Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ramana » 17 Dec 2019 02:54

Washington Post has a series of articles on how the US military has been less than honest to itself on their efforts to train the Afghan National Army and are thus suffering casualties.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ramana » 19 Dec 2019 05:07


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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ramana » 19 Dec 2019 05:35

^^^ Above captures the essence of the modern Asian dilemma

The VSG worked from the premise that the security of the Asian rimland from the Persian Gulf to Indochina “is one complete strategical problem.” The security of the Gulf was bound up with the security of the Indian subcontinent which in turn depended on Burma and Indochina. A stable if not united subcontinent formed the fulcrum in the system. Its fragmentation would leave the wings isolated and the balance broken. This view contrasted with a geospatial perspective both natural and understandable for Americans that located the Gulf on the eastern edge of a European-centered system and Burma and Indochina on the western edge of a Pacific-centered system. But by viewing the region from an Indian center, as the VSG did, events along the Asian rimland since 1945 seem unsurprising, the products of a predictable, albeit complex and dynamic, structure.

To give a concrete example, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979 was, as Olaf Caroe, the VSG’s director put it, the predictable (and predicted) “after-effect” of India’s partition in 1947.

By creating two mutually antagonistic successor states in India and Pakistan, the partition effectively turned the subcontinent’s power potential in on itself. For nearly a century beforehand, power based on a stable subcontinent had provided the indispensable counterpoise to Russia that had allowed the emergence of a viable Afghan state. The fragmentation of the counterpoise on the subcontinent allowed Soviet decision-makers to calculate their interests and options in 1979 very differently than their Russian predecessors had in comparable crises in 1885, 1895, and 1925. It is worth emphasizing that the subcontinent’s stability formed a counterpoise in diplomatic and economic terms as well as military ones. The continued hostility of India and Pakistan in the 1990s thus weighed heavily against the reconstruction of security and stability in Afghanistan. The fact that different elements in the Afghan polity pulled variously toward Pakistan, Iran, and former Soviet states in Central Asia was not so much symptomatic of strength on the part of those countries as it was of the subcontinent’s weakness as a center of gravity. (NOTE: IMPORTANT POINT)

Afghanistan consequently reemerged as the kind of base area and seedbed it had once formed in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries for forces of regional instability and terrorism.



and

Figure 1.0 Great Game Afghanistan c. 1935

Image

Figure one and two review key entities before and after partition for a scenario based on Afghanistan. The <> in the model to define locations, agents, values, and other entities have their definition in the Great Game profile described in the next section. Figure one shows the main agents in that have goals leading them to focus on Afghanistan. Note that none of the players, or <>, hold goals or values that lead them to promote a version of social control in Afghanistan.

In contrast, as shown in Figure two, the Great Game following partition inserts new agents into the game, most importantly Pakistan, split into the unwieldy federation bifurcated by another new agent, India. The United States also appeared on the scene as a great power, but they lacked the focus on the goal of maintaining Indian stability that had animated the British in India.

Pakistan and India had territorial goals that forced competition between them, especially in terms of which princely states the Imperial successors would control, with the Kashmir region still a thorn. Post independence, the Great Game now had actors concerned with the type of social organization in the region, with Pakistan organized as an entity protecting Islamic values of some undetermined form in a social polity. The differences between these two models illustrate Caroe’s emphasis on systemic instability that left the Soviet Union room for maneuver to bring troops in the region.




Figure 2.0 Great Game post Partition c. 1950

Image

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ramana » 19 Dec 2019 05:43

I submit the US by supplying TSP with more weapons then needed like Pattons, F 104, F-86s etc. and favorable wargaming the PaXistan chances of subduing India in 1965 caused the instability of Asia from 1969 to now.
Relying on the favorable war game and pumped up with propaganda, Gen. Ayub Khan attacked India and lost. This plunged PaXistan into instability crisis which we are seeing even now.

Its has been a long 50 years war started in 1965.
This led to the Shah of Iran crisis, FSU into Afghanistan, Iran-Iraq war, 9/11 and Iraq invasion

Now DT is making amends by removing the blind spot in US strategic outlook by pushing for Indo-Pacific sphere of operations.

So that is what all those treaties are about trying to fix the US myopia nay blind spot.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby rohitvats » 21 Dec 2019 22:33

Some very interesting food for thought, ramana.

On similar lines, the repeated, albeit periodic, attempts by US (or should we say, US State Department) to supply Pakistan with modern weapons is an attempt to create a Muslim state which is key to Middle East, Afghanistan and Central Asia. From CENTO & SEATO days, Pakistan's primary offensive potential has come from US dollars. They themselves would not be able to afford half of what they have!

While we say that Pakistan is China's cat's paw to box India in, the same applies historically to USA as well. They don't want stronger India, and one with independent foreign policy at that, to exert influence over ME and Central Asia.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ramana » 23 Dec 2019 07:01

Sahi pakde aap.

I wish more folks think about it and post.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Vikas » 23 Dec 2019 14:48

Very interesting conversation...

The great game still is on is given but How does China's role fit into the larger scheme of things. What is their extra interest in Paxtan besides keeping India focused on this septic wound ?
They never had any historical or civilizational relationship with Gulf unlike India except for marauding bands of Mongols or Huns who would descent to burn everything in its sphere.
Are they the new entrants forcing themselves into this Great game equation ? Geography does not support them to be a effective player in the great game.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Neshant » 02 Jan 2020 07:20

Swedish government is literally encouraging its citizens to preparing for war / chaos situations in Europe.

War with Russia or economic collapse in Europe.

A country that tends to be ahead of the curve.


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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby vishvak » 02 Jan 2020 07:32

Well look at it this way for Indian subcontinent. The media never said anything about radical communist terror. Never said that prosecuting majority of pakis are who exactly. Never said who gotta have weapons in LTTE whilst lower rung were thrown under bus of terrorism and used as human shield. Guess the majority in India just gotta roll over so post colonial plans could go further and declare natives as just short of civilized.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Vips » 02 Jan 2020 08:03

Neshant wrote:Swedish government is literally encouraging its citizens to preparing for war / chaos situations in Europe.

War with Russia or economic collapse in Europe.

A country that tends to be ahead of the curve.



Not really. If they were so perceptive and had strategic thinking they would never have allowed unrestricted and free entry of thousands of peacefools to settle in the country. Result is now there is rioting and potential no go areas.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Kati » 02 Jan 2020 12:51

UK Home Office refuses to divulge high risk countries in visa issuance

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/202 ... -countries

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Kati » 02 Jan 2020 12:52

^^^^
Wondering if TSP is on top of that list ....

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby sajo » 02 Jan 2020 15:05

Not sure which thread this should go in, but a quick search for Carlos Ghosn did not yield any results in any thread, so posting here.

Carlos Ghosn, former CEO of the Renault-Nissan alliance, who was under house arrest in Japan had dramatically escaped 24x7 surveillance.

Carlos Ghosn has spent more than a year trapped in a Japanese legal odyssey that’s transfixed the automotive world and thrown his life into chaos. Now, having pulled off a daring escape from Japan to Lebanon, he’s an international fugitive.

But the executive is also free to speak his mind fully, without legal filtering, for the first time since his surprise arrest on the tarmac at Haneda airport back in November 2018. And this much seems likely: The former head of Nissan Motor Co. and Renault SA has stories to tell and scores to settle.

At stake is Ghosn’s entire legacy. Will he be remembered as the brilliant, cost-cutting manager who rescued Nissan and built one of mightiest auto alliances in the industry? Or will he be just another name in a hall of infamy of white-collar fugitives?


It gets interesting with the below :

“I have not fled justice," Ghosn said in the first emailed statement after his remarkable exit from Japan. “I have escaped injustice and political persecution."


Wealthy as though he might be, there was no "escaping" from the fact that he was under 24x7 electronic surveillance, with people and cars tailing him wherever he went.
Apparently, he hid inside a musical instrument casing after a band performance at his place, was whisked to a small airfield near Osaka, private jet to Turkey and thereon to Lebanon. There is no extradition treaty between Japan and Lebanon. Rumour also has it that he may have been whisked away by French intelligence assisted by paramilitary mercenaries. He may try and include himself in the Lebanese politics where, apparently, he is a national hero.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ramana » 03 Jan 2020 03:05

He has dual citizenship from Lebanon and went to high school and college there.
He is considered a Lebanese success.

He also has Brazilian passport!

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Avtar Singh » 03 Jan 2020 04:27

cnbc tv usa, were reporting that he has a french passport.

some Japan visiting advice I was given...
never ever say a single japanese word when talking to police...
even if all you know is; syanara or arigato..
once any japanese word is uttered you are assumed to be a japanese speaker...
which means no translator.

the translator will be the only contact you will have with outside world,
once you disappear into the black hole that is japanese "justice" system

on cnbc; bob lutz was really laying into ghosn. the presenter was a bit embarrassed by his reply
since ghosn is always portrayed as a hero type on cnbc

oh here it is;

Lutz, who said he’s known Ghosn for a number of years, said the embattled executive suffers from a “god complex” and “CEO disease.

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/01/02/former- ... mplex.html

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ramana » 03 Jan 2020 04:59

Kick him while he is down!!!

Did this Lutz guy ever say similar things when Ghosn was powerful?

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ramana » 09 Jan 2020 02:05

X-Post from West Asia thread after the Iran BM strike fizzles:

Lohit wrote:Some points that Trump made and some conjecture of my own (in increasing order of conjecture),

1. This round is officialy over, economic warfare will continue

2. Trump has drawn a line in the sand - Iran cant proceed with its nuclear program or killings of any US citizens else strong mil danda will follow

3. US is energy self sufficient and hence rest of the world, especially NATO (and I think under the guise of JCPOA he also hinted at Russia and China) will need to step into Middle East and subsequently global policing as US withdraws completely from ME and soon from other parts of the world. This is inline with the outlook of Trump in particular and US in general on MAGA.

4. Drawing from the point above is a change, that I feel will shape the next few decades as NATO (read European), China, Russia and other power hungry nations start a new round of colony hunting (disguised as creating beholden puppets - think Imran for China, Sisi for KSA, Al Thani for Iran etc)

European countries are regaining their colonial appetites, viz, Libya where France and Italy are fighting a proxy war to gain oil resources. As are Turkey, Russia, China etc across different parts of the world.

5. With the gradual reduction of US' footprint Russia, France, UK, Turkey and Asian players such as China, KSA and Iran will carve out their own "empires" and "spheres of influence" such as,

Turkey lording the stans and North Africa
Russia and the slav republics (what's happening in Belarus is a case in point)
France with new African colonies
Shia and Arab super states
and so forth

6. Such neo empires would necessarily lead to erosion of democracy, the virtual obsolescence of the UN and emergence of virtual rulers like we see in the case of Putin, Erdogan or Xinping. Of course Middle East dynasties, theocracies and dictatorships are already present.

This could be followed by pre-world war style alliances with megalomanic personalities on both sides. Would it then be far fetched that a regional fight becomes a global conflagaration with various super nations going at each other on their respective continents, as dictated by their alliances.

7. This will be preceded by stages of naked colonialism. Say Baluchistan being carved out of Pakistan and being handed over to the Shia super state by the Sino superstate in lieu of resources or markets

8. While far fetched, if such a world takes shape, the only way India can survive and prosper would be to proactively regain a Mauryan like national character and geographic influence (if not territorial rule).

If this is not done, again in this hypothetical scenario, a new great game aimed at the motherland, of course abetted by the jaichands who we never lack, could produce catastrophic results for the country.

9. I again feel that the period from 50s has been an outlier in terms of geopolitical stability because it had a bipolar (during Soviet existence) or uni-polar character (pax americana). From a systems perspective, the lower the number of poles the greater the stability. With an increased number of poles, turbulence will again regain historic levels as has been the case throughout history.

Apologies to the Mods for going on a long OT rant. :mrgreen:

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ramana » 09 Jan 2020 02:17

Good thoughtful post.

Joel Kotkin in his book 'Tribes' envisages a world of Tribes of similar peoples with shared values and history coming to the fore in later 21st century.


This covers your point 4,5, and 6.

As for Shia super state I think after the QS elimination the theocratic part of Iran state will whither.
This will most likely lead to Iran leaving the Shia orbit.

The Shia super state will become another Arab Islamist congregation. In a sense its already there with UAE, Iraq, and some of the GCC. However these have Sunni strong men leading the states and that will give rise to unstable regimes.
This is the old Abbasid vs Fatimid caliphates.

Turkey will try to setup a modern Ottoman version of congregation.

So Islamic world will be Arab Sunni, Arab Shia, Turkic.

Pak is the joker in the pack.

8. Is what MAD working on by erasing fault-lines that divide India to get there.

9 I see you are electrical engineer background with Nyquist plot and all that.



4. Drawing from the point above is a change, that I feel will shape the next few decades as NATO (read European), China, Russia and other power hungry nations start a new round of colony hunting (disguised as creating beholden puppets - think Imran for China, Sisi for KSA, Al Thani for Iran etc)

European countries are regaining their colonial appetites, viz, Libya where France and Italy are fighting a proxy war to gain oil resources. As are Turkey, Russia, China etc across different parts of the world.

5. With the gradual reduction of US' footprint Russia, France, UK, Turkey and Asian players such as China, KSA and Iran will carve out their own "empires" and "spheres of influence" such as,

Turkey lording the stans and North Africa
Russia and the slav republics (what's happening in Belarus is a case in point)
France with new African colonies
Shia and Arab super states
and so forth

6. Such neo empires would necessarily lead to erosion of democracy, the virtual obsolescence of the UN and emergence of virtual rulers like we see in the case of Putin, Erdogan or Xinping. Of course Middle East dynasties, theocracies and dictatorships are already present.

This could be followed by pre-world war style alliances with megalomanic personalities on both sides. Would it then be far fetched that a regional fight becomes a global conflagaration with various super nations going at each other on their respective continents, as dictated by their alliances.


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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Lohit » 09 Jan 2020 03:03

Agree with most of the perspectives you shared sir.

The next question then becomes how will Bharat be steered in the times to come? Or to rephrase, how do we go about the grand orchestration required to create an Indic superstate by expanding influence towards the North, East and West?

Towards the East the problem perhaps is not so pressing and we have perhaps taken the first very tentative step with the Sabang project.

The key to the North and Westward expansion lies obviously in solving the thorny problem of Na-Pakistan.

Coming to the mechanism, militarily again perhaps again the first tentative step has been taken in the establishment of the CDS office, which will hopefully take four steps back and look at the bigger picture. As well as provide some semblance of continuity and a determined push towards long term goals. Hopefully, the office will also acquire more functions such as control over intelligence to better sync with long term military objectives and a centralized approach towards a world class mil-def complex. New functions such as Expeditionary forces, Electronic, Cyber and Space warfare will also become very relevant, very soon.

However the Achilles heel remains in constant, steady orchestration of political statecraft towards the long term objectives. US has its Bilderbergs and whatnots, China its CPC etc. Currently the closest we have is perhaps the RSS but it loses relevance if the BJP goes out of power. Plus IMHO it needs to evolve far more to truly take on this new and intimidating challenge (although even the journey that we have traversed would not have been impossible without the RSS).

Hence resynthesizing, the question / challenge that we face is how do we manage constancy in statecraft towards the grand objectives irrespective of day-day political fluctuations?

We have already seen the himalayan damage most non BJP govs, after PVNR have inflicted towards such objectives.

As I see it, the solution will there require two concerted efforts,

1. Dismemberment of Congress into legacy Italian congress and Congress 2.0 with leaders like Amrinder Singh, Kamalnath etc who might at least be somewhat more amenable to the grand objectives. Legacy Congress then needs to be done away with.

2. RSS evolving into RSS 2.0, that can provide strategic and operational guidance and review whilst influencing both BJP and Congress 2.0 to take the hard decisions required to keep steering towards the grand objective of an Indic superstate

I believe if the right mechanism and people are in place, the key to the North and West can be had as well.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby krishna_krishna » 09 Jan 2020 03:23

For stability the real part of every pole must be negative.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ldev » 09 Jan 2020 04:19

A tour de force of a press conference by Carlos Ghosn today in Beirut. The first 1 hour is where he gives his presentation and then the remaining is Q&A. He responds to questions in English, French, Arabic and Portuguese!! If his version of events is accurate it portrays the Japanese legal system in extremely poor light. Almost as bad as running afoul of the law in an Arab country.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ramana » 09 Jan 2020 04:50

Lohith, You need to separate internal from external. Makes it easy to focus.
As for internal the main issues are to erase the fault lines and create a new organic entity.

Put yourself in pre Mauryan and post Mauryan shoes.
What was it before and what was it after?
Similarly map the current state and preferred state.

And the answer to how to reach preferred state comes along with the enabling mechanisms which look isolated without the roadmap.

But this should be in Indian Interests thread.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Tanaji » 09 Jan 2020 06:16

ldev wrote:A tour de force of a press conference by Carlos Ghosn today in Beirut. The first 1 hour is where he gives his presentation and then the remaining is Q&A. He responds to questions in English, French, Arabic and Portuguese!! If his version of events is accurate it portrays the Japanese legal system in extremely poor light. Almost as bad as running afoul of the law in an Arab country.


I don't doubt it.. Japan has a 99.9% conviction rate. You cant get that high without the system being seriously biased in favour of the state.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby habal » 09 Jan 2020 08:44

Some sources were saying for immigrants to admit that they can speak and understand japanese means that it is impossible for them to get justice in japan legal system. If you can't speak japanese then atleast you will get a lawyer/translator whom you can see from time to time. Else not even that.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ramana » 09 Jan 2020 22:25

Atmavik wrote:
Lohit wrote:Some points that Trump made and some conjecture of my own (in increasing order of conjecture),



Lohit, quality post. allow me to probe further

Lohit wrote:
3. US is energy self sufficient and hence rest of the world, especially NATO (and I think under the guise of JCPOA he also hinted at Russia and China) will need to step into Middle East and subsequently global policing as US withdraws completely from ME and soon from other parts of the world. This is inline with the outlook of Trump in particular and US in general on MAGA.




this is very true and the biggest impact will be on East Asia. This is one of the reasons why china is building a massive navy and this will impact us as they enter IOR. what happens to japan as the US retreats? does new emerging tech like EVs change anything?

Lohit wrote:
4. Drawing from the point above is a change, that I feel will shape the next few decades as NATO (read European), China, Russia and other power hungry nations start a new round of colony hunting (disguised as creating beholden puppets - think Imran for China, Sisi for KSA, Al Thani for Iran etc)



we need to look at brexit in the above context.looks like britan has made its move. France still has a grip on their colonies but what are the Germans up to?

I am not sure if Turkey and Russia can play the Empire game anymore even though their rulers are nostalgic about their historical status. maybe a bit in their neighborhood but not much beyond that. newer players have emerged. UAE and SA getting close to India is a sign.


as US becomes more isolationist what happens to our Aussie friends? they have historically relied upon US/UK alliance but their biggest trading partner is now china. mass immigration is great for property value but it creates other problems. I think in this game Aussies are in a tough spot. can the west afford to give up on them?


and

Lohit wrote:
Atmavik wrote:
Lohit, quality post. allow me to probe further


Thanks chief. On your points,

1. Chinas massive anticipatory naval build up - Agree, in fact I recall having read on BRF quite some time back that Khan and Chin are actually in cahoots and have an understanding on this.

Japan with its demographics and depleted mil forces/infra will surely be in deep peril. It might reap the karma it earned under Tojo. Australia will soon be part of Pax Sina.

2. Emerging super states - Indeed Germany seems to be late in the game like last time. And agree that Russia and Turkey will be regional supwrstates with low global force projections. Ultimately I see these latter two super states aligned in a Sino axis, faced with a Euro-Arab super axis.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby panduranghari » 12 Jan 2020 14:24

Sir,
The German demographics are worse than Japanese. The Europeans are either going to build a new Templar force under the Eastern European leaders or going to go completely Islamic under new liberal leaders of Germany-France.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ramana » 21 Jan 2020 07:17

Architecting a Future of World Order


Please read Prof Francis J. Gavin, Harvard on new post 2008 world order.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Thakur_B » 21 Jan 2020 08:36

ldev wrote:A tour de force of a press conference by Carlos Ghosn today in Beirut. The first 1 hour is where he gives his presentation and then the remaining is Q&A. He responds to questions in English, French, Arabic and Portuguese!! If his version of events is accurate it portrays the Japanese legal system in extremely poor light. Almost as bad as running afoul of the law in an Arab country.


There is something really wrong with Japanese legal system. About 98% people charged with a crime are handed convictions. The police usually shy from filing charges until they believe they have a water tight case, and when they do, judges refrain from going against law enforcement. Really messed up system.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Suraj » 21 Jan 2020 12:17

The high conviction rate in Japan is because the police only prosecute watertight cases . They generally follow a velvet glove approach in daily life focused on harmonious society, generally very helpful and polite . Petty crime is almost nonexistent in Japan; people use their expensive bags or coats to mark their chairs when using the restroom as a matter of routine, and it’s expected that no one would steal it.

However, things are very different at high levels . The same social contract focused on preserving order and harmony, instead focuses on national interest . There are many local businessmen who’ve done way worse than Ghosn and never get prosecuted . I was in Japan during his escape . The general talk was the guy has balls and yes he’d never get justice in Japan anyway.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ramana » 21 Jan 2020 21:07

CFR has a report on conflicts to watch in 2020:
Interestingly they have 4 hot-spots marked in Indian sub-continent:

https://www.cfr.org/report/conflicts-watch-2020

They have a map that high lights these.

I like the graphic depiction of risk based on Impact and Likelihood.

Do take a look.

I could not copy paste the map.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby ramana » 21 Jan 2020 21:39

Currently WEF is going on at DAVOS Switzerland.
I think we should study the news reports coming from there and the videos of speeches.
World is in transition and economics is coming center stage.
Please help in posting interesting information and speeches from WEF, Davos.
Thanks, ramana

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby chetak » 23 Jan 2020 18:52

ramana wrote:Currently WEF is going on at DAVOS Switzerland.
I think we should study the news reports coming from there and the videos of speeches.
World is in transition and economics is coming center stage.
Please help in posting interesting information and speeches from WEF, Davos.
Thanks, ramana


article in swarajya magazine

ps://swarajyamag.com/insta/get-an-econo ... divestment … via @swarajyamag


twitter

“Get An Economics Degree, Then Let’s Talk”-U.S Treasury Secretary To Greta Thunberg’s Call For Fossil Fuel Divestment


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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby UlanBatori » 25 Jan 2020 02:43

Suraj wrote:The high conviction rate in Japan is because the police only prosecute watertight cases . They generally follow a velvet glove approach in daily life focused on harmonious society, generally very helpful and polite.
However, things are very different at high levels. There are many local businessmen who’ve done way worse than Ghosn and never get prosecuted . I was in Japan during his escape. The general talk was the guy has balls and yes he’d never get justice in Japan anyway.

In the dins of 007 they used to just dump the gangsters in Tokyo Bay from helicopters. Water-tight. Ghosn is gora but not exactly gora. Can't understand how he came to be head of a classic Nippon corporation.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby nandakumar » 25 Jan 2020 03:47

Nissan was a small player compared to aito majors Toyota and Honda. Even Mitsubishi automobiles business was bigger and was part of the Mitsubishi group with interest in heavy machinery and a giant international trading arm. Even Suzuki had the advantage of a huge two wheeler business besides they struck it rich with their investment in India. In France the automotive industry with a high cost base could not compete against German car industry that had become bigger and turned out to be more cost efficient. The EU ended tariff protection within Europe. First to fall was Citreon. Peugeot was also struggling. Renault was better placed and clearly saw the writing on the wall. So a merger where both parties were seen as equal but in reality Renault was the one calling the shots. Carlos Ghosn became the CEO of the jv company.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby chanakyaa » 25 Jan 2020 08:21

(World Econ Forum) Shaping a Multiconceptual World 2020
A lengthy ready, that discusses following points.
- The Expansion of Geopolitics
- Multilateralism in an Ungoverned World
- Managing the Rising Influence of Nationalism
- Culture, Identity and the Evolution of Geopolitics
- Navigating the Digitization of Geopolitics
- The Upcoming Technological Revolution on the Battlefield?
- The Future Balance: The Geopolitical Impacts of GDP, Population and Climate Change
- Economic and Trade Challenges for a World in Transition

Yoichi Funabashi (Chairman, Asia Pacific Initiative, Japan) - By 2050, China, India and the United States are projected to emerge as leading global powers. The three will boast the world’s largest national economies by gross domestic product (GDP), if measured in terms of purchasing power parity. India is expected to surpass the United States in terms of this metric by 2040 – a milestone indicating the sustained, and indeed growing, importance of the Indo-Pacific region within the world economy. The shifting economic picture means that different potential scenarios for the future international order will emerge that involve these three countries: the possibility of a system pitting China against a US and Indian partnership exists, as does the potential of an order in which the three separately compete against one another.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Shanmukh » 25 Jan 2020 10:14

Trust a Brit to be contemptuous of India. Robin Niblett, Director, Chatham House, UK, has this to say about us,

In Russia and Hungary, the threat of global integration has intensified a historical rejection of outsiders and sense of national grievance. Their leaders have turned to national culture and identity as the basis for resistance. China has carefully curated its period of historical exploitation by Western powers to strengthen popular support for its return as a great power. In India, Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the Bharatiya Janata Party have reawakened Hindu resentment against the country’s minority Muslim community and have used myths about Hindu India’s glorious past to try to galvanize Indians towards its potential great future.


India's glorious past is a `myth' for this scumbag. I would rather trust ISIS than UK. Their unreasoning hatred of all things Indian make it clear that they are the last people who should be trusted.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby chetak » 25 Jan 2020 12:19

Shanmukh wrote:Trust a Brit to be contemptuous of India. Robin Niblett, Director, Chatham House, UK, has this to say about us,

In Russia and Hungary, the threat of global integration has intensified a historical rejection of outsiders and sense of national grievance. Their leaders have turned to national culture and identity as the basis for resistance. China has carefully curated its period of historical exploitation by Western powers to strengthen popular support for its return as a great power. In India, Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the Bharatiya Janata Party have reawakened Hindu resentment against the country’s minority Muslim community and have used myths about Hindu India’s glorious past to try to galvanize Indians towards its potential great future.


India's glorious past is a `myth' for this scumbag. I would rather trust ISIS than UK. Their unreasoning hatred of all things Indian make it clear that they are the last people who should be trusted.


wasn't this "myth" the very reason why the britshits made a beeline for India, this "myth" and the legendary greed of the mercenary britshits, aka a nation of shopkeepers.

these britshits now have cognitive dissonance about the role they played in the rape, pillage, and plunder of India, all the while pretending that they were here only to "civilize" the unruly and pagan natives to whom they grandly brought the great gifts of the bible, the english language, and of course, the railways.

apparently even god did not see fit to save their queen, seeing the bleddy and utterly unholy mess that the britshits are in today.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby chetak » 25 Jan 2020 12:24

twitter

China’s Eating Habits Could Bring About ‘The End Of The Human Race’: Malayasian PM Mahathir’s Media Advisor A Kadir Jasin. Blames China’s voracious appetite for wild meats as source of many recent deadly diseases and says it must hold itself accountable.

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Re: Geopolitics/Geoeconomics Thread - June 2015

Postby Arun.prabhu » 25 Jan 2020 12:39

UK intelligentsia is biased towards muslim Pakistan. You can see it in BBC's puke-worthy coverage of all things India-Pakistan related. Ordinary Englishmen may not give a damn, but we can't expect the ones in the upper levels - the ones who have been turning a willful blind eye to the rape grooming gangs on their soil - to be pro-India or even neutral.

Shanmukh wrote:Trust a Brit to be contemptuous of India. Robin Niblett, Director, Chatham House, UK, has this to say about us,

In Russia and Hungary, the threat of global integration has intensified a historical rejection of outsiders and sense of national grievance. Their leaders have turned to national culture and identity as the basis for resistance. China has carefully curated its period of historical exploitation by Western powers to strengthen popular support for its return as a great power. In India, Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the Bharatiya Janata Party have reawakened Hindu resentment against the country’s minority Muslim community and have used myths about Hindu India’s glorious past to try to galvanize Indians towards its potential great future.


India's glorious past is a `myth' for this scumbag. I would rather trust ISIS than UK. Their unreasoning hatred of all things Indian make it clear that they are the last people who should be trusted.


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