International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

The Military Issues & History Forum is a venue to discuss issues relating to the military aspects of the Indian Armed Forces, whether the past, present or future. We request members to kindly stay within the mandate of this forum and keep their exchanges of views, on a civilised level, however vehemently any disagreement may be felt. All feedback regarding forum usage may be sent to the moderators using the Feedback Form or by clicking the Report Post Icon in any objectionable post for proper action. Please note that the views expressed by the Members and Moderators on these discussion boards are that of the individuals only and do not reflect the official policy or view of the Bharat-Rakshak.com Website. Copyright Violation is strictly prohibited and may result in revocation of your posting rights - please read the FAQ for full details. Users must also abide by the Forum Guidelines at all times.
chola
BRF Oldie
Posts: 4419
Joined: 16 Dec 2002 12:31
Location: USA

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby chola » 18 Feb 2020 06:05

Pretty big news if it happens. It'll certainly cripple the C919 just as it is in heavy testing with six prototypes on the LEAP-C. If they change engine now, all that data gos out the the window and have to restart.

Lot of unease on Wall Street. The PRC was expected to buy from the West not only for the C919 but the CR929 as well.

This decision would cut off a big revenue stream in Cheen and would open up the C919 and CR929 markets for a domestic maker. I guess the hope is this destroys the chinis ability to continue with a domestic airliner.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/15/business/economy/trump-administration-aircraft-china.html


Trump administration could block GE-made jet engine exports to China: Report

Such exports could pose a threat to Boeing and Airbus

By Evie FordhamFOXBusiness

The Trump administration is reportedly weighing a decision to block the export of jet engines co-produced by GE to China, in part over concerns that the country could reverse-engineer the product, posing a potential threat to U.S. business.

The administration doesn't want the jet engines to be delivered to the country for use on the Comac C919 airliner that China is developing — an aircraft that could rival those produced by Boeing, The Wall Street Journal reported Sunday.

The administration could decline to issue a license allowing CFM International, the joint venture between GE and French aerospace company Safran, from exporting the LEAP 1C engines.

“GE has provided products and services in the global marketplace for decades," a GE spokesperson told FOX Business on Monday. "We aggressively protect and defend our intellectual property and work closely with the U.S. government to fulfill our responsibilities and shared security and economic interests.”


brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 18 Feb 2020 18:53

brar_w wrote:
Kartik wrote:The contracts, worth a total of €155 million ($168 million) and equally funded by Paris and Berlin, were announced late Feb. 12 as Airbus prepared to announce its 2019 financial results.


$168 Million over 18 months after nearly a year of negotiating and multiple HOS or defense minister level photo ops. At this rate, they are smart to target a 2040 time-frame.



A good contrast. The USAF is spending about $1 Billion dollars in its next budget on the air-vehicle technologies and about $400 Million on engine development. This climbs to nearly $10 Billion for the two over the next 6 years. The US Navy has its own program but the budget for it is classified for the 2021-2025 time-frame. All we know is that they have requested that the 2021-2023 procurement of F-18 E/F's be stopped to pay for it (this is a budget trick as Congress will add that money back). Higher spending is commensurate with a need to field a Penetrating Long Range Counter Air fighter for the USAF by the early 2030's and a Super Hornet replacement for the US Navy by the early to mid 2030's. And they are starting from a F-35/RQ-180/B-21 technology baseline. The FCAS's biggest challenge is that all three current partners probably consider themselves as equals (that is a bureaucratic landmine) and the long technology development and advanced system production holiday these OEM's took (besides TD's which don't feed SC's).

Air Force's FY-21 NGAD funding profile steady after years of fluctuation


After several years of a shifting funding profile, the Air Force's Next-Generation Air Dominance program’s outyear projection is relatively stable in the service’s fiscal year 2021 budget request. The FY-21 budget requests about $1 billion for NGAD in FY-21 and about $7.4 billion through FY-25. The program's funding profile is on track with what the Air Force projected it would need in last year's request. The program's funding profile grew from $4.5 billion in the FY-18 future years defense program...

Kartik
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5164
Joined: 04 Feb 2004 12:31

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 19 Feb 2020 03:41

chola wrote:Pretty big news if it happens. It'll certainly cripple the C919 just as it is in heavy testing with six prototypes on the LEAP-C. If they change engine now, all that data gos out the the window and have to restart.

Lot of unease on Wall Street. The PRC was expected to buy from the West not only for the C919 but the CR929 as well.

This decision would cut off a big revenue stream in Cheen and would open up the C919 and CR929 markets for a domestic maker. I guess the hope is this destroys the chinis ability to continue with a domestic airliner.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/15/business/economy/trump-administration-aircraft-china.html


Trump administration could block GE-made jet engine exports to China: Report

Such exports could pose a threat to Boeing and Airbus

By Evie FordhamFOXBusiness

The Trump administration is reportedly weighing a decision to block the export of jet engines co-produced by GE to China, in part over concerns that the country could reverse-engineer the product, posing a potential threat to U.S. business.

The administration doesn't want the jet engines to be delivered to the country for use on the Comac C919 airliner that China is developing — an aircraft that could rival those produced by Boeing, The Wall Street Journal reported Sunday.

The administration could decline to issue a license allowing CFM International, the joint venture between GE and French aerospace company Safran, from exporting the LEAP 1C engines.

“GE has provided products and services in the global marketplace for decades," a GE spokesperson told FOX Business on Monday. "We aggressively protect and defend our intellectual property and work closely with the U.S. government to fulfill our responsibilities and shared security and economic interests.”



Woohoo ! Yeah !


Kartik
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5164
Joined: 04 Feb 2004 12:31

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 19 Feb 2020 03:46

Marte-ER anti-ship missile on target for Eurofighter integration

Image

MBDA has performed a second test firing of its Marte ER anti-ship missile in support of the long-range weapon’s integration with the Eurofighter Typhoon.

Conducted from a test range in Sardinia, the missile’s latest ground-launched firing “pushed its envelope to the limit”, MBDA says. “This firing confirmed the overall design and performance of the missile, marking a critical milestone in its development path,” the company adds.

Several enhancements have been made to the 340kg (770lb), 3.6m (11.8ft)-long weapon since a first test firing conducted in late 2018, MBDA notes. New features tested recently include an integrated navigation system, proximity fly-over fuze with associated weapon controller and actuation system, and terminal guidance via a new seeker.

Following a flight of about 185nm (100km), including “very low sea-skimming at very high speed”, the weapon hit its intended floating target with an “almost zero miss distance”, the company says, hailing “perfect behavior of the missile”. It cites a maximum range of “well beyond 100km” for the high-subsonic-speed Marte ER.

The weapon’s pending addition represents a new capability for the multi-role Typhoon, with the anti-ship mission among duties to be performed by an export customer. Eurofighter’s current production backlog includes examples ordered by Kuwait and Qatar.

“Full integration of Marte ER on the Eurofighter Typhoon platform is proceeding at pace,” MBDA notes.

Rakesh
Forum Moderator
Posts: 8763
Joined: 15 Jan 2004 12:31
Location: Planet Earth
Contact:

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Rakesh » 19 Feb 2020 04:44

French Navy new Rafale M F3-R conduct first operational missions
https://www.navyrecognition.com/index.p ... sions.html

17 Feb 2020

According to the French Navy’s Aéronavale (Naval Aviation), the new F3-R standard represents a breakthrough in communications, intelligence and armaments. On January 29, Lieutenant Guillaume launched from the Charles de Gaulle flying a Rafale M F3-R. The purpose of his mission was to collect data in the Syrian skies in order to have them analyzed by the international coalition fighting against the Islamic State, within the framework of Operation Chammal. This marked the first operational missions for the Rafale M in its latest standard. Thanks to the new “free text” system, the aircraft can now communicate with the aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle and the E-2C Hawkeye. Like a simple email, it receives written orders despite distances of hundreds of nautical miles. Waiting on the radio frequency for information is no longer necessary, and, unlike an audio transmission, the information is written and therefore available for consultation. For the pilot, “all these new features have been perfectly implemented”. This was a normal operational flight, except for the new capabilities that the F3-R brings.

Quickly after this first flight and with its new functionalities, the new generation carrier-borne fighter flew an hour later, for a Close Air Support mission (CAS). The Rafale M F3-R is already involved in all French air wing operations taking advantage of its new capabilities in its fight against the Islamic State. The new Rafale F3-R standard brings new capabilities in the areas of intelligence, communication, engagement and command. If the integration of the Meteor long-range missile and the new generation Talios laser designation pod are the major innovations, other developments (mainly software) translate into a further evolution of the aircraft. The F3-R standard also includes the installation of an Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (AGCAS) and various improvements to the RBE2 radar, the Spectra electronic warfare system, the Reco NG pod and the inertial navigation system. The French Navy (Marine Nationale) took delivery of its first Dassault Rafale M fighter upgraded to the F-3R standard in December 2018. The first unit to deploy the new Rafale M standard is the “Flotille 11F” squadron.

brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 19 Feb 2020 21:19

Israel is moving ahead with another squadron of F-35's (will bring total to 75) and F-15.
[/quote]https://breakingdefense.com/2020/02/israel-buys-stealth-lotsa-weapons-2nd-squadron-of-f-35s-f-15s/

TEL AVIV: After a long internal debate, Israel’s military has decided to buy both another Lockheed Martin F-35 squadron AND another Boeing F-15 squadron, in a deal estimated at $3 billion.

The Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) general staff’s decision reflects the scope of missions the IAF will have to deal with in any major confrontation, especially one with Iran. Sources close to the issue say that, while the F-35’s stealth and advanced sensors are essential for some situations, in later phases of combat Israel will need other aircraft, ones with advanced avionics that can operate in conjunction with the F-35 and carry heavy loads of weapons. Israel has developed a variety of such weapons and the source that talked with Breaking Defense said, “we need a heavy truck for these systems.” That truck would be the F-15.

Eitan Ben Eliyahu former commander of the IAF, told Breaking Defense that the F-35 will add two main capabilities to the IAF: “The stealth is one major capability especially in our region, where enemy countries are operating huge numbers of ground-to-air weapons. The second capability is the one that allows this aircraft to receive and distribute all kinds of combat data from a long list of sensors. This is very important for an air force that is performing combat missions almost continuously.”

So far, Israel has signed contracts for 50 F-35s. The plan is to buy 25 more. That was the desired size of the F-35 fleet when the IAF decided to buy the stealth fighter.

The IAF plan is to upgrade its existing fleet of F-15I’s to the level of the IA variant. This will add to the budget burden.

The voices for the purchase of more F-35 were based on its capability to gather and share intelligence. “With the threats Israel faces this capability is essential,” one of the sources said. Last year the IAF’s F-35 participated in a massive exercise and proved their capability to serve as “targets generator” for other fighter aircraft.

One of the main scenarios is attacking targets protected by Russian made S-300 and S-400 surface – air missiles. The F-35’s participated for the first time in such an exercise, designed to penetrate the northern sector, and proved their worth. The F-35 is the only aircraft designed with a requirement that it be able to defeat advanced Russian SAM systems, like the S-300, which are operational in Syria. The IAF did not explain why the exercise simulated areas protected by the more advanced S-400, like the ones purchased by Turkey. One explanation may be based on Turkey’s declaration that it might deploy the S-400 near its border with Syria.

Israeli sources said that the S-400 may be rushed to the area “under certain circumstances” and that is the reason that the pilots are being trained against it. Those sources added that the current dispute about the gas reservoirs in the Mediterranean has the potential to cause “major confrontations”.

Another scenario is of the IAF suppressing salvos of missiles launched by the Hezbollah in Lebanon, which has an arsenal of some 140.000 rockets, some with very heavy warheads. According to Colonel A. from the IAF: “The enemy is capable of launching big salvos of rockets. Our mission is to strike even before a single rocket is launched.”

The two aircraft will be equipped with some Israeli developed systems. The F-15IA will carry more of these, as access to its baseline systems is easier. The F-35’s advanced electronic warfare systems, security systems and other sensors are heavily protected by the United States.

The decision to buy both airplanes is surprising as the big deficit in the Israeli national budget makes it hard to finance such a big acquisition plan.

The Lockheed Martin F-35 test aircraft will be delivered to the Israeli Air Force (IAF) later this year together with six additional aircraft part of the 50 under contract. So far twenty aircraft have been delivered.

The IAF has prepared a list of weapon systems and “functional” systems that it intends to test on special F-35 test aircraft to be delivered this year. It was built according to specifications that took two years to prepare.

The aim of the special aircraft is to help test Israeli-developed systems to the IAF’s F-35’s. “All our platforms have been upgraded to enable stretching the flight envelope while using the unique weapon systems made by the Israeli industries,”an IAF officer from its flight test center said.

The test aircraft will enable the flight test center to enhance the capabilities of the F-35 (Adir) in air-air and air-ground missions using the highly classified systems developed for this purpose in Israel.


Some of the Israeli defense companies have been busy adapting unique electronic systems and weapon systems that fit the operational requirement of the IAF. The Israeli companies that are developing systems for the IAF’s F-35’s are reluctant to provide any details about the systems under development, but sources say the focus is on special air-to-ground systems and systems that can enhance the F-35 capabilities as a “knowledge center” for other forces in the air, on the ground and at sea.


Kartik
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5164
Joined: 04 Feb 2004 12:31

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 21 Feb 2020 01:53

Indonesia conducts maiden flight of upgraded F-16A

The Indonesian air force has conducted the maiden flight of an upgraded Lockheed Martin F-16A fighter.

The project involved Lockheed, air force technicians, and local contractor Indonesian Aerospace (also known as PTDI), the service says.

The jet (TS-1610) underwent Lockheed’s Falcon Star mid-life upgrade, which extends its service life to 8,000h, from 4,000h.

The air force says the upgrade also updated its avionics and radar.


Cirium fleets data shows that TS-1610 is 29.4 years old. Overall, 10 F-16A/B Block 15 aircraft will receive the upgrades.

In addition to its A/B-model examples, Jakarta operates 23 F-16C/Ds.


29.4 year old airplane gets an upgrade that'll extend it's life for possibly another 30 years at least at the same rate of usage per year. If spares will be available that long, that is. Will end up being a 50-60 year old jet when it'll retire. Quite astonishing.

Manish_P
BRF Oldie
Posts: 2272
Joined: 25 Mar 2010 17:34

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Manish_P » 21 Feb 2020 12:41

With Tail propellers being all the buzz these days, the traditional tail rotors might undergo a makeover too..

Bell's Electrically-Powered Tail Rotor Tech Breaks Cover And It Could Be A Game-Changer

Image

Bell has been quietly flight testing a modified Model 429 helicopter with a new all-electric tail rotor configuration in Canada for months. This Electrically Distributed Anti-Torque system, or EDAT, offers improved efficiency and reliability, as well as a reduced acoustic signature and lower maintenance costs compared to traditional tail rotors.

"In a nutshell, we removed all of the conventional mechanical anti-torque components – which is gearboxes, driveshafts, and tail rotor hub and blades – and replaced it with four electric motors and fans,” Eric Sinusas, Bell's Light Aircraft Program director, said in an interview with Vertical magazine. "This is the first time anyone in the world ever done this, so the first step was just to make sure that it actually works – and yes it does work."

Having four fans instead of one single rotor also offers valuable redundancy, which in turn makes the helicopter safer to fly. Bell says that the EDAT system can provide sufficient anti-torque force even if three of the four electric fans fail.


brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 22 Feb 2020 19:31

From the MMRCA thread:

Barath wrote:https://corporalfrisk.com/2020/02/21/hx-challenge-pt-5-bigger-better-stronger/

From Finland's HX competition, which features all the western aircraft that mmrca2.0 might feature (and also the F35, but not the F15) comes this

US government requirements include a requirement for new signals to be processed at a US facility before being inserted into an updated version of the data set. The solution is to embed Finnish personnel at a suitable US facility
Once Finnish (or allied) assets would identify a new signature the data would be supplied to these Finns who would process it, before it would be sent back to Finland. The whole process would result in a turnaround time of less than 24 hours from collecting the raw data until having the updated mission data in the aircraft.

Seems relevant to us aircraft including a potential F15, F16 or F18 in mmrca 2.0

Anyone have specific info on the regulation or context and applicability to India ?


MDF's on the F-35 particularly, but also on the Growler are a tricky given how sensitive the capability is and how this data is vital to US's national security needs given the roles and missions these aircraft are expected to perform. One is the most prevalent penetrating asset for the US services and the other its flagship SEAD/DEAD platform. One agreement reached under the F-35 and Growler programs was to have partner or foreign customers' teams embed with the US Electronic Warfare squadrons and work jointly on the Mission packages for these programs. This is also a two-way street. The USAF and USN are really the only constantly globally deployed force that pretty much runs a SIGINT and ELINT program at a global scale. The partners and programs have access to US upgrades on the F-35 program (and Growler) in return for this arrangement so there is value to it as well. This arrangement has been pushed and when it comes to EW, the US military and DOD are not willing to budge.

brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 24 Feb 2020 03:41

South Korea's fighters (Via Cignus Hunter).

Image

Barath
BRFite
Posts: 127
Joined: 11 Feb 2019 19:06

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Barath » 24 Feb 2020 15:16

brar_w wrote:From the MMRCA thread:

Barath wrote:https://corporalfrisk.com/2020/02/21/hx-challenge-pt-5-bigger-better-stronger/ .. From Finland's HX competition,


MDF's on the F-35 particularly, but also on the Growler a..... The USAF and USN are really the only constantly globally deployed force that pretty much runs a SIGINT and ELINT program at a global scale. The partners and programs have access to US upgrades on the F-35 program (and Growler) in return .


Ok. So if I am reading you right, this is basically for the ELINT/SIGINT missions & the EW platforms, and thus relevant to F35, Growler in H-X and not to the SH, F16, or the F15E-X. ....

Makes sense.

Additionally, I believe the plan was to incorporate some capabilities onto the Predator/Sea Guardian ? Would that mean the offer of these platforms to India may not have included these options ?

NRao
BRF Oldie
Posts: 16526
Joined: 01 Jan 1970 05:30
Location: Illini Nation

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby NRao » 24 Feb 2020 16:22


brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 24 Feb 2020 17:11

Barath wrote:
brar_w wrote:From the MMRCA thread:



MDF's on the F-35 particularly, but also on the Growler a..... The USAF and USN are really the only constantly globally deployed force that pretty much runs a SIGINT and ELINT program at a global scale. The partners and programs have access to US upgrades on the F-35 program (and Growler) in return .


Ok. So if I am reading you right, this is basically for the ELINT/SIGINT missions & the EW platforms, and thus relevant to F35, Growler in H-X and not to the SH, F16, or the F15E-X. ....

Makes sense.

Additionally, I believe the plan was to incorporate some capabilities onto the Predator/Sea Guardian ? Would that mean the offer of these platforms to India may not have included these options ?


Joint EW labs aren't in place for all ELINT or SIGINT platforms unless they are very specific and sensitive platforms that are shared only with a select few. They exist for the F-35 and Growler because of how that signals data needs to be turned into actionable MDF's, and especially on the F-35, how closely these data are tied to the sensor fusion and the capability of the aircraft in an offensive and defensive capacity. For something like a Sea Guardian the MOD would have to deal with the OEM and either contract out work or obtain rights to perform those future upgrades etc. Everything else (f-16, F-15 etc) needs to be offered under the terms that qualify them for the IAF/MOD RFP.

Chinmay
BRFite
Posts: 212
Joined: 15 Aug 2016 07:25

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Chinmay » 24 Feb 2020 19:37

brar_w wrote:
Joint EW labs aren't in place for all ELINT or SIGINT platforms unless they are very specific and sensitive platforms that are shared only with a select few. They exist for the F-35 and Growler because of how that signals data needs to be turned into actionable MDF's, and especially on the F-35, how closely these data are tied to the sensor fusion and the capability of the aircraft in an offensive and defensive capacity. For something like a Sea Guardian the MOD would have to deal with the OEM and either contract out work or obtain rights to perform those future upgrades etc. Everything else (f-16, F-15 etc) needs to be offered under the terms that qualify them for the IAF/MOD RFP.


Just to clarify brar_w, does this also apply to other ISTAR platforms such as AEW, Global Hawk and/or the Sentinel or is it limited to the F-35 and the Growler?

brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 24 Feb 2020 19:44

Chinmay wrote:Just to clarify brar_w, does this also apply to other ISTAR platforms such as AEW, Global Hawk and/or the Sentinel or is it limited to the F-35 and the Growler?


The ISTAR and AEW platforms are not operated by the US though there is an element of the mission files that goes into the E-7 for example that is for five eyes partners only but others who have bought into that platform don't get it so their is no question of sharing or co-sharing these resources. The Sentinel is a US industry developed solution for the UK. How that platform is sustained and upgraded is between those two entities as long as the required export clearances were obtained prior to the sale.

brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 25 Feb 2020 06:50

The first two F-35A units in the USAF are now fully operational and capable of global deployment. Next up would be the units in Alaska, and the UK (with reserve and guard squadrons sprinkled in between). Those units will be fully operational over the next 3-4 years.

Also note that the "fully trained pilots and maintainers" in these units involved multiple (I think 4 - a bit high but these units were fielding a new type so essentially writing the playbook for upcoming units) Red-Flag deployments and other multi/large force exercises both in the US and abroad. The training portion of this is important and it is just not about having the kit and enough spares to sustain global ops.

Gen. Mike Holmes, commander of Air Combat Command, and Lt. Gen. Richard Scobee, commander of Air Force Reserve Command and chief of the Air Force Reserve, paid a visit to the active-duty 388th Fighter Wing and reserve 419th Fighter Wing to help commemorate a key milestone in F-35A Lightning II operations.

The Feb. 20 ceremony marked the 388th FW and 419th FW reaching “full warfighting capability,” which denotes success in three key areas: fully trained pilots and maintainers, a full complement of 78 aircraft and the support equipment needed to fly them.

Holmes addressed the Airmen from both wings, lauding their accomplishments with the aircraft, including additional deployments to Europe and the Pacific. He said they have “answered all the critics” in proving the jet’s capabilities.“People said you wouldn’t make it. People said you couldn’t get it done in the time frame we set out. People said there were too many problems yet to be worked out with the airplane,” Holmes said. “And yet, pretty much on schedule, here we are.”

The 388th and 419th fighter wings are the Air Force’s only combat-capable F-35 units. Together, they fly and maintain the jet in a total force partnership, which plays on the strengths of both the active-duty and reserve.

Holmes called the F-35 one of the most “sophisticated, exquisite” machines ever made, and praised the Airmen for their crucial role in bringing it to full warfighting capability.

“We couldn’t be more proud of you and all that you’ve accomplished,” he said.

Scobee also addressed the Airmen, thanking them for their diligent work in making the F-35 program a success. He also noted he has seen “no better feat of engineering” than the F-35 during his time in the Air Force.

“This is an awesome day and it’s an awesome accomplishment,” Scobee said. “It takes a full-functioning team to be able to accomplish something like this, and that’s what has happened in these two wings.”

“The F-35 gives the Air Force and its allies the power to dominate the multi-domain, full spectrum of warfare that we’ll have to be able to do anytime, anywhere,” he said.

The wings received the first operational F-35s in 2015 and have since participated in multiple exercises both stateside and overseas. Last year, the wings began supporting combat operations with consecutive F-35 deployments to the Middle East.

“No matter how good that airplane is, no matter how impressive a scientific and technological marvel it is, it doesn’t become a weapon of war until we give it to you,” Holmes said. “You have produced a combat power that no one has ever known across the history of the world.”


https://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display ... 5-success/

Prasad
BRF Oldie
Posts: 7467
Joined: 16 Nov 2007 00:53
Location: Chennai

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Prasad » 25 Feb 2020 10:35

Brarji,
how does the usn track sea skimming missiles from launch platform to target if the SPY has a radar horizon of only about 70kms for a missile at 100m asl? air search radars could find the missile carrier from 300-400kms but the missile itself?

brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 25 Feb 2020 17:27

Prasad wrote:Brarji,
how does the usn track sea skimming missiles from launch platform to target if the SPY has a radar horizon of only about 70kms for a missile at 100m asl? air search radars could find the missile carrier from 300-400kms but the missile itself?



Most sea-skimming missiles do not sea-skim through their entire flight profile (regardless of whether they can). A large proportion of them probably have a terminal sea-skimming phase in order to maximize effective range and be out of targeting range from USN shooters (The SM-6 is a 250 mile interceptor). Having said that, sea-skimming threats for the USN are tracked by a dedicated X band sensor that is placed higher up than the SPY-1/6 radars. It's job is to fill the gap and be on the look out for threats that fly lower than the SPY given horizon limitations. It's looking for only one type of target - Cruise Missiles. It is also capable of FC with the ship's defensive systems. It extends the horizon a little beyond the SPY-1/6's capabilities. But even that is likely not enough, hence one of the roles of the E-2 fleet is to provide that early warning and targeting capability to large surface combatants as the E-2C and now the E-2D is linked to AEGIS, CES and with the E-2D and NIFC-CA it can actually guide AEGIS t complete a succesfull SM-6 intercept of cruise missile targets. The reason the USN is buying 85 E-2D's isn't just for carrier ops (they would probably only need half as many for this role) but also to support deployed combatants during heightened tensions or war. When these larger combatants would be operating without Carrier support then they will be receiving manned and unmanned aircraft support from shore based facilities..

Image

Prasad
BRF Oldie
Posts: 7467
Joined: 16 Nov 2007 00:53
Location: Chennai

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Prasad » 25 Feb 2020 21:53

Very interesting. So dedicated sensor + networked solution. Not something the bakis will have. I wonder what the Chinese solution to this is.

Thanks for the info. As always.

Kartik
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5164
Joined: 04 Feb 2004 12:31

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 26 Feb 2020 04:07

Azerbaijan to buy M-346 Master jets

Image

Azerbaijan is to buy an undisclosed number of Leonardo M-346 Master trainer and light attack aircraft, the country's president announced on 20 February.

Azerbaijani Defense Minister Zakir Hasanov and Leonardo Executive Director Alessandro Profumo exchanged a 'declaration by agreement' between the Ministry of Defence (MoD) of the Republic of Azerbaijan and Leonardo for the acquisition of "an integration system for M-346 aircraft", the website for the President of the Republic of Azerbaijan, Ilham Aliyev, announced.

No details pertaining to a contract value or delivery timelines were disclosed.

In May 2017 Leonardo showcased its Alenia Aermacchi M-346 Master trainer aircraft to top Azeri military officials. While the number of aircraft was also not revealed, in July 2019 Leonardo chief executive Alessandro Profumo said that his company had signed a deal for six M-346FA light attack aircraft with a major "international customer".

..

Prithwiraj
BRFite
Posts: 234
Joined: 21 Dec 2016 18:48

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Prithwiraj » 26 Feb 2020 05:38

brar_w wrote:Israel is moving ahead with another squadron of F-35's (will bring total to 75) and F-15.
https://breakingdefense.com/2020/02/israel-buys-stealth-lotsa-weapons-2nd-squadron-of-f-35s-f-15s/

TEL AVIV: After a long internal debate, Israel’s military has decided to buy both another Lockheed Martin F-35 squadron AND another Boeing F-15 squadron, in a deal estimated at $3 billion.

The Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) general staff’s decision reflects the scope of missions the IAF will have to deal with in any major confrontation, especially one with Iran. Sources close to the issue say that, while the F-35’s stealth and advanced sensors are essential for some situations, in later phases of combat Israel will need other aircraft, ones with advanced avionics that can operate in conjunction with the F-35 and carry heavy loads of weapons. Israel has developed a variety of such weapons and the source that talked with Breaking Defense said, “we need a heavy truck for these systems.” That truck would be the F-15.

Eitan Ben Eliyahu former commander of the IAF, told Breaking Defense that the F-35 will add two main capabilities to the IAF: “The stealth is one major capability especially in our region, where enemy countries are operating huge numbers of ground-to-air weapons. The second capability is the one that allows this aircraft to receive and distribute all kinds of combat data from a long list of sensors. This is very important for an air force that is performing combat missions almost continuously.”

So far, Israel has signed contracts for 50 F-35s. The plan is to buy 25 more. That was the desired size of the F-35 fleet when the IAF decided to buy the stealth fighter.

The IAF plan is to upgrade its existing fleet of F-15I’s to the level of the IA variant. This will add to the budget burden.

The voices for the purchase of more F-35 were based on its capability to gather and share intelligence. “With the threats Israel faces this capability is essential,” one of the sources said. Last year the IAF’s F-35 participated in a massive exercise and proved their capability to serve as “targets generator” for other fighter aircraft.

One of the main scenarios is attacking targets protected by Russian made S-300 and S-400 surface – air missiles. The F-35’s participated for the first time in such an exercise, designed to penetrate the northern sector, and proved their worth. The F-35 is the only aircraft designed with a requirement that it be able to defeat advanced Russian SAM systems, like the S-300, which are operational in Syria. The IAF did not explain why the exercise simulated areas protected by the more advanced S-400, like the ones purchased by Turkey. One explanation may be based on Turkey’s declaration that it might deploy the S-400 near its border with Syria.

Israeli sources said that the S-400 may be rushed to the area “under certain circumstances” and that is the reason that the pilots are being trained against it. Those sources added that the current dispute about the gas reservoirs in the Mediterranean has the potential to cause “major confrontations”.

Another scenario is of the IAF suppressing salvos of missiles launched by the Hezbollah in Lebanon, which has an arsenal of some 140.000 rockets, some with very heavy warheads. According to Colonel A. from the IAF: “The enemy is capable of launching big salvos of rockets. Our mission is to strike even before a single rocket is launched.”

The two aircraft will be equipped with some Israeli developed systems. The F-15IA will carry more of these, as access to its baseline systems is easier. The F-35’s advanced electronic warfare systems, security systems and other sensors are heavily protected by the United States.

The decision to buy both airplanes is surprising as the big deficit in the Israeli national budget makes it hard to finance such a big acquisition plan.

The Lockheed Martin F-35 test aircraft will be delivered to the Israeli Air Force (IAF) later this year together with six additional aircraft part of the 50 under contract. So far twenty aircraft have been delivered.

The IAF has prepared a list of weapon systems and “functional” systems that it intends to test on special F-35 test aircraft to be delivered this year. It was built according to specifications that took two years to prepare.

The aim of the special aircraft is to help test Israeli-developed systems to the IAF’s F-35’s. “All our platforms have been upgraded to enable stretching the flight envelope while using the unique weapon systems made by the Israeli industries,”an IAF officer from its flight test center said.

The test aircraft will enable the flight test center to enhance the capabilities of the F-35 (Adir) in air-air and air-ground missions using the highly classified systems developed for this purpose in Israel.


Some of the Israeli defense companies have been busy adapting unique electronic systems and weapon systems that fit the operational requirement of the IAF. The Israeli companies that are developing systems for the IAF’s F-35’s are reluctant to provide any details about the systems under development, but sources say the focus is on special air-to-ground systems and systems that can enhance the F-35 capabilities as a “knowledge center” for other forces in the air, on the ground and at sea.
[/quote]

Just 3 billion for 1 Sq. Of F35 and 1 Sq. Of F15. !!

brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 26 Feb 2020 05:51

It doesn't have to be $3 Billion for both the squadrons. Israel usually likes to stretch out its deals so they may only announce one of the two for $3 Billion and then follow up on the other later. It is most likely going to be an exercise of the options of 17 F-35A's they had in their previous deal along with the development and initial procurement cost of their specific Advanced Eagle variant. They paid $110 MM URF from the last Lot of aircraft they procured. The URF for these lots will likely be $78 Million. Creating an Israeli specific variant of the F-15 Adv. Eagle will probably cost a couple hundred million in integration and testing..

Kartik
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5164
Joined: 04 Feb 2004 12:31

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 28 Feb 2020 03:40

From Boeing News Now

Image

Video link

Boeing T-7A crew shuts off, restarts engine in flight

Restarting a military jet’s engine in flight is a critical safety feature that can only be demonstrated by doing something a flight crew rarely wants to do: shutting off the engine in flight.

That’s all the more daunting in a single-engine aircraft. Yet, a Boeing T-7A trainer crew recently did just that, at 20,000 feet (6,096 meters) above an Illinois test area, then flew the plane for 48 seconds before restarting the GE F404 engine and landing back at Boeing’s St. Louis site.

"Engine air start testing requires a large amount of preparation, planning and teamwork," said T-7A chief pilot Steve Schmidt. "It’s a test of all the subsystems built for backup in the event a pilot would have to shut the engine down in an emergency and power it back up again."

Schmidt performed the test with fellow Boeing pilot William Berryman. The test was the latest success for a program that’s meeting all its critical development milestones. The company expects to deliver the first T-7A Red Hawk to the U.S. Air Force in 2023.

"This is a testament not only to the confidence our pilots have in the reliability of the T-7A aircraft, but also to the team that designed, engineered and built this new trainer aircraft for the Air Force," said Chuck Dabundo, T-7 vice president and program manager.

In September 2018, the U.S. Air Force awarded Boeing a $9.2 billion contract to supply T-7A Red Hawk aircraft and training simulators. Designed by Boeing and Saab, the T-7A has already accumulated more than 160 developmental test flights.

brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 28 Feb 2020 07:36

This is relevant for the future US Army, and Indian Air Force/Army AH-64 development/modernization. The T-901 is aiming for a US Army reqiurement of 50% more horsepower, 25% less fuel consumption and a 20 % longer service life compared to the incumbent T-700 also made by GE. Along with the new radar the US Army is exploring and the SPIKE NLOS this is likely what will comprise the "F" upgrade.


Army completes Apache next-generation engine test


The Army last month successfully mounted the next-generation engine for the AH-60 Apache attack helicopter during a "fit test," the service announced this week.

The test took place in Mesa, AZ, on Jan. 28 and 29 and consisted of "installing a full scale 3D-printed model of the General Electric T901 turboshaft engine to assess the form, fit, and human systems integration in the aircraft," according to an Army press release.

The GE T901, a replacement for the current T700 engine, is the designated engine for the Future Attack Reconnaissance Aircraft under the Army's future vertical lift modernization priority and one of the service’s top aviation priorities for the Black Hawk and Apache fleets.

According to the press release, the GE T901 is designed to provide significant fuel savings and power enhancement over the current engine, lower operation and sustainment costs, joint all-domain operations capability, worldwide performance at 6k/95 degrees Fahrenheit and features a modular design that enables field level repair.

The service's Advanced Turbine Engine Project Office completed the tests with the Apache Attack Helicopter Project Office, General Electric Aviation and Boeing.

The Army awarded GE a $517 million contract for the Improved Turbine Engine Program in February last year. Boeing and Sikorsky were awarded integration support contracts for the enduring fleet last year for the AH-64E and H-60M platforms, respectively.

The ITEP is currently in the engineering and manufacturing development phase.

The GE T901 engine will be tested on the Black Hawk next and a critical design review is scheduled for the third quarter of this year, according to the release.

brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 29 Feb 2020 04:02

Serial production of the XQ-58A Valkyrie has been started by Kratos preempting an expected contract from the US Air Force and possibly another service. The first few examples were non production prototypes but the system is now going to be produced to a production standard and with specific mission payload provisions and USAF specified requirements in mind -

Kratos begins XQ-58A Valkyrie production, despite funding delay caused by mishap


Image

A Nandy
BR Mainsite Crew
Posts: 384
Joined: 06 Sep 2009 23:39

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby A Nandy » 01 Mar 2020 16:19

Satellite repair & life extension as it moves from 1 customer to another. In-orbit servicing, extension modules, first private satellite docking success

https://www.space.com/private-satellite ... mev-1.html


brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 01 Mar 2020 20:11

The MALD, the MALD-Jammer, the MALD-J/X and the MALD-N have all evolved via testing new payloads, and tactics/conops at Exercise Northern Edge in Alaska. NE 2020 could possibly kick this off as well..

Small Bombs, Jet-Powered Decoys To Demo Semi-Autonomy


ORLANDO, Florida—Small Diameter Bombs and Miniature Air-Launched Decoys (SDBs and MALDs) will demonstrate a new semi-autonomous weapon technology later this year, an Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) official says.

A new technology named Golden Horde, selected as one of five “Vanguard” priorities by AFRL in 2019, seeks to change how the U.S. Air Force employs long-range weapons, said John James, an AFRL spokesman.

James spoke at the Air Warfare Symposium here.

For the demonstration, AFRL will replace the laser seeker in the SDB with an autonomy package, which includes a radio frequency data link and a processor. The processor includes “play calling” software. A set of “plays,” or employment options, are loaded into the processor.

As the munitions are en route to the target, they collaborate with each other. If conditions change—for example, if a glide bomb or cruise missile is shot down by an air defense system—the munitions collaborate by data link, consult a list of preloaded “plays,” and reconfigure target assignments for each weapon, James said.

Alternatively, multiple munitions can be assigned to strike the same target to provide redundancy, but if the first weapon successfully destroys the target, it or the follow-on munition can send a message to other weapons to attack alternates.

AFRL describes the technology as “semi-autonomous,” not fully autonomous, because the munitions cannot deviate from the preprogrammed list of plays. But it offers more flexibility than the current targeting process that limit munitions only to a single, preprogrammed target.

Golden Horde is derived from another AFRL program called Gray Wolf, which developed a new, Lockheed-designed cruise missile with a low-cost jet engine and an autonomy package. The latter technology was transferred to Golden Horde, but the Gray Wolf missile demonstration continues, James said. A flight demonstration is scheduled in April for Gray Wolf.

brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 01 Mar 2020 21:15

The Royal Norwegian Air Force F-35 fighters are now on the Quick Reaction Alert (QRA) mission for Icelandic airspace, from the former American Air Base at Keflavik.



Kartik
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5164
Joined: 04 Feb 2004 12:31

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 04 Mar 2020 01:07

US Navy F-16A Aggressor jets receive structural upgrade

The US Navy has completed update work on 10 Lockheed Martin F-16A fighters that are used in the aggressor role.

The work was undertaken by the Specialized and Proven Aircraft Program office, says the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR).

It involved the FalconUp programme to extend the jets’ fatigue lives by over 500 hours. It also provides the baseline for the Falcon Star upgrade that will add additional 3,750 hours of service life. The Falcon Star work is already funded, says NAVAIR.

“The FalconUp upgrade incorporates structural improvements that extend the service life of the aircraft from 3665 hours to 4250 hours,” says US Navy captain Ramiro Flores.


“The programme procured and installed proven structural modification kits on 10 U.S. Navy aircraft that enhanced and strengthened their internal structure.”

A “Build-to-print” methodology was used for the FalconUp work, with products, equipment, and components exactly tailored to the navy specifications.

The work should extend the operational life of the jets through 2025.


So the F-16A/B had a fatigue life of 3665 hours if it didn't get structural upgrades through the Falcon Up program that adds 500 hours and the Falcon Star upgrade that adds 3750 hours of life. Expect very similar fatigue life of the PAF's F-16A/Bs that were upgraded with the Falcon Star upgrade by TAI in Turkey. So the PAF's F-16A/B MLUs will continue to be in service well into the 2030s and their new Block 52s will last longer. I would expect TAI to be the source of further upgrades to the PAF's F-16 fleet, to upgrade them with an AESA radar, possibly of Turkish origin if SABR is not available.

These US Navy F-16As are among the 28 that were produced for the PAF and were embargoed and then stored at AMARC boneyard for several years before being given to the US Navy and USAF as aggressor aircraft.

In 2002, the US finally stopped trying to sell the aircraft and decided to assign them to the USAF and US Navy to fill the Aggressor role. After the demise of the (T)F-16N aggressor force, the US Navy lacked a high-performance aggressor aircraft. Because of the low airframe life of the embargoed Pakistani F-16s, these airframes were ideally suited for the demanding aggressor role. The 28 aircraft were thus evenly split between the USAF and the US Navy, and will take a vital role in DACT training of US forces.


link

Image

One of the latest Navy F-16s. F-16A #90942 was one of the ex-pakistani vipers that were taken into service with the USNavy in 2003. [Photo by LT Steve "Haggis" Sirinek]


Image

USNavy F-16A block 15 #92-0410 with 61 code. This is one of the ex-Pakistani aircraft that have been delivered to the NSAWC for dissimilar air combat training in 2003. [Tailslides photo by Peter Steendam]


Image

USNavy F-16B block 15 #92-0461 with 07 code. This is one of the ex-Pakistani aircraft that have been delivered to the NSAWC for dissimilar air combat training in 2003. [Tailslides photo by Fred Krause]

brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 04 Mar 2020 01:26

Turkish AESA radar on a non Turkish F-16. That is not going to happen anytime in the coming decade for several reasons.

brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 04 Mar 2020 02:07

Lockheed Martin Delivers 500th F-35 Aircraft, Surpasses 250,000 Flights Hours


Lockheed Martin and the F-35 Joint Program Office delivered the 500th F-35. In February, the F-35 enterprise surpassed 250,000 flight hours.

The 500th production aircraft is a U.S. Air Force F-35A, to be delivered to the Burlington Air National Guard Base in Vermont. The 500 F-35s include 354 F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) variants, 108 F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) variants and 38 F-35C carrier (CV) variants for the U.S. and international customers. The 250,000 flight hours include all F-35s in the fleet comprised of developmental test jets, training, operational, U.S. and international aircraft.“These milestones are a testament to the talent and dedication of the joint government, military and industry teams,” said Greg Ulmer, Lockheed Martin, Vice President and General Manager of the F-35 program. “The F-35 is delivering an unprecedented 5th Generation combat capability to the warfighter at the cost of a 4th Generation legacy aircraft.”

The F-35 operates from 23 bases worldwide. More than 985 pilots and over 8,890 maintainers are trained.Nine nations use the F-35 from their home soil, eight services have declared Initial Operating Capability and four services have employed F-35s in combat operations.


Image

Kartik
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5164
Joined: 04 Feb 2004 12:31

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 04 Mar 2020 05:42

brar_w wrote:Turkish AESA radar on a non Turkish F-16. That is not going to happen anytime in the coming decade for several reasons.


Is there a specific reason why? Apart from the political tensions with the megalomaniac Erdogan in power?

Israel had at one time required the Elta 2032 to be integrated on the F-16I. But then they were forced to accept the APG-68 on the F-16I since the State Dept. refused to allow them to integrate the Elta 2032 onboard..Could it be for similar reasons that a non-US radar will not be acceptable if Turkey wants it to be integrated?

LM will offer Elta radar for IDFAF F-16
IDFAF frustrated over U.S. radar for the F-16I

Kartik
BRF Oldie
Posts: 5164
Joined: 04 Feb 2004 12:31

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby Kartik » 04 Mar 2020 05:57

Boeing resurrects effort to turn JDAM into cheap cruise missile

Image

Boeing has resurrected and is showing off its Powered JDAM concept believing that the US Air Force (USAF) is keen to buy low-cost cruise missiles.

The company has increased development work on the concept within the last 18 months, it says at the Air Force Association Air Warfare Symposium in Orlando, Florida on 28 February. The project was originally begun about eight years ago, but had been put on the back burner due to lukewarm interest from the service.

The idea has new life now that the USAF is pursuing glide bomb swarms, such as the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Golden Horde project. It is also relevant because of the service’s desire for long-range strike options.

“Our entire Air Force customer set keeps saying, ‘We need range, we need range, we need range,” says Wade Kirkbride, senior marketing representative with Boeing.

The Powered JDAM shares a lot of similarities to the glide variant of the JDAM. The Powered JDAM uses a derivative wing kit that is sized between the 2,000lb-class and 500lb-class glider JDAM wing kits. The warhead on the cruise missile variant is also a standard Mark 84 and it would use a regular Guidance Control Unit, says Kirkbride.

The important difference between the gliding JDAM and the cruise missile version is a small jet turbine engine. While jet turbines are typically one of the most expensive parts of a cruise missile, the Powered JDAM uses an undisclosed low-cost engine from an undisclosed manufacturer, says Kirkbride.

Boeing declines to disclose the cruise missile’s exact range, but says that it is comparable to more expensive and sophisticated cruise missiles, such as JASSM, which has a range of 200nm (370km).

...

kit
BRF Oldie
Posts: 3846
Joined: 13 Jul 2006 18:16

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby kit » 04 Mar 2020 06:00

brar_w wrote:Turkish AESA radar on a non Turkish F-16. That is not going to happen anytime in the coming decade for several reasons.


why not ? they own the IP dont they ?

brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 04 Mar 2020 06:12

Kartik wrote:Is there a specific reason why? Apart from the political tensions with the megalomaniac Erdogan in power?


First they don't have a radar operational and it is not an easy task to just create one and prove it out given the developmental and operational test program required and the range and test infrastructure required. I don't know if they've run any program like that before EVEN WITH cooperation from the original equipment IP owner and integrator. And it isn't easy to do so for something like an upgraded F-16A class of aircraft. The SWaP limits are tough to work around and you have to add the cost sensitivity to it. Just look at what the UAE had to spend to ugprade the cooling and power generaiton on the F-16 to get to the block 60 configuration. Second, the level of cooperation with Lockheed has been significantly reduced and Northrop Grumman and Lockheed have shown signs of very aggressively thwarting any competition that comes their way in terms of creating competition outside of the US. They want to dominate the F-16 market. In fact, even within the US the way they shut down Raytheon and BAE out of the F-16 program goes to show that they will defend their turf. If Turkey wants to go on its own and reject the IP rights then its defense industry will suffer. Pakistan is a tiny market..future cooperation with US defense industry is many times that in terms of $ value.

Israel had at one time required the Elta 2032 to be integrated on the F-16I. But then they were forced to accept the APG-68 on the F-16I since the State Dept. refused to allow them to integrate the Elta 2032 onboard..


Exactly. The GOTUS pays for a lot of Israeli equipment including those F-16's, and a significant portion of Israel's Missile Defense program. To do that requires congressional support and these radars and other equipment are manufactured in someone's district which means jobs. If Israel wants greater level of customization, it can spend its own money but then this is a cooperative program so usually they work it out internally (like they did with the F-35 CNI customization). To think that Turkey can just elbow its way into the F-16 upgrade and mod market is really not realistic. There is zero incentive for the US to allow Turkey to create competitions for these systems. I mean Turkey doesn't even have the F-35 leverage now since it got kicked out. This is akin to the recent attempt by Israel to try to push upgraded F-16's paid for by US taxpayers to a third party, defying the basic rules and regulations that they themselves agreed to. The only precedent for this is the Israeli-Singapore deals which came through after both worked with the US government to flesh them out as a one-off.

Kartik wrote:Boeing resurrects effort to turn JDAM into cheap cruise missile


Boeing's PR sucks. This is a dodo. The JSOW is already operational, and the JSOW-ER EMD and production contact is expected soon and it has already been demonstrated a couple of times now. There is only so much space for a slow, high RCS target at those distances. Even their JDAM-ER flopped because the USAF considered the time-to-target was unacceptable (the USAF doesn't want a glider with anything more than 60-70 km range - it takes too long to get to target). And their JASSM analogy is also flawed. The standard JASSM hasn't been in production for half a decade. The ER version has nearly a 1000 km range, while the XR version currently in development is going to improve that by 30-50%. And it is a stealthy weapon with dual-mode targeting (and is networked).

Boeing also dusted off their T-3 Variable Flow Ducted Ramjet missiles for the AFA conference. Though they flew that missile 2-3 times and were succesfull in testing, the USAF didn't want a VFDR system and chose something different. Again, they showed up with something that their main customers have already rejected. This is a big problem going forward for Boeing Defense. They are just not producing a lot of stuff that their customers seem to want.

Image

brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 04 Mar 2020 18:04

One notional weapon that Boeing did show, and that the USAF is known to be interested in (their acquisition boss referenced to this in the same event) is a Medium-Intermediate Range Hypersonic Boost Glide Vehicle. Boeing showed a potential 3300+kg weapon carried by the F-15 EX. They used a notional non program representative weapon but the US Acquisition secretary that the F-15 EX may eventually carry the AGM-183A ARRW BGV which is going to give it 2000+ km Hypersonic strike capability.

Image

Meanwhile, the USAF's AGM-183A (Lockheed's version..Raytheon's version of the BGV is about a year behind) completed its Critical Design review recently -

Design Milestone Reached For Air-Launched Hypersonic Missile

And a new rendering of the weapon from Lockheed :

Image

brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 05 Mar 2020 06:23

There are 2 funded, but undisclosed hypersonic projects that the US DOD is currently executing. Perhaps this is related..

USAF Boss Alludes To Work On New Top Secret Air-Launched Anti-Ship Weapons

brar_w
BRF Oldie
Posts: 8590
Joined: 11 Aug 2016 06:14

Re: International Aerospace Discussion - Jan 2018

Postby brar_w » 06 Mar 2020 08:37

Japan's next-gen fighter to be built with US, not UK


TOKYO -- Japan plans to choose the U.S. as its partner for developing the successor to the F-2 fighter jet, while taking on most of the R&D costs to avoid leaving essential design information solely in American hands again, Nikkei has learned.

Tokyo was weighing the U.S. offer against a U.K. proposal that would have guaranteed it the freedom to update the new planes at will. But ultimately, it decided to stick with its top ally given that their security ties have significantly expanded in scope in recent years. An official decision will made within this year.

"Ensuring we can freely modify and upgrade [the new jets] in the future is extremely important," Defense Minister Taro Kono said. Japan's inability to freely update the F-2 has limited the usability of much of its fleet.

Japan's defense industry is envisioned as playing the central role in the project, which is expected to cost tens of billions of dollars. Deployment of the new jets is now slated for the mid-2030s.

The government has been in talks with the U.S. and U.K. on the project since last summer, with American contractors Lockheed Martin and Boeing and London-based BAE Systems named as possible partners.

The move toward the American bid comes amid deepening defense cooperation between Tokyo and Washington. As joint defense exercises between the two expand both in number and in content, Tokyo needs more advanced tactical networks that are compatible with those used by the U.S. military. A Defense Ministry proposal for the jet project last year cited the need for interoperability.

Japan looks to create a completely new manned aircraft, opting against a Lockheed Martin proposal for a hybrid of the F-22 and F-35. Tokyo will stick with domestic development for the plane's mission systems, which control such crucial equipment as radar, sensors and electronic warfare gear. It will not limit itself to a single American partner company.

Japan opted against picking the U.K. as a main partner for the project, concluding that even a three-way arrangement would not let the Japan-U.S. alliance maintain its technological edge.

But it does look to share technology with London, which is working on its own next-generation fighter, the Tempest, and has inquired about working with Tokyo on developing systems and electronic components.

On the domestic side, Japanese companies have begun research into high-output engines and powerful but compact radar systems that can detect stealth fighters. Participants in the project are expected to include Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Toshiba and IHI.

The plan could take some twists and turns before Tokyo makes the final call. Japan was initially set to lead development of the F-2 when the project first came up in the 1980s, but the U.S. took over as trade tensions between the allies led Washington to pressure Tokyo to buy American.

As a result, design details of components considered to be sensitive were not disclosed to the Japanese side, hamstringing its ability to modify the jets on its own.

U.S. President Donald Trump, who has demanded that Japan take on more the cost of hosting American troops, has reportedly expressed interest in the new project. Negotiators will continue working to hammer out each side's share of the development costs as well as production.


Return to “Military Issues & History Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Dennis, srin, Vamsee and 56 guests