India-Africa News and Discussion

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ramana
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Re: India-Africa News and Discussion

Postby ramana » 19 Jun 2019 23:42

Folks I had heard of contract farming in Kenya and Somalia by Indians. Do we have any news reports?

mappunni
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Re: India-Africa News and Discussion

Postby mappunni » 19 Jun 2019 23:52

ramana wrote:Folks I had heard of contract farming in Kenya and Somalia by Indians. Do we have any news reports?



Some old reports

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-01-11/karuturi-challenges-ethiopian-decision-to-cancel-farming-project

ramana
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Re: India-Africa News and Discussion

Postby ramana » 20 Jun 2019 00:32

Thanks. Quick response. 8)

ramana
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Re: India-Africa News and Discussion

Postby ramana » 03 Jul 2019 05:33

India extends Line of Credit worth $28B to countries.

https://m.timesofindia.com/india/extend ... ssion=true

chetak
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Re: India-Africa News and Discussion

Postby chetak » 09 Jul 2019 22:16

Tanzania Suspends China-Funded $10 Billion Bagamoyo Port Project; Calls The Financing Terms ‘Exploitative’





In a major blow to Chinese President Xi Jinping's pet project Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), the Government of Tanzania has suspended the construction of the $10 billion Bagamoyo port which was to be constructed with funds from China, reports Economic Times.

The project had been signed by President Jinping in March 2013. However, the newly elected Tanzanian President John Magufuli refused to move ahead with the project, calling the conditions 'exploitative' and 'awkward'.

"Chinese financiers set tough conditions that can only be accepted by mad people," said President Magufuli.

As per the agreement, the port, once built, would have been leased to China for a period of 99 years, during which Tanzania would not have had any say on who else could come and invest in the port upon its operationalisation.


The project was a major connectivity initiative being pursued by China in East Africa under its BRI programme. The project included construction of several rail lines and roads to oil fields. The Bagamoyo port was intended to be built as the biggest port in all of East Africa.

sooraj
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Re: India-Africa News and Discussion

Postby sooraj » 11 Sep 2019 17:50

African nations offer India barter deal: Copper, gold for infra projects

Struck by liquidity crunch, low foreign exchange, African nations want to swap copper, gold for infra projects


At least three countries — Zambia, Ghana and Rwanda — have approached India with a proposal to export minerals in return for project import. Among the commodities that could be part of the barter deal are copper and gold. Two Indian companies, Ircon International and the State Trading Corporation of India (STC), are already in talks with these countries for a commodity-project swap deal.

ramana
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Re: India-Africa News and Discussion

Postby ramana » 12 Sep 2019 00:48

This is important. its barter as they don't have $ reserves.
And China will clean them out.

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Re: India-Africa News and Discussion

Postby Rony » 07 Oct 2019 05:27

The most unusual ways many African countries got their names

The concept of nation states in Africa is only a bit over a century old, arising after the 1884 Berlin Conference and the subsequent Scramble for Africa by European superpowers of the time. It is therefore not surprising that the names of most African countries are remnants of a colonial legacy.

Nearly every country on earth is named after after one of four things—a directional description of the country, a feature of the land, a tribe name or an important person, most likely a man. For the most part, Africa mirrors this trend with a few exceptions. The stories of how African countries got their names ranges from the more mundane, to the fantastical and sometimes even the mind-boggling.

Cameroon, a country that has the complicated legacy of first having been colonized by the Germans, then later partitioned by the French and British, was actually named by a Portuguese explorer in the 15th century. Coming across the Wouri river, one of Cameroon’s largest rivers, he renamed it, Rio dos Camarões (shrimp river,) for the abundance of shrimp in it. The name stuck and evolved to become the country name.

Another 15th century Portuguese explorer would find his way further West where either the mountains that looked like a lion’s teeth or the impressive roar of thunderstorms would lead him to name the place, Sierra Lyoa (lion mountains.) In time, the name would change to Sierra Leone.

Centuries later, another mountain would yield a country’s name in East Africa, when the British came upon an imposing snow-capped mountain that the Kikuyu people called Kirinyaga (Where God dwells.) As they struggled to pronounce, Kirinyaga, they called it Mt. Kenya – the country would be named after this mountain.

Elsewhere it was not linguistic challenges that led to a country’s misnaming, but actually a sort of clerical error. Marco Polo, the 13th century Italian explorer never visited Madagascar, but is believed to be responsible for mistaking it for Mogadishu and including it in his memoirs. This is the first written reference to Madageiscar. Thus, the corrupted Italian transliteration of Mogadishu, Madageiscar, eventually gave the world’s second largest island country its name.

Mali derives its name from the original Bambara word for hippopotamus that evolved to mean “the place where the king lives.” In Malian culture, the hippopotamus signifies strength. There is a particularly fascinating Malian legend about how the founder of the Malian empire, Sundiata Keita, changed himself into a hippopotamus upon his death and continued dwelling in the Sankarani River, a tributary of the Niger River.

Close to Mali, two other countries got their name from Western Africa’s principal river, the Niger river. Niger (former French colony to the north of Nigeria) and Nigeria (a former British colony) were both named for the Niger river that flows through them. It was originally called Ni Gir (River Gir) in one of the local languages though there’s also the theory it was named for the Latin adjective for black, as in Black River.

The Arab legacy on the continent was also the source of some of the names of African countries. In Mozambique, it would be an Arab Sheikh, whose name would remain with the country. Mussa Bin Bique ruled the area at the time when the Portuguese arrived, and the Portuguese would call this country, Mozambique. Sudan would get its name from the Arabic phrase, Bidad as-Sudan (land of the blacks).

Comoros derives its name from 10th century Arab traders who called it kamar or kumr, meaning moon, perhaps because of the half-moon shape that the four original islands of Comoros form.

Gabon, would also be named based on a shape of a place. The country’s first European visitors were Portuguese traders who arrived in the 15th century and named it Gaboa (coat,) based on the shape of the Como River Estuary, where they first explored, that looked to them like a coat with sleeves and a hood.

In the South, Zimbabwe would reclaim its name in 1979 just ahead of independence from the 13th-15th century kingdom of Zimbabwe removing its colonial legacy name of Rhodesia, after Cecil Rhodes. The British colonialist, whose legacy on the continent and beyond is called to question these days, headed the British South Africa company that during colonial times, “owned” present-day Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Ghana on its part would also reclaim its name at independence from the Ancient West African Kingdom of Ghana after its British colonial legacy when it was known as the Gold Coast. Recently, in multicultural and multiracial South Africa, there have also been some calls to shake off the colonial legacy of its naming by changing its name to Azania. Interestingly, even this name has no African origin. It was the name used by 1st century Greek explorers to refer to Southern Africa.

Even a country without colonial heritage find its names have roots in Europe, such is the case with Ethiopia, which was never colonized but whose name also has Greek roots from the words “burnt-face” as a noun or “red-brown” in as an adjective. Liberia, the continent’s oldest republic which was established as independent country in 1847 by freed former African-American slaves was obviously named for liberty.


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