Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Mihir.D » 17 Oct 2008 11:22

neerajbhandari wrote:Vivek ji didn't get a fix since last 3 days :x . When are you giving the next dose.

Cheers...

Yeah..C'monn Vivek give us our dose. We need is desperately :D .

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby asbchakri » 17 Oct 2008 14:15

Mihir.D wrote:
neerajbhandari wrote:Vivek ji didn't get a fix since last 3 days :x . When are you giving the next dose.

Cheers...

Yeah..C'monn Vivek give us our dose. We need is desperately :D .


Vivek Dude! i had a lousy week in office :evil: , need something to cheer me up man, to get into the weekend mode, please please, :(( give me 3 GOOD SOLID PANDA ASS WHOPPING SCENARIOS man. :twisted: :twisted:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 17 Oct 2008 18:12

EASTERN BANK OF THE RIVER KHOUMA
EAST OF DIRANG
WESTERN ARUNACHAL PRADESH
DAY 3 + 0840 HRS


The activity was feverish. Soldiers were busy removing the snow camouflage netting over the two white painted vehicles spread out over two sections of a grassy clearing on the eastern bank of the frozen Khouma River. The road from Bomdila to Dirang to Se-La and then to Tawang was parallel to the river along this section. And the soldiers on this side of the river bank could see the endless convoys of trucks moving through the morning snowfall on to Tawang. The officers of this particular unit, however, were busy with their own little war...
The two vehicles now being uncovered were what were technically known as Mobile Autonomous Launchers or MAL, for short. Each vehicle was armed with three Transport Launch Canisters or TLCs, each armed with three of the supersonic short range Brahmos cruise missiles. And at the moment it was a game of numbers and science for this detachment’s officers.

Two vehicles with three missiles each meant a total of six deadly warheads. A cruise speed of Mach 3 and a travel distance of three hundred kilometres allowed for a roughly five minute flight. That number was five minutes. Such a short launch to impact time could surprise anybody, anytime and anywhere. The issue, however, was terrain. The current launch point was at around six thousand feet above Mean Sea Level or MSL. Se-La peaks to the northwest were at fourteen to fifteen thousand feet MSL. The Great Himalayan Peaks went as high as sixteen thousand feet MSL, and then the Tibetan peaks remained at roughly the same altitude. In other words, any missile launched from near Dirang would have to do a quick rise to altitude to be able to cross these peaks as high supersonic velocities like those of the Brahmos do not allow TERCOM flights through the valleys without drastic reduction in range.

If, on the other hand, the missile had to go over the peaks, it would be cruising at altitudes of around seventeen thousand feet, which again would eat up on range given the thin air of the mountains. And for ramjet engines the devil was in these details. And the Air Force would not be launching any Brahmos missiles in support of the Army in the next few days at the very least. They had their own problems to counter with the PLAAF and the deadly S-300s deployed all over Tibet. It was for that reason that this detachment of vehicles had to be airlifted using Mi-26 helicopters to this region. If launched from the foothills of Northern Assam, there was no range left to reach the target itself. This was a classic case of the wrong weapon in the wrong theatre of war. Unfortunately, the Nirbhay was only now rolling off the production lines and available only in smaller numbers for more inaccessible targets. As always, the Indian Army would have to improvise...

A few minutes after the final checks were completed; the MALs came to life with the hydraulic pumps pushing the TLC tubes from horizontal position to near vertical and then initiated an azimuth change to bring them to face the magnificent snow covered Se-La peaks against the blue morning sky. Half a kilometre away, a camouflaged trailer sat quietly among the edge of the trees where several officers were busy loading the target information into the Fire-Control-System. The Colonel in command of the detachment was monitoring the activities over the shoulder of the men sitting on the consoles before nodding to one of them. By this time small orange warning lights were flashing near the MALs as a sign for everybody to clear the area. The Major sitting at the FCS Console announced a “Ready” to all in Mobile Command Trailer before the Colonel gave the order they had been waiting for:

“Execute Salvo Launch. All containers.”

The Major leaned forward and flipped open the cover over the lighted button labelled ‘LAUNCH’ and then depressed the button...

A few seconds later the ground shook with all abruptness as the first Brahmos cruise missile streaked out of the TLC tube under the force of the solid rocket booster underneath and raced vertically for the sky. Several seconds later the booster ran out and was ejected a second before the ramjet blasted into operation and propelled the missile even higher. With the booster ejection the missile had lost all smoke trails.

And as a thunderclap raced through the skies to announce the achievement of Mach one, it had also shed all sounds...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 17 Oct 2008 18:59

LHASA AIRPORT
TIBET
DAY 3 + 0855 HRS


The cold light blue morning sky above Lhasa was littered with pairs of thin white contrails forming large circles at the high altitude. The almost complete transparency of the thin mountain air showed the new sets of pairs coming in an almost straight line from the northeast while others left for the same region. The airspace over Lhasa was a busy one this morning. There were at least twelve J-8IIs flying overhead on Combat Air Patrol missions while another six were on the ground being refuelled to provide security to the small groups of IL-76s that had been plying back and forth for the whole night between Lhasa and other airbases in the plains to the northeast. On the ground, there were two Il-76s being hurriedly unloaded while another two loitered high above waiting for their chance to land in what was an endless supply chain for the PLA 13TH Group Army that was now deploying to the southern front of the Tibetan Frontier...

There was no warning.

The six brahmos missiles streaking across the cold morning skies over Tibet were detected by Chinese radar as they crossed the McMahon line and headed north. But with less than three minutes before impact, there was little that could be achieved with that warning other than the klaxons being sounded all over Lhasa that saw everybody heading for cover even as the first Brahmos missile flashed over the peaks around Lhasa and dived into the airport with the sun glinting over the sleek metallic body. That was when the ground shook like an earthquake.

The two IL-76s on the ground didn’t stand a chance. The Indian DIPAC had been watching the Chinese activities at Lhasa for hours now. They knew that a certain section of the tarmac was always being occupied by the incoming IL-76s and they had promptly handed over that piece of information in their Intelligence Estimate to the Army. One of the six incoming Indian missiles slammed into the ground between the two parked aircraft, such was the accuracy of the Brahmos. Both aircraft and the PLA’s precious cargo inside them were shredded and left burning as an inverted cone of fire and smoke raced for the sky like a volcano. The clear shock-wave from the explosion shook building for kilometers around and decimated all windows around.

The second missile slammed into the main terminal building at the airport and literally razed it into the ground with its large explosive warhead destroying the building inside out. The debris was still falling with two other Brahmos slammed into the sections of the main runway at equal intervals and cratered whole sections of it, dividing the runway into three one-third sections. That coupled with long runway requirements in the mountains meant that no aircraft could now this runway. The final two missiles found the parked radar directed gun battery in the approach valley to Lhasa airfield and the parked J-8IIs and flattened both targets using proximity detonated warheads.

Dozens of sympathetic explosions coupled with these warheads neutralized the complete airfield and all aerial resupply operations at Lhasa airport. The PLAAF was already diverting the aircraft flying overhead to other airbases in the north. As the smoke and debris settled around the airport, the skies above no longer had circular contrails, only straight ones heading northeast...

SNOW-THUNDER had begun.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Shyam_K » 17 Oct 2008 20:28

vivek_ahuja wrote:SNOW-THUNDER had begun.


Great to see India has started hitting back. The 6 Brahmos missiles are a great opening salvo, looking forward to see what else is in store from SNOW-THUNDER..

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby amitmas » 17 Oct 2008 20:59

Vivekji,
waiting for your book to be released soon. WOW after a bad week at work all a guy can ask for is this kind of a adrenalin shot in the night with some Zam Zam cola. :P please if possible make this a weekend where dil maange more.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby mdhoat » 18 Oct 2008 06:16

Please keep it coming Vivek, next lets shower them with warm thunder and then red hot thunder..... :twisted: :twisted: ... above all else, I love your choice of words to name your operations. "SNOW THUNDER".....Chinese deserved every character of it. :D :D

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby neerajb » 20 Oct 2008 09:40

vivek_ahuja wrote:In other words, any missile launched from near Dirang would have to do a quick rise to altitude to be able to cross these peaks as high supersonic velocities like those of the Brahmos do not allow TERCOM flights through the valleys without drastic reduction in range.


I always thought that absence of TERCOM in Brahmos is because of mach 2.8 cruise speed. For such speeds you need higher refresh rates/frame rates for guidance which automatically translates into higher processing power and advanced CCD sensor. It also means that flight control actuators and autopilot needs to be fast too to respond well at such speeds. That is why this missile is best suitable in sea skimming role.

Cheers...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby SGupta » 20 Oct 2008 09:57

Interesting discussion with TERCOM - I was looking around and found this in Wikipedia regarding a US supersonic missile designed in 1955 with TERCOM.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supersonic ... de_Missile

Regards,
Sanjay

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 20 Oct 2008 12:44

P.L.A.A.F. SECTOR COMMAND
SOUTH OF KASHGAR
SINKIANG AUTONOMOUS REGION
CHINA
DAY 3 + 0930 HRS (L)


“Is that all that they achieved?” Colonel Feng asked the Staff Officer handling the Intelligence operations for Major-General Xhigao, the PLAAF sector commander. He handed the satellite images across to General Xhigao who looked at the results impassively. He was the optimist in the room who had enough confidence in his pilots that the situation did not seem very worrying to him. His Operations chief held the opposite views. Xhigao knew why General Chen had sent Feng over here to take over the role of General Staff Officer (Operations) or GSO-Ops for short. He believed Feng to be another of the new generation officers whose loyalty to the Communist Party was suspect, and whose confidence in his soldiers were always lacking. The fact that General Chen had taken Feng as his protégé was all the more worrying for Xhigao to the level that he had in fact mentioned his concerns to Chen, only to be dismissed on grounds of Feng’s supposed capabilities. Unfortunately for Feng though, General Chen and the rest of the PLAAF Command were now thousands of kilometres to the east. Out here, General Xhigao was in command...

“Yes Sir. The Leh airbase is operational again as far as eyewitnesses report. We did manage to do some damage to their ability to bring in larger transports. As you can see in the third image, the runway is damaged to the point that the Indians cannot bring in IL-76 transports into Leh for some time. But the Mig-29s are back at the airbase. Our attacks also destroyed two Indian cheetah helicopters and one Mig-29 on the ground as is seen in image five and six respectively.” The Lt-Colonel handling Intelligence for the PLAAF in this sector reported from his notes. Feng nodded but was not impressed. He looked to Xhigao:

“We will not be able to hold off the Indian air attacks against our ground forces if we do not knock out these high altitude airbases and push them south. Our missile attacks haven’t done the required amount of damage. The initial estimates were overly optimistic. The idea was that we would be able to inflict enough damage on their airbases to buy us time to deploy. It seems that it worked better in the eastern sectors. But out here the damage to these Himalayan airbases has been nominal. And now while we begin our own operations, we can expect them to launch attacks against our convoys on the Aksai Chin road in the next few hours.”

General Xhigao dismissed the assessment: “Perhaps. But we have the S-300s deployed all along the roads, do we not? They can handle the pesky attacks by their low level bombers.”

Really? Then how would you explain the complete demolition of the airbase at Lhasa? Were those “pesky” attacks too? Feng thought out in anger as he heard his CO dismiss his advice. Xhigao continued:

“What we need to do is draw out their heavy fighters into a decisive battle and end their hopes for air superiority. After that we can crush the attempts of their low level bombers to prevent the PLA from advancing. What is our operational status?”

A full scale attack! He wants to engage the Indian SU-30s head on! Feng thought with disbelief while his commander laid out his grand strategy for the air war in the east. He recovered enough to respond to his CO’s questions:

“We have a regiment of SU-27s and another of J-8IIs ready for air combat. A composite regiment of J-10s and H-6s have been placed at our disposal for the bomber missions. Several tankers and special mission aircraft are on standby as well. With these we can initiate attacks in piecemeal fashion and take out the Indian airbases one by one.” Take the hint...Feng thought as he finished his overview of the readiness status.

“No. We will concentrate on taking out their fighters first. They pose the biggest threat to us. We can use the bombers as bait to lure out the Indians into out back yards where we will shoot them down. Once the skies over Laddakh are clear, the bombers can finish their missions.”

Brilliant! And if the Indians shoot down our fighters, we can hand them our bombers on a tray as well...Feng thought as wished for General Chen to be around. But half an hour later the plans had solidified despite his efforts. In the end he had to give his consent, not that it mattered, of course. Then again, if the plan did work out, Colonel Feng did not fancy being branded as a coward in the wake of the successes. But if it didn’t work, the disaster that would follow would see most of the men in this room facing a firing squad. The thing was, there was a fine line between being rash and being bold. The question was, which side of the line General Xhigao was on? Only time would answer that question...

With the meeting coming to a close to allow everybody to prepare for their jobs, Feng picked up his fur cap and prepared to leave the room. With the decision made, the time for doubts was gone. Now all that mattered was for him to make the best of the situation and aim for success. Colonel Feng grunted to himself as he hoped for someone else to take the job from him as he left the room behind his General...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby ovein » 20 Oct 2008 14:07

The real war begins here.... Great writing VIvek. You have one more fan to count with me.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby asbchakri » 20 Oct 2008 14:45

Thanks Vivek bhai u really made my week :D :D

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby sunny_s » 20 Oct 2008 18:49

waiting for singha sir 2 give his supplement.. :wink: :wink: so that the fire keeps burning..thank u so much vivek sir for ur much needed 9 G WEEK STARTING DOSE...Hope we feel the force this whole week..good josh.. :twisted:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 21 Oct 2008 11:48

OPERATION PHOENIX
THE SKIES OVER LADDAKH
DAY 3 + 1040 HRS (L)


Squadron Leader Khurana looked at the data in the HUD screen to see the current aircraft status. The altitude was what it should have been, speed indicator, attitude and bearing. The Fulcrum was cruising in the thin mountain skies with full weapons payload underneath the wings. Khurana looked left and right to see his Finger-Four formation of four Mig-29s in perfect sync with his own. They were patrolling fifteen kilometers west of the LAC beyond the reach of the long range S-300 batteries the Chinese had deployed east of their strategic highway through the Aksai Chin. Khurana was making sure that his flight did not drift into the fuzzy region of radar detection for the Chinese missile radars where there was a high probability of bumping into range of some odd anti-air system. Like his own flight of four, all other Indian aircraft were staying away from the deadly S-300s...

The skies were filling up pretty quickly. The Indian Air Force was coming out in force in the skies west of the LAC in the first phase of what was now Operation PHOENIX, as the Indian aerial counter-strikes following the Chinese attacks had been named. At the vanguard were several flights of Mig-29s from Leh and Avantipur who were tasked primarily for the air superiority missions. Two hundred kilometers to the south, a single Phalcon AWACS was also on patrol, providing the eyes for the Indian commanders. Then there were the two large groups of SU-30MKIs just to the west of Khurana’s crews. One group of eight fighters was on standby to support the Mig-29s should the PLAAF appear in force. These were also tasked with the job of putting themselves between the Mig-29s and the Phalcon in case the former were fully committed into the fight. Nobody at Western Command wanted nasty anti-AWACS surprises at this time.

Khurana was checking the display status of the RWR mounted on the aircraft. It was showing some long range Chinese radars in the Laddakh hills around the highway and to the north beyond the Karakoram pass. Then there were two KJ-2000 AWACS aircraft flying to the extreme north. No fighter emissions were being detected. Chinese ones, that is. A hundred kilometres to the west beyond the Siachen Glacier, two Pakistani F-16 radars were active and tracking the Indian aerial armada gathering over the Laddakh skies. That was worrisome. The Pakistanis were acting aggressive already, and the war between India and China was less than a day old...

Khurana was rocked back into action as the UHF R/T squawked with the latest chatter from the other group of four SU-30s that were now approaching the Aksai Chin...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Rahul M » 21 Oct 2008 12:01

and you had to stop there ? that's unfair ! :evil:

anyway, great going as usual. hope somebody makes a movie out of it one day. :)

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby asbchakri » 21 Oct 2008 12:10

vivek_ahuja wrote:OPERATION PHOENIX
THE SKIES OVER LADDAKH
DAY 3 + 1040 HRS (L)


....A hundred kilometres to the west beyond the Siachen Glacier, two Pakistani F-16 radars were active and tracking the Indian aerial armada gathering over the Laddakh skies. That was worrisome. The Pakistanis were acting aggressive already, and the war between India and China was less than a day old...

Khurana was rocked back into action as the UHF R/T squawked with the latest chatter from the other group of four SU-30s that were now approaching the Aksai Chin...


So the Porkis are entering the fray. Excellent Vivek. I think this would what be the exact Scenario if war broke out between India and China.

Vivek , could you direct the scenario onto what the indian Preparedness when such Scenario actually arises. I think you are actually trying to do that, but all the same this is just my request. Thanks :D

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby asbchakri » 21 Oct 2008 12:14

Rahul M wrote:and you had to stop there ? that's unfair ! :evil:

anyway, great going as usual. hope somebody makes a movie out of it one day. :)



Yeah i hope so too. Maybe Vivek could also Act in it :mrgreen: :mrgreen: Defence Minister Vivek Ahuja :twisted:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 21 Oct 2008 12:20

OPERATION PHOENIX
THE SKIES OVER LADDAKH
DAY 3 + 1050 HRS (L)


The four SU-30s now heading directly for the LAC were not about to go on a kamikaze mission. These were armed specially for a specific job. In fact they were not even going to enter the S-300 kill zones east of the LAC. Each aircraft was armed with a single Air-Launched Brahmos missile. The four aircraft were spread out in line abreast formation and were barely a thousand feet above the peaks of the Laddakh Mountains as they streaked towards the border. Just beyond the Chinese “Fuzzy Detection Range” the aircrafts accelerated to very high subsonic mach numbers, pulled up level and released their deadly cargo.

The long tube shaped missiles fell cleanly off the four aircraft and ignited their motors after dropping a few dozen feet. By this time the four aircraft were already pulling tight “pitch-out” manoeuvres as they headed back out of the FDR and into friendly airspace.

The missiles were heading the opposite way. The targeting information had been fed in before the launches and they had been launched from around one hundred and fifty kilometres out, allowing for a time-to-target of less than three minutes. The missiles streaked across the Laddakh peaks with a massive thunderclap following in their wake. They were detected immediately after release from the SU-30s by the Chinese radars. West of the highway passing through the Aksai Chin, multiple S-300 systems engaged the four missiles with several launches. Even with the phenomenal speeds and low reaction times involved for both the target and the interceptor missiles, the S-300 proved to be a worthy opponent.

These systems had been placed east of the highway only because of the clear line of sight the plains provided to the defenders. Once the Brahmos missiles cleared the peaks around the Galwan River to the north and the Mobdi La peaks to the south, they had entered relatively clear terrain in full view of the deadly defences. With more than a dozen interceptor missiles targeting the four inbound Brahmos missiles, losses were inevitable. Two of the four Brahmos missiles were blown out of the sky by several interceptor missile hits.

The remaining two, however, streaked past the defences and slammed into the two BIG-BIRD radar systems for a battery in the central sector. The result explosions destroyed the two radar systems completely, shutting down the anti-missile radar capability for that sector of the highway. But the system was designed to be robust and included overlaps with other batteries and redundant auxiliary radar systems that went active minutes after the primary ones went down.

Back on board the Phalcon, the MC noted that there had been a temporary shut down of radar activity in the central sector that had opened up like a hole in the coverage, but it had now covered up again as new radar sources were tagged by the on-board computer as coming online. Until and unless the coverage of this network of defenses was reduced severely, the Jaguars could not dare penetrate the Aksai Chin region to take out the individual launchers around these batteries. And if that could not happen, the Indian fighters could not go north and take the fight to the PLAAF. It was all linked to one another.

But as it was turning out, the S-300 defensive belt around the Aksai Chin was proving to be a tough opponent at the moment...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 21 Oct 2008 12:33

P.L.A.A.F. SECTOR COMMAND
SOUTH OF KASHGAR
SINKIANG AUTONOMOUS REGION
CHINA
DAY 3 + 1120 HRS (L)


Colonel Feng was staring at the giant display screen in the command centre as he observed his suggestion of moving S-300s into the Aksai Chin being vindicated. Two radars had gone down but they had been replaced. The system was now buying time for the PLAAF by forcing the Indians to stay south while the aerial armada of SU-27s assembled over the northern skies under the direction of the two KJ-2000s.

Feng still considered General Xhigao’s plan to be ill-advised at best. But seeing the results on the screen he could not help but wonder if the plan just might work out, and that brought a rare smile to the Colonel’s grizzled face...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Vaibhav » 21 Oct 2008 13:54

Great Post,

Will like to here about Pakistani movements too as well as international reaction to the ongoing war.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby RamaY » 22 Oct 2008 01:46

Vivek

Exceptional storytelling and very realistic scenarios... great posts!

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Sudhanshu » 22 Oct 2008 17:51

The best part of Vivek story is, even a Chinese would be thrilled reading it.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Shankar » 23 Oct 2008 15:59

you mean chinese dont like my story posting.php?mode=reply&f=3&t=4287#

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Hari Sud » 23 Oct 2008 16:59

Vivek enthusiasts, please go slow on heaping praise on him.

Shanaker please do not mind. We love your scenarios.

Most of the over exuberrant comments are reader's way of expressing appreciation.

They are all boys. Boys who have not seen the business end of a gun yet. This is their only opportunity to read about action.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Tanaji » 23 Oct 2008 17:43

I love both Vivek's and Shankar's scenarios equally but this

They are all boys. Boys who have not seen the business end of a gun yet. This is their only opportunity to read about action.


calls for :roll: :roll: :roll:

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby RamaY » 23 Oct 2008 18:32

Hari Sud wrote:Vivek enthusiasts, please go slow on heaping praise on him.

Shanaker please do not mind. We love your scenarios.

Most of the over exuberrant comments are reader's way of expressing appreciation.

They are all boys. Boys who have not seen the business end of a gun yet. This is their only opportunity to read about action.


I am one of those boys... never touched a gun or saw it closer than 50ft away...

Shankar ji - Your posts were equally great! But reading these scenarios is like addiction you know... you gotta keep injecting new stuff every couple of days...

I was wondering a strategic/political game scenario where few posters run a mock/shadow govt to analyze contemporary issues/developments and strategize them towards a stated objective, something like super power status (based on some metrics like per-capita GDP, social institutions, economic model, military strength, geopolitical objectives)...

what do you say?

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 23 Oct 2008 18:58

THE SKIES OVER SINKIANG
SINKIANG AUTONOMOUS REGION
CHINA
DAY 3 + 1140 HRS (L)


The last of the SU-27s dropped below the altitude of the patrolling H-6 tankers and accelerated south. The thirty SU-27s stacked in groups of ten each were well north of the border with India and even further from the prying eyes of the Phalcon far to the south. All fighter radars were on standby. General Xhigao had committed his entire SU-27 force for this mission to the level that Colonel Feng had to divert incoming reinforcements from the northeast to take over the vital job of protecting the two KJ-2000s which would be left nude once the SU-27s moved southwards.

Fifty kilometers behind the SU-27 force now heading south, and a few thousand feet below in altitude, three H-6 cruise missile carriers approached launched bearing and released four long range cruise missiles each. That had been the only aspect of the mission on which General Xhigao had agreed with Feng. If the former was intent on engaging the Indian fighters head on, then there was no one below him who could reverse that thought, but at the very least the situation could be mined for all its worth. A full frontal engagement with Indian fighters would leave the airbases relatively undefended against incoming missiles, and so even if the engaging fighters failed to defeat the Indians in the skies above, Feng had every intention of doing so on the ground below.

The long tube shaped missiles fell dozens of feet below the pylons once they were jettisoned before their small engines kicked in and propelled them forward of the launch aircraft. A few seconds later the small flight control surfaces deployed and the missiles began their journey south, followed by the SU-27s above them...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby vivek_ahuja » 23 Oct 2008 19:01

THE SKIES OVER LADDAKH
INDIA
DAY 3 + 1150 HRS (L)


Khurana looked through his HUD display to see the two green horizontal squares being projected above the Himalayan peaks to the west against a bright blue sky. The two Pakistani F-16s in front of him were now less than seventy five kilometers west of the Siachen Glacier and well within range of his R-77s. But by the same token he was well within the range of the latter’s AMRAAMs. Further to the west, two more F-16s had been detected as having entered the skies. Given the current situation, the PAF was playing with fire, patrolling aggressively as it was against the IAF who was already in a shooting war with the Chinese. But unlike the Chinese, the PAF’s abilities to challenge the skies over Kashmir were limited at best given the concentration of IAF forces now in the skies above. And they knew it.

Khurana was merely tracking the F-16s because somebody had to. His real focus was on listening to the chatter coming in from the four SU-30MKIs that had just “tickled” the Chinese S-300 defensive belt around the Aksai Chin with their Brahmos cruise missiles. He knew the lethality of the S-300 from the IAF’s evaluation of its own handful of S-300 batteries in service. But for all that fifty percent of the Brahmos missiles had made it to the target and flattened two long range BIG-BIRD radars, and despite the Chinese having covered up that hole with other redundant systems, he knew it had hurt them. Long range radars don’t exactly come cheap or quickly enough. The next effort in Op PHOENIX was not so much a tickle as it would be a punch, provided the situation remained much as the same as it was now. And the likelihood of that happening was about as much as the Chinese packing up their S-300s and leaving the region. Sure enough, the UHF R/T squawked again:

EAGLE-EYE-ONE to all CLAW elements, we have confirmed inbounds from the northeast. Thirty plus bandits and possible cruise missiles at Angels thirty, two hundred out. CLAW Flight is now under tight leash control. Out”

Tight-Leash-Control’ was the colloquial terminology for fighters operating directly under the command of a Phalcon controller after being pulled away from defensive patrols. That being said, it was not dependent on the distances involved, nor did it take away any maneuvering flexibility from the fighter commanders, should the situation arise. It merely informed the concerned flight that it was on point for the job at hand...

CLAW-ONE to all CLAW elements, axis reorientation to bearing two-one-five. Look sharp everybody, this is the real deal. Out.”

The voice of Khurana’s squadron commander rang out over the R/T before Khurana himself was directing his flight to the south after initiating a ninety degree turn to the left. They were currently within fifteen kilometers of the LAC, flying just outside the S-300 kill zones. If they were to engage the Chinese fighters head on, they could not afford to overfly that active kill zone. So the idea was to fly south for thirty odd kilometers and then wait there until the last possible moment before heading on a reciprocal bearing towards the Chinese without overflying the Chinese ground defenses.

Khurana’s flight of four was the western most within CLAW squadron. As such he had been facing the Pakistani F-16s south of the Karakoram peaks. Now his flight was flying alongside the LOC with the Karakoram peaks to his right as they headed south. They were achieving axis reorientation with respect to the Chinese, but in such congested skies as over Laddakh, they were now presenting their open flanks to the Pakistani F-16s. Khurana quietly looked to the right after having initiated his helmet mounted sights now that he was being forced to look away from the HUD to track the Pakistanis.

Sure enough, the off-bore sight target acquisition system immediately reacquired the two F-16s, but there was now no denying the fact that the skies over Laddakh were now getting really crowded...

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Mihir.D » 23 Oct 2008 20:16

C'mon Vivek, give us two more :D

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Tanaji » 23 Oct 2008 21:34

RamaY wrote:I was wondering a strategic/political game scenario where few posters run a mock/shadow govt to analyze contemporary issues/developments and strategize them towards a stated objective, something like super power status (based on some metrics like per-capita GDP, social institutions, economic model, military strength, geopolitical objectives)...

what do you say?


Take a look through the archives for the Leila-I scenario. The "one-who-must-not-be-named-and-has-left-to-start-his-own-blog" did exactly the same thing when he was in good books with the admins. Although it had a limited scope and time limit.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby RamaY » 23 Oct 2008 22:46

Tanaji wrote:
RamaY wrote:I was wondering a strategic/political game scenario where few posters run a mock/shadow govt to analyze contemporary issues/developments and strategize them towards a stated objective, something like super power status (based on some metrics like per-capita GDP, social institutions, economic model, military strength, geopolitical objectives)...

what do you say?


Take a look through the archives for the Leila-I scenario. The "one-who-must-not-be-named-and-has-left-to-start-his-own-blog" did exactly the same thing when he was in good books with the admins. Although it had a limited scope and time limit.


Thank you for the reference. I will look for it.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Sudhanshu » 23 Oct 2008 22:49

Shankar wrote:you mean chinese dont like my story posting.php?mode=reply&f=3&t=4287#


I assume that was sarcastic comment.

Come on Shankar, who will not like your story? It was certainly not comparison between you and vivek.

I meant, since vivek has given almost equal amount of suspense on both sides and both sides have some heroes, or a character. Hence, it is very enthralling to read for anyone.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby andy B » 24 Oct 2008 03:25

Tanaji wrote:I love both Vivek's and Shankar's scenarios equally but this

They are all boys. Boys who have not seen the business end of a gun yet. This is their only opportunity to read about action.


calls for :roll: :roll: :roll:


Tananaji couldnt agree more with your reaction :roll: :roll: :roll:

Shankarda,

Please dont get upset by these comments we enthusiasts respect and admire both you and Vivek equally. A lot of jingos around the world rejoice every time one of you posts a scenario. Shankarda you and Vivek have been writting for a long time now and doing a bloody good job of it so if anything take a moment to consider all the excitment and adulation that us jingos feel reading these incredible scenarios.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Singha » 24 Oct 2008 10:12

can the Mi-26 really lift the huge Tatra + 3 brahmos even at sea level? sounds like a really bulky load to me that
can swing wildly too.
the trick to moving huge vehicles up mountain roads is to have a articulated trailer rather than a one-piece.
and steering on all the front axles also helps (some construction and garbage pickup types I see in
NYC have that)

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Shankar » 24 Oct 2008 11:02

hey I was just kidding -I enjoy viveks story too quite a lot -he is unique in his own way

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby jamwal » 25 Oct 2008 22:11

Where is this Leila scenario?
deleted?
Searching doesn't fishout that particular thread.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Rahul M » 25 Oct 2008 22:19

check the br monitor.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby jamwal » 25 Oct 2008 22:49

Rahul M wrote:check the br monitor.


Thank you Rahul jee
Found it.

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Sudhanshu » 26 Oct 2008 12:20

Long time no news on our claw elements :-?

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Re: Possible Indian Military Scenarios - XII

Postby Mihir.D » 26 Oct 2008 13:25

jamwal wrote:
Rahul M wrote:check the br monitor.


Thank you Rahul jee
Found it.


If you don't mind, which issue ?


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