Mass Rapid Transit in India

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby SSridhar » 28 Jan 2010 19:15


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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby rachel » 28 Jan 2010 19:58

Suraj wrote:Crowding in the new DMRC lines is due to the progressive opening of lines, due to which the system is somewhat unbalanced, resulting in congestion in places. Once the entire ~200km Phase 2 network is open in mid 2010, things should run more smoothly. DMRC also significantly underestimated the popularity of the NOIDA line, which generated nearly twice the passenger traffic they originally estimated. As a result their trainset allocation didn't go to plan, and they have too few trainsets to address the current demand.

.


Let me explain the overcrowding succintly. Toronto has 70 km of subway and 780 railcars.. Delhi has 96 km and about 350 railcars.

Chicago and Washington each have 170 km of metro and about 1100-1200 railcars. Delhi by October will have 190 km and about 780 railcars.

DElhi network is growing rapidly and railcar production is barely keeping up. The problem will solve itself .. after a certian point track construction will take a breather and railcars will cathc up.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby sreeji » 28 Jan 2010 20:37

Conclusions Performance Audit by CAG
7.1 The Delhi MRTS Phase I Project has been widely assessed as a success story in
project implementation that is worth emulating in other projects. It is unique
project, under the present administrative model. Some of the innovative practices
that contributed to the successful implementation of the Project as reported by the
management and as also observed by Audit are:
(i) All decisions were taken by participative discussions rather than through file
notings. This led to speedy decision making. However, the company needs to
record the minutes of such discussions for future reference and guidance to
maintain continuity and to secure proper accountability;
(ii) The company has adopted exemplary practices to minimise inconvenience
caused to the public during the construction of the Project.; and
(iii) The company has adopted international standards for fire, safety and
environmental safeguards at work sites which are now being emulated by
other projects being executed in the country.
7.2 Audit pointed out certain shortcomings and lapses in the systems and procedures, as
highlighted below, to facilitate the management to further improve its systems and
bring it at par with the best practices.
(i) The innovative practices adopted by the Project need to be adequately
documented for the benefit of similar and other infrastructure projects;
(ii) Under the unique administrative model evolved by the Government of India,
the company has not been put under direct control of any administrative
ministry. This model presents ambiguity relating to the issues of (i)
coordination and control by the executive government and (ii) the proper
forum for legislative accountability. There are also no independent Directors
on the Board of Directors of the company, a practice which is not conducive
to good corporate governance.
(iii) The company has not prepared a Corporate Plan to chart out its goals and
strategies for achievement of business development, diversification,
technology upgradation, and customer satisfaction. It has also not
‘Manualised’ the procurement guidelines for domestically funded contracts.
(iv) The highest daily average ridership attained by the company was 21 per cent
of the original projections and 29 per cent of the revised figure
. The shortfall
in ridership was mainly due to higher fare structure, lack of proper
connectivity and lack of feeder bus system.


Even though the ridership is about 29% of estimates, trains are jampacked. How come? Also, the report does not mention shortage of rail cars.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Suraj » 28 Jan 2010 22:25

Track construction at Delhi Metro is not going to take a breather soon - the network will expand from 190-200kms to 450 kms by 2016, and probably stabilize around 600-700kms in 2021. They've progressively upgraded their network master plan; a lot of what went into Phase 2 was not originally envisioned, but traffic trends forced them to expand their original goals, something that will continue. All this means that depending on the route length topping out is a bad idea - we need local trainset manufacturing capabilities and need to ramp them up to support a minimum of 6 cities with between 150-600kms of network each, plus smaller tier cities. The Bombardier plant in Gujarat is a good start, but we need local manufacturers too.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby SSridhar » 29 Jan 2010 05:05

Chennai Metro: Awarding of contract for elevated viaducts
According to a senior official of Chennai Metro Rail official, except for a small portion of the stretch from St. Thomas Mount to Chennai Airport, contracts for construction of elevated viaducts have been awarded. The design and construction of elevated viaduct does not include stations.

The official told The Hindu on Thursday that two contracts have been awarded to Larsen & Toubro to design and construct the elevated viaducts from Saidapet to Officers Training Academy (OTA) at a cost of Rs.173.30 crore for a distance of 5.17 km and from Ashok Nagar to St. Thomas Mount at a cost of Rs.141.13 crore for 4.56 km. The company has been given two years to complete the work, which is expected to commence soon, the official said.

Earlier, the Hyderabad-based Soma Enterprise had been signed up for construction of the elevated viaduct for a stretch of 4.5 kilometres from Koyambedu to Ashok Nagar for Rs. 199 crore.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby AjayKK » 29 Jan 2010 17:50

The Mass Transit topic is a one very close to my heart. When the NDA government was in power, ABV cleared the way for a totally indigenous, safe and low cost Mass rapid transit system, the Skybus.

In August 2001, the then Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee cleared a massive programme to develop the Skybus in eight cities - Mumbai , Delhi, Kolkata , Chennai, Ahmedabad , Bangalore, Pune and Hyderabad. Other cities like Goa, Coimbatore and Kochi had also viewed the Skybus with favour.

Link



I followed the Skybus in very fine detail .The Skybus is the idea of B Rajaram the same person who invented the Anti Collision Device used in Konkan Railways. Though he would need no introduction, his bio is as follows:

Mr. B. Rajaram (born 1945) is a First Class First with Distinction Engineering graduate and an M.Tech from IIT/Kharagpur. Having served a decade in railway open line in various capacities, another decade in Railway research at RDSO & IIT, worked abroad as consultant till 1990. He was involved with the Konkan railway project from the beginning of construction (1990) as a Chief Engineer, Director (Projects) and finally as the Managing Director(1998 to Jan, 2005)- instrumental in delivering more than 100 tunnels(including Mumbai-Pune Expressway tunnels), close to 2000 bridges and 750 km of live running tracks through treacherous terrain. He took the First train across to commission Konkan Railway on 26th Jan 1998. The World Bank praised his management practices.

He holds several patents abroad and in India for his inventions. His inventions cover railway technologies, world’s first Intelligent Anti- collision Devices Network,"RAKSHA KAVACH" (already under implementation over 2500km of route on Indian Railways), Sky Bus Metro (concept first presented in Bologna University Italy, by him in 1989)- in all 17 patents are assigned by him to the Government, through Konkan Railway Corporation, the royalty streams valued ( by Pricewaterhouse Coopers) at Rs 20,000 to 30,000 cr over 10 years with NPV of over Rs 8000 cr, if nurtured over next three years.

http://rajarambojji.atrilab.com/
B Rajaram Blog Profile - Blog





Currently, the Government of India and various state governments are providing vast amounts of money for the Metro and the Monorail. However, Skybus is completely out of favour with not a single state committing to it. When it was being talked about in the NDA days around 2001-02, I saw a detailed presentation along with explanations on how the Skybus could not only better the available technologies for Mass Transit – the Metro and Monorail – it would also generate better use of space on which it is being constructed. At a cost of 50 paise per km for the commuter, it was supposed to be the cheapest at that time.

After the NDA was voted out of power, and UPA 1 came to being, B Rajaram and Skybus too fell out of favour. On a personal level, B Rajaram himself is what we would call an Indic, Sanatan Dharmic and definitely BR material! Perhaps like the foolish MP of the Congreess labeled Kargil as BJP’s war, Skybus too became “ BJP technology” and let it be said, Rajaram himself , through wink wink - nudge nudge ways of the powerful babus, was labeled BJPwala in the powerful corridors of babudom. Also, it is not hidden from those in the know that Skybus was scuttled from within by lobbies that wanted systems like the Metro and the Monorail to be the preferred transit system. Though, B Rajaram wouldn’t name him publicly. Also since the person is such a *celebrated* figure in mass transit circles, naming him is of little use. But it is no secret who did the job!

Coming back to Skybus, it should not be implemented just because it was developed in India. It must have been implemented if it met the needs, was inexpensive, and generated revenue better than existing mass transit systems. Moreover, if we implemented an innovative technology in India first, we could have taken the same to different parts of the world. Much like what is happening in the Telecom sector. But if the same is not provided space in the host country itself, how would it be tested elsewhere? In the official site for Mumbai monorail, I read that it is going to be rubber wheel based, which means a low passenger load of maximum 15000 -25000 passengers per hour per direction at schedule speed of 31 kmph; which is half the capacity of the Skybus at highercost! The Monorail will be 20 km in the first route that is Jacob Circle- Wadala-Chembur for around 2460 crores. The Chennai Metro will cost 14,600 crores for the two corridors totaling 50.1 km.

Here are some links to focus more light on the issue:

Skybus PPT:

http://www.atrilab.com/files/SkyBusHyb260505PPS.pps

National Geo video – Hindi :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDKAeIYo91c


Official Channel – Skybus Hyderabad Metro:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5qeL4vvOy0&feature=fvw

On his official channel at youtube, Rajaram replies to comments and here are some of his comments

A test track exists in Goa and tested and and certified results also obtained by me. But the Government owns the intellectual property as donated by me.. and is a poor business manager. It requires blessings of a political boss.

Well the scenes are terrible with young men just hanging out with a toe hold on the foot board. It is dangerous. Same is the ride in suburban trains in Mumbai. In Mumbai annually 5000+ lives are lost on suburban rail system. We have solutions within our affordability and better ones like Skybus metro rail, superior to what Delhi has got at 4 times the cost. But our leaders want only the most expensive inferior solution willingly sacrificing lives of others, waiting for huge funds!

Anyway it has not been adopted in Hyderabad, even though full funding not loan, was offered by Hon'ble Prime Minister of Malaysia, in honour of the inventor living in Hyderabad! Government wants to spend their own funds and put up conventional metro rail of old technology, at double the cost!!! Like God's ways, government's also are mysterious! Hope one day the expensive old style metro rail takes off and solves our traffic problem.

Political class has to act.. in democracy people have a say but in India they just quietly and stoically suffer! It is nice to take to profession of politics in India! There seems to be no serious pressure on the rulers by the intelligentia amongst people who are ruled!
Honest engineers lost to lobbies who can influence the governments! So Skybus waits for youth of the country to raise our nation from the rut we seniors managed to place her over 6o years of political independence leading to mental slavery and bankruptcy.

No pessimism in life! Innovation always suffers from persecution and disinformation. Post accident of an experimental system, the certified system proved itself and still exists though neglected.. The strength of idea will carry it forward , and one wise and courageous honest leader in political circle has to take the step to adopt. I believe it will happen.



Finally, a must read article on Monorail versus Skybus in Sucheta Dalal’s magazine:
Read in full.

Monorail not a good option, says expert

http://www.suchetadalal.com/?id=839fd001-0584-e872-4b5829caaeb0&base=sections&f

The country’s first monorail planned in Mumbai will have four cars instead of eight. An expert believes that the term ‘monorail’ is actually a misnomer.

“(The) monorail is a misnomer. It actually runs on rubber tyres. The loading density is no better than a bus. Only steel wheels on steel rails can optimally carry (more) load,” said Rajaram Bojji, former managing director, Konkan Railway.

According to Mr Bojji, Skybus is also cost-effective compared to the monorail. The Mumbai monorail is being developed at a cost of Rs2,460 crore for a 19.5-km stretch, which translates to more than Rs100 crore per km. In comparison, the test track for the Skybus at Goa—along with rolling-stock units, two traverses and a station—was constructed at an average cost of less than Rs36 crore per km within 6 months.




I wonder if Skybus can be granted a trial run in Gujarat. (Honestly, I do not believe it will get a say in the Congreess ones, apologies to bring politics in this topic, but no topic is devoid of political overtures.) Perhaps members who are on business communication terms with the Gujarat government can take it forward. Maybe we will see the same in this decade.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby KrishG » 29 Jan 2010 18:49

^^^ Pretty sad. I hope he can secure private-sector investment to continue the work of Skybus.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby AjayKK » 30 Jan 2010 13:33

The mass transit sector in India is now game to two hugely influential groups lobbying for contracts - the Metro and the Monorail consortium, even as their project viability and revenues come under question. Both try to push each other out of the game.

So here is another article on Mumbai Monorail from today's news...


Monorail to carry less, cost more than Metro

MUMBAI: The monorail, which had a show run on Republic Day, may end up as little more than a feeder to the Metro and suburban trains, experts fear.

This is because the monorail can pack in only a total of 560 passengers in four coaches, compared to the metro’s capacity of 1,500. Moreover, the monorail’s doors will refuse to close if the number of passengers in any of the coaches exceeds their capacity of 140.


Image

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Surya » 30 Jan 2010 23:31

when the monorail struggles in KL , I dounbt it will work in the heavier traffic of mumbai.

At peak hour in KL I have waited 4 or 5 trains before being able to get in so good luck in mumbai.

But maybe it will get some crowd of the streets.

anyway hope they all work out - the poor city needs tons of mass transit.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Sachin » 31 Jan 2010 09:46

Surya wrote:when the monorail struggles in KL , I dounbt it will work in the heavier traffic of mumbai.

IIRC the 'fumble harmer' of Karnataka, Deve Gowda also had made a ruckus when Namma Metro was still in its conceptual stages. Deve Gowda wanted to have a Mono Rail instead of a Metro. And with Gowda's know how of things, I dont know if he can spot the differences between the two.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby manish » 31 Jan 2010 12:47

AjayKK wrote:The Mass Transit topic is a one very close to my heart. When the NDA government was in power, ABV cleared the way for a totally indigenous, safe and low cost Mass rapid transit system, the Skybus.
..
...
...

I wonder if Skybus can be granted a trial run in Gujarat. (Honestly, I do not believe it will get a say in the Congreess ones, apologies to bring politics in this topic, but no topic is devoid of political overtures.) Perhaps members who are on business communication terms with the Gujarat government can take it forward. Maybe we will see the same in this decade.

AjayKK saar, the SkyBus is a truly sad story indeed. There were rumblings earlier on about the KCCI wanting it implemented in Mangalore and it was in line to be implemented at Kochi as well. But what finished off the project was a fatal accident during its trial runs in Madgaon in Goa in 2004.

While the rationale for the need for a SkyBus in small cities like Mangalore and Kochi 5-6 years ago certainly would have been open to debate, the 'other' faction only needed an excuse to bury the project, and the unfortunate accident provided them one. Bigger cities moved on to 'bigger' stuff like metros and monorails.

Even today, any one travelling on the Konkan Railway past Madgaon can see the SkyBus prototype railcar hanging from the Test Track right next to the Madgaon station and just rusting away. It is indeed a sad sight to see for patriotic Indians.

Some Links (most are dated/old):
KCCI wants Skybus in Mangalore by 2010
KRC hopes to survive Skybus mishap (Also mentions some interest shown by Pune at the time)

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby manish » 31 Jan 2010 12:52

Sachin wrote:
Surya wrote:when the monorail struggles in KL , I dounbt it will work in the heavier traffic of mumbai.

IIRC the 'fumble harmer' of Karnataka, Deve Gowda also had made a ruckus when Namma Metro was still in its conceptual stages. Deve Gowda wanted to have a Mono Rail instead of a Metro. And with Gowda's know how of things, I dont know if he can spot the differences between the two.

Fumble Harmer's technical skills and knowledge are unparalleled. IIRC, he very famously railed against the T-90 deal - no, not by advocating Arjun but by proposing procurement of T-72B or some such variant instead (which was probably vaporware back then/even now).

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby KrishG » 31 Jan 2010 21:38

BMRCL mulls over Metro connectivity to BIA

The Bangalore Metro Rail Corporation Limited (BMRCL) is mulling over a proposal to establish Metro connectivity from Yeshwantpur to Bengaluru International Airport.

At an interactive meet organised by the Bangalore Chamber of Commerce and Industry (BCIC) on Thursday, BMRCL MD N Sivasailam said the proposal was being considered after a survey conducted by Rail India Technical and Economic Services (RITES), indicated that two thirds of the people going to the airport were coming from the Yeshwantpur-Yelahanka areas.

The proposed area would cover stations beginning from Yeshwantpur and head towards the railway line and then go underground all the way to Mathikere with an exit at BEL. Thereafter it would take a left turn towards Yelahanka and another stretch of underground on the right to Kannur. From there, it would be elevated all the way to the airport.

Four stops planned

A total of four stops were planned at the airport including one for existing terminal and one for the proposed terminal. The entire stretch would be 33 km in length and the cost estimated for this project is Rs 7,500 crore.

Sivasailam said they would advise the Government to allow this stretch to proceed on a Public Private Participation (PPP) model, where the concrete structures would be owned by the Government, while the rolling stock would be owned by the private operators.

First station

Meanwhile, Swastik near Majestic will be the first station to be constructed on a PPP model with Mantri Developers. The station, which split the surrounding Mantri property in two, will now be developed by Mantri and the BMRCL has entered into a revenue sharing agreement with them.

Sivasailam also spoke about the BMRCL’s plans to plant saplings in a catchment area owned by the BWSSB near Tippagondanahalli reservoir. He said they faced difficulties planting saplings in other areas and as a result had chosen this area to develop green space. The area which measures 350 acres would be bigger than Lalbagh or Cubbon park when developed, he said.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Rishirishi » 01 Feb 2010 04:55

The Sky bus lacks capacity. I think it is 28K people per hour, as compared to 60K for metro. In stead of Sky bus, it makes more sense to have dedicated bus lanes.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Surya » 01 Feb 2010 05:07

what is this mulling over extending connectivity to airport??

which half decent modern airport in the world exists without a train connection to the nearest city??

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Hitesh » 01 Feb 2010 08:24

Not only that, but the Mumbai authorities really need to do a real "cleaning" job of the river that runs through the Mumbai airport. It is the single reason and source of the terrible smell that affronts the olfactory senses of visitors and tourists when they enter India for the first time through Mumbai.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Sachin » 01 Feb 2010 08:41

Surya wrote:which half decent modern airport in the world exists without a train connection to the nearest city??

As of now there is no rail connectivity to the International AP at Bengaluru. There is a single-line, non-electrified route from Yeshwantpur to a place Doddballapur which is near the airport. There was a plan to run commuter trains (either normal passenger trains or MEMUs) on this route. There was also a plan to put a new line from BNC, which would join the line coming from YPR. All it required was the military to give up some land. The land required for this line, would be exclusively military owned land. AFAIK, both the proposals just remain that - proposals.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Surya » 01 Feb 2010 09:11

Sachin

my point was that they should have been thinkingin parallel with the airport construction

Existing airports I can understand - all new airports they better think together

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby AjayKK » 01 Feb 2010 14:05

Let us consider the viability, revenues and passenger per hour per direction of the Delhi Metro. The DMRC is the sole consultant to many state governments in India to draw up plans.

The Delhi Metro Phase 1 was completed at a cost of Rs.10, 571 crores for 65 kms. that means, a per km cost of around 165 crores. At this exorbitant cost, serious questions arise over its sustainability. The Delhi metro in 2009 carried 0.85 million passengers everyday. For a metro with seventeen hour operability, it translates into 50000 passengers per hour. However, these 50000 passengers per hour are on three diffferent lines. So the basic criterion of 60000 passengers per hour per direction is simply out of consideration. The average passengers per hour per direction would be around 20-25000 at anoperational speedof less than 60 km per hour.

The Delhi Metro largely depends on revenue from non-operational sources. For the financial year ended March 2008, the Metro reported operating revenues of Rs. 305.27 crores and a profit before tax of Rs. 19.98 crore. It estimates around Rs 390 crores revenue in the year 2009-10. The Delhi metro has been provided soft loans - hundreds of crores - at extremely low rates by the Japanese development assistance program, namely JBIC and the JICA. Real-estate development, on the land provided to it, accounts for more than passenger revenues. If this model is to be followed, all Metros will have to be sustained by commercial development of land banks, to be provided at below market rates by the state government. Is this to be our model of mass transit, huge loans at low rates to DMRC and land banks for viability? After adjustment of interest and depreciation will the DMRC leave a white elephant behind which tax payers of the country have to subsidise (Paging Vina..) at their expense!?!

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby chetak » 01 Feb 2010 14:19

Surya wrote:Sachin

my point was that they should have been thinkingin parallel with the airport construction

Existing airports I can understand - all new airports they better think together



Proposals for the new airports are political decisions that allow enough time for slimy politicians and snake oil salesmen to acquire the surrounding land cheaply and make a killing thereafter.

BIAL is a very well illustrated case.

Running rail links will cause these jokers to lose valuable land and get compensated only at the low government rate of compensation.
Hence the extreme reluctance and frequent googly bowling by entrenched political families and friends. :wink:

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Manish Jain » 01 Feb 2010 14:56

Gagan wrote:The eye candy is amazing! The best time is between 8 and 10 AM around Vishwavidyalaya, and between 3-7 PM at all these three locations. (This I assume from expected behaviour pattern of the feline species time of venturing out of caves).
The candy is much better than Jammu - more numerous, more aggressively dressed, and surprisingly approachable.
Try it - and post a full report in the love and marriage nukkad dhaga / nukkad dhaga.


Just a brief report. Had to visit Rajiv Chowk on Saturday and was duly impressed by Metro cleanliness, punctuality and comfortable ride. The eye candy really lived up to the hype and full marks on aggressive dressing and approachability. Though in this case, yours truly was approached by couple of said eye candies about some information about Metros/Noida that they somehow thought I was capable of providing :roll:
A group of firangs was also there and large number of people seem to have moved away from staring/gawking at them like alien species. White skin on display wasn't such a big deal for them (well, a few had :shock: expression on their faces though)

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby mmasand » 03 Feb 2010 13:43

Hitesh wrote:Not only that, but the Mumbai authorities really need to do a real "cleaning" job of the river that runs through the Mumbai airport. It is the single reason and source of the terrible smell that affronts the olfactory senses of visitors and tourists when they enter India for the first time through Mumbai.


Widen Mithi or forget development

The Mumbai Metropolitan Region Development Authority (MMRDA) has given the Mumbai International Airport Ltd (Mial) an ultimatum. In a recent meeting, the agency said that it won’t allow any further development at the airport if the MIAL didn’t undertake widening of the Mithi river running below the airport runway.

MMRDA was recently appointed as the special planning authority for the airport area —which till recently was under the jurisdiction of the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation. The agency claimed to have finished most of the Mithi deepening and widening, ranging from 60m to 200m in various sections of the river.

However, the middle stretch of 600m running through the airport is
still a mere 27m wide.

“Though Mial has undertaken a feasibility study for widening Mithi through IIT Mumbai and Jacob Circle, they demanded that the river be diverted through the Andheri-Kurla Road. The proposal was turned down,” an MMRDA official said.

The official claimed that Mial has been ordered to carry out Mithi widening work or MMRDA won’t let them plan any development activity around the airport. “Mial officials seemed positive and we expect them to carry out the work on the stretch before monsoon,” said MMRDA metropolitan commissioner Ratnakar Gaikwad.


Seems it will be imperative that a clean up will be done once the slums are booted out.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Vasu » 03 Feb 2010 21:09

And is there an even distinct possibility in the near future that they will?

It seems that only a tragedy emanating from those slums will spur the authorities into clearing them. Besides, cleaning the Mithi will be like declogging a drain that will soon be clogged up again with the waste from the slums flowing into it.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby KrishG » 04 Feb 2010 23:22

Namma Metro coach design to be finalised next week

BMRCL sources told Deccan Herald that the final design will be approved in the next board meeting. A team of officials from BMRCL had visited South Korea recently for discussions on the design aspects of the train that would be shipped to Bangalore.

The BMRCL has considered about five designs before zeroing in on the final design that is being considered for approval. A consortium led by BEML, Rotem and Mitsubishi have been chosen by BMRCL to build the coaches.

“The first train set is expected in October 2010 and the test run is expected in November 2010. Trial runs will have to be conducted first. The Bangalore Metro on Reach 1 (Baiyappanahalli to Chinnaswamy Cricket stadium) will run as per schedule,” said Dr M Ramachandran, Chairman of BMRCL over telephone from New Delhi on Wednesday.


The coaches better be exceedingly excellent! :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby SSridhar » 05 Feb 2010 11:10

Voith Turbo to make India as hub for its metro rail products
Voith Turbo Scharfenberg, part of Voith Turbo of Germany, plans to make India its hub for rail products. It has established a new manufacturing unit at Voith Turbo India's Hyderabad campus to begin with.

“We will manufacture a range of couplers for metro rail applications and high speed trains from here. In addition to meeting the domestic demands, we plan to reach out to export markets in key parts of Asia and Europe in the near future,” said Mr Martin Wawra, Chief Executive Officer of Voith Turbo Scharfenberg, based in Germany.

With the promise of metro rail in Bangalore, Mumbai, Chennai and Hyderabad, we are sure of hitting the €8-10 million in the next three-four years. “This is why we have added the new plant.”

The Voith Group's rail business association with India started growing with the Delhi Metro Phase-I, when it supplied the first order of couplers. During 2008-10, it is into executing a big order through BEML (Bharat Earth Movers Ltd). Similarly, it has bagged orders from the Mumbai Monorail (2009-10) and will be supplying through the OEM, SCHOMI of Malaysia, Mr Wawra said.

The Hyderabad facility has been geared up to supply couplers for the upcoming Bangalore Metro during 2010-11 through BEML.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby KrishG » 18 Feb 2010 20:32

Rock block for Namma Metro

Engineers have just discovered digging a tunnel for the Metro won’t be so easy. They were led to believe the 8.8 km underground stretch of the rail track was just 20 per cent hard rock. It now turns out it is 70 per cent. :roll: :roll:


The problem assumes serious proportions in the stretch between Vidhana Soudha and Majestic. The rocky bed, expected to be encountered at a depth of 40 metres, was sighted at 10-15 metres. :roll: :roll: This is one of the reasons underground work in the central part of the city has been delayed.


“This kind of geological composition entails specialised construction, controlled blasting and designing for water pressure from all sides,” a BMRCL technical officer said.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby KrishG » 24 Mar 2010 18:24

Mumbai Metro's Rolling Stock. Looks cool.

[youtube]oYvtqi59Hp0&feature=player_embedded[/youtube]

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Rishirishi » 24 Mar 2010 21:40

Really dislike the purchase of Chinease trains. They have only 8 years of experiance, and their products are probably not any better then what can be made domestically.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby manish » 25 Mar 2010 10:58

Rishirishi wrote:Really dislike the purchase of Chinease trains. They have only 8 years of experiance, and their products are probably not any better then what can be made domestically.

Strangely, Mumbai's infra elements seem to keep coming out of China. First, BEST decided to go in for King Longs (badged Cerita) when everyone and his uncle was buying Tata-Marcopolo, AL and (India-built/assembled) Volvo B7RLEs. Heck, even private operators down south have given up on King Longs, so the decision was a bit baffling. At least NMMT went the Volvo way thankfully.

Mumbai's metro rolling stock too is coming out of China now instead of BEML or (again Indian-built/assembled) Bombardier ones.

BTW Reliance's reliance on Chinese stuff can be seen across the board. Chinese equipment for power generation, EPC, telecom equipment and now Metro Rail rakes. Apparently they are the single largest importer of Chinese made power equipment in India.

ADAG's 'success' seems to be built on Chinese made goods nowadays.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Hitesh » 25 Mar 2010 11:13

Then it is time to stop giving sops and subsidies to Reliance. They are getting way too much freebies for my taste.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby shaunb » 31 Mar 2010 21:26

The oldest SkyBus(called monorail in Germany)

Hopefully the babus evaluating what type of mass transit to sanction for funding, get some inspiration from this time tested service.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby KrishG » 03 Apr 2010 13:58

Image
Image

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Klaus » 03 Apr 2010 14:51

Sachin wrote:As of now there is no rail connectivity to the International AP at Bengaluru. There is a single-line, non-electrified route from Yeshwantpur to a place Doddballapur which is near the airport. There was a plan to run commuter trains (either normal passenger trains or MEMUs) on this route. There was also a plan to put a new line from BNC, which would join the line coming from YPR. All it required was the military to give up some land. The land required for this line, would be exclusively military owned land. AFAIK, both the proposals just remain that - proposals.


There is yet another line from KR Puram to Yelahanka (passes behind the Wheel and Axle Plant) and goes on to meet the Yeswantpur line here, any BG railway link will have to take new land from the military because BSF, IAF, Indian Army, Paratroopers, Civil Aviation all own land between the Int'l airport and Yelahanka. The other option is a elevated High speed Std Gauge link from Intl Airport to Hebbal Flyover, if they are able to build beyond the Hebbal flyover area, then they could take it to Mekhri circle or Palace Orchards. This HS rail should be able to make the 32 km journey in 10-12 minutes.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby KrishG » 13 Apr 2010 21:52

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby SSridhar » 14 Apr 2010 08:35

Chennai Metro may connect to Anna Nagar-Villivakkam link
The Chennai Metro Rail Company and the Southern Railway are planning to link Anna Nagar – Villivakkam line with metro rail.

Addressing mediapersons here on Tuesday, Southern Railway General Manger Deepak Krishan said detailed planning was being done to link the isolated Anna Nagar-Villivakkam line with the proposed Chennai Metro rail. One major problem in the linking would be serious dislocation of constructed buildings. These issues were discussed at the meeting with metro officials, he said.

Though the Chennai Beach – Anna Nagar via Villivakkam line was inaugurated in 2003, response from the passengers was poor forcing the railway administration to reduce the frequency of EMU services. To provide better connectivity, it operated direct services from Anna Nagar to the MRTS. As the response was not good, it suspended the operation. Now Southern Railway is planning to revive the traffic by providing connection to the proposed Chennai metro rail.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby AjayKK » 14 Apr 2010 12:18

'Broke' govt asks DDA to fund Metro Phase III

http://indiatoday.intoday.in/site/Story ... e+III.html

A cash-strapped Delhi government has asked the DDA to foot its share of bills for the Metro railway's third phase of extension. The state finance minister, A. K. Walia said, the government cannot pay the money because its coffers have dried up.

State finance ministry officials have requested the Union urban development ministry, which is an equal partner with the state in the Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC), to fund the Metro's third phase of extension.

Metro officials say planning for the expansion, in which they aim to add another 120 km to the existing rail network, is underway.

The state is supposed to pay nearly Rs 2,677.50 crore over the next few years for this phase, with Rs 558 crore due this fiscal, according to Walia. It now wants the Delhi Development Authority (DDA), which the urban development ministry controls, to pay its share of the cost.


"We have written to the ministry explaining our financial crunch. We don't have the money required for the job," Walia said. "The DDA is the city's biggest land- owning agency," said Walia. "

The state is yet to pay nearly Rs 1,417 crore as its share of the expenses towards the construction of nearly 125 km of rail network that was added in Phase Two, a senior finance ministry official said. "All construction going on right now is part of the second phase, which should be complete by September." Expenses on preparing for the Commonwealth Games have punched a hole in the government's pocket, another finance department official said.

"That's why we had to levy taxes worth nearly Rs. 800 crore on taxpayers in this year's budget. We are broke, our revenues have dried up," he added.

In the third phase, the DMRC plans a link parallel to the Ring Road from Ghazipur in east Delhi to Dhaula Kuan, and another link from Noida Sector 18 to the National Highway 8, running parallel to the Outer Ring Road.

To be completed by 2015, the network is expected to cost over Rs 30,000 crore.


Our Metro policy relies on soft loans by Japanese to the construction company which is then offset by leasing or handing out prime real estate land. It seems that his model may well turn out to be unsustainable in the future.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Vasu » 14 Apr 2010 12:59

why? I was under the impression that a project such as the metro relies on operational profits to pay off the debt.

If the government's broke because of the CWG, once the games are over, the government will be able to get back on track.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby AjayKK » 14 Apr 2010 15:20

DMRC: Property Development

http://www.delhimetrorail.com/corporates/propertydvp/background.html

While sanctioning Delhi MRTS Phase-I project in 1996, the Union Cabinet had mandated that approximately 7% of the initial project cost should be generated through property development on lands transferred to DMRC for the project.

In addition recurring income should be generated through property development for paying back subordinate debts etc. in future years. Most of the land was to be made available to DMRC on 99 years lease at nominal rent at interdepartmental transfer rates.

# DMRC set up a Property Development Wing in1999, for implementation of this scheme. Planning of property development work was taken up under the different types of arrangements noted below:

* 6 - 12 yr license for spaces within station buildings for commuter related vendors such as ATMs, Kiosks for refreshments, magazines etc.

* 30 yr Concession for commercial developments on vacant land pockets adjacent to MRTS stations.

* Long-term lease (50-90 yrs) on land pockets, in depots, etc, not immediately needed for operational structures./




DMRC Earning High from Property Development

http://www.indianrealtynews.com/real-estate-india/delhi/dmrc-earning-high-from-property-development.html


March 5, 2007


Delhi Metro is not just making killing through ticket selling. For every Rs. 3 that Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) earns by selling out tickets, Re. 1 comes from real estate development.

Out of Rs. 70 lakhs per day, which is its operating revenue, as high as 25% comes from property development and includes activities like leasing out commercial spaces, advertising, construction of shopping arcades, setting up of accommodation units, construction of IT parks etc.

The DMRC mopped up Rs 750 crore in the past few years from property development during the first phase I operations. The metro will undertake a number of projects worth Rs 18,000 crore as new lines in the Capital and NCR are added. The second phase is likely to be over by 2010.

Apart from our very own DMRC, the metros in other highly developed cities are making gains by much higher percentage from property development. As for Hong Kong Metro, it is earning more than 35-40% of its revenue from the same, says a DMRC official.

The Delhi Metro is planning to rent out more areas which will be utilized for the development of big intersections.

Such infrastructure projects offer high real estate potential. DMRC can certainly generate capital for its expansion by leveraging the property development prospects,
says Sanjay Verma executive MD, Cushman Wakefield India Ltd.


A K Bhattacharya - Business Standard - In defence of Metro

http://www.business-standard.com/india/news/a-k-bhattacharya-in-defencedelhi-metro/331266/

For connoisseurs, experts and economists, though, Delhi Metro has many problems. First, there are those who question the very model of running a highly capital-intensive metro service in a city like Delhi. A metro service, they argue, is better suited to cities that have grown vertically and not to those like Delhi, which has seen circular growth.

Second, there are legitimate questions about the manner in which Delhi Metro has been funded. The bulk of Delhi Metro’s financing needs has been met through long-term loans from Japanese and other agencies at hugely concessional interest rates.

The money it has got is virtually free. So, its real costs have been hidden and the operational efficiency that Delhi Metro boasts of will not look as dramatic if it had to budget for market rates of interest on the funds it used to build the network.

Third, there is a view that Delhi Metro has hugely benefitted from the large tracts of land it got from the government. It has used that land to develop real estate and augment its income. Indeed, only 40 per cent of its total revenue is coming from traffic operations and Delhi Metro’s target is to reduce it further. In other words, Delhi Metro’s profit is boosted not so much by its traffic income as by what it earns from real estate (which incidentally is now more than its revenue from traffic)
.


It is an efficient transport model, only the money part is a bit of a trouble. Will all metros by the same company follow the same model? In case real estate development is not viable, then the metro may be reporting negative income?

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby amit » 14 Apr 2010 15:36

Given the high capital costs and the high cost of operations/maintenance I don't think any metro in the world, especially in the developing world can be viable just on ticket sales alone. As such there shouldn't be any problems if property development at stations and along the route funds part of the expenses. And isn't this the very same model which the Railways hope to exploit, especially at nodal stations? However, the problem is that this kind of model can be easily misused if proper oversight is missing. Think Maytas and its Hyderabad Metro proposal.

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Re: Mass Rapid Transit in India

Postby Rishirishi » 16 Apr 2010 03:39

Personally I think they should impose an extra property tax, where ever new flats are developed that is near to the metro (or an extra 2% when ever a sale takes place). It is unfair that the porperty owner can harvest a handsome gain in value, at the expense of the government.

Imagine a new undeveloped area (greater noida for example). If you build a metro which is 15 km and has 14 stops, the cost would probably be 3750 crores (250 crores per km).

Let us say 5000 crores. Now divide that by 15 and you get just 333 crores. Now if you have 3000 flats built up near each station and tax them 2 lack "metro tax" for being near to the station. The revenue will be 600 crores. per station. Or a whooping 9000 crores for 15 stations. Use the 5000 crores on the line and spend the rest on metro/feeder bus lanes.
Who would not pay another 2 lacks to purchase a flat near a metro station?

Just imagine the value addition to commercial property near the metro station? Offices, shops, etc.


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