about getting blown up.”

In addition to funding research on growing testicles in the lab, the Pentagon is considering ways to make the protective gear more comfortable and effective.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby deejay » 09 Jan 2016 11:38

02 days old news:

https://www.rt.com/news/328176-us-strategic-assets-korea/

US considers returning strategic arms to South Korea

Washington and Seoul are in talks over possible re-deployment of strategic nuclear arsenals and missile defense systems to the Korean peninsula, withdrawn from the region in the ‘90s. Beijing sees the move as a direct threat to China’s security.

North Korea’s alleged hydrogen bomb test on Wednesday has pushed the militaries of South Korea and the US towards discussions about returning American “strategic assets,” such as nuclear-capable B-52 bombers, F-22 stealth fighter jets and nuclear-powered submarines to American military bases in South Korea, the Yonhap news agency reports.
...

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby Philip » 09 Jan 2016 11:55

Wouldn't that make them easier targets for the NoKo badboy? How can one distinguish a NoKo saboteur form a SoKo soldier? Just as we saw at Pkot,NoKo worthies could use same tactics to gaina ccess to a mil base where such US assets are stationed. An event involving US N-assets in SoKo would be simply catastrophic.SoKo is a small country.

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Re: India-US Relations : News and Discussion- II

Postby arun » 10 Jan 2016 10:16

X Posted from the STFUP thread in view of comment of our former NSA Brajesh Mishra of "He went on to criticise the US “double standard”, arguing that we treat Hizbollah one way, and the Pakistan-based United Jihad Council very differently. The bottom line, Mishra said, is that there is a widespread perception that the US is doing nothing to help India fight terror".:

Thomas Kolarek wrote:US, UK rubbished India’s ‘evidence’ against Pakistan in Mumbai attacks, says Wikileaks - http://www.thenews.com.pk/print/89034-US-UK-rubbished-Indias-evidence-against-Pakistan-in-Mumbai-attacks-says-Wikileaks#sthash.2JcapJOp.dpuf
ISLAMABAD: Following Pathankot attack, the Indian media and government authorities have been referring to Mumbai attack as Pakistan’s work despite the fact that the Wikileaks had shown both the US and the British authorities trashing Indian so-called evidence against Pakistan.

Publicly both Washington and London have been shy to embarrass India and avoided rejecting her allegation against Pakistan but the Wikileaks showed the two trashing Indian claims about the involvement of either Pakistan’s prime intelligence agency- the ISI- or even senior leaders of a proscribed organisation.

Wikileaks, which contained secret State Department wires, had quoted former US ambassador to Pakistan Anne W Patterson as writing to the State Department that India had presented insufficient evidence against the senior leaders of now proscribed Lashkar-e-Taiba.

Anne W Patterson had mentioned in a wire to the Washington that Federal Investigation Agency (FIA) and other investigators had insufficient evidence for prosecution against Lashkar-e-Taiba’s Zaki-ur-Rehman Lakhvi, Zarar Shah and Mazhar Iqbal Alqama.

Patterson had even said that FIA was forced, as a result of political pressure, to arrest and charge the three LeT leaders and that FIA was still without solid evidence to begin a formal trial.

Some of the wires generated by US embassy in India had also made the India’s case on Mumbai attacks doubtful. Charge Geoff Pyatt was quoted to have written to Washington: “Indian officials remain convinced that Pakistan is behind the July 11th Mumbai attacks, and worry that the US is setting the bar too high for “solid evidence” of Pakistani intelligence involvement.”

The leak had even quoted National Security Advisor MK Narayanan as admitting that there are some pieces of the puzzle still missing. “He (Narayanan) said he is hesitant to say the evidence is “clinching”, but it is pretty good. Narayanan used the opportunity to reinforce the popular perception here that Pakistan is to blame for the attacks, while answering criticism that the foreign secretary’s and Mumbai police’s statements about the investigation were not backed by solid proof…”

The wire, generated from New Delhi, had also shown the Indian politicians reminding the Americans that India had sided with US on the issue of 9/11 despite the absence of concrete evidence.

The wire said: “At dinner with CIA Deputy Director of Intelligence Carmen Medina on October 23rd, former National Security Advisor Brajesh Mishra raised the issue of the US response to the Mumbai blasts.

‘We backed you when you decided to take action in Afghanistan after September 11,’ he said. ‘Your evidence after 9/11 was no less circumstantial than our evidence after 7/11 in Mumbai.’

He went on to criticise the US “double standard”, arguing that we treat Hizbollah one way, and the Pakistan-based United Jihad Council very differently. The bottom line, Mishra said, is that there is a widespread perception that the US is doing nothing to help India fight terror.”

Another leak, a wire sent from US New Delhi embassy to Washington, reflects on British doubts about Indian’s evidence against Pakistan.

The leak said, “While Indian press continues to pin blame on Pakistan, observers and diplomats in Delhi are asking the same question: was the ISI behind the Mumbai attacks? While there are clear links between the attacks, perpetrators and the extremist group LeT, and likewise, there are links between LeT and the ISI, there is no clear evidence yet to suggest that ISI directed or facilitated the attacks, according to the British High Commission.”

Now yet again after Pathankot attack, Indians have started blaming Pakistan claiming that they have evidence of Pakistan's involvement.
- See more at: http://www.thenews.com.pk/print/89034-U ... apJOp.dpuf


The cited October 2006 telegram from the US Embassy in New Delhi:

INDIA DEFENDS MUMBAI BLAST EVIDENCE POINTING TO PAKISTAN


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