Artillery: News & Discussion

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Singha
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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Singha » 28 Jul 2018 08:06

is zsu-23-2 radar guided or laid manually(impossible against low flyers)

is zsu on tatra a new IAF AD regiment thing?

pic from Shatrujeet page
Image

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby sarabpal.s » 28 Jul 2018 09:13

Singha wrote:is zsu-23-2 radar guided or laid manually(impossible against low flyers)

is zsu on tatra a new IAF AD regiment thing?

pic from Shatrujeet page
Image

When world moving toward 4x4 vehicle for zsu we using ultra expensive TATRA for zsu

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Khalsa » 28 Jul 2018 16:53

I have watched the Zsu being tried on the valiant Shaktiman, 4 ton, and the venerable Tata 7 ton as well.
The shock absorbers was what died the quickest death.
So you needed ground platforms on the side so you were not translating the recoil shock via the leaf springs or shock absorbers to the ground.

I think tatra either has the poles on the side or enough loha in it to stand up to the recoil.

The challenge was always sustaining the recoil.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby barath_s » 29 Jul 2018 11:02

ramana wrote:
So why was team firing so many rounds from M777 despite mfg restrictions?


Barrels can be changed. They can be refurbished. Calibration/qualification may need to go beyond the norms or there may be stress tests.
The manufacture failure mode for barrel life may be accuracy/precision (electronic fire control based) rather than actual failure.
I simply don't know the details;and so i prefer not to venture judgement. The intriguing thing is that it was deemed acceptable to complete trials by firing 90 from the other gun, which may limit the kinds of info possible.


I haven't heard much about the US initiative to chrome-line and retrofit existing guns. Looks interesting. Hope the indian army looks into it; and procurement agility is there to react and support if appropriate.

https://www.marines.mil/News/News-Displ ... d-barrels/

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Singha » 29 Jul 2018 11:26

Syrians zsu gunners use it like playing tabla
Dont know how long the pickups last but they are cheap cots vehicles

We ahould trying getting 1000s of free hummers from boneyards for this use

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Khalsa » 29 Jul 2018 16:26

Singha wrote:Syrians zsu gunners use it like playing tabla
Dont know how long the pickups last but they are cheap cots vehicles

We ahould trying getting 1000s of free hummers from boneyards for this use



Our needs are met by Zsu being towed to their positions.
We don't have the need to keep them on the move like that.

For the SP stuff we use Shilka to keep up with the front line units.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby sarabpal.s » 29 Jul 2018 19:50

Singha wrote:Syrians zsu gunners use it like playing tabla
Dont know how long the pickups last but they are cheap cots vehicles

We ahould trying getting 1000s of free hummers from boneyards for this use

Syrian use them for machine gun fire role mostly, most of videos suggest so, and We need them static for area defence, no quick movement is required and its wheels can add to movement if needed by Jeep

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Austin » 29 Jul 2018 20:33

Singha wrote:Syrians zsu gunners use it like playing tabla
Dont know how long the pickups last but they are cheap cots vehicles

We ahould trying getting 1000s of free hummers from boneyards for this use


Stability and Mobility is much better on TATRA then any 4x4 platform , I have seen those videos of Syria and the vehical shakes when they fire those 23 mm gun. Hope these guns are stabilized types on TATRA for better accuracy

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Pratyush » 29 Jul 2018 22:37

Why mount the zsu 23 on a Tatra. Why not use it as a towed system. With the Tatra acting as an ammo carrier.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Kakarat » 31 Jul 2018 12:32

First Since Bofors, Indian Army’s New Field Artillery Unit Around The Corner - LIVEFIST

In ten months, the Indian Army will be ready to raise its first new field artillery regiment since the infamous Bofors Scandal. After a three-decade freeze on any new howitzer inductions despite expansive and rolling plans, Livefist can confirm that the Army will be all set to raise its first regiment of M777A2 ultra-light howitzers by summer 2019.

The guns are part of a $750 million deal signed by India in 2016 with U.S. government for 145 M777A2 guns, the first 25 of which would be supplied fully built by BAE Systems from the United Kingdom, while the remaining would be built at an Assembly, Integration & Test (AIT) facility formed as a partnership between BAE Systems and India’s Mahindra Defence.

While the first two guns arrived last May and have since been involved in the generation of range tables in the Pokhran desert, three more guns arrived in April this year and placed at the School of Artillery in Deolali, Maharashtra. A further 20 guns will be delivered by next May, giving the Army well over the 18 guns it needs for a single regiment. By June next year, the Mahindra facility on the outskirts of Delhi will begin delivering its first guns at a rate of five per month and complete deliveries by June 2021. Livefist can confirm that hardware for the first India-assembled guns will arrive next month, bringing the Indian production line to life.
...

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Khalsa » 31 Jul 2018 15:16

Pratyush wrote:Why mount the zsu 23 on a Tatra. Why not use it as a towed system. With the Tatra acting as an ammo carrier.


Too expensive to be towed by a tatra.
Why do you need over 300 hp to do the job of what can be achieved by 125+ hp.
Those 4X4 carry about the same.

Light AD have tons of trucks who are bringing up the stocks.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby darshhan » 31 Jul 2018 22:43

Khalsa wrote:I have watched the Zsu being tried on the valiant Shaktiman, 4 ton, and the venerable Tata 7 ton as well.
The shock absorbers was what died the quickest death.
So you needed ground platforms on the side so you were not translating the recoil shock via the leaf springs or shock absorbers to the ground.

I think tatra either has the poles on the side or enough loha in it to stand up to the recoil.

The challenge was always sustaining the recoil.


I think you are talking about outriggers

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Indranil » 31 Jul 2018 23:31

I think they are just transporting it.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby dinesh_kimar » 01 Aug 2018 10:02

On AD artillery, 2 quick points.
1. Israel has a single AD command supporting both the IAF /IDF. Seems like good idea for savings on training, asset optimization, single entity dealing with all threats from the sky, less bureaucracy, faster response, etc.

2. For some reason, they apparently don't use AD guns any more (willing to be corrected on this). No threats worth the insufficient 1500-2500 m bubble provided.Their AD SAM network like spyder/derby/ hawk/arrow/patriot is however, especially effective. Gun based CIWS is being used, though, as last ditch defence, more for incoming cruise / other missiles rather than fixed wing aircraft.

If we follow the same doctrine, the mobile Tunguska type AD assets can be replaced by Strella / Akash batteries.

Old ZSU-23 / L-70 currently used can be redeployed on LOC.

As it is, One of our adversaries style themselves on the German Gebirgsjäger (mountain infantry) while coming uphill , and the Deutscher Skiverband ( Olympic Sking team) while going downhill. Well, the above mentioned AD gun works well both up hill and down hill.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Pratyush » 01 Aug 2018 11:18

Indranil wrote:I think they are just transporting it.

Most senseble comment on the zsu thing.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Khalsa » 01 Aug 2018 15:24

darshhan wrote:
Khalsa wrote:I have watched the Zsu being tried on the valiant Shaktiman, 4 ton, and the venerable Tata 7 ton as well.
The shock absorbers was what died the quickest death.
So you needed ground platforms on the side so you were not translating the recoil shock via the leaf springs or shock absorbers to the ground.

I think tatra either has the poles on the side or enough loha in it to stand up to the recoil.

The challenge was always sustaining the recoil.


I think you are talking about outriggers

Yes I am, forgot the name momentarily

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Khalsa » 02 Aug 2018 02:10

Pratyush wrote:
Indranil wrote:I think they are just transporting it.

Most senseble comment on the zsu thing.


Would love to agree with IR but I have seen many COs trying to hack the Zsu into a SP unit because they want to remove down time of unhooking and and prepping it to fire.


Re: the transporting thing.
Zsus always move on wheels.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby ramana » 02 Aug 2018 04:06

Please look out for news about Electronic fuzes from BEL unit in Pune.

Should have commenced production by now.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Snehashis » 02 Aug 2018 15:54

ramana wrote:Please look out for news about Electronic fuzes from BEL unit in Pune.

Should have commenced production by now.


BEL plans to come up with artillery fuse plant in Nagpur

So far, with 1.5 lakh units made at its plant in Pune, BEL hopes to make a similar amount on an annual basis at the proposed unit in Nagpur.


As of 18th July 2018.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby ramana » 03 Aug 2018 06:56

Thanks. Very good idea to have the new factory at Nagpur as it minimizes the road travel loads on the filled fuzes.
Also the emphasis on 105mm fuzes shows how many of those guns and ammo is in inventory.
Wonder if same fuze can be fitted into different shells.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Rakesh » 05 Aug 2018 01:52

https://twitter.com/livefist/status/1025812347766624257 ---> A K9 Vajra-T tracked howitzer from L&T’s Hazira assembly facility rolls in this picture from Thursday. Part of the first batch that’s all set to be delivered to the Army next month. Full report up this week.

Image

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby krishna_krishna » 05 Aug 2018 01:59

Finally after many nears good news on artillery front. Here is small news to bring small cheer to aam Abduls on BRF:

GCF to hand over first lot of 6 ‘Dhanush-155’ guns to Army

http://thehitavada.com/Encyc/2018/7/15/ ... -lot-of-6-‘Dhanush-155--guns-to-Army.aspx

Finally, Gun Carriage Factory, Jabalpur (GCF) obtained green signal for handing over first lot of six ‘Dhanush – 155’ guns to the Indian Army, on Saturday. Director General (Artillery), Lieutenant General P K Shrivastava congratulated the management and team of GCF for successful trials of Dhanush-155 at Pokharan (Rajasthan) and directed for preparing the guns for handing over to the Indian Army. Earlier, DG (Artillery), Lieutenant General, P K Shrivastava, accompanied by GCF, Senior General Manager, S K Singh, representatives of other units, including Controller Quality Assurance (Weapons), Director General Quality Assurance (DGQA), Bharat Electronics Limited, Bengaluru, OF Ambernath etc. involved in Dhanush Project, conducted visit of Dhanush production unit and sought information about progress in development of more guns. He interacted with the officers engaged in production and overhauling of Dhanush-155.

In second phase of the inspection, Lieutenant General P K Shrivastava chaired a review meeting of Dhanush Project. He applauded the efforts of GCF administration and other supporting units for successful upgradation of Swedish Bofors gun and enhancing its firing efficiency. He directed the officers to complete overhauling of six guns and starting preparation for handing over to the Indian Army. He also directed the officers to start production of 12 new guns and sought information about preparations and materials procurement.
Last edited by krishna_krishna on 05 Aug 2018 02:10, edited 5 times in total.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Rakesh » 05 Aug 2018 02:01

Very good news. Krishna, please provide source for above...

Added Later: Thank You Krishna. Greatly appreciated.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Rakesh » 05 Aug 2018 04:52

https://twitter.com/SJha1618/status/1025850491736010752 ---> I think OFB should be able to deliver twelve 155 mm Dhanush howitzer units to the Army in the next fiscal once bulk production clearance is awarded post general staff evaluation.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby ramana » 05 Aug 2018 04:59

Great news on Dhanush. Delivered 6 and order for 12 more.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Katare » 05 Aug 2018 05:12

Wow, three type of 155mm artillery guns getting delivered to army within the same quarter is simply amazing!!

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby ramana » 05 Aug 2018 05:32

The Hitavada site has quite a few artillery reports!

http://thehitavada.com//Encyc/2018/6/14 ... m-155.aspx



ANOTHER indigenously developed gun system ‘Soltam-155’ at Gun Carriage Factory (GCF), Jabalpur, is awaiting nod from the Ministry of Defence (MoD) to kick-start its production.
GCF has given a tough contest to other gun systems developed by two private companies and emerged on top with fulfilling technical parameters recommended by the Indian Army. GCF Senior General Manager S K Singh, while talking to ‘The Hitavada’, confirmed that indigenously developed gun system with upgradation of Russian 130 mm gun named ‘Soltam-155’ passed through rigorous user trials and awaiting green signal from higher authorities to start its production. Two prototype guns were developed on recommendation of the Indian Army and handed over for testing of their technical parameters in Field Evaluation Trials (FET). He is hopeful to get production order for Soltam-155 in next 4 to 6 months. Gun Carriage Factory (GCF) in collaboration with Ordnance Development Centre, Kanpur, and Ordnance Factory Kanpur successfully completed upgradation of Soltam gun.


The factory has upgraded Israel made 130 mm Soltam gun that was procured by the Indian Army from Russia. Upgradation of 130 mm Russian gun is a part of research and developments being carried out at Gun Carriage Factory.
The factory participated in technical bidding amongst two other private firms to exhibit its upgraded guns to procure its
production order from the Ministry of Defence. Gun Carriage Factory has already proved its mettle by indigenously developing longest firing Dhanush-155/45 calibre gun and eyeing positive nod from Ordnance Factory Board to register its strong presence against private firms in production of best defence weapons for the nation.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby ramana » 05 Aug 2018 05:40

http://thehitavada.com//Encyc/2018/6/9/ ... h-155.aspx



GCF stands out with indigenous production of Dhanush-155
Source: The Hitavada Date: 09 Jun 2018 13:24:55



Staff Reporter,

“BEING one of the oldest weapon manufacturing units in the country, Gun Carriage Factory (GCF) Jabalpur has proved its mettle with indigenous development of world’s longest firing ‘Dhanush-155 gun. Along with Dhanush, GCF is also developing some new guns of variant uses with rigorous research and development works. Pride of Jabalpur, Dhanush Gun will be serving the nation for a long time to come,” informed Senior General Manager of Gun Carriage Factory Jabalpur S K Singh, while addressing a press conference on Friday. The 114-year-old GCF has now unmatchable expertise in indigenous production of weapons to strengthen armed forces on national borders. Indigenous artillery gun will take India out of perpetual import and foreign dependency for artillery gun.

Senior GM Singh informed that indigenously developed ‘Dhanush-155’ is the pride of Ordnance Factory Board (OFB) and also brought the name of Gun Carriage Factory, Jabalpur (GCF) on world map. The 12 prototype Dhanush guns manufactured at GCF have successfully passed through rigorous internal and user trials in extreme climatic and torrential conditions. Prototype guns have fired around 4,200 rounds in last 54 months’ trial and emerged as exceptional gun in terms of accuracy and constituency.

Indigenous content of Dhanush is more than 81 per cent and efforts are being made to reach indigenisation level of 90 per cent by 2019. OFB is geared up to provide a comprehensive support system for spares, training and maintenance for Dhanush Gun System, which are not readily available for imported gun system. Mentioning about success story of Dhanush-155, Senior General Manager Singh informed that a significant decision was taken by Defence Acquisition Council in October 2011 for modernisation and development of 45-caliber, 155 mm indigenous artillery gun system, a project named ‘Dhanush’ was undertaken in GCF, Jabalpur, with collaboration of sister Ordnance Factories, PSUs and Private Industries.

In 2014, prototype of Dhanush was made ready for user trial and evaluation. He added that Dhanush Gun System has successfully completed winter trials at Sikkim and Leh, summer trials at Pokharan besides firing demonstration at PXE Balasore and Babina range, Jhansi. DGQA evaluation and maintainability trials have been completed already. For more than a year, Dhanush gun was undergoing user exploitation at Pokharan, where two incidents leading to damage of Muzzle and Barrel of the gun took place. An expert panel of officers of different departments of MoD carried out an investigation to ascertain reasons of accident.

Design of entire gun systemwas revisited and international standards were used for testing functioning standards. Investigation team could not find any design related defect in the gun system of Dhanush.
Dhanush Gun System has build confidence among Indian industries and DRDO that 155 mm gun system with all complexities and intricacies can be developed and produced in India. It is a result of this confidence building initiative of GCF that many Indian players are undertaking development of 155 mm gun system.


‘Dhanush, tried and tested successfully’

GCF Senior GM S K Singh informed that reliability in the field of functioning was an area of concern which has been addressed in last one year. During last 2 trials of Dhanush, one at PXE Balasore and another at Pokharan user exploitation. In last user exploitation trial at Pokharan, gun system successfully completed battery firing comprising 6 guns at Pokharan on June 7.

Above 300 rounds were fired in last 5 days on trial schedules and all 6 guns fired around 50 rounds each. On June 7, all 6 guns fired simultaneously around 100 rounds without any major stoppage. BMCS of OF Nalanda was used during firing trial of Dhanush. Besides this, MBCS from Nexter, South Africa was also fired from Dhanush.




Dhanush-155 pride of OFB

Indigenous content of ‘Dhanush-155 gun, world’s longest firing, is more than 81 per cent and efforts are being made to reach indigenisation level of 90 per cent by 2019. Dhanush has successfully completed winter trials at Sikkim and Leh, summer trials at Pokharan besides firing demonstration at PXE Balasore and Babina range, Jhansi. Dhanush has build confidence among Indian industries and DRDO that 155 mm gun system with all complexities and intricacies can be developed and produced in India.



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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby ramana » 07 Aug 2018 02:49

From a DRDO book

1.11BRIEF HISTORY OF DEVELOPMENT OF PROXIMITY FUZES IN INDIA
(1966-1975)

The variable-time (VT) fuze was an important contribution of World War II and it
was the first ever attempt to introduce electronics in armaments. While the Indian Navy
was using fuzes imported from the UK, the Indian Army did not possess these. Since its
aerial burst was effective against ground troops, the development of the fuze was
undertaken by ARDE. It was the prime contractor and was responsible for the
development of the explosive train. The electronics part was concurrently developed by
two R&D agencies, namely the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) of the
Department of Atomic Energy and by the Solid State Physics Laboratory (SSPL) of
DRDO. The BARC was involved in the development of the VT fuze for the 25 Pounder
gun while the SSPL’s involvement was for the development of the VT fuze for the 75/24
Pack Howitzer. The VT fuzes for the 105 mm IFG and the 75/24 Pack Howitzer were
successfully completed and they rolled out of the production line in 1973. For this
project, ARDE had two customers, namely the Army and the Indian Navy, two associate
R&D agencies in development namely BARC and SSPL, and three production
agencies, namely Electronics Corporation of India (fuze for 105 mm IFG) and HAL, both
in Hyderabad and an ordnance factory. It was no easy task for ARDE to finalise in
association with the agencies involved in development and production and with the
User Services, the modalities for testing and proofing the rounds and quality
acceptance procedures. The development work on fuzes continued with BARC and
SSPL and was crowned with success, with BARC involved in the VT fuze for the 76.2 mm
gun for the Navy and SSPL for the VT fuzes for the 130 mm Russian gun for the Army
and the 4.5 inch gun for the Navy.
The development of proximity fuzes for 75/24 Howitzer was assigned to SSPL in the
year 1966. Dr NB Bhatt was the Director of SSPL when the formal project was entrusted
with its design and development. Prof. DS Kothari who was the first Scientific Advisor
of the Minister of Defence and headed the Defence Science Organisation formed in
1958. Right from the inception of the project, Dr DS Kothari took keen interest in the
development of proximity fuze and monitored its development even after his successor
Prof Bhagavantam had taken over as Scientific Advisor in 1961. Dr BD Nagchaudhari
who took over as the Scientific Advisor on 1st July 1970 took tremendous interest in the
development of proximity fuzes and was great source of inspiration to the author and
the team which successfully developed the proximity fuzes for 75/24 Howitzer shell.
Major General JR Samson who was the Chief Controller of the Defence R&D
Organization was a key driving force. His keen interest in the development of fuzes
provided tremendous impetus to the progress of the project.
Some exploratory work on VT Fuzes was being carried out by a small team in a
group in Defence Science Laboratory situated in the Metcalfe House complex called the
Radar Research Wing under Dr NB Bhatt who later became the Director of SSPL situated
at Metcalfe House. This exploratory work continued at SSPL after shifting to Lucknow
Road but unfortunately no success on VT fuzes had been achieved.
Soon after the formal sanction of the project to develop a proximity fuze was
sanctioned to SSPL in early 1966, Dr NB Bhatt requested the R&D Headquarters that the
author be called from DRDL, Hyderabad to lead the fuze project. The author had worked
in the Special Weapons Development Team (SWDT) co-located with the R&D research
8
History of Proximity Fuzes
wing in Metcalfe House with Dr BN Singh as its Director. The author joined SSPL in
March 1966 and with a team of three other young scientists, PC Nagpal, MN Sen,
GJ Chaturvedi and two technicians commenced the work on electronics of the fuze.
The
team developed a prototype of CW proximity fuze in three months. The fuze electronics
developed consisted of a Colpitts oscillator at 220 MHz using an epoxy encapsulated
RF transistor, Doppler amplifier, a Schmitt threshold circuit and a transistor switch to
ignite the detonator. The fuze oscillator detector was tested for its sensitivity by using
a horizontally moving aluminium reflector in the vicinity of fuze. The complete
electronics was encapsulated. The oscillator was encapsulated in low density
polyethylene. The remaining circuit was encapsulated in an epoxy resin. The electronics
was embedded in a plastic nose cone with a metal cap on top of the nose cone which in
conjunction with shell body would work as a quarter wave monopole antenna.
The complete electronics was tested for its ruggedness by the drop test. The fuze
was fitted on a 25 pound dummy shell and dropped in a guided steel tube over a metal
block from the roof top of a 40 feet high building. The electronics withstood the ‘g’ test
estimated to be several thousand ‘g’s.
The fuze was powered with a dry battery of 22.5 V. The first few fuzes were designed
to function with a 25 pound smoke shell (and tuned to appropriate frequency of
oscillator with this shell) at Proof and Experimental Establishment (PXE) at Chandipore
on sea at Balasore in Orissa. The fuze in its first firing failed. It was soon discovered from
the recovery of the fuzed shells that the fuze had failed due to its defective
encapsulation of the battery in wax. Wax as the encapsulant of the battery was replaced
with a polyester resin. In the second test carried out with this encapsulation of the
battery and without any changes in electronics, in September 1966, the fuze was fired at
charge II of 25 pounder shell. The fuze achieved air bursts over the sea as could be seen
from the beautiful flash of the smoke shell. The fuze had made a history in September
1966, as this was first successful fuze developed by the DRDO.
From this point onwards
there was no looking back.The process of improvements to withstand shocks on higher
charges were carried out. The fuzes using new nose cones fabricated from glass filled
polypropylene were successfully fired with high explosive shells right upto the charge
IV of 75/24 Pack-How shell. The sensitivity of the fuzes was improved using optimized
oscillator-detector. Also a new reserve battery suggested by the author had been
developed by this team during 1969. The system consisted of a single cell using carbon-
zinc system with chromic acid/stannic chloride electrolyte in conjunction with a DC-DC
converter capable of satisfactory operation from 1.5 volts. This was the first
development of a single cell battery in India and perhaps in the world for fuze
applications, as no other fuze was known to have used a single cell system.
Concurrent with the development of the fuze, a new technique called the hoist gear
technique was developed in end 1966. The author and his team developed a completely
new system of measuring the oscillator sensitivity of fuzes wherein the oscillator
transmitted its own collector current information to a ground telemetry receiver. The
shell was hoisted above the ground over a water pond and suspended with a nylon rope
and moved over few wavelengths at a mean height of about ten metres, variations in the
oscillator collector current was monitored by a telemetry receiver..This was a new
innovation far superior to various contemporary methods of determining the fuze
sensitivity .
9
Proximity Fuzes: Theory and Techniques
The technical trials of the fuze were conducted at PXE, Balasore in March 1971 and
School of Artillery, Devlali in May 1971, more than a hundred fuzes were fired with a
success rate of 90 per cent. The first phase of user trials was conducted at Devlali in
September 1971, more than hundred fuzes were fired with a success of 80 per cent. The
analysis of the user trial results indicated that the fuze did not meet the reliability
requirements at higher charges.
This was intriguing as the fuze had undergone a
successful technical trial. Investigations and improvements were carried out. In the
phase II of user trials at Devlali, fifty fuzes were fired and forty eight fuzes functioned
perfectly.
Having met the GSQR, the fuze was formally accepted by the user for its
induction into services. The fuze technology was transferred to Hindustan Aeronautic
Laboratory (HAL), Hyderabad in 1973. In 1974, HAL fired a pre-production lot of fuzes
successfully. The manufacturing agency produced several thousand fuzes
subsequently.
The team later in 1975 developed a 4.5” Naval anti-aircraft fuze in a record nine
months period and tested it at PXE, Balasore against a standard metal sphere.
Interestingly in one of the tests carried out at that time when a foreign made 4.5” fuzes
was also being tested at the range, the indigenous fuze produced better results than the
imported fuzes. Nine of ten fuzes functioned in the proximity of the spherical target.


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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby ramana » 10 Aug 2018 05:28

A question for those with knowledge of the M777.

Which parts of it are made of titanium alloy?

I guess the trails and carriage.


ramana
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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby ramana » 10 Aug 2018 06:01

Rakesh,
Thanks. So they use net shape castings using investment casting technology to reduce machining and welding time. And TI alloy for weigh reduction.

OFB can use similar techniques with steel castings which is easier metallurgy than Titanium to realize mfg savings.


Eg:3D printed molds for Sand casting high strength steels.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby ramana » 23 Aug 2018 06:54


nam
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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby nam » 25 Aug 2018 16:32

MoD approves production of 150 ATAGS at 3400 crores.

Indian MIC is on it's way.

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Kakarat » 25 Aug 2018 16:35

https://twitter.com/livefist/status/1033305774238453760

FLASH: MoD approves acquisition of 150 @DRDO_India Advanced Towed Artillery Gun Systems (ATAGS) for the Indian Army at a cost of ₹3,400 crore.


https://twitter.com/SJha1618/status/1033307699738374144

And as expected, the Defence Acquisition Council of India's Ministry of Defence has cleared the procurement of 150 @DRDO_India developed ATAGS 155 mm / 52 calibre howitzers for the Indian Army @adgpi . ATAGS, as you know, boasts next generation capability.

The order value at the approval stage is Rs 3,364.78 crores for the 150 @DRDO_India developed 155 mm / 52 calibre ATAGS howitzers.


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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby nam » 25 Aug 2018 18:20

PZH 2k MRSI


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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby Pratyush » 25 Aug 2018 20:34

nam wrote:MoD approves production of 150 ATAGS at 3400 crores.

Indian MIC is on it's way.


Yippie

Major brown pants in Rawalpindi. :twisted:

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby suryag » 25 Aug 2018 21:06

There are still a bunch of trials to go before army places an order of production for 18 guns, the DAC approval is only one step forward and there are a lot many to go

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Re: Artillery Discussion Thread

Postby nam » 26 Aug 2018 02:13

Chini artillery solutions.
Ah4, m777 equivalent, seem to have a little generator to power the movement of supporting arms.
They managed to sell to Kuwait!

Chinis don't have SP towed artillery, like our ATAGS. They do have small truck mounted 155/52.



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